Training Progress Review Summer 08

Training Progress Review – Summer 08 Weapons of Mass Destruction Awareness Training for the City of Harrisonburg and the Rockingham County Fire and Re...
Author: Erick Atkinson
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Training Progress Review – Summer 08 Weapons of Mass Destruction Awareness Training for the City of Harrisonburg and the Rockingham County Fire and Rescue Departments Ronald W. Raab, Ph.D. Authorized Trainer WMD Standardized Awareness Training

James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

AWR-160 •  Target Audience Needs: First responders from a wide variety of disciplines will respond to the next natural or man-made disaster. Each responder needs to have the foundational knowledge of what they may face them when confronting an act of terrorism. •  Goal: The WMD Standardized Awareness course is to provide first responders with baseline awareness level knowledge of WMD James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Objectives At the end of the AWR-160 course, the first responder will be able to 1.  Identify definitions of terrorism and WMD indicators of potential terrorist acts and targets using the RAIN concept 2.  Identify the signs and symptoms of chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals using the RAIN concept; and the advantages and disadvantages of using chemical agents as a WMD 3.  Identify the signs and symptoms of biological agents using the RAIN concept; and the advantages and disadvantages of using biological agents as a WMD 4.  Identify the signs and symptoms of radiation and radiological material using the RAIN concept; and the advantages and disadvantages of using biological agents as a WMD 5.  Identify the characteristics of explosives, and the effects of a detonated explosive device James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

WMD Awareness Level Response Training Prevention and Deterrence

Presented by: Office of Grants and Training National Domestic Preparedness Consortium

To be ready. We must be Aware V8.2.1

Prevention and Deterrence Define terrorism and WMD List actions indicating potential terrorist activity List potential terrorist targets Define general precautions to protect oneself if a WMD incident is witnessed or discovered, and define the four elements of the RAIN concept

V8.2.1

WMD Awareness Level Response Training Chemical Agents

Presented by: Office of Grants and Training National Domestic Preparedness Consortium

V8.2.1

Objectives: Chemical Agents Discuss the RAIN concept as it applies to chemical agents Describe toxic industrial chemicals used as weapons and the physiological signs/symptoms associated with them Describe choking, blood, blister, and nerve agents and the physiological signs/symptoms associated with them Discuss time, distance, shielding, and isolation zones as they apply to chemical agents Describe the advantages and disadvantages of using chemical agents for terrorism

V8.2.1

WMD Awareness Level Response Biological Agents Training Presented by: Office of Grants and Training National Domestic Preparedness Consortium

V8.2.1

Objectives: Biological Agents Discuss the RAIN concept as it applies to biological agents Describe biological agents Describe the general signs and symptoms of exposure to biological agents Describe the physical characteristics of biological agents Describe the advantages and disadvantages of using biological agents for terrorism

V8.2.1

WMD Awareness Level Response Training Radiological Materials and Nuclear Weapons Presented by: Office of Grants and Training National Domestic Preparedness Consortium

V8.2.1

Objectives: Radiological Materials Describe radiation and radioactive material Identify the physiological signs and symptoms of exposure to radiation Identify radiation exposure devices and radiological dispersal devices and distinguish between a nuclear weapon detonation and a conventional explosion

V8.2.1

WMD Awareness Level Response Training Explosive Devices Presented by: Office of Grants and Training National Domestic Preparedness Consortium

V8.2.1

Explosive Devices Differentiate characteristics of explosives Recognize indicators of explosive manufacture Recognize potential explosive indicators

V8.2.1

Management: Course Schedule •  The course starts with a 30 minute pre-test to determine the background knowledge of the students •  Each module instruction takes about 40 to 50 minutes •  The course ends with a 30 minute post-test •  Students are required to achieve a score of 70% or better to receive certification from the Center for Domestic Preparedness/ FEMA for the AWR-160 course James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Summary of Accomplishments Harrisonburg Fire Department 4 classes taught to 60 out of 75 HPD personnel. All passed the AWR-160 course

James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Summary of Accomplishments Rockingham County Fire and Rescue Responsible for coverage for everything in the county except for the city of Harrisonburg Locations where the course was taught at Company 15 Bridgewater 2 courses Company 20 Grottoes 2 courses Company 30 Elkton 1 course Company 40 Harrisonburg 3 courses Company 50 Broadway 3 courses Company 80 McGaheysville 2 courses Fire Admin. Harrisonburg 2 courses James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Summary of Accomplishments •  15 courses taught to 52 out of 60 RCFR personnel –  All passed the AWR-160 course

•  22 volunteers at various stations took and passed the course

James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Costs

•  •  •  • 

Instructor - IIIA Vehicle - RCFR Materials/supplies – RCFR/HFD Books, Exams, Certificates - DHS/FEMA

$6,500 $ 500 $ 100 $2,700 $9,800

James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Savings If each first responder had to go off site for this class the cost per person would have been For RCFR this would have been for 40 duty personnel $300 for shift coverage and travel expenses Cost for off site would have been $12,000 For HFD this would have been for 50 duty personnel for ½ of a 24 hour shift, cost about $175 each. Total off site cost would have been $8,750

Off site costs On site costs SAVINGS

$20,750 $ 9,800 $10,950 James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Benefits •  First responders that have passed the AWR-160 course are eligible for the H.O.T. (Hands-On Training) course at the CDP in Anniston Ala. •  Thus far RCFR has sent 10 personnel and is planning to send more in 2009 •  HFD is planning on sending some personnel in 2009 •  Page County Fire/EMS would like to have this course taught for their personnel •  Instructor responded to 2 HazMat calls,4 EMS calls, 2 fire alarm calls while teaching James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance

Future Move from the basics to more advanced training on •  Chemical detection •  Biological detection •  Radiological detection Including the proper use, understanding, interpreting results from test kits and equipment. Establishing proper protocols and SOPs for different types of HazMat incidents. Results: Control Test Positive Protein Test Result Valid

Control swab changes color to PURPLE

pH may be any color: red, yellow or blue

James Madison University

The Institute for Infrastructure and Information Assurance