Simon Radley at the Chester Grosvenor. Wine list. Wine List

Simon R adley at the C hester Grosvenor Wine list Wine List The Chester Grosvenor hotel is in the fortunate position of being able to maintain an ...
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Simon R adley at the C hester Grosvenor

Wine list

Wine List

The Chester Grosvenor hotel is in the fortunate position of being able to maintain an extensive cellar of wines. For the past ten years it has been my privilege to have been in charge of the selection of wines, not only for the Simon Radley restaurant, but I have been instrumental in the selection of the La Brasserie and Banqueting wines as well. We have responded to changing tastes and palates, not to mention changing fortunes, all of which have influenced the selection of wines we have offered. I have been very fortunate to have visited a few wine regions and have brought back some interesting selections from these visits. I have put together the following selection of wines from around the vinous world because I believe that they contribute something to the wide and varied menu that Simon and his brigade offer. The essence of a good selection is one that brings an additional dimension to the dining experience, one that can enhance and complement the food to round out the meal. With each of the wines I have selected I have always thought of where it would fit alongside Simon’s cuisine and what enhancement it would bring to the table. I have always had a soft spot for certain producers, regions and indeed grapes, and I think that looking through this list, you may well see where my interests lie. Slainté

Garry Clark Sommelier

Wines by the glass Tasting menu wine packages Champagne and Sparkling wines

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Alsace Regional French Rhône Valley Loire Valley Bordeaux Burgundy Italy Spain and Portugal Germany, Greece, Austria, Hungary and Lebanon England The Americas Australia New Zealand South Africa Rose Dessert & Fortified

page 3–4 page 5-7 page 8-11 page 12 page 13 page 14 page 15 page 16-18 page 19-25

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page 26-29 page 30-33

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page 34 page 35 page 36-39 page 40-42 page 42 - 44 page 45– 46 page 47 page 48-51

@sommelier_garry

23/05/2014

2

Our wines by the glass are a selection of interesting and esoteric wines that work quite well with the various menus we have in place in the Arkle bar as well as being stand alone wines on their own merits. The aim is to provide a selection that ticks all the boxes in respect of meeting your expectations of style, taste and of course budget. This last critieria is one of the hardest to work along with, the growing burden of alcohol taxation coupled with increasing labour costs, massively increasing land costs, material costs and transportation costs have helped to drive the cost of many wines ever upwards. Add this to the continual currency fluctuations creates many challenges in providing a stable range of wines at affordable prices. Last year I was fortunate enough to visit Domaine Boutinot in the Rhône Valley and got the opportunity to experience first hand the vendage (harvest), picking fruit in the commune of Rasteau. Eric Monnin and his team are working with some fabulous vineyard plots and the wines reflect this. The red comes from their plot at the back of the hill in the beautiful commune of Seguret, a world heritage site.

Wines Served By the Glass

Champagne Taittinger Brut

NV

100ml 14.00

Taittinger Prestige Rosé Brut

NV

17.00

Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Blanc de Blancs

2004

26

Irroy Carte d’Or Brut

NV

12.00

White Wine

125ml

250ml

Tenuta Musella, Bianco del Drago, Garganega/Chardonnay, Veneto, Italy

2011

9.00

15.00

Domaine Boutinot, La Fleur Solitaire, Rhône Valley, France

2012

10.00

16.00

Errazuriz, Wild Ferment Chardonnay, Casablanca Valley, Chile

2011

10.00

16.00

Mount Hector, Sauvignon Blanc, Wairarapa, New Zealand

2012

6.00

11.00

2009

6.50

12.00

Otto Gorgon, Ellenzer Goldbaumchen Riesling, Mosel, Germany (medium)

Rosé Wine

125ml

250ml

Domaine Astruc, Côtes Mas Rosé Aurore, Sud de France, France

2011

5.00

9.00

Domaine Lafond, Tavel Rose, Rhône Valley, France

2012

8.00

13.00

125ml

250ml

Red Wine Alex & Mitch, Negroamaro, Apuglia, Italy

2011

5.00

9.00

Bolney Estate, Lychgate Red, East Sussex, England

2011

7.50

12.00

Côtes de Rhône Villages, Rhône Valley, France

2010

6.50

10.50

Gladstone Vineyards, Jealous Sisters Pinot Noir, Wairarapa, New Zealand

2011

9.00

15.00

Domaine de Tourelles, Estate Red, Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

2010

6.50

12.00

Domaine Boutinot, les Coteaux Schisteaux, Seguret

Sommeliers Selection We have been fortunate enough to be able to acquire a Coravin unit, a device that is set to open up a world of possibilities within the restaurant business. This magical piece of equipment will enable us to offer virtually any wine on the list by the glass (as long as its sealed with a cork!). Its preservation system injects Argon, an inert gas into the bottle before ejecting the wine through a fine, medical grade needle. Once the device is removed from the cork, the only evidence is a tiny hole in the top of the capsule, as the cork reseals itself.

75ml

150ml

Didier Dagueneau, Silex, Blanc Fumé de Pouilly, Loire Valley, France

2006

16

30

Domaine de l’Arlot, Nuits St Georges Blanc, Burgundy, France

2011

13

24

Gaja, Rossj Bass, Langhe, Piedmont, Italy

2011

9

16

Joh Jos Prum, Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Spatlese, Mosel, Germany

2004

7

12

Cheval des Andes, Cheval des Andes, Mendoza, Argentina

2008

18

34

Numanthia, Numanthia, Toro, Spain

2009

10

18

Tenuta San Guido, Sassicaia, Bolgheri, Tuscany, Italy

2001

42

80

Ive decided to have a bit of fun with the selection here, I plan to evolve this list, and maybe in the near future we may be able to offer as many as 100 different wines by the glass. If there is a particular wine that you would like to have a glass of that isn't listed here, then provided the wine is sealed with a cork, we can work out a cost (approx 1/5 of the cost of the full bottle for a 125ml glass or 1/8th of the cost for a 75ml glass)

Gaja, Conteisa, Langhe, Piedmont, Italy

2006

25

48

Henschke, Hill of Grace, Barossa Valley, Australia

1997

50

95

Château Mouton-Rothschild, Pauillac, Bordeaux, France

2007

55

100

Ridge Vineyards, Lytton Springs, California

2009

6

10

Château Hosanna, Pomerol, Bordeaux, France

2003

6

10

Bouchaine, Copeland Estate Pinot Noir, Carneros, California

2009

25

48

Now you have that chance to have a glass of Hill of Grace, or Yquem or even treat yourself to a Mouton Rothschild.

Château d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France (from half bottle)

1989

90

150

Disznoko, Tokaji Aszu 6 Puttonyos, Aszu, Hungary

1999

20

36

Didier Dagueneau, Les Jardins de Babylone, Jurancon, France

2008

25

40

Ornellaia, Ornus, Tuscany, Italy

2009

20

36

@Coravin

23/05/2014

White

Red

Dessert

4

Dessert wines are typically much more expensive. This is partly due to the considerably lower yields that the vines provide. An average healthy vine can produce upto 9 kilograms of fruit which will yield approximately 1 bottle of wine. For certain types of dessert wine, ie Botrytised wines, that yield could be significantly lower, as low as a couple of kilos of fruit, giving approximately a glass or so of wine. The higher sugar levels often mean a longer fermentation is required as only very specific strains of yeast can cope with the denser musts. There are some much lighter styles of dessert wine like the Moscato’s which have a light floral note with fresh fruity flavours and a softer sweetness. A growing trend is the sweeter red wines like the Aleatico from Apuglia in Italy. We often have odd bottles open, so the selection here isn't comprehensive, but please ask for guidance or a recommendation.

Dessert wine

100ml

Santa Vittoria, Moscato d’Asti, Piedmont, Italy

NV

5.00

Torres, “Floralis”, Moscatel d’Oro, Penedes, Spain

NV

5.00

Bonny Doon, Vinferno, Santa Cruz, California, USA

2007

14.00

Aldobrandesca, Aleatico, Apuglia, Italy

2007

9.50

Domaine de Chenes, Muscat de Rivesaultes, Roussillon, France

2009

6.00

Fortified wine

100ml

Weise & Krohn, Colhieta, Oporto, Portugal

1998

9.00

Quinta do Vesuvio, Oporto, Portugal

1989

30.00

Dow’s, Oporto, Portugal, en magnum

1980

32.00

Weise & Krohn, Colhieta, Oporto, Portugal

1978

26.00

Niepoort, Vinho Moscatel, Oporto, Portugal (served chilled)

NV

5.00

Blandy’s Secial (dry) 10 year old, Madeira, Portugal

NV

13.00

Blandy’s Verdelho (medium), 10 year old, Madeira, Portugal

NV

13.00

Simon and his team prepare a new tasting menu each month, using the opportunity to highlight seasonality, and where possible using the best of the local produce. Each new menu brings different challenges in pairing to the menu. I’m not a firm believer in the “perfect match”, the dishes are complex with a variety of different flavours and textures going on, and this is part of the fun in compiling the tasting selection. My philosophy with the tasting wines is to try and create a journey of tastes and experiences. I like to use the menu as an opportunity to allow you to try new wines and expand your horizons. If I can fit something different in there then I will. In the past this has often meant an unusual grape variety, an obscure country or it could be a beer.

Tasting wines Scallop 2011 Wickham Estate, Fumé, Hampshire, England £6

Heritage potatoes 2012 Ascheri, `Do Ut Des’ Verduno Pelaverga, Piedmont, Italy £6

Asparagus 2011 Domaine de la Perruche, Saumur-Champigny, Loire, France £5

Herdwick lamb 2010 Château Clinet, Ronan by Clinet, Pomerol, France £8

Croquant 2012 Kleine Zalze, Cellar Selection Gamay Noir, Stellenbosch, South Africa £9

“Pain perdu” Tropical fruit NV Nyetimber Demi-sec £15 Prices per person for a 100ml carafe.

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Vegetarian Tasting Selection Wye Valley 2011 Wickham Estate, Fumé, Hampshire, England £6

Composition 2013 Kleine Zalze, Vineyard Selection Chardonnay, Stellenbosch, South Africa £5

Curried Egg 2011 Domaine de la Perruche, Saumur-Champigny, Loire Valley. France £5

Ravioli 2011 Henry Pelle, Sancerre “la Croix au Garde”, Loire Valley, France £13

Croquant 2012 Kleine Zalze, Cellar Selection Gamay Noir, Stellenbosch, South Africa £9

“Pain Perdu” Tropical fruit NV Nyetimber, Demi-Sec, Sussex, England £15 Prices per person for a 100ml carafe.

Champagne Nothing is as intrinsically linked to feelings of joy and celebration as champagne. We reach for it to mark out the special occasions in our lives—birthdays, anniversaries, births and weddings, promotions, moves, the list goes on. This leads us to forget that Champagne is a wine and as a wine it can be paired with food. The region is a long, narrow region stretching about 180 kilometres from north to south. Split into three distinct regions—Montagne de Reims and the Vallée de la Marne in the north, evolving down into the Côtes des Blancs before finishing in the southern Côtes des Bar (also known as the Aube). The northern part of Champagne is subject to a maritime climate, bringing regular rainfall with little variation in the seasonal temperatures. As you progress south into the Aube the climate becomes a more continental climate subject to biting cold winters but generally longer warmer summers. These climatic challenges have led the champenois to develop many of the techniques used in the region. From pruning methods, to their use of a secondary fermentation to develop the sparkling wines of the region, which coupled with the extended aging on the yeast deposits helps to give champagne its character and fine bubbles.

23/05/2014

Montagne de Reims £

216

Krug, Grande Cuvée, disgorged 4th quarter 2012

MV

250

237

Krug, Rosé

MV

570

242

Ruinart, Brut Rosé

NV

101

224

Egly-Ouriet, Brut, disgorged 2011

NV

100

234

Egly-Ouriet, Brut Rosé, disgorged August 2009

NV

135

213

Veuve Clicquot, Yellow Label Brut

NV

90

248

Benoît Lahaye, Cuvée Essential, Extra-Brut disgorged March 2011

NV

105

297

Benoît Lahaye, Cuvée Essential, Extra-Brut, half bottle disgorged Sept 2011

NV

50

381

Benoît Lahaye, Rosé de Macération, Extra-Brut, disgorged June 2012

NV

90

232

Veuve Clicquot, Rosé Brut

NV

120

201

Taittinger, Brut Reserve

NV

64

283

Taittinger, Brut Reserve, Magnum

NV

120

235

Taittinger, Cuvee Reserve, Brut, Half Bottle

NV

39

262

Taittinger, Nocturne, Sec, Half Bottle

NV

44.50

239

Taittinger, Prelude, Grand Cru, Brut

NV

90

Pommery, Les Clos Pompadour, Brut, Magnum

NV

600

8

£

I have been fortunate enough to visit the region on multiple occasions, each as memorable as the last. Lunch in Clos de Mesnil drinking aged bottles of Krug Rose, or staying at La Maison Belle Epoque and having a tutored tasting with Herve Deschamps, winemaker at Perrier-Jouët are two of the highlights,. Each visit gives me new insights to the region, and helps to cement my love of their wines.

203

Taittinger, Brut Prestige Rosé

NV

90

263

Taittinger, Brut Prestige Rosé, Half Bottle

NV

46.50

255

Taittinger, Les Folies de la Marquetterie, Brut

NV

64

245

Jérôme Prevost, Les Béguines, Extra-Brut

NV

140

244

Krug, Vintage Collection, Magnum

1981

2195

272

Dom Ruinart, Rosé, Brut, Magnum

1990

930

Ive chosen a selection of wines that I feel show off some of the diversity and typicity of the region. The small grower champagnes are amongst the more interesting selections as they most express the influences that terrior makes to the wines. They are also the wines that most highlight the skills of the growers and winemakers (in most cases the same person).

308

Dom Ruinart, Blanc de Blancs

1996

225

228

Krug, Clos d’Ambonnay, Blanc de Noirs, Brut

1995

3950

240

Krug, Vintage, Brut, Magnum

1996

850

359

Veuve Clicquot, La Grande Dame, Brut

1998

260

204

Taittinger, Comtes de Champagne, Brut

2004

160

328

Pommery, Cuvée Louise, Brut, Magnum

2000

420

287

Taittinger, Comtes de Champagne, Brut, Magnum

2000

320

236

Taittinger, Comtes de Champagne Rosé, Brut

2002

265

286

Taittinger, Vintage, Brut

2003

115

268

Louis Roederer, Cristal Rosé, Brut

2004

850

265

Louis Roederer, Cristal Brut

2005

375

Benoît Lahaye, Bouzy Rouge, Coteaux Champenois

2009

70

Jérôme Prevost for example which shows exactly how complex the flavours of Meunier can be and go some way to dispelling the myth that it isn't noble enough to be used as a grape in its own right. Tiny production he only makes two wines, each is a single vintage wine— although it is never declared as such on the labels. 100% Meunier (there is some dispute about this) with no dosage. Stunning Krug is undoubtably the king of Champagnes, the family may no longer own their eponymous Champagne but they remain firmly in control. Small barrel fermentations with the wines being aged in the bottles for a minimum of 6 years before release, these are big rich styles of wines with immense complexity and development. @Krugoli

Red 383

Côtes de Blancs Flowing south from the town of Epernay for 20km, the Cotes de Blancs is predominantly Chardonnay, with small localized parcels of Pinot – particularly in the commune of Vertus. The slopes here are a bit more dramatic than the gently undulating slopes of the Montagne de Reims, giving the soils a thinner layer of topsoil over the Cretaceous chalk soils.

Larmandier-Bernier is a small family estate based in the villages of Vertus a premier cru village known for the quality of its chardonnay. The Terre de Vertus is a 100% Chardonnay with zero dosage.

Cotes de Blancs £

212

Moët & Chandon, Brut Impérial

NV

90

206

Besserat de Bellefon, Cuvée des Moines Brut

NV

65

251

Larmandier-Bernier, Terre de Vertus 1er Cru, Brut

2007

120

264

Perrier-Jouët, Grand Brut, Brut

NV

70

241

Agrapart, les 7 Crus, Brut, disgorged May 2012

NV

90

243

Salon, Le Mesnil, Blanc de Blancs, Grand Cru, Brut

1997

650

261

Krug, Clos de Mesnil, Blanc de Blancs, Brut

1998

950

256

Perrier-Jouët, Grand Brut, Millésimé

1998

140

250

Agrapart, Avizoise, Brut, Grand Cru, disgorged November 2011

2005

160

Cotes de Bar (Aube) 269

Dosnon & Lepage, Recolte Noire, Blanc de Noir

NV

65

249

Bertrand Gautherot, Saignée de Sorbée, Extra-Brut – disgorged Jan 2011

NV

135

382

Cedric Bouchard, Inflorescence Brut – disgorged April 2011

NV

80

Côtes de Bar (Aube) Situated 75 miles south east of Epernay, the Cotes de Bar (previously known as the Aube) is home to some of the finest rosé in champagne. Its semi-continental climate brings ripeness in the fruit, coupled with the fine band of Kimmeridgian chalk, marl and limestone that lends an austerity and steeliness to the wines. Floral notes and orchard fruit flavours dominate the wines which are deserving of a try.

23/05/2014

10

Vallée de la Marne Straddling the banks of the River Marne north of Epernay, the Vallée de la Marne is home to some of the biggest names in the region. The main point is the small town of Aÿ, famed for many years for the quality of its red wines. The Vallée is also home to some of the most spectacular single vineyard champagnes. Disgorgement Dates There has been a lot of discussion amongst the wine trade in recent years surrounding the issue of Disgorgement dates. Many grower champagnes routinely indicate the date of disgorgement on their labels as an indicator of the maturity of the wines. By knowing the date of disgorgement you can often work out the base vintage of the wines. For example a wine disgorged in October 2004 would more than likely be based on the 2002 vintage. Temperatures There is a tendency in the UK to drink wines at inappropriate temperatures. White wines should generally be drunk between 8 and 12 degrees Celsius and we would recommend that champagnes, particularly vintage and prestige champagnes be served at a temperature of at least 12 degrees. However we recognise that as the paying customer, your preferences are important, so if you would prefer your champagne to be served colder please ask. Most of the champagnes are stored in the cold room at the appropriate temperature, so it might take about 5 minutes to chill them down to your preferred temperature in an ice bucket.

Vallée de la Marne £

289

Bollinger, Grande Année, Brut, Magnum

2000

360

218

Bollinger, Special Cuvée, Brut

NV

110

279

Dom Pérignon, Œnothèque, Brut

1964

975

227

Dom Pérignon, Œnothèque, Brut

1971

2100

229

Dom Pérignon, Œnothèque, Brut

1975

1900

280

Dom Pérignon, Œnothèque, Brut

1976

800

225

Dom Pérignon, Œnothèque, Brut

1995

500

221

Dom Pérignon, Brut

2003

210

291

Dom Pérignon, Brut

2004

285

231

Laurent-Perrier, Brut Rosé

NV

130

299

Billecart-Salmon, Sous Bois

NV

120

301

Billecart-Salmon, Brut Rosé, half bottle

NV

60

302

Billecart-Salmon, Demi-sec

NV

70

285

Gaston Chiquet, Sélection Cuvée, disgorged June 2010, Brut

NV

70

233

Jacquesson, Cuvée no 734, disgorged 2010, Brut

NV

85

384

Georges Laval, Cumières Premier Cru, disgorged 2010, Brut Nature

NV

95

385

Bereche & fils, “Rive Gauche”, Extra Brut, disgorged October 2011

NV

110

Alsace Alsace is a curious region with a great culinary culture. Its cuisine and indeed its wines are an amalgamation of the Germanic and French styles so integral to the region. The wines are amongst the most food friendly in the world, yet they are so very often overlooked. The whites favour the aromatics—Riesling, Gewuztraminer and Pinot Gris shine here. Each producing such shining examples with mineral purity, exceptional fruit character and racy spicy notes that just seem to enhance so many styles of cuisine. Most of the producers are families with a long history and the region is firmly rooted in tradition.

White

£

511

Riesling, “Cuvée Frédéric Emile”, Domaine Trimbach

2004

90

508

Gewurztraminer, Charles Schleret

2007

50

510

Riesling, Domaine Trimbach, half bottle

2010

21

512

Pinot Gris, “Cuvée Réserve”, Domaine Trimbach

2007

45

516

Gewurztraminer, Trimbach

2010

45

Domaine Trimbach is known for its drier style of winemaking in a region that is perhaps better known for its slightly sweeter style. Their wines show a purity of style that has won them many fans and a devoted following. Hugel is perhaps the most famous producer in the region with a large export market. They make their wines in a very traditional style, rich and complex with strong fruit character and mineral development.

23/05/2014

12

Regional France Some of the more interesting wines to come out of France recently have been in the smaller regions—Languedoc, Provence, Roussillon, and the numerous Vin de Pays. The slightly less restrictive AOC rules have given growers the opportunity to compete on a more international level by allowing the grape varieties on the label. There are some incredibly interesting wines here using a mixture of grapes. From the sharply acidic Picpoul de Pinet—whose name literally translates as Lip-stinger—to the more aromatic Vermentinos from Corsica there is a very versatile range available. The reds are a touch more rustic in style, big dark fruit flavours with firm tannins and complex flavours.

White

£

518

Château de Sarrins, Blanc de Rolle, Vin de Pays du Var

2007

45

52

Domaine de Vedilhan, Serica Viognier, Vin de Pays d’Oc

2011

28

501

Domaine Fiumicicoli, “Vin de Corse Sartène”, Corsica

2008

40

506

Chateau de Jurque, Emotion, Jurançon Sec

2008

38

504

Duc de Morny, Picpoul de Pinet, Coteaux du Languedoc

2012

26

The Rhône Valley Rhône wines are challenging wines, but once you come to understand them, you will appreciate the complexity of the region. Over the years the region has faced many challenges – it was one of the first regions affected by the phylloxera infestation of the late 1800’s that devastated France’s vineyards. Climatically, the Rhône has its own challenges. Such a wide body of fairly fast moving water has a massively cooling influence on the region, so that by day it can be blisteringly hot, yet at night it becomes shiveringly cold. The river also affects the wind, with a howling wind known as the Mistral influencing the placements of vineyards and the methods of training the vines. Across much of the Rhône the vines are trained in a method known locally as Gobelet – small bushy vines that are low to the ground. There is a logic behind this – by day the sun warms the rocky soil littered with big heavy pebbles, called Galets. At night those stones act as radiators warming the vines through the cold nights. This helps to achieve the levels of fruit ripeness that the vines achieve. In the north Syrah dominates with some small spatterings of Viognier and Grenache, while the southern Rhône is dominated by Grenache and various supporting varieties such as Carignan, Mourvedre, Cinsault and many others.

23/05/2014

White

£

808

Châteauneuf du Pape, le Vieux Donjon

2008

85

804

Condrieu, “les Terrasses de l’Empire”, Georges Vernay

2009

100

803

Châteauneuf du Pape, Domaine de Beaurenard

2010

80

844

Châteauneuf du Pape, “Magis”, Rotem & Mounir Saouma

2010

200

806

Châteauneuf du Pape, Chante Cigale

2011

60

845

Châteauneuf du Pape, ”Extrait”, Chante Cigale

2011

100

807

Condrieu, “Amour de Dieu”, Jean-Luc Colombo

2012

85

827

Côtes du Rhône Blanc, Domaine Boutinot, “la Fleur Solitaire”

2012

26

2967

Châteauneuf du Pape, Chante Cigale, Tradition

1993

180

2974

Chateauneuf du Pape, Château de Beaucastel

2008

150

2964

Cornas, Jean-Luc Colombo, “les Méjeans”

2009

55

2971

Chateauneuf du Pape, Jean-Luc Colombo, “les Bartevelles”

2010

60

2978

Châteauneuf du Pape, Domaine de Vieux Lazaret

2009

75

111

St Joseph, Domaine Gaillard

2006

44

2959

Chateauneuf du Pape, le Vieux Donjon

2009

105

2954

Cote Rotie, “Colline de Couzou”, Bonnefond

2008

90

139

Rasteau, Domaine de Beaurenard

2009

40

2968

Châteauneuf du Pape, “Omnia”, Rotem & Mounir Saouma

2009

200

2965

Chateauneuf du Pape, le Vieux Donjon, half bottle

2010

66

2960

Côtes du Rhone, Domaine St Gayan, half bottle

2010

18

2963

Côtes du Rhône, Jean-Luc Colombo, “Bonne Roche”

2010

26

2987

Côtes du Rhône Séguret, Domaine Boutinot, “les Coteaux Schisteux”

2010

26

Red

14

The Loire Valley As with many of Frances great wine regions, this one follows the path of a great river – the Loire. From the beginnings out Ruanne the course of the river runs through the great Sauvignon communes of the Loire – Quincy, Sancerre, Pouillysur-Loire as it swells fed by numerous tributaries. As we move through Touraine we see a more diversity in the style of wine with Chenin beginning to play a more dominant role alongside some wonderful Cabernet Francs and Gamays. In Anjou-Saumur we see a greater swing towards the sweeter style of wines before the startling bone dry wines of the Nantais. The region was once the summer retreat of the kings of France and naturally the entourage that followed, and is home to some of the most spectacular Chateaux in France. Ranging from the steely sharp, flinty mineral wines of Pouilly, through the chalky dry whites of Sancerre, the diverse styles of Vouvray from bone dry to cloyingly sweet via sparkling. The reds are less known but can be quite soft and fruity, and would typically be served lightly chilled.

White

£

414

Pouilly Fumé, “Silex”, Didier Dagueneau

2006

200

413

Menetou-Salon, “Morogues”, Henry Pellé

2009

44

458

Pouilly Fumé, “Blanc Fume de Pouilly”, Didier Dagueneau

2009

150

421

Sancerre, “le Chêne”, Lucien Crochet, Half Bottle

2010

35

410

Pouilly Fumé, Mademoiselle de St Baville, Half Bottle

2011

26

422

Sancerre, “Cuvée Insolite”, Franck Millet

2011

65

57

Sancerre, “La Croix au Garde”, Henry Pellé

2011

50

408

Pouilly Fumé, Mademoiselle de St Baville

2011

50

1412

Domaine Jean Teiller, Menetou-Salon, Loire Valley

2010

44

1418

Domaine Jean Teiller, Menetou-Salon, Loire Valley, Half Bottle

2010

24

2018

Chinon, “Tradition”, Pierre Sourdais

2010

32

2001

Thouarsais, “Cabernet Bretton”, Francois Gigon

2009

30

Rosé

Red

Bordeaux We have a long history with Bordeaux, for a long period of history Bordeaux was ruled by the Plantagenet Kings of England after being gifted to Henry II as his dowry from Elenear of Aquitaine. The wines made their ways into the cellars of the nobility and a flourishing trade in Clairet became established. The town of Bordeaux flourished as merchants from across France and Europe poured into the town to gain access to the English market. Bordeaux prospered and between the 1600’s and 1800’s Dutch engineers undertook much of the drainage work that allowed the expansion of the vineyards and a large growth in production. The turning point came as the 1855 Universal Exposition took place in Paris as the merchants of the region created a classification of the vineyards that rated them in a five tier rating based on their previous sales performance. The 1855 Classification of Medoc has since stood the test of time and with only one change—the elevation of Mouton Rothschild from a second growth to a premier growth in 1973.

White

£

551

Château Mouton Rothschild, Aile d’Argent, Bordeaux Blanc

1993

120

553

Château Smith Haut-Lafitte, Bordeaux Blanc, Pessac-Léognan

1998

100

555

Château Smith Haut-Lafitte, Bordeaux Blanc, Pessac-Léognan

2005

120

556

Château Larrivet Haut-Brion, Pessac-Léognan

2007

84

55

Château Nicot, Bordeaux Blanc

2012

28

1405

Château Lamothe de Haux, Bordeaux Clairet, Bordeaux

2007

32

1402

Château La Foret, Bordeaux Clairet, Bordeaux

2009

24

2168

Château Couprat, Fronsac

1996

100

2192

Château La Lagune, 3ème Cru Classé, half bottle

1996

65

2285

Château la Tour de By, Cru Bourgeois, Médoc

1996

62

2216

Château La Lagune, 3ème Cru Classé

2003

75

2286

Château Cantemerle, Cru Bourgeois, Haut-Médoc

2002

90

Rosé

Red

Pessac-Léognan/Graves

Pessac-Léognan Granted Appellation status in 1987, the commune contains some of the greatest estates of Bordeaux. Considered to be more robust in nature these are densely structured wines with a rich earthy character.

23/05/2014

2227

Château la Mission Haut-Brion, Cru Classé, Pessac-Léognan

2005

600

2229

Château Haura, Cru Classé, Graves

2007

50

16

Margaux The largest of the Médoc appellations, it is also the most famous, containing more classified chateaux than any other. The wines are considered to be refined and elegant, with great presence and character.

Margaux £

2289

Château d’Angludet, Cru Bourgeois Superieur

1979

150

2172

Château Lascombes, 2ème Cru Classé

2005

160

2261

Château Rauzan-Ségla, 2ème Cru Classé

2008

105

2251

Alter Ego, 2nd wine of Château Palmer

2008

90

St Estèphe St Estèphe One of the smallest of the Médoc appellations, it is producing consistently good wines that are more accessible and approachable than ever.

Pauillac The powerhouse of the Médoc, the blackcurrant dominance of Cabernet Sauvignon very much evident in its wines. These are wines that reward patience, rich elegant flavours with strong defining tannic structure.

2279

Chateau Montrose, 2ème Cru Classé

1969

250

3478

La Dame de Montrose, 2nd wine of Château Montrose

1999

100

2237

Château Cos d’Estournel, 2ème Cru Classé

2007

180

2255

Château les Ormes de Pez, Cru Bourgeois

2008

65

2253

Château Calon-Ségur, 3ème Cru Classé

2008

105

2158 Château Pichon-Lalande, 2ème Cru Classé

1985

350

2189

Château Mouton Rothschild, 1èr Cru Classé

1989

1120

2190

Château Lynch Bages, 5ème Cru Classé

1990

750

2194

Château Duhart Milon Rothschild, 4ème Cru Classé, half bottle

1995

60

2414

Château Mouton Rothschild, 1èr Cru Classé

1996

1250

2239

Château Pichon-Lalande, 2ème Cru Classé

2004

140

2166

Château Pichon-Lalande, 2ème Cru Classé

2005

230

2155

Château Mouton Rothschild, 1èr Cru Classé

2005

860

2220

Château Clerc-Milon, 5ème Cru Classé

2005

105

2236

Château Pichon-Lalande, 2ème Cru Classé

2007

200

2234

Château Mouton Rothschild, 1èr Cru Classé

2007

655

2252

Château d’Armailhac, 5ème Cru Classé

2008

90

2262

Château Pichon-Lalande, 2ème Cru Classé

2008

180

Pauillac

Vintages for Bordeaux A lot of people get quite tied up about the vintage of a wine. True it is the ultimate expression of a time and the place, and as such can have a massive influence of the end result of the wine. But it is also worth remembering that the skills of a good winemaker will enable them to produce a good wine from whatever conditions are brought to them. 1983  1985 

St Julien £

2191

Château Branaire Ducru, 4ème Cru Classé, half bottle

1995

65

2250

Château Talbot, 4ème Cru Classé

2005

100

2228

Château Ducru-Beaucaillou, 2ème Cru Classé

2007

155

2254

Château Gruaud-Larose, 2ème Cru Classé

2008

90

2256

Sargets de Gruaud-Larose, 2nd wine of Gruaud-Larose

2008

55

2257

Château Talbot, 4ème Cru Classé

2008

100

1989 

St Émilion

1992 

2193

Château Troplong Mondot, Grand Cru Classé, half bottle

1996

90

1993 

2202

Château Teyssier, Grand Cru Classé,

2010

70

1994 

2360

Délice du Prieure, Grand Cru Classé,

2010

55

1995  1996 

Pomerol

1998 ()

2207

Château Clinet

1998

140

1999 

2186

Vieux Château Certan

1996

160

2000 

2181

Château de Sales

1998

80

2001 

2213

Château Hosanna

2003

190

2002 

2219

Château Trotanoy

2003

150

2215

Château Lafleur-Pétrus

2003

180

2243

Château Trotanoy

2004

150

2242

La Conseillante

2004

115

2244

Château L’Hospitalet de Gazin

2004

50

2009 

2245

Château La Grave à Pomerol

2004

65

2010

2188

Pétrus

2006

2800

2003  2004  2005  2007  2008 

23/05/2014

18

Burgundy Until I worked here I had never experienced the joys of mature Burgundy, most of the wines I had encountered from the region had been young. Suddenly I had a cellar full of wines going back as far as the early 70’s. After a very sharp learning curve I came to love and appreciate the complexity of the region. A week spent in the Côtes de Nuits doing the vendage (harvest) in 2006 with the Vallet family cemented my love of the region. I consider myself exceptionally fortunate to have inherited a great selection of wines from my predecessor, who was also smitten by the region based on the selection of wines he chose. Over the years these wines have proven to be very popular, and it is difficult to find mature burgundy on the market. That itself is an indication of the sublime appeal of Burgundy. Collectors buy Bordeaux as a commodity, to trade as its price increases, whereas they buy Burgundy to drink, meaning that what little mature wines comes onto the market tends to command fairly high prices. Burgundy is a region of family. One of the memories I have is being driven around by Bernard who pointed out the neighbouring producers, almost all of whom are related in one way or another. Everyone seemed to be a relative and that was one of the defining characters of what Burgundy is about. Within an individual vineyard or lieu-dit there may be many owners and the Napoleonic laws of inheritance slowly divide the holdings into smaller and smaller plots. Sometimes the holdings grow in size as part of a dowry when two families come together in marriage.

Chablis Crisp apple flavours with a milk-like acidity and usually no oak treatment. £

Grand Cru 601

Chablis,”Valmur”, Moreau-Naudet

2010

95

602

Chablis,”Vaudesir”, Louis Michel

2007

110

Premier Cru 644

Chablis, “Montmains”, Louis Michel

2010

65

636

Chablis, “Montee de Tonnerre”, Louis Michel, half bottle

2007

45

729

Chablis, “Montee de Tonnerre”, Francois Raveneau

2009

225

651

Chablis, “Mont de Milieu”, Emile Petit

2010

55

706

Chablis, Moreau-Naudet, half bottle

2009

25

619

Chablis, Emile Petit

2012

32

2009

60

Village

Côtes Chalonnais and Mâconnais

More simple style of wines with some oak but not too dominant.

759

Pouilly Fuissé, “Sous Vergissons”, Domaine Ferret

Côte de Nuits

Nestled amongst the Pinot vines are the odd parcels of Chardonnay. Very structured wines, rich and minerally with well integrated oak flavours. These are wines that require some patience.

700

Nuits St Georges, 1er Cru “Clos de l’Arlot” Domaine d’Arlot

2007

145

I am continually fascinated at the diversity and complexity that each commune brings to the wines. Their common grape varieties – Chardonnay for the whites and Pinot Noir for the reds – show differing characteristics when separated by as little as a few hundred metres. The positioning of the vineyard on the undulating slopes of the Côtes de Nuits can make all the difference, when you taste the meaty gameyness of a premier cru Gevrey compared with the black violet floral tones of an elegant Chambertin “Clos de Beze”. Vallet frères is a small family operation whose cellars are based in the town of Gevrey-Chambertin but their winery sits on the main Routes des Grands Vins through the Côtes de Nuits. Louis Vallet Snr, his sons Bernard and Jean-Christophe run the domaine with Bernards son Louis Jr running the vendage each year. The white wines are fermented in mainly new oak barrels, using natural yeasts, while the reds are whole bunch fermented in large oak vats, with manual breaking of the skins (pigeage) to extract as much colour and tannin as possible. The resulting wines are ones that reward patience and careful cellaring.

23/05/2014

Côte de Beaune Starting with the beautifully perfumed and floral Meursault, the Cotes de Beaune swings around through the smaller, lesser known communes of Auxey, Pernand and Savigny to reach the pinnacle of white Burgundy the Grand Cru vineyards of Le Montrachet and its surrounding lieu-dits.

Grand Cru From the rich buttery style of stand-alone vineyard Corton-Charlemagne to the denser intensely structured flavours of Montrachet and its surrounding Grand Crus. £ 609 Chevalier-Montrachet, Grand Cru, Domaine Leflaive 1986 350

605

Criots-Bâtard-Montrachet, Domaine Fontaine-Gagnard

1988

185

625

Corton-Charlemagne, Grand Cru, Domaine Champy

1999

135

628

Montrachet, Grand Cru, Etienne Sauzet

1999

600

1225

Corton-Charlemagne, Grand Cru, Bonneau du Martray

2007

160

Pernand-Vergelesses Finely balanced oak and fruit character drive this unknown little commune. Its relative obscurity means that it offers great value for money.

646

Pernand-Vergelesses, Vallet Frères

2011

65

2009

60

Auxey-Duresses 608

Auxey-Duresses, Vallet Frères

Saint-Aubin 698

Saint-Aubin, “La Fontenotte”, Marc Colin

2008

65

689

Saint-Aubin, 1er Cru “les Murgers des Dents de Chien”, Lucien LeMoine

2010

150

20

Saint-Romain

£

656

Saint-Romain, Morey-Blanc

2005

55

709

Saint-Romain, Mischief and Mayhem

2009

71

2007

58

2008

63

Santenay 661

Santenay, “Comme Dessus”, Roger Belland

Savigny-les-Beaune 642

Savigny-les-Beaune Blanc, Simon Bize

Meursault For me Meursault can be defined as a floral, perfumed style of Burgundy, a touch drier and more austere on the palate, the oak takes a back seat to the cleaner fruit character of the grapes.

657

Meursault, 1er Cru “les Chevalières”, Lucien Le Moine

2008

120

659

Meursault, “les Narvaux”, Vincent Girardin, Half bottle

2008

60

719

Meursault, Louis Jadot

2008

65

639

Meursault, Vallet Frères, 1er Cru, “les Perrieres”

2009

160

Puligny-Montrachet These wines are marked by their complexity, aromas of almond paste, exotic fruits, amber and a touch of floral character. Mellow with subtle acidity they lend themselves well to a range of foods.

617

Puligny-Montrachet, 1er Cru “les Pucelles”, Jean-Marc Boillot

1997

140

627

Puligny-Montrachet, Etienne Sauzet

1999

94

655

Puligny-Montrachet, Vincent Girardin

2007

100

708

Puligny-Montrachet, Vallet frères, Magnum

2009

265

Chassagne-Montrachet Full bodied whites with typical aromas of fresh almonds, ripe apples, honey and white flowers, with a lasting powerful flavour. £ 631 Chassagne-Montrachet, Domaine Blain-Gagnard 1999 65

621

Chassagne-Montrachet, 1er Cru “les Folatières”,

2003

160

640

Chassagne-Montrachet, 1er Cru “les Morgeots”, Vallet frères

2007

125

Domaine Henri Boillot

Red Beaujolais The Gamay grape produces soft, fruity reds with an ethereal sweet fruit character on the nose that entices you and draws you in. Often called a Sommelier’s “Get-out-of-jail-free-card” these are wines that will work with any dish from any cuisine.

2610

Chénas, Domaine de P’tit Paradis

2008

29

2858

Juliénas, Louis Latour

2007

24

2580

Moulin-á-Vent, Domaine de P’tit Paradis

2010

35

2605

St Amour, La Porte du Paradis

2011

32

135

Beaujolais Villages, Les Pivoines

2011

25

Vougeot Tiny village appellation overshadowed by the grand cru Clos de Vougeot.

23/05/2014

2635

Clos de Vougeot, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze

1997

135

2624

Clos de Vougeot, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze

1999

120

22

Vosne Romanée At the heart of the Cotes de Nuits lies the village of Flagey-Echezeaux and the vineyards of Vosne-Romanée. Aromas of Violets and Blackberries with soft red fruit character and a soft silky texture. £ 2574 Vosne Romanée, René Engel 1996 90

2602

Vosne Romanée, 1er Cru “Aux Réas”, Lucien LeMoine

2010

152

Chambolle-Musigny Sited on the Route des Grand Crus the village of Chambolle-Musigny has an excellent position in a small geological fold offer the vineyards vital protection from the elements while still exposing them to the sun. The wines are seductive in their aromas, with a slightly feral character behind the red fruit.

2558

Chambolle-Musigny, 1er Cru, ‘les Charmes’, Champy Père & Cie

1983

110

2562

Bonnes Mares, Grand Cru, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze

1983

95

2611

Chambolle-Musigny, Domaine G Roumier

1997

75

2583

Musigny, Grand Cru, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze

1999

200

Gevrey-Chambertin 2561

Chapelle-Chambertin, Grand Cru, Domaine Drouhin Laroze,

1983

120

2634

Chapelle-Chambertin, Grand Cru, Domaine Drouhin Laroze

1993

115

2556

Latricierès Chambertin, Grand Cru, Domaine Drouhin Laroze

1993

120

2647

Gevrey-Chambertin, 1er Cru, ‘les Evocelles’, Lucien Boillot

1996

74

2758

Gevrey-Chambertin, Vallet freres

1998

80

2567

Chambertin, Grand Cru, ‘Clos de Bèze’, Drouhin-Laroze

1999

140

2653

Gevrey-Chambertin, 1er Cru, ‘les Corbeaux’, Lucien Boillot

1999

85

2641

Latricierès Chambertin, Grand Cru, Domaine Drouhin Laroze

1999

95

2690

Gevrey-Chambertin, 1er Cru, ‘Lavaux St-Jacques’, Denis Mortet

2007

255

Nuits-St-Georges

£

2608

Nuits-St-Georges, 1er Cru ‘les Damodes’, Jean Chauvenet

1996

85

2572

Nuits-St-Georges, Emmanuel Rouget

1996

80

2644

Nuits-St-Georges, 1er Cru ‘les Pruliers’, Lucien Boillot

1996

85

814

Nuits-St-Georges, 1er Cru ‘les Vaucrains’, Lucien LeMoine

2010

175

2606

Volnay, 1er Cru “les Angles”, Lucien Boillot

1996

70

2664

Volnay, 1er Cru “les Caillerets”, Lucien Boillot

1999

68

2568

Savigny Champ Chevrey, 1er Cru Monopole, Champy Père & Cie

1995

65

2625

Savigny Champ Chevrey, 1er Cru Monopole, Tollot-Beaut & fils

1999

50

Monthelie 2566 Monthelie, Domaine Roulot

1997

40

Pommard 2650 Pommard, 1er Cru “Les Fremiers”, Marc Colin & fils

1999

75

Auxey Duresses 2570 Auxey Duresses, “Ecuseaux”, Domaine Jessiaume

1998

45

Ladoix 2564 Ladoix, Domaine Francois Capitain

1995

25

Volnay

Savigny

23/05/2014

24

Pernand-Vergelesses 2604 Corton, Bonneau du Martray

£

2001

150

Aloxe Corton 2563

Corton-Bressandes, Tollot-Beaut & Fils

1995

105

2631

Corton-Bressandes, Tollot-Beaut & Fils

1996

90

2596

Corton, Tollot-Beaut & Fils

1999

100

2598

Corton-Bressandes, Tollot-Beaut & Fils

1999

110

Chassagne-Montrachet 2661 Chassagne-Montrachet, 1er Cru “Clos St Jean”, Domaine Ramonet

1999

60

2627

1999

40

1995

190

Chassagne-Montrachet, Blain-Gagnard

Red Burgundy Large Formats 2670

Chapelle Chambertin, Grand Cru, Drouhin-Laroze, Magnum

Italy

23/05/2014

White

Italy is an area that I have long struggled with, the sheer diversity and complexity of the regions had me tied in knots. Its an area that I have recently devoted a lot of attention to, and it has opened my eyes to what I have missed all these years. Italy is a culinary nation, the country that kick started the slow food movement, as a way to encourage us back to the table. Meals in Italy are family affairs, something to be lingered over, a time to meet, to eat and to talk, all the while enjoying some wine.

Northern Italy 859 Ascheri, Montelupa Viognier, Langhe, Piedmont

2006

75

895

Gaja, “Gaia & Rey” Chardonnay. D.O.C. Langhe, Piedmont

2009

320

863

Marchesi di Gresy, Sauvignon Blanc, Langhe, Piedmont

2010

48

876

Fontanafredda, Roero Arneis, D.O.C.G. Piedmont (500ml)

2010

25

890

Tenuta Musella, Bianco del Drago, I.G.T. Veneto

2011

30

864

Ascheri, Arneis, Langhe, D.O.C.G. Piedmont

2011

40

861

Ascheri, Gavi di Gavi, D.O.C.G. Piedmont

2011

40

A recent trip to Italy’s Piedmont region drew a lot of comparisons with Burgundy. Like Burgundy, the region is all undulating hills with the better plots being at the tops of the hills enjoying longer sunshine. Also like Burgundy the region is about family, small family estates with some vineyards having multiple owners. The wines of Piedmont are generally mono-varietal with Arneis and Cortese being among the more dominant whites, and Nebbiolo and Barbera being the more dominant reds.

866

Gaja, “Rossj-Bass” Chardonnay. D.O.C. Langhe, Piedmont

2011

120

896

Moccagatta, Chardonnay. D.O.C. Langhe, Piedmont

2011

50

56

La Marchesa, Gavi “Ettichetta d’Oro. D.O.C.G., Piedmont

2011

35

865

Bastianich, Vigna Orsone. D.O.C. Fruili Colli Orientalle, Fruiliano

2011

40

Central Italy is a much warmer climate and the white wines show an added sharpness and acidity. It is no co-incidence that the dominant cuisine in the region is fish. The reds traditionally had a more medium bodied characteristic but the advent of the “super-tuscan” has seen the style become much richer, more full bodied and claret like.

£

Central Italy 867

Casalfarneto, Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi, D.O.C. Marche

2007

25

868

Velenosi, “Villa Angela” Passerina, I.G.T. Marche

2010

42

889

Cantina Zaccagnini, il Bianco di Ciccio, I.G.T. Colline Pescaresi, Abruzzi

2011

30

891

Tenuta del’Ornellaia, Poggio alle Gazze, I.G.T. Tuscany

2011

80

870

La Valentina, Pecorino, Colline Pescaresi, I.G.T., Abruzzi

2011

38

879

Castello della Sala, “San Giovanni”, Orvieto Classico, D.O.C. Umbria

2011

38

869

Perticaia, Trebbiano Spoletino, I.G.T. Umbria

2010

42

26

Southern Italy & Islands The South and the Islands are home to some of the more interesting varietals— Fiano for example has a sharp citrusy nose with notes of garrigue herbs not too far removed from a Picpoul in style.

862

MandraRossa, Fiano, Sicily

2011

26

854

Planeta, Cometa, Sicily

2011

55

855

Planeta, Chardonnay, Sicily

2009

60

857

Planeta, La Segreta Bianco, Sicily

2011

28

Red E. Pira & Figli Pira is a small estate, founded in the early 20th century. It was recently taken over by the very capable Chiara Boschis, whose family run the Giacomo Borgogno estate. Chiara makes some cracking wines with an emphasis on the terrior of the plots she owns in three of the prime locations in Barolo. With two hectares in the commune of Cannubi, historically considered as a “Grand Cru”, and half a hectare in Via Nuova, Chiara is able to blend the differing characteristics of the vineyards into the wines. Currently undertaking major renovations to increase the cellar, Chiara plans to be able to build a small Enotheca and build a store of older vintages for the future.

Piedmont £

3003

Mascarello e Figlio, Barolo , “Villero”, D.O.C.G.

2001

125

3098

Mascarello e Figlio, Barolo , “Monprivato”, D.O.C.G.

2005

120

3006

Gaja, Conteisa, Langhe D.O.C.

2006

345

3097

Mascarello e Figlio, Barbera d’Alba , “Scudetto”, D.O.C.G.

2007

65

3091

Gaja, Barolo “Dagromis”, D.O.C.G.

2007

115

3023

Poderi Colla, Bricco del Drago, Langhe D.O.C.

2007

52

3002

Araldica, Barbera d’Asti, “Ceppi Storici” D.O.C.

2007

25

3040

E.Pira & Figli, Barolo “Cannubi”, D.O.C.G.

2008

150

3009

Ascheri, Barolo, “Pisapola” D.O.C.G.

2008

90

3038

Conterno Fantino, Barolo, “Sorì Ginestra”, D.O.C.G.

2008

180

Mascarello & Figlio

3115

Moccagatta, Barbaresco, D.O.C.G.

2009

68

Mascarello is a traditional family estate run along very stringent terms by Mauro Mascarello. Following a path laid down by his grandfather and uncles, he maintains a traditional outlook on production, believing firmly that the wines are made in the vineyard, especially the families pride and joy, the Monprivato vineyard in Castiglione Falletto. Here a selection of Nebbiolo clones—Michét, Lampia, and Rosé—produce a stunning Barolo with aromas of tobacco spice and licorice root over warm red stone fruits. An elegant wonderful wine that shows what the commune is capable of.

3010

Ascheri, Dolcetto d’Alba “Nirane”, D.O.C.

2010

38

3039

E.Pira & Figli, Barbera d’Alba Superiore, D.O.C.

2011

60

3035

Fontanafredda, Dolcetto d’Alba “Briccotondo”, D.O.C.

2010

30

3090

Conterno Fantino, Monpra, Langhe Rosso

2010

75

3011

Gaja, Sito Moresco, Langhe D.O.C.

2010

84

3054

Ascheri, Nebbiolo d’Alba “Bricco San Giacomo” D.O.C.

2011

50

3001

il Cascinone, “Conan” the Barbera, Barbera d’Asti, D.O.C.

2009

40

Piedmont (continued) £

3092

Gaja, Barbaresco “Sorì Tildin”, D.O.C.G.

2007

400

3059

Moccagatta, Barbaresco “Bric Balin”, D.O.C.G.

2006

100

3159

E.Pira & Figli, Barolo “Cannubi”, D.O.C.G., Magnum

2005

300

3114

Ascheri, Verduna Pelaverga, D.O.C.

2012

50

1996

40

2004

100

Valpolicella Classico Superiore Ripasso D.O.C., Veneto

2010

30

Corte Adami, Amarone della Valpolicella, D.O.C.,Veneto

2006

77

3037

Planeta, Santa Cecilia, Sicily, Magnum

2006

120

3041

Agricola Punica, Montessu, Isola dei Nuraghi I.G.T., Sardinia

2010

48

3116

Planeta, Dorilli, Cerasuolo di Vittoria Classico, D.O.C.G. Sicily

2011

60

3117

Planeta, Etna Rosso, D.O.C., Sicily

2012

50

North Eastern Italy 3015

Maso Cantanghel, “Rosso Pila”, Cabernet Sauvignon, D.O.C., Trentino

3020

Villabella, “Francastoro”, Amarone della Valpolicella D.O.C.G., Veneto

3024 3058

Luigi Righetti, “Campolieti”,

Islands

23/05/2014

28

Central Italy Montevertine Sergio Manetti bought the Montevertine estate in 1967 intending it to be a family summer home. In 1968 he planted the Le Pergole Torte vineyard under the direction of his friend Giulio Gambelli, who has acted as consultant winemaker to the estate ever since. In 1981, Sergio submitted his wine to the Consorzio Vino Chianti Classico, in a bid to bolster the ailing Consorzios position. The blistering rejection letter (not fit for bottling) takes pride of place in the winery and encouraged Sergio to withdraw his wines from the domination and join the growing ranks of the Super-Tuscans. Now being run by his son Martino the estate is still guided by the principles of his father—to produce wines of stunning elegance and finesse, wines to elicit pleasure not points. What is a “Supertuscan”? The term Supertuscan was coined to describe those wines that chose to declassify from D.O.C.G. down to Vino di Tavola or table wines. Usually this was due to the inclusion of “foreign” grapes such as Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon. Originating in the Chianti region, the movement spread across parts of Tuscany, including Bolgheri and further afield. The rules where adapted in the late 90’s to create a new classification - Indicazione Geografica Tipica which allowed the producers to classify their wines above the bottom tier Vino di Tavola. Wines such as Ornellaia, Sassicaia and Tignanello are classed as Supertuscans.

£

3017

Tenuta di Trinoro, Tenuta di Trinoro, I.G.T., Tuscany

1997

105

3068

Tenuta dell’Ornellaia, Ornellaia, Bolgheri Superiore, D.O.C. Tuscany

1997

600

3067

Marchesi Antinori, Solaia, I.G.T., Tuscany

1999

420

3099

Tenuta San Guido, Sassicaia, I.G.T., Tuscany

2001

480

3043

Pieve Santa Restituta, Brunello di Montalcino, D.O.C.G., Tuscany

2008

110

3027

Zigolo, Sangiovese/Merlot, I.G.T., Lazio

2008

29

3005

Tenuta dell’Ornellaia, Le Volte, I.G.T., Tuscany

2009

47

3031

Grillesino, Morellino di Scansano, D.O.C.G., Tuscany

2010

47

3093

Tenuta dell’Ornellaia, Le Serre Nuove, Bolgheri Rosso, D.O.C., Tuscany

2010

100

3021

Montevertine, Pian del Campolo, I.G.T., Tuscany

2010

60

3042

Querciabella, Chianti Classico, D.O.C.G., Tuscany

2009

55

3049

Cantina Zaccagnini, “il vino del Tralcetto” Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Abruzzi

2009

30

3032

La Valentina, “Spelt” Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Abruzzi

2006

50

3089

La Valentina, “Bellovedere” Terre dei Vestina, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Abruzzi

2006

75

118

San Georgio a Lapi, Chianti Colli Senesi, D.O.C.G., Tuscany

2011

28

3051

Tenuta San Guido, Guidalberto, I.G.T., Tuscany

2011

75

3052

Tenuta San Guido, Le Difese, I.G.T., Tuscany

2011

40

3050

Tenuta San Guido, Sassicaia, I.G.T., Tuscany

2011

340

3008

Cantina Zaccagnini, “Ikebana” Novello, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Abruzzi

2013

30

2011

22

Southern Italy 3147

Alex & Mitch, Negroamaro, I.G.P., Puglia

Spain I have chosen to join Spain and Portugal together because they share a lot of common factors. There is a commonality in the style of wines and they both utilise broadly traditional methods. At the moment, out of all the Eurozone countries Spain and Portugal are offering exceptional value for money. Recently there has been a lot of discussion within Spain regarding the transition to a more commercial style of winemaking, involving the acceptance of “International” grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz. I have selected a range of wines that showcase the traditional methods of the country –old barrel fermentations with wild yeasts and no manipulation, but there is also a smattering of modern producers, young guns bringing the best techniques of the new world into a decidedly old world wine country. Wines worth exploring: Bodegas Baigorri is an ultra modern winery on the road out to Haro in Rioja. Carved into a hill, the winery wouldn’t look out of place on the set of a Bond film, but their style is very in vogue. Using traditional grapes and methods in a state of the art facility produces some stunning wines. Alejandro Fernandez is one of the most influential winemakers in Spain. With a quartet of estates, mostly in the Ribera del Duero sub-region, he has championed the Tempranillo grape. Each estate is now being run by one of his daughters, and they continue to grow in strength.

23/05/2014

White

£

908

Chivite, Coleccion 125 Blanco, Navarra D.O.

2004

65

912

Bodegas Alto Almanzora, Aqel Blanco, Almeriá

2007

32

913

Bernabeleva, Navaherreros Blanco, Vinos de Madrid D.O.

2009

45

903

Bodegas Naia, Naia, Rueda D.O.

2010

35

907

Senorio de Astobiza, Arabako Txakolina D.O.

2010

40

921

Itsasmendi, “7” Bizkaiko Txakolina D.O.

2010

54

936

Gorka Izagirre, Bizkaiko Txakolina D.O.

2012

36

914

Santiago Ruiz, Albarino, Rias Baixas D.O.

2012

45

928

Raventos I Blanc, Perfum de Vi Blanc, Penedés D.O.

2010

36

Red Ribera del Duero D.O. 3253

Bodegas y Vinedos Vega Sicilia, Único

1999

560

3255

Bodegas y Vinedos Vega Sicilia, Valbuena 5°

2006

350

3234

Bodegas Alion, Tinto Fino,

2008

150

3324

Alejandro Fernandez, Pesquera “Janus”, Gran Reserva

2003

200

1998

70

Montsant D.O. 3208

Celler de Capçanes, Cabrida

Toro D.O. 3252

Bodegas Pintia, Pintia

2002

85

2400

Bodegas Numanthia, Numanthia

2009

100

30

Bierzo D.O. £

3239

Descendientes de J Palacios, Villa de Corullón

2007

95

3202

Descendientes de J Palacios, Petalos

2009

45

3280

Dominio de Tares, Baltos

2009

38

3243

Bodega Vinos Valtuille, Pago de Valdoneje

2009

35

Navarra D.O. 3241

Senorio de Sarría, Vinedo No 7 Graciano, Crianza

2008

28

3240

Senorio de Sarría, Vinedo No 8 Mazuelo

2005

28

3233

Domaines Lupier, El Terrior

2008

48

Priorat D.O.Ca. 3221

Buil & Giné, “Giné Giné”, Gratallops

2007

55

3237

Alvaro Palacios, Finca Dofi

2009

150

3238

Alvaro Palacios, Camins de Priorat

2008

45

2012

26

2006

27

Jumilla D.O. 3201

Juan Gill, Monastrell

La Mancha D.O. 3217

Finca Antigua, Garnacha

Rioja D.o.Ca. £

3227

C.V.N.E. “Viña Real”, Gran Reserva

1973

250

3228

C.V.N.E. “Viña Real”, Gran Reserva

1985

190

3225

Viña Ijalba, Reserva Seleccion Especial

1994

90

3212

LeAltanza, Reserva, Artistas Españoles Dalí

2004

125

3226

C.V.N.E. “Real de Asúa”

2004

117

3244

San Vicente

1998

70

3249

Vinedos de Páganos, El Puntido

2005

85

3206

LeAltanza, Reserva, Artistas Españoles Gaudi

2005

120

3289

Contino, “Vino del Olivo, Reserva

2007

100

Campo de Borja D.O.

23/05/2014

3211

Bodegas Borsao, Tres Picos, Garnacha

2007

40

3224

Bodegas Borsao, Joven, Garnacha

2010

20

32

Portugal White 902

Jorge Moreira, Pó de Poeira, Vinho Regional Duriense

2009

50

904

Aliança, Galeria Branco, Bairrada D.O.C.

2009

21

911

Quinta da Espiga, Branco, Vinhos do Lisboa

2009

22

1049

Quintas de Melgaco, Torre de Managem, Alvarinho/Trejadura, Vinho Verde

2012

32

Other European It seems kind of wrong lumping the other European countries together under such an unassuming label. Considering that for many years German whites pretty much topped our imports of wine. Now the countries wines languish forgotton on many wine lists their complicated naming and often sweeter style of wine a fading fancy occasionally dusted off for a trip down memory lane.

Greece is a country worthy of more attention, their industry is growing at a healthy rate and the whites especially are a style suitable for most cuisine.

Germany-White £

953

Joh. Jos Prüm, Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Auslese, Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

1995

70

966

Joh. Jos Prüm, Graacher Himmelreich Riesling Spätlese , Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

2004

95

965

Von Schubert, Maximin Grünhäuser, Abstberg, Riesling Spätlese, Mosel-Saar-Ruwer

2005

60

956

Otto Gorgon, Riesling classic, Mosel

2007

26

963

Von Kesselstatt, Kaseler Nies’Chen, Riesling Kabinett, Mosel

2007

55

Austria-White 951

Weingut Heidler, Steinhaus Riesling trocken, Kamptal

2006

42

958

Stefan Bauer, “Bromberg” Gruner Veltliner, Wagram

2009

24

Greece-White 1036

Gaia, Notios, Peleponissos

2010

28

1045

Domaine Geravassiliou, Malagousia, Epanomi PGI

2010

35

2009

31

2008

28

Greece-Red 3403

Mitravelas Estate, “Red on Black”, Agiorgitiko, Nemea

Hungary-White 1031

Royal Tokaji Company, Dry Furmint, Tokaji

Lebanon-Red

23/05/2014

3401

Château Musar, Gaston Hochar, Bekaa Valley

2005

60

3458

Domaine des Tourelles, Rouge, Bekaa Valley

2010

28

34

England England has shown that it is capable of producing some exceptional wines, its Sparkling wines are as good as any top end champagne, and the future certainly could look rosy. After such an exceptional year of promotion, with the Jubilee and the Olympics, 2012 ended with a bit of a downpour. Such a miserable summer had a terrible effect on many of the vineyards. The rain brought reduced crops and the very real risk of mildew and grey rot. The news that Nyetimber wouldn't be making any wine that vintage seemed to signal a death knell for the 2012 harvest, but it wasn't all doom and gloom. A lot of producers recorded small crops, but reports were that many were expecting a decent vintage out it. Sure it would be a small volume vintage, but altogether several reports were of some quite decent juice. I hope to see more here over the coming years as we expand our knowledge and experience with the vines and our climate. As many producers steer away from the hybrid varieties and plant more commercially acceptable varieties we will see more accessable wines on our shelves. As volumes slowly climb, we should start to see things change price wise as well, making the wines more friendly on our stretched budgets! Camel Valley Down in Cornwall Bob and Sam Lindo have made Camel Valley one of the stand out estates in the English Wine Scene. Their sparkling wines are award winners, but their still whites are exceptionally good. @camelvalleybob @camelwinemaker

England-White

£

1035

Chapel Down, Flint Dry, Tenderten, Kent

2010

35

1010

Wickham Estate, Fumé, Hampshire

2011

35

1028

Bolney Estate, Bolney Bubbly, Brut, Sussex (Sparkling)

NV

58

1027

Nyetimber, Demi-Sec, Sussex (Sparkling & Sweet)

NV

100

NV

58

England-Rosé 1458

Bolney Estate, Sirrus, Brut, Sussex (Sparkling)

England-Red 3408

Bolney Estate, Cuvée Noir, Brut, Sussex (Sparkling)

2010

60

3409

Bolney Estate, Lychgate Red, Sussex

2010

38

NV

18

England-Still Cider 5068

Hush Heath Estate, Jakes Orchard Still Cider, Kent

The Americas Geographically an enormous area of production. Within the continental US almost every single state produces wines, although most of them are never seen outside the borders of their own state. California wine has been on our shelves for many years now, in part due to their large scale production and ready availability to export. Recently we have seen more from Oregon, Washington and to a lesser extent, Canada, especially British Columbia. Most of these wineries are still fairly small production affairs, and so the little that gets exported tends to have a higher premium, but the quality is certainly worth it.

California California is a vast landscape of hills, rivers and fertile valleys, and is the largest producer of wine in America. Vast ranches of vines provide much of the fruit for the vast number of producers in the state.

White

£

1069

Shafer, Red Shoulder Ranch Chardonnay, Napa Valley

2001

100

1114

Stonestreet, Sauvignon Blanc, Alexander Valley

2010

80

1078

Byron, Chardonnay, Santa Barbara County

2011

80

1082

Hartford Court, “Four Hearts Vineyard” Chardonnay, Russian River Valley

2009

75

1095

Frog’s Leap, Rutherford Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley

2012

50

1129

Alpha/Omega, Chardonnay, Napa Valley

2011

135

1130

Alpha/Omega, Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley

2012

95

1096

Frogs Leap, Rutherford Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley, Half Bottle

2012

30

Red Napa Valley

23/05/2014

3518

Merryville, ‘Profile’

1990

90

3525

Dominus Estate, Estate Cabernet

1994

220

3521

La Jota Vineyard Co., Howell Mountain Cabernet Sauvignon

1995

150

3523

Robert Mondavi, Barrel Aged Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon,

1998

170

3507

Havens, Syrah “Hudson Vineyard”, Carneros

1999

90

3589

Domaine Carneros, “Avant Garde” Pinot Noir, Carneros

2009

45

3516

Bouchaine, “Copeland Estate” Pinot Noir, Carneros

2009

250

36

Sonoma

£

3514

Durney Vineyards, Private Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon,

1992

80

3538

Wild Hog, Saini Farms Carignane, Dry Creek Valley

2002

75

3535

Hartford Family, Lands Edge Pinot Noir, Sonoma Coast

2005

70

3536

La Crema, Pinot Noir, Russian River Valley

2008

60

3569

Ridge Vineyards, Lytton Springs

2009

85

3568

Ridge Vineyards, Geyserville, Alexander Valley, Half Bottles

2010

55

3625

Hirsch Vineyards, East Ridge Pinot Noir, Sonoma Coast

2011

140

3542

Littorai, Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir

2011

105

Sonoma Valley

Central Valley 3522

Wild Horse, Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon, Central Coast

1996

60

3515

Renaissance, Unfiltered Merlot, North Yuba

1996

62

3511

Bonny Doon Vineyards, Old Telegram, Santa Cruz

2001

75

2010

45

Mendocino 3537

Edmeades, Zinfandel

Pacific Northwest Comprising the states of Oregon, Washington and to a lesser extend the Canadian province of British Columbia, the Pacific Northwest is home to some of the more interesting wines in America. Oregon is building its reputation as a producer of aromatic whites, but is fairly well established as a top producer of Pinot and Chardonnay. Perhaps it is no co-incidence that the landscape bears more than a passing resemblance to Burgundy, so much so that Veronique Drouhin settled there from Burgundy to establish her own domaine. Finding wines from the Pacific Northwest is getting easier as they establish trade routes and look to export markets to grow, but generally the limited availability means that the prices are at the higher end of the spectrum.

White

£

1087

Bethel Heights, Chardonnay, Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon

2006

85

1084

Willakenzie Estate, Pinot Blanc, Willamette Valley, Oregon

2007

62

1086

Amity Vineyard, Pinot Blanc, Willamette Valley, Oregon

2007

57

1071

Château Ste Michelle, “Eroica” Riesling, Columbia Valley, Washington

2008

50

1075

Domaine Drouhin, “Arthur” Chardonnay, Dundee Hills, Oregon

2009

60

1083

K Vintners, K Viognier, Columbia Valley, Washington

2011

70

3509

Canoe Ridge, Merlot, Columbia Valley, Washington

2004

50

3501

Andrew Will, Two Blondes Vineyard, Yakima Valley, Washington

2008

120

3527

Domaine Drouhin, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, Oregon

2011

80

3552

Domaine Drouhin, Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley, Oregon, Half Bottle

2010

45

3548

K Vintners, K Syrah, Millbrandt Vineyard,

2009

75

Red

Wahluke Slope, Columbia Valley, Washington

23/05/2014

38

South America Chile and Argentina have had a long history of viticulture, but their popularity really exploded as the recession started to take hold in the UK. As our purse-strings tightened we looked to cheaper and better value wines and the wines of Chile particularly hit the spot. Relatively disease free, due mainly to the sandy nature of much of the soils (the Phylloxera louse doesn't like sandy soils.) the growth of the wine industry seems limitless. Chile is quite fortunate in that the long profile of the country incorporates several diverse climatic conditions allowing a multitude of styles and varieties to flourish. Argentina’s wine industry is predominantly based in the Mendoza, but recent growth in Patagonia is expanding their horizons and bringing a newer style of wine into scope.

White 1066 Catena Alta, Chardonnay “Tupungato”, Mendoza, Argentina

1995

75

1079

Catena Alta, Chardonnay “Luca Vineyard”, Mendoza, Argentina

1996

75

1070

Catena Alta, Chardonnay “Luca Vineyard”, Mendoza, Argentina

1997

75

1081

Tabalí, Reserva Especial Chardonnay, Limarí Valley, Chile

2011

31

1061

Casa Marin, Gewürztraminer, Casona Vineyard, San Antonio Valley, Chile

2008

38

1099

Amayna, Barrel fermented Sauvignon Blanc, Leyda Valley, Chile

2008

60

1089

Trapiche, Torrontes “Broquel”, Cafayate, Argentina

2009

30

1118

Andeluna Cellars, Tupungato Unoaked Chardonnay, Mendoza, Argentina

2010

28

1128

Errazuriz, Wild Ferment Chardonnay, Casablanca Valley, Chile

2011

35

Red 3553

Altair, Altair, Cachapoal Valley, Chile, Magnum

2003

180

3550

Emiliana, Coyam, Colchagua Valley, Chile

2009

50

3545

Finca Decero, Remolinos Vineyard Amano, Agrelo, Mendoza, Argentina

2008

75

3626

Cheval des Andes, Cheval des Andes, Mendoza, Argentina

2008

130

3528

Errazuriz, Manzanar Vineyard Syrah, Aconcagua Costa, Chile

2011

35

3658

Casarena, Jamilla’s Vineyard Malbec, Perdriel, Mendoza, Argentina

2010

70

3540

Casa Marin, Syrah, “Marimar” Vineyard, San Antonio, Chile

2010

74

3570

Andeluna, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tupungato, Mendoza, Argentina

2010

40

3659

Casarena, Roble Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina

2012

26

3660

Casarena, Pinot Noir Reserve, Luján de Cuyo, Mendoza, Argentina

2012

36

£

Australia Australia appears to have undergone a considerable re-invention of its wine industry in the last few years. As the backlash against overoaked “aussie” chardonnay is slowly being forgotten, there has been a real emphasis lately on boutique wines from some of the outlying regions that often miss our radars. Of all the countries on the wine-list, Australia is the one where I am able to have some real fun, finding obscure little wines from up and coming producers. Australian winemakers seem to have a real pioneering spirit when it comes to trying new varieties, growing grapes in unusual places and generally just mixing it up. Combine this with the wonderful names they come up with, both for the towns and regions as well as the wineries. Some parts of Australia, notably the Barossa and Eden Valleys, have a long history stretching back to the Germanic and European immigrants of the late 1800’s. These early settlers brought vine cuttings and cultivated the gnarly old vines that now provide fruit for such iconic wines as Henschke’s Hill or Grace, or Brokenwood’s Graveyard Shiraz.

South Australia Home to the most iconic names and sub-regions in Australia – the Barossa Valley, Clare Valley, Adelaide Hills, Coonawarra, South Australia has it all.

White 1152 Henschke, Lenswood Coralinga Sauvignon Blanc, Adelaide Hills

2012

40

Red 3840

Alpha Box and Dice, “Tarot” Grenache, Langhorne Creek

2008

30

3885

Some Young Punks, “The Squids Fist” Sangiovese/Shiraz, South Eastern Australia

2011

50

£

Victoria The Dalwhinnie vineyards are sited in a natural amphitheatre in the mountains of the Grampians at about 595 metres above sea level. This meso-climate provides the perfect foundation for great wines and Dalwhinnie certainly deliver them.

White 1161 Dalwhinnie, Moonambel Chardonnay, Pyrenees

2002

58

1178

Crawford River, Riesling

2010

65

1195

Kooyong, “Beurrot” Pinot Gris, Mornington Peninsula

2009

55

Red 3807

Jasper Hill, “Georgia’s Paddock” Shiraz, Heathcote

2010

120

1289

Tahbilk, Cabernet Sauvignon, Nagambie Lake, Central Victoria

2009

40

2008

50

2010

80

Tasmania Tasmania seems to have come from nowhere to emerge as an exciting region to watch.

White 1175 Pipers Brook, Chardonnay Clare Valley Red 3899

23/05/2014

Adelina Estate, Grenache

40

New South Wales Home to the Hunter Valley, famed for its Semillon.

White 1179 Keith Tulloch, “Field of Mars” Semillon, Hunter Valley

2011

45

1193

Lillypilly, Tramillon, Riverina

2008

44

1208

The Rude Mechanicals, “Ephemera”, Viognier/Pinot Gris

2010

26

Rosé 1419

Charles Melton, Rose of Virginia, Barossa Valley

2012

50

Red 3802

Henschke, Keyneton Estate, “Euphonium”, Shiraz/Cabernet/Merlot

2006

75

3833

Henschke, Johann’s Garden, Grenache/Mourvèdre/Shiraz

2006

65

3824

Two Hands, Bad Impersonator Shiraz

2006

90

3815

Charles Melton, Nine Popes, Barossa Valley

2009

85

3808

Charles Melton, “Grains of Paradise” Shiraz, Barossa Valley

2009

90

White 1194 Cascabel, Riesling

2010

40

Red 3818

1997

450

2008

50

£

Barossa

Eden Valley

Henschke, Hill of Grace

McLaren Vale Red 3837

Yangarra, Old Vine Grenache

Western Australia

New Zealand Home of one of the most iconic white wines in the world, we were first introduced to the wines of New Zealand in 1986 when Cloudy Bay first appeared on our shores. Our love of the crisp dry sauvignons continues to this day, sometimes at the detriment of all the other wines New Zealand makes so well. Some of the best examples of Riesling outside of Germany come from the sheltered climate of Central Otago, not forgetting Martinborough on the North Island. Tightly structured Syrah that captures all the charm of a top range Rhône can be found in the region of Hawkes Bay, especially around the sub-region Gimblett Gravels. New Zealand has managed to avoid many of the pitfalls that Australian wine in particular fell into, namely they have avoided flooding the market with too much generic volume wine. This partly enforced, partly circumstance situation, has ensured that New Zealand is a byword for quality and value.

23/05/2014

White 1192 Willespie, Riesling, Margaret River

2005

64

1258

Larry Cherubino, Ad Hoc Wallflower Riesling, Mt Barker

2011

40

1260

Larry Cherubino, Ad Hoc Strawman Sauvignon/Semillon, Margaret River

2011

38

1261

Cullen, Kevin John Chardonnay, Margaret River

2011

120

1257

Cullen, Mangan Vineyard, Sauvignon Blanc/Semillon, Margaret River

2011

60

Red 3988

Cullen, Diane Madeline, Margaret River

2011

135

3999

Cullen, Mangan Vineyard, Merlot/Malbec/Petit Verdot, Margaret River

2012

55

White 1158 Dry River, Craighall, Riesling, Martinborough

2005

70

1154

Te Mata, Woodthorpe Vineyard, Chardonnay, Hawkes Bay

2007

38

1164

Ata Rangi, Craighall, Chardonnay, Martinborough

2004

60

1184

Paritua, “Grace”, Sauvignon Blanc/Semillon, Hawkes Bay

2011

55

1202

Mt Hector, Sauvignon Blanc, Wairarapa

2012

32

1274

Gladstone Vineyards, Sauvignon Blanc, Wairarapa

2010

40

1273

Gladstone Vineyards, Jealous Sisters, Sauvignon Blanc, Wairarapa

2012

30

Rosé 1413

Stone Paddock, “Jolie”, Hawkes Bay

2010

34

New Zealand North Island

42

New Zealand Dry River was established by Dr Neil McCallum who built its reputation in Martinborough by producing exceptional low yield wines packed with fruit character and expression. They export most of their wines to the US and UK and the allocations are so small they are eagerly fought over. The Pinot is exceptional with ripe berry fruit flavours and rich mineral expression, growing hints of chocolate and black tea add body to the wine. Rivals any decent Grand Cru burgundy in my opinion. Greywacke is the new wine from iconic winemaker Kevin Judd. Kevin was an instrumental part of the history of Cloudy Bay and the growth and status of New Zealand as a producer of quality wines. A renowned photographer, hes gone back to making wines that show the true expression and character of the fruits. @greywacker

North Island Red 3813

Matakana Estate, “Moko”, Matakana, Aukland

2004

38

3810

Sileni Estate, E.V. Merlot/Cabernet Franc, Hawkes Bay

1998

130

3847

Leung Estate, Ma Maison Pinot Noir Reserve, Martinborough

2006

70

3999

Destiny Bay, Destinae, Waiheke Island

2007

120

3852

Dry River, Pinot Noir, Martinborough

2008

160

3817

Ata Rangi, Pinot Noir, Martinborough

2010

95

White 1215 Riverby Estate, Sali’s Block Riesling, Marlborough

2009

38

1217

Riverby Estate, Chardonnay, Marlborough

2009

48

1196

Mount Difficulty, Target Gully Riesling, Central Otago

2007

50

1170

Amisfield, Pinot Gris, Central Otago

2008

60

1151

Dog Point Vineyards, Section 94 Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough

2008

55

1186

Ant Moore, Pinot Gris, Marlborough

2012

33

1167

Mount Difficulty, Pinot Gris, Central Otago

2011

30

1200

Cloudy Bay, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, Magnum

2011

140

1159

Saint Clair, Pioneer Block 18 “Snap Block”, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough

2011

56

1248

Greywacke, Wild Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough

2011

65

1168

Mount Difficulty, Bannockburn Sauvignon Blanc, Central Otago

2011

48

1156

Dog Point Vineyards, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough

2012

45

1247

Greywacke, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough

2012

46

3906

Cloudy Bay, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, Magnum

2012

150

1171

Cloudy Bay, Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough,

2013

65

South Island £

23/05/2014

Red 3811

Mount Edward, Pinot Noir, Central Otago

2004

80

3987

Lowburn Ferry, Pinot Noir, Central Otago

2007

60

3830

Ant Moore, Pinot Noir, Central Otago

2009

50

3822

Mountford Estate, Pinot Noir, Waipara, Canterbury

2004

75

3558

Cloudy Bay, Pinot Noir, Marlborough

2011

60

44

South Africa I’m quite excited about the future of South African wines. With so much change in infrastructure, and the emergence of a new generation of winemakers, there has been a lot of change in the country. One of the more interesting changes is the move away from large cooperative farming to a more boutique style production method. With many farmers now learning the skills and techniques of winemaking, I think the future of South African wine can only be positive. A better understanding of the placement of vineyards is leading to a continual program of planting new vineyards, expanding the regions, districts and wards so it becomes harder to keep up with it all. John Platter’s eponymous wine guide, the industry bible for South African wines, is getting larger and larger each passing year. In the past, South African wines, especially the reds, were known for an unusual characteristic – a farmyardy smell that bordered on the dirty. Pinotage, South Africa’s unique grape, was one of the worst for exhibiting that dirty, animalistic aroma, masking the fruit character of the grape. Modern production techniques such as controlled temperature fermentations and use of new oak have helped to control the presence of the wild yeast (Brettanomyces) that causes the funky odours.

White

£

1357

Dewetshof, “Bataleur”, Chardonnay, Stellenbosch

2001

65

1354

Bouchard Finlayson, Blanc de Mer, Western Cape

2010

30

1368

Hermanuspietersfontein, “Die Bartho”, Sauvignon Blanc/Semillon Upper Hemel & Aarde Valley and Elim

2011

45

1371

Ashbourne, “Sandstone”, Walker Bay

2006

42

1351

Lammershoek, Roulette Blanc, Swartberg Mountain

2006

42

1369

Circumstance, Sauvignon Blanc, Stellenbosch

2011

35

1352

Vondeling, “Petit Blanc” Chenin/Viognier/Chardonnay, Voor-Paardeberg, Paarl

2012

30

1365

Vondeling, Chardonnay, Voor-Paardeberg, Paarl

2009

28

1379

Boer & Brit, Gezina, Western Cape

2010

38

4360

Sadie Family, “Palladius” Chenin/Grenache Blanc/Clairette/Viognier/Chardonnay, Swartland 2010

95

1362

Moreson, Sauvignon Blanc, Franschhoek

2011

36

1389

Kleine Zalze, Family Reserve, Sauvignon Blanc, Stellenbosch

2011

50

1399

Lands End, Sauvignon Blanc, Elim, Cape Agulhas

2011

35

1359

Circle of Life, Vineyard Blanc, Stellenbosch

2012

40

1398

Buitenverwachting, Sauvignon Blanc, Constantia

2012

38

1360

Sadie Family, Die Ouwingerdreeks, “Skerpioen”, Palomino/Chenin, Swartland

2012

85

1395

Kleine Zalze, Vineyard Selection, Chardonnay, Stellenbosch

2013

30

Sadie Family wines have been making their mark on the world stage under the guidance of Eben Sadie. His winemaking style is uncompromising and his passion is boundless. Fast becoming a winemaking icon in a country that is teeming with up and coming talent Eben and his wines command serious attention. The allocations for these wines are ridiculous, the hoops we had to jump through to get them defy belief considering this is South African wine we are talking about. This kind of hysteria is usually reserved for cult Napa cabs and DRC. The highlight of the selection must be the Old Vines series—Die Ouwingerdreeks in Afrikaans, made with fruit sourced from a select few parcels of old vines Eben has literally begged to save from being grubbed up and replanted. Treinspoor—a Tinta Barocca (an old Port varietal) planted in 1974, Soldaat—Grenache from a vineyard planted in the 70’s and Pofadder—and old Cinsault from a vineyard with stock dating back to 1920’s. These are seriously small production wines, often fermented in clay amphorae or large concrete egg fermenters due to the tiny volumes involved. Pofadder is less than 2000 bottles a year. Highly sought after and made in such low volumes means these wines command fairly high prices but there is little question they are definitely worth it.

23/05/2014

Red £

4304

Saxenburg, Special Selection Shiraz, Stellenbosch

2001

140

4303

Nico Van der Merwe, Mas Nicholas, Western Cape

2001

70

4318

Simonsig, Frans Malan, Cape Blend, Stellenbosch

2006

50

4309

Hermanuspietersfontein, “Swartskaap” Sondagskloof

2009

45

4313

Signal Cannon, Merlot, Paarl

2010

24

4301

Cederberg, V Generations Cabernet Sauvignon, Olifants River

2000

75

4316

Simonsig, SMV, Stellenbosch

2010

34

4302

Meinert, Cabernet Sauvignon, Devon Valley

2009

42

4359

Sadie Family, “Collumella” Syrah/Mourvedre/Grenache, Swartland

2010

135

4358

Sadie Family, Die Ouwingerdreek “Treinspoor” Tinta Barocca, Swartland

2012

75

4361

Sadie Family, Die Ouwingerdreek “Soldaat” Grenache, Piekenierskloof

2012

85

4362

Sadie Family, Die Ouwingerdreek “Pofadder” Cinsault, Swartland

2012

80

46

Rosé France There’s a wide diversity of grapes and styles from France. £

1405

Château Lamothe de Haux, Bordeaux Clairet, Bordeaux

2009

32

1412

Domaine Jean Teiller, Menetou-Salon, Loire Valley

2009

44

1402

Château La Foret, Bordeaux Clairet, Bordeaux

2009

24

1410

Domaine Pieretti, Rosé du Cap Corse, Corsica

2011

42

1415

Jean-Luc Colombo, “les Pins Couché”, Vin de Pays de Mediterranee

2011

22

1424

Domaine Astruc, “Côtes Mas”, Rosé Aurore, Sud de France

2012

21

England English wines are becoming a force to be reckoned with and the future certainly looks bright.

1458

Bolney Estate, Sirrus, Brut, Sussex (Sparkling)

NV

58

Australia The Melton rosé is named in honour of his wife and over the vintages has gotten darker and darker, now its more like a Clairet, the wine being drawn off after two days of skin maceration.

1419

Charles Melton, Rose of Virginia, Barossa Valley, South Australia

2012

50

2010

34

New Zealand Bursting with fresh red fruit character this is a lovely wine.

1413

Stone Paddock, “Jolie”, Hawkes Bay

Dessert Wines For some there can be no better way to end a meal that a glass of something unctuously sweet and sticky. The aromas of honey, nutty pastries and tropical fruit can often be a substitute for dessert too! There are several different ways that dessert wines are made. The most challenging way is by succumbing to Noble Rot (Botrytis Cinerea) a fungal infection of the fruit that causes the berries to dehydrate, raising their sugar concentration. The increased sugar level mean a high potential alcohol level, but typically dessert wines will be around the 10-12% by volume. It is the unfermented sugars that give the wines their sweetness. Noble Rot is a fickle mistress though, and requires very specific conditions to thrive in, (warm with high humidity and close bunches of fruit). As such these wines are expensive to produce as the yields are much lower and the challenges in harvesting mouldy fruit are not inconsiderable!

Full Bottles

£

1505

Chateau Climens, Barsac, Bordeaux, France

1917

955

1580

Chateau d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France

1989

970

1596

Chateau d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France

1997

620

1508

Domaine Pieretti, Muscat du Cap Corse, Corsica, Vin Doux Naturel

2010

55

1509

Domaine de la Tour Vieille, Banyuls Reserva, Roussillon

N.V.

47

1516

Peller Estate, Iced Cuvée Classic, Niagara Peninsula, Canada

N.V.

60

1517

Domaine de l’Ancienne Cure, Monbazillac “Joue de Fruit”, France

2010

47

1699

Domaine de Barroubio, Muscat de St-Jean de Minervois, France

2010

45

1658

Domaine de Chênes, Muscat de Rivesaultes, Vin Doux Naturel, France

2010

42

1628

Santa Vittoria, Moscato d’Asti, Piedmont, Italy

2010

24

1546

Alasia, Brachetto d’Acqui, Piedmont, Italy

2011

30

A more productive way is to later harvest the fruit. This means leaving the fruit on the vines for an extended period. The extended ripening increases the sugar levels to a point until the vine starts “shutting down” at which point the fruit will begin to raisin (dehydrate). This has the effect or raising the sugar levels, again so that not all the sugar is fermented. Typically later harvested wines don’t have the exotic honeyed character of a Botrytised wine. Icewine (Eiswein) is a special wine that is left on the vine for considerably longer, over winter in fact, until the vines and remaining fruit are encased in ice. After three consecutive nights at less than -3 degrees the fruit is harvested (usually at night) while still frozen. It is quickly crushed and the ice is skimmed off the juice, again concentrating the sugar levels. A long period of fermentation will follow with the resulting wine being one of the more sublime dessert wines. Conditions for Icewine are rare in Europe, occurring perhaps once or twice in a decade, making the wines very expensive. In Canada however, the conditions occur almost every year, meaning that they are a little bit more affordable.

23/05/2014

48

Half Bottles £

1514

Chateau d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France

1996

360

1601

Chateau d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France

1973

480

1579

Chateau d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France

1989

500

1511

Chateau d’Yquem, Sauternes, Bordeaux, France

2003

420

1538

Corte Adami, Recioto di Soave, D.O.C.G., Veneto, Italy

2005

42

1659

Château Dauphine Rondillon, Loupiac, Bordeaux, France

2005

38

1507

Two Hands Winery, Moscato Bianco, Barossa Valley, South Australia

2006

36

1548

Chapel Down, Nectar Late Harvest, Tenterden, Kent, England

NV

38

1598

Quady, “Deviation”, Dessert wine with Rose Geranium, Madera, California

NV

50

1609

Cloudy Bay, Late Harvest Riesling, Marlborough, New Zealand

2007

60

1590

Bonny Doon Vineyards, “Vinferno”, Beeswax Vineyard, Arroyo Seco, California

2008

55

1587

Didier Dageuneau, “Les Jardins de Babylon”, Jurancon, France

2008

195

1559

Itsas Mendi, “Urezti”, Late Harvest Txakoli, Bizkaiko Txakolina, Spain

2008

100

1625

Tenuta dell’Ornellaia, “Ornus”, Bolgheri, Tuscany, Italy

2008

160

1527

Planeta, “Passito di Noto”, Sicily, Italy (500ml)

2008

60

1611

Greywacke, Late Harvest Riesling, Marlborough, New Zealand

2011

60

1589

Aldobrandesca, “Sovana”, Aleatico, Apulia, Italy

2010

48

1691

Château Climens, “Cypres de Climens”, Barsac, Bordeaux, France

2010

60

Fortified Wines – Bottles

Portugal (700ml)

23/05/2014

£

1735

Cossart-Gordon, Madeira Sercial (dry)

1954

350

1740

Grahams, Vintage

1960

435

1729

Cockburns, Vintage

1967

180

1724

Cockburns, Vintage

1970

340

1731

Dows, Vintage

1970

260

1732

Taylor’s, Quinta de Vargellas

1978

195

1708

Wiese & Krohn, Colheita

1978

140

1733

Grahams, Vintage

1980

175

1792

Quinta do Vesuvio, Vintage

1989

185

1719

Dows, Vintage

1994

90

1706

Ferreira, Vintage

1994

70

1718

Fonseca, Vintage

1994

85

1749

Quinta do Vesuvio, Vintage

1996

150

1716

Grahams, Vintage

1997

95

1713

Warres, Vintage

1997

95

1705

Wiese & Krohn, Colheita

1998

50

1787

Dows, Quinta Senhora da Ribiera

1998

130

1727

Grahams, Malvedos, Single Quinta Vintage

1998

100

1738

Blandy’s, 10 year old Sercial (dry)

N.V.

44

1739

Blandy’s, 10 year old Verdelho (medium sweet)

N.V.

45

50

Australia (375ml) £

1714

Lillypilly, VP fortified Shiraz, Riverina, New South Wales

1995

45

1704

Yalumba, 50 year old Museum Tawny

NV

55

Domaine de la Tour Vieille, Banyuls Reserva, Roussillon

N.V.

47

France 1509