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This is Township High School DISTRICT Annual Report 2014 - 2015 adc.d211.org A Message from the Superintendent Daniel E. Cates Township High Sch...
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Township High School

DISTRICT

Annual Report 2014 - 2015 adc.d211.org

A Message from the Superintendent Daniel E. Cates

Township High School District 211 Superintendent of Schools Welcome to our Annual Report of Township High School District 211. Our theme this year is This is District 211! The 2014-2015 school year was founded upon our greatest, longstanding asset – our people – and it provided a clear glimpse into our future via our integrated technology, a focus on career readiness and numerous facilities upgrades. The year was marked by highlights among the many outstanding students and staff members that make District 211 a remarkable community filled with extraordinary opportunities, innovative teaching and exceptional learning. Inside, you will learn about many remarkable students, programs, services and staff members, and though space does not allow us to convey all the notable accomplishments and contributions, here are a few of the noteworthy events and accomplishments of the past year. Comprehensive and Current Curriculum Fostering Student Opportunities More of our students are enrolling in Advanced Placement courses and earning college credit while in high school. Our teachers develop career skills in pre-engineering, technical manufacturing, culinary experiences, child development and early education, programming, and countless others. During the 2014-2015 school year, we had 10 students earn the highest score possible on the ACT (one of the students earned a perfect score twice) and 18 students were recognized as National Merit scholars.

A Message from the Board of Education Mucia A. Burke

Township High School District 211 President, Board of Education

Each year, the Board of Education is proud to showcase top students and programs in its Annual Report. The 20142015 year was one of growth, innovation, and expansive opportunities for not only District 211 students, but also the surrounding communities. As educational needs continue to evolve, we strive to offer a challenging curriculum and outstanding resources that meet the needs of every student.

Last year was the first year that every student was provided an iPad and our instructional program shifted to a digital environment. Our students’ future will undoubtedly increasingly shift toward an electronic environment and the one-to-one initiative ushers in a new era in learning and teaching.

In this year’s Annual Report, This is District 211, we exhibit exactly what District 211 portrays and how our programs help students realize their strengths to become college and career ready by the time they graduate. On the pages that follow, you will find highlights from each school, ranging from dual-credit opportunities, therapeutic school, leadership programming, and more. In addition, you also will find facts, figures, and overall resource information for High School District 211.

In October, we celebrated when Fremd High School Applied Technology teacher Steve Elza was named the Illinois Teacher of the Year. Just a few months later, Palatine High School Principal Gary Steiger was named Illinois Principal of the Year. Like so many staff members throughout the District, both of these individuals exemplify a profound commitment to students and tireless efforts to create unforgettable connections and opportunities among our students.

This is District 211 – a place where students have the opportunity to reach their maximum potential and prepare for successful lives. On behalf of the Board of Education, I would like to thank you for your continued support of High School District 211 and helping our students prepare for the future.

Sustaining Quality Facilities and Operations to Support Student Experiences The 2014-2015 school year again brought an increase in the number of students qualifying for free or reduced-price meals, with one out of every three students District-wide being eligible based on economic hardship. To ensure that students have the energy they need throughout a challenging school day to carry them into their after-school activities, the District 211 food services department adopted new nutrition standards. As a result, our District 211 food services staff members prepared and served more fruits, vegetables and healthy meals than ever.

Sincerely,

Mucia A. Burke Board of Education President

We applied energy awareness to our facilities, as well, with four of our high schools qualifying for an Energy Star Award. The District’s facilities expanded upon the purchase of the District 211 Academy-North and the acquisition of the Higgins Education Center, directly adjacent to Hoffman Estates High school, both of which will serve students long into our future. We completed the first new swimming pool at Conant High School and immediately began the projects at Fremd and Hoffman Estates High Schools. Our first media center upgrade was completed at Schaumburg High School and this dramatic upgrade draws students into the media center and creates an inviting and comfortable “learning commons” that fosters opportunities for students to spend time studying and collaborating with one another. On behalf of our students and staff members, thank you for your support and partnership in our shared mission of creating advantages for all students to pursue their passions and aspirations upon graduation. Our students are the driving force for all that we do and I invite you to enjoy the information throughout the report to celebrate This is District 211! Sincerely,

Daniel E. Cates Superintendent of Schools

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Front row: Anna Klimkowicz, Board Secretary; Mucia Burke, Board President; Robert LeFevre, Jr., Board Vice President Back row: Will Hinshaw, Mike Scharringhausen, Lauanna Recker, Peter Dombrowski

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Operation Snowball at William Fremd High School

While students tend to focus on academic, athletic, or extracurricular achievements, Fremd High School’s Operation Snowball changes that for a day. Operation Snowball is a one-day, student-led event where students of all grade levels participate in team-building activities, as well as share and discuss what it is like to be a high school student.

“At Snowball, you can’t tell age differences, there are no grades, and it doesn’t matter if you are in AP classes or remedial classes. Everyone is interacting together and having a good time. It’s really neat.” – Erin Malinowski, counselor at Fremd High School

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“It is difficult to capture what Snowball is in words without experiencing it,” said Erin Malinowski, counselor at Fremd High School. “We usually tell students that it is one day they can spend at the school and get together with other students to talk about what it is like being a teenager. They can put everything else going on in their lives on pause and not have focus or stress on anything else going on. They can just be in the moment.” Each year, there are 31 student leaders who are interviewed and selected to run Operation Snowball. Of those students, 28 run small groups and three are co-directors who manage the entire event. Roughly 150 students are involved with the daylong event that usually lasts 15 to 16 hours on a Saturday in February. Guest speakers are invited each year to share their own experiences as high school students. While every year is different depending on what the student leaders organize, there is always a similar theme of encouraging students to be the best version of themselves.

“This is a reminder for them,” Malinowski said. “We try to tell students that when they are approaching other students or people they come across in the halls, to take a second to recognize that everyone has a story. Everyone has something they are dealing with and to have an awareness of that.” Tony Tosh, counselor at Fremd High School, said one of the best parts of Snowball is seeing how students from all grade levels let down their guard and bond with the community around them, even if they are hesitant at first. “Within the first 10 minutes of Snowball, some of the activities they do are fun, out of the box, and a little bit rowdy. It’s the best form of peer pressure you could see because it’s hard for other students not to go along with it. We have plenty of kids to this day, even leaders, that have said, ‘my mom made me come as a freshman,’ and then by the end of the day, it’s the best thing they have ever done.” Both Malinowski and Tosh said they like that the event is large enough for team building, and intimate enough for students to confidentially share some of their life challenges with their peers. “A lot of students have said it’s one of their best days in high school,” Tosh said. “They think it is so strange to be at the school and it has nothing to do with schoolwork and everything to do with connecting with people.”

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Business Incubator Program at James B. Conant High School “We work in hypotheticals a lot in other classes, and in this course, students are getting real business experience. They are creating something they are passionate about that could potentially lead to a start-up company. That’s exciting.” –Anthony Miller, Business Education Teacher at Conant High School

It’s never too early for students to get a head start on some of their business ideas. Conant High School’s Business Incubator course allows students who have an entrepreneurial vision with a unique opportunity to learn necessary components to take a business idea and follow it through to fruition. The class, which is in the first year of implementation, combines creativity, innovation, and expert entrepreneurial guidance together in one course that allows students to jump-start their business ideas before they graduate high school. “Students are challenged to think critically and outside the box, because that is what entrepreneurs have to do to be successful,” said Anthony Miller, business education teacher at Conant High School. “Students need to find unique ways to differentiate their businesses and find ways to market themselves in a different light. That is the constant challenge students will have throughout the course of the year.” Throughout the course, students brainstorm ideas, write business plans, pitch their plans to investors, obtain funding, launch their enterprise, and then sell their products or services. Along the way, they also work with business professionals to build a brand identity and create a website. These professionals serve as either mentors who help guide students as they solidify their ideas or coaches who are subject matter experts and co-teach lessons with their teacher.

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Technology in the classroom also helps shape students’ business ideas. Students have access to 21st century classrooms, which provide collaborative, media-enriched workspaces to help with any stage of their business planning. In addition to the classroom teacher, students hear expert advice from local business owners and professionals who serve as guest speakers and mentors to help students bring their business ideas to life. These professionals also provide experience and real-world business scenarios students would not have access to in a traditional classroom. At the end of the course, students face an investment panel that has the potential of investing funds in the students’ business opportunities. The top pitches in the course can end up being a full-functioning business by the end of the course. “A great and powerful aspect of the program is that the class has become a community of learners and it’s one of the first programs, I think, that has brought in community members to be part of the learning environment,” Miller said. “Coaches and mentors are teaming up with the teacher to provide the highest quality educational experience we can give our students in regards to entrepreneurship.”

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Certified Nursing Assistant Program at Palatine High School Students in the Certified Nursing Assistant Program (CNA) at Palatine High School get more than just a glimpse into the job of a healthcare worker – they live it. The dual-credit, two-semester course allows students to learn nursing skills as well as provide hands-on clinical care with real patients. By the end of the course, students will have the qualifications to become Certified Nursing Assistants upon graduation, as well as earn six college credits. “I always tell my students there are three reasons to take this course,” said Victoria Deguia, science teacher at Palatine High School. “After they complete the course, they are workforce ready, they get college credit, and they earn their 40 clinical hours, which is the requirement to become certified.” During the first semester, students learn about what characteristics good healthcare workers possess. They also learn about the environment they will work in, varying medical topics, and practice skills they are expected to perform in the lab. The CNA lab has all the basic equipment students would find in a medical setting, as well as mannequins as patients. Students are taught skills to assist patients with daily living, including assisting with brushing teeth and going to the bathroom, how to take blood pressure, and how to transfer someone who is unable to move. During second semester, students complete clinical hours for a full day, averaging roughly one Saturday or Sunday per month. At the end of the semester, they have the opportunity to take the Nurse Aide Competency examination and be certified by the State of Illinois as Nurse Aides. To date, all of the students who have taken the course have been certified. During clinical care, students work with real patients and utilize the skills they have practiced. Deguia said many of her students enjoy working with longterm care patients, because they can see how much their work makes a difference. Additionally, students can decide if a healthcare career is right for them. “This program is a chance for students to realize what true responsibility really is,” said Carl Garrison, science department chair at Palatine High School. “When they go out and do their clinical hours, they are working with real patients where they have to do the job. It is helping them develop their understanding of what maturity is.”

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“Some of the CNA students say that during their clinical experience they were surprised how rewarding it was to help a patient and to make a difference for them, even for one day, because of the extra TLC our students provide when working on site. A lot of residents crave that.” - Victoria Deguia, science teacher at Palatine High School 9

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Manufacturing Program at Schaumburg High School Hands-on experience is becoming more vital in today’s work force, and Schaumburg High School’s Advanced Manufacturing program gives students the chance to get ahead of the competition. The program, which is in its third year, not only allows students the opportunity to gain real-world work experience, but also earn nationally recognized certifications and up to 21 credit hours toward Harper College’s Manufacturing Program. “This program is a good way for students to earn college credit and explore a career they may want,” said Steve Kuipers, applied technology teacher at Schaumburg High School. “With college credit, they can go into an internship right out of high school. They don’t need to take an introductory class at Harper College, and they are ready to go to a job right after they graduate.” Advanced Manufacturing courses are available to sophomore, junior, and senior students. The skills they learn in the classroom at a high school level, as well as the industry recognized certifications through National Institute of Metal Working Skills (NIMS) and the Manufacturing Skills Standards Council (MSSC), push District 211 students ahead of the competition when applying to college or applying for a job. Students can leave high school with the skill set and knowledge to continue building their career. District 211 worked closely with Harper College to create courses that aligned with the college’s curriculum. Students learn about the safety and operation of “This program is a good way for students to earn manufacturing college credit and explore a career they may want. machinery and designing products. When students With college credit, they can go into an internship right out of high school. They don’t need to take an graduate from Schaumburg High School, introductory class at Harper College and they are they can immediately gain ready to go to a job right after they graduate.” an internship through Harper College’s program - Steve Kuipers, Schaumburg High School . or apply for a job. The program also is gaining the attention of local business owners who have told Kuipers that the talent they need is not available yet – there are jobs that simply cannot be filled. “I think business owners like the fact that students can go into a job with experience,” Kuipers said. “Companies know students with skills like these are hard to find and want to hire our students. These kids are pretty valuable.”

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Leadership for Life at District 211 Academy-North

District 211 is proud to offer academics that cater to every student’s needs. In Academy-North’s Leadership for Life class, students are immersed in a collaborative, group-sharing environment where they can learn and practice various skills necessary to create not only a positive learning environment, but also to manage various social situations outside of the classroom. “It’s a great opportunity for collective sharing for students, as well as training them to be leaders in their school and community,” said Brian Hebert, teacher at Academy-North. “This class is also a great collaboration between a teacher and a therapist, which is sometimes rare and difficult to join both philosophies together.” Students have the opportunity to practice training in communication, group sharing, planning, goal setting, conflict management, and self-evaluation. They also can improve qualities of self-respect, self-management, and goal setting that cut across issues of personal growth and management. At the end of each semester, teachers and staff at AcademyNorth recommend students who participate in this class because they want to ensure students are ready for the level of intensity of the subject matter. Leadership for Life focuses on practicing Restorative Justice, which teaches students to be accountable

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for their actions and aims to improve behavior, leadership skills, and service learning and volunteering. The four quadrants that comprise the class include: • Belonging: making sure students feel confortable and part of the school; • Mastery: that they feel confident that they can complete a task, that they are good at studying, or ready to apply for a job; • Generosity: this is a focus once a week on Wednesdays during service learning; and • Independence: getting students to solve problems on their own, which is the goal of the Peace Ambassador Training that teaches students conflict and problem solving skills. During Peace Ambassador Training, students learn how to handle peer conflict and find resolution in their school. When students learn how to mediate situations for their peers, they also learn how to apply those mediation techniques in their own lives. Once a month, Harper College students studying social work or therapy visit the class to talk with them. Hebert said this works well because Harper College students learn about some of the challenges these students face, and Academy-North students get to learn about the Harper College students. Hebert said another great aspect for the students is the opportunity to give back to the community through volunteering.

“The volunteering aspect is huge,” he said. “A lot of our students, 95 percent of them, are on free and reduced lunch, so they are helping others in need. They can see they are not the only ones struggling and can do something to help others.” In the future, Hebert said he would like to see some of the older students permeate the culture they learn in the classroom throughout the rest of the school, and for more students to become trained peace ambassadors. “We are using an interesting model where we are teaching while students are practicing life skills and getting their needs met therapeutically through group sharing,” Hebert said. “They see a lot of growth with each other because our goal is to have a collective group of students supporting other students.”

“We are using an interesting model where we are teaching while students are practicing life skills and getting their needs met therapeutically through group sharing. They see a lot of growth with each other because our goal is to have a collective group of students supporting other students.” – Brian Hebert, teacher at Academy North

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FreshMentors at Hoffman Estates High School

Freshman year of high school can be very intimidating – students are in a new school, they are getting used to a rigorous academic schedule, and adjusting to a new social environment. However, upperclassmen at Hoffman Estates High School try to make that transition easier through the FreshMentors Program, a freshman mentoring program. FreshMentors are juniors and seniors who meet specific criteria, GPA requirements, and apply to work with freshmen in the Freshman Foundations classroom, as well as at Freshman Kickoff, Parent Open House, and Freshman Parent Night. Through training, student mentors learn to be effective leaders within the school, specifically to help meet the needs of new freshman students. Each year there are between 60 and 80 mentors who participate. “There is definitely a component of the program that is Hoffman students wanting to help other Hoffman students,” said Maureen Mann, counselor at Hoffman Estates High School. “Our juniors and seniors have learned from their experiences, and they want to make a difference in the lives of freshmen.” In addition to being a FreshMentor, students can also apply to be student ambassadors or serve on the Freshman Council. Student ambassadors help both freshmen and transfer students familiarize themselves with the school, including finding their lockers, class locations, provide support, and answer questions when

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The program forms a strong unity within the entire school population of 1,900-plus students. I say this because when seniors are asked about their own Freshman Foundations class, they say everything positive. For the mentors, this is a way to basically give back and pay it forward.” – Tony Tanner, counselor at Hoffman Estates High School they can. The Freshman Council is a select group of senior students who lead the FreshMentor trainings, plan events, and organize monthly student check-in meetings. Only students who participated in FreshMentoring their junior year are eligible to serve on the Council. By creating a support group for freshman students that is run by their peers, students start to feel connected and comfortable in their new school environment. The mentors also help encourage a supportive school climate from a freshman’s first day at school that lasts with them all four years of high school.

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Academy-South at Higgins Education Center

Academy-South, a special education program housed at the newly renovated Higgins Education Center, is where students can find an individually specialized blend of support and rigorous academics to meet their needs. The program serves roughly 40 students who struggle with social, emotional, and behavioral challenges that hinder academic success in a traditional high school setting. The duration a student attends Academy-South is on a case-by-case basis. Some students are placed in the program for only 45 days, some eventually reintegrate full- or part-time at their home school. Other students will attend Academy-South for four years. “We have very bright and intelligent students. We try to create a balance between helping students grow and foster their social and emotional needs and regulations without compromising an academic agenda,” said David O’Conner, special education teacher at Higgins Education Center. “Students have regular academic classes, and we utilize curriculum gained from all over the District, including Professional Learning Teams and fellow teachers at home schools. We modify and accommodate it for our students’ specific needs.” Smaller class sizes, specialized programming, and utilization of a research-based social and behavioral management system known as Positive Peer Culture, helps students excel in their academics despite other challenges. Utilizing Positive Peer Culture teaches students social responsibility and awareness using a specific language so students can help each other identify what kind of problems they are having during the day. On average, teenage students respond positively to their peers more often than their authority figures, such as their teachers and administrators. Positive Peer Culture encourages students to support one another during challenging

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moments throughout the day, even with something as simple as redirecting a peer to pay attention during class. Additionally, students participate in “Group,” which allows time for self-reflection and self-reporting. Each group has leaders, group rules, and it is a respectful environment. Students can reflect on their day, as well as talk about the frequency and intensity of authority problems. The group can then process through some individual problems, as well as set group goals to enforce positive behavior in the program. By blending these therapeutic techniques with the District 211 curriculum, students at Academy-South can stay on track academically while getting the social and emotional supports they need. “We try to create a marriage between social and emotional growth and compassion by weaving it into a stringent academic curriculum,” O’Conner said. “We really invest in each and every child who walks through this door, and we are carrying on a mantra and a vision that is District 211. We are District 211.”

“Now that we have the Higgins Education Center, my students stand up a little straighter, their chests are out a little more, and they are proud. They feel embraced by their District, they feel cared for, and have a greater sense of worth and value. By making this investment, District 211 made having any sort of special education classification, whatever it is, less stigmatizing and taboo.” - David O’Connor on Academy-South’s location in the Higgins Education Center

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District 211 Illinois State Scholars Named in 2014 - 2015

Each year, the Illinois Student Assistance Commission (ISAC) recognizes Illinois high school students for outstanding academic achievement. Township High School District 211 is pleased to announce that 573 students were named Illinois State Scholars. Students ranking in the top 10 percent of the state’s graduating high school seniors are named State Scholars. Selection is based on ACT and/or SAT I test score results and/or students’ individual class rank at the end of the junior year of high school. Christina Miller Sarah Richter Robert Giagnorio Rebecca Beale James B. Conant Glenn Huang Miller Kristina Brooke Roller Aditi Jagadish Sara Gibbons Katherine Benson High School Jacob Milligan Carmen Rosas Cameron Berglund Jeff Gill Jonmichael Alabado James Janczy Mayank Mohan Audrey Rose Joshua Jones Dora Gillettevalero Rhea Bhojwani Elisa Ambrose Rosemary Daniel Roy Kelly Gnaster Adam Bieda Samatha Ankireddy Dario Kikas Montgomery Raam Sanghani Angela Killian Koryn Green Ian Bohn Mohit Bandla Moran Brittany Isha Shah Kartik Kulkarni Samantha Green Sarah Burger Robin Barr Ryan Moran Riana Shah Justin Kumar Anita Grudzien Ryan Cajandig Jake Bean Andrew Mueller Shanawaze Shaikh Nicholas Cervone Michael Lampert Ty Hamilton Brianna Benson James Mullen Itsuki Shindo Hannah Lee Allison Chamberlin Nathan Hanlon Carly Bryeans Prakhyath Muppidi Emily Sing Matthew Hansen Jui-En Chang Samantha Buresch Joshua Lee Hollisemily Neal Lila Snaidauf Gregory Lindquist Bridget Hathaway Justine Chee Megan Callahan Erik Nelson Anthony Solano Conor Lipinski William Helgren Patrick Chen Robert Carlos Tara Nenninger Daniel Sotos Katherine Lomas Ayako Higuchi Siyu Chen Leah Celarek Ellen Ni Andrea Storey Sean Mack Michael Ho Yutong Chen Kevin Chang Matthew Nicholson Michelle Marasigan Ruth Tai Lauren Hoffman Derek Cheng Kaitlyn Chantrey Nami Nishihara Dylan Hynds Juskarun Cheema Robert McCutcheon Matthew Thilmany Jenna Chin Timothy Norman Abby Tripp Shil Mehta Sresht Iyer Timothy Chin William Chen Tim Norman Aurora Tsai Emily Miller Andrew Jacks Martin Chindblom Mohansrinivas Jonathan Novak Daniel Vaynshteyn Dahuy Choi Maxim Jahns Chennakesavalu Michael Montelo Lindsay Obeso Govind Verma Natalie Moore Prerana Jayanth Yearim Choi Seongkyung Cho Hazuki Okuda Jessica Vivirito Alexander Julie Josten Patrick Chomczyk Joon Cho Taylor Origer Jordyn Wagner Motchouslki Sameer Kalva Justin Chon Leeann Clayton Austin Pace Taylor Waidanz Brianna Murphy Vignesh Karthikeyan Alexandria Pagones Paraskevas Kevin Courtney Christodoulopoulos Jamie Kim George Mussman Christopher Zachary Cox Elias Pagones Lauren Ciardiello Varsha Muthukumar Wegenek Jimin Kim Matthew Crance Walter Panfil Alexandra Wilmot Noah Ciborowski Munekazu Justin Klein Jessica Dailey Anthony Parafinczuk Paulina Wolska Nakamura Allison Cochran John Komoll Zachary Dale Radhe Parikh Adrian Zelechowski Nathan Cornwell Jennifer Nelson Dustin Korbus Claudia Debruyn, Joanne Park Jacob Cuthbert David Koruna Madelyn Demaret Niraj Pant Jerry Parng Dhara-Dipesh Patel William Fremd Melanie D’Andrea Emilie Kouatchou Nicholas Depinto Dominique Pasek High School Jay Patel Nicole Degla Srivathsan Harshal Desai Sayali Patankar Sarah Aftelak Kishan Patel Krishnamoorthy Carson Devries Shubhit Tomas Peleckas Jack Albrecht Neil Patel Bhargavi Dhanireddy Jenna Kurtzweil Dharnidharka Sophia Peng Jack Albrecht Erin Larusso Mateo Diaz Christopher Dolce Nisha Patel Abigail Peterson Ryan Allen Reema Patel Haley Dirkes-Jacks Lee Joshua Chase Dorn Jessica Peterson Jinsun An Ruchi Patel Josh Lee Jason Doering Benjamin Du John Peterson Dannika Andersen Saisnigdha Shama Patel Vance Lehman Caitlin Eder Aaron Petykowski Katherine Anderson Duggirala Shlock Patel Courtney Lemajeur Annie Egan Gina Pfister Zoish Avari Lindsey Shrey Patel Samuel Libert Michael Einig Daniel Pinderski Edward Bae Dzierozynski Sunny Patel Nicholas Liotti Liam Finkle Julia Portmann Courtney Balogh Samantha Enault Tulsi Patel Grace Liu Owen Flasch Roshan Rajan Bryanna Barrera Leah Fagerson Vishal Patel Rachel Lucas Anthony Forte Amy Reidy Lea Barrett Jake Flannery Yogi Patel Junilane Lusung Michael Frale Damon Rios Meghan Bartos Matthew Fossing Anthony Preucil Sarah Marturano Michelle Frawley Carly Roberts Sindhuja Battula Caroline Freeman Fatima Qarni Daaniya Mazhar Izadoro Garcia Peyton Roberts Alexandra Baumgart Anthony Fu Maya Rafalowicz Soumyaa Mazumder Patrick Hathaway Sarah Roberts Alexander Bazil Denae Gerasta Brandon Rafidi Sarah McTague Kevin Hong Yazmin Rustomji

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Kent Sayre Keenan Schmidt Peter Schmuker Konstantin Schroeter Katherine Schuelke Amy Sedlak Sanjana Shah Peter Sieh Reilly Siepka Jeemin Sim Melissa Simboli Eric Simon Haeyeon Son Megan Spletzer Kamalesh Srikanth Madison Stoms Jaxon Stout John Thiel Hui Tian Joseph Uhrich Christopher Umeki Michael Valverde Kathryn Vanek Manthra Venkatakrishnan Kevin Wade Alex Wang Daniel Weber Gregor Wettermann Morgan Whitecotton Evan Wieczorek Rachel Wilhelm Casey Wood Michael Wu Jennie Yang Seungkyun Yim Jihee Yoon Ramish Zaidi Katherine Zara Michael Zelenka Erik Zettlemoyer Aiqi Zhang Alex Zhang Erik Zillner Benjamin Zimmerman

Hoffman Estates High School

Alejandra Alonso-Hernandez Carly Behm Melanie Bliudzius

Nancy Camacho Nicholas Fortney Dhruv Gajjar Michael Gates Bryan Girard Hannah Greenwalt Abigail Grybos Leah Hall Grace Ham Brandon Harris Jackson Harvey Mustafa Hashim Rhianna Heide William Herbert Rima Homsi Alice Kim Haenah Kim Joseph Kosiek Anirrudh Krishnan Elise Lemp Tiffany Lim Irena Mehic Shunya Namiki Dirgham Nubani Duncan Oliver Srushti Pai Amber Pasik Hita Patel Meet Patel Shuchi Patel Yash Patel Nikolay Penchev Bianca Perez Dawei Qiu Nikita Raheja Christian Ramirez-Gomez Matthew Roesch Sarah Scott Andrew Seong Vishani Shah Aashna Singh Daria Szymczyk Destiny Talo Victoria Tompkins Jared Townsend Carter Trousdale Kaitlin Vlasaty Kelsey Warford Bartosz Widelak Kaylan Williams Natalie Wnek

Ryan Kissane Sean Klein Daniel Koshy Eva Kossmann Palatine High Lawson Kosulic School Kate Lahey Carl Aldag Abigail Lindert Dhivyaa Anandan Jessica Lundell Morgan Anderson Madeline Mathias Rachel Bank Jonathan Matthew Jacob Baran Carter McCall Tanya Barrios Taylor McCall Megan Beach Caitlin McHugh Logan Beck Alaina Mikkelsen Charles Bowman Zachary Mobille Evan Braun Jared Much Alexander Amanda Muck Breytenbach Brian O’Mahoney Andrew Breytenbach Casey O’Meara Samantha Brucks Kelly Ocock Kevin Burke Matthew Oesterlein Kara Burton Kristina Okamura Ryan Campbell Jennifer Paul Nicholas Cervenka John Peters Maria Charlier Kenneth Piasecki Natalie Charlier Victoria Pisula Joanne Choi Laura Plata Lily Chon Anamaria Quiroga Derek Christiansen Michelle Raymond Nicole Chung Caitlin Riedy Kaitlin Conklin Rachel Rilloraza Jeremiah Dela Pena Nicole Robinson Kathleen Dileo Darshan Rola Mitchell Dolen Alexander Ruthe Conor Ehrenstrom Taylor Salas Gabriella Eppley Ryan Schlaiss Rachel Erdmann Mark Scovic Eleanor Esbrook Megan Shaler Aliya Estes Stephanie Shiro Martin Evtimov Michael Smith Michelle Fis Ian Smith Quinn Gerdes Karissa Smola Jacob Gordon Kristen Sonderegger Mary Grana Olivia Stagnito Logan Hedrick Allison Steinebrey Maria Howell Katrina Steinman Nathan Jasionowski Jenna Stitt Thomas Johnson Emily Sund Thomas Judd Derek Thomas Peter Kawiecki Anacattleya Lisa Kehe Villarama Zachary Kerr Maryrose Patrick Killigrew Weatherton Noah Woerne Henry Woo Haseeb Yahya

Colin White Crystal Wilson Caroline Wojtas Darien Zhao

Justin Lorenz Catherine Lynch Kristen Mahler Benita Mathew Kevin McGinn Schaumburg Ryan McGowan, High School Shannon McGowan Angela Aranda Kruti Merchant Anthony Argueta Philip Minneci Emilee Baldwin Kassandra Miura Sarah Bier Cheyenne Morton James Birriel Christopher Napier Carolyn Byrne Alexandria Ness Vince Calabrese Trent Neubecker Mariah Calubag Sydney Noxon Sneha Cherukuri Rafal Ogorek Emily Collins Abhijit Patel James Conley Teresa Paton Paul Couston Tamanna Phadke Anthony Cruz Noah Phalen Mahima Desetty Mark Picardi Tatiana Doroskin Vinay Prabhakar Kevin Dravet Sherzad Press Erin Falsey Jack Pyde Zaynah Farooq Rachela Ranaldi Sabrina Farshori Akhila Rao Gabrielle Fentem Kaitlyn Remian Carla Gracia Isaac Rogenski Danielle E. Grubb Samantha Salvador Danielle J. Grubb Briana Samudio Samantha Grzesiak Parisha Sangani Alexandria Gutt Yoshiya Sato Wassim Hassan Madeline Schneider Michael Hinz Ryan Shope Jessica Hufford Amir Siddiqui Dada Ibrahimovic Gregory Sobie Kevin Janega Christian Spitelli Nicholas Jaras Deepthi Suresh Pujan Joshi Zohra Tabassum Bryan Ju Tyler Teele Ivan Karparov Mitava Thakkar Andrew Kissamis Melissa Tran Bozhidar Kolev Elena Tresin Vasili Kolias Yash Tulsiani Boston Kuchar Muhammad Umar Abhineet Kumar Jared Vargas Caroline Kurdej Carolyn Warren Sarah Lemar Colleen Wilkes Rebecca Lii Andrew Wirtz Michael Lin Grace Zaplatynsky Vincent Lin Christian Zielinski Griffin Lober Michael Long

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Honoring our Military

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To honor our military, the Board of Education often invites a District 211 alumnus currently serving in the armed forces to attend a Board meeting and lead attendees in the Pledge of Allegiance. Below are those who attended a meeting during the 2014-2015 school year.

Lance Corporal Grant Dunham, 2013 William Fremd High School graduate. Marine Corps, 2nd Battalion, 24th Marines Echo Company, 3rd Platoon, 4th Marine Division based in Chicago.

Private First Class Leon Dixon, 2013 Schaumburg High School graduate. Illinois National Guard, based in Chicago.

Trevor McLean, 2014 Palatine High School graduate. Illinois National Guard.

Captain Tae Kim, 2001 William Fremd High School graduate. Illinois Army National Guard; in 2013, he resigned from active duty in the Army after serving as an aviation officer since graduating from West Point in 2005.

Sergeant George Rivera, 2007 James B. Conant High School graduate. U.S. Marines Corp.

Private First Class Daniel Vazquez, 2013 Hoffman Estates High School graduate. Illinois National Guard, based in Elgin.

Private Stephan Bonilla, 2015 Hoffman Estates High School graduate. National Guard.

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Exceptional Students

Eighteen students from Palatine, William Fremd, James B. Conant, and Schaumburg High Schools were named National Merit Scholars and received the Robert Creek Excellence Award. (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) Palatine High School: Kara M. Burton, Lisa M. Kehe, Lawson B. Kosulic, Lily Y. Zahn; William Fremd High School: Justine M. Chee, Nathan Cornwell, Soumyaa Mazumder, Ellen Ni, Walter K. Panfil, Sanjana K. Shah, Jeemin Sim, Jennie Yang; James B. Conant High School: Mohansrivivas Chennakesavalu, Kevin Z. Hong, Glenn J. Huang; Schaumburg High School: Sarah B. Bier, Deepthi E. Suresh, Melissa T. Tran.

The Illinois Music Educators Association awarded AllState Honors to the following students: (not pictured in order, not all students are pictured) Palatine High School: Jack Hallier, Orchestra. James B. Conant High School: Joseph Connolly, Orchestra; Kevin Hong, Orchestra; Konomi Kuba, Orchestra; Spencer Metcalf, Orchestra; Anthony Preucil, Orchestra; Audrey Rose, Chorus; Raam Sanghani, Orchestra. William Fremd High School: Andres Carrero, Orchestra; Sung Yong Cho, Orchestra; Nathan Cornwell, Orchestra; Anthony Fu, Band; Grace Liu, Band; Nathan Mo, Orchestra; Hazuki Okuda, Band; Melanie Shaffer, Band; Jennie Yang, Orchestra; Xuemeng Yin, Orchestra.

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Highest Possible Score - ACT

Each year, several District 211 students achieve a score of 36 on the American College Test (ACT) examination, the highest possible composite score. These students are invited to receive Board of Education recognition for this outstanding achievement. The ACT, which is taken by nearly 60 percent of America’s college-bound students, is comprised of tests in English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning. Each test is scored on scale of 1-36, and a student’s score is the average of the four test scores. On average, less than one percent of all ACT test takers earn a top score. Left to right - Conant High School: Kevin Chang, Reema Patel, Caitlin Eder, Glenn Huang

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Daily Herald 2014 - 2015 Teams

The Daily Herald Leadership Team, in its 14th year, honors those high school students who are among the top in leadership through their involvement in school, church, and community organizations. In 2014-2015, District 211 had four students named to the 10-member first team.

At right (students are in the front row; each has an invited sponsor standing behind them) Left to right: Michael Einig, James B. Conant High School; Allison Cochran, William Fremd High School; Dhivyaa Anandan, Palatine High School; and Christopher Napier, Schaumburg High School.

At right: Twin brothers from Palatine High School, left to right, Ryan Jannak-Huang and Kyle Jannak-Huang

Lisa Yang, Fremd High School

At right: (not pictured in order) Palatine High School student Bryan Lu, and William Fremd High School students Daniel Classon, Kellie Halloran, Cameron Harro, Jiamin Huang, Abigail Iuorio, Soumyaa Mazumder, and Jennie Yang

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The Daily Herald Academic Team, also in its 14th year, recognizes students who have consistenly excelled in their studies, as well as made a contribution to their schools through academic activities. In 2014-2015, District 211 had five students named to the 10-member first team.

Left to right: Kevin Chang, James B. Conant High School; Jennie Yang, William Fremd High School; Haenah Kim, Hoffman Estates High School; and Soumyaa Mazumder, William Fremd High School. Not pictured: Melissa Tran, Schaumburg High School.

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Student Achievements Mohansrinivas Chennakesavalu, James B. Conant High School, pictured with Coach Ami Marshall, was honored for placing 2nd in Chemistry - Worldwide Youth in Science & Engineering. Not pictured: Akhila Rao, Schaumburg High School, who placed 6th place in Chemistry.

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Business Professionals of America

Schaumburg High School student Colleen Huston was honored for achieving a 1st in Speech for Poetry Reading. No picture available.

The William Fremd High School Team placed 3rd in state at the Scholastic Bowl. Front row, left to right: Roumyaa Mazumder and Rebecca Mathew. 2nd row, left to right: Chris Grattoni (assistant coach), Advay Mahajan, Daniel Tokarz, Kartik Kansal, Tim Chin, and Kevin Palmer (head coach). 3rd row, left to right: Laura Marsh (assistant coach), Jennie Yang, Gretchen Coleman, and Bissmun Gill. Back row, left to right: Kashif Javid, Gregor Wettermann, and Melinda Coleman. (not pictured: Varun Cidambi)

Melissa Tran, Schaumburg High School, was recognized for achieving the highest possible score on the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). Approximately one in every 5,000 students who takes this test achieves that score.

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BPA Award Winners: (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) William Fremd High School — Coach Jessica Monticello was invited along with student: Yulia Odinokova — 2nd place, Interview Skills. Schaumburg High School — Coach Jaclyn Phillips was invited along with students: Rudrakeerthan Anumala — 2nd place, Broadcast News Production Team; Sagar Kachhia — 2nd place, Broadcast News Production Team; Aaron Poland — 2nd place, Broadcast News Production Team; Harsh Shah — 2nd place, Broadcast News Production Team. Palatine High School — Coach Cliff Watanuki was invited along with students: Margaret Bombal — 1st place, Presentation Management; Holly Darow — 1st place, Presentation Management; Ann Marie Decheva — 1st place, Presentation Management; Justin Escalona — 1st place, Digital Media Production and 1st place, Video Production Team; Nicholas Kowalski — 1st place, Video Production Team; Emily Williams — 1st place, Presentation Management. Hoffman Estates High School — Coach Kerri Largo was invited along with students: Camille Ann Arce — 1st place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Barathkumar Baskaran — 1st place, Parliamentary; Procedures Team; Kimberly Camacho — 1st place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Nancy Camacho — 2nd place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Ainsley Galvez — 2nd place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Shreyas Gandlur — 1st place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Akshay Khokhari — 2nd place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Tara Ramanathan — 1st place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Gabrielle Ramos — 2nd place, Parliamentary Procedures Team; Carter Trousdale — 2nd place, Parliamentary Procedures Team. Conant High School — Coach Patti Ertl was invited along with students: Niraj Pant — 1st place, Information Technology Concepts; Mohansrinivas Chennakesavalu — 1st place, Financial Math and Analysis; Haricharan Cheruvu — 3rd place, Financial Math and Analysis; Aditi Katwala — 3rd place, Economic Research Team and 2nd place, Prepared Speech; Dhvanii Raval — 3rd place, Economic Research Team; Jon Michael Alabado — 1st place, Visual Basic/C#; Neil Patel — 1st place, Small Business Management; Reema Patel — 1st place, Small Business Management; Reina Patel — 1st place, Small Business Management; Rikin Patel — 1st place, Small Business Management; Kishan Patel — 1st/Integrated Office Applications; Annie Egan — ­ 2nd place, Presentation Management; Shlock Patel ­— 2nd place, PC Servicing and Troubleshooting; Smit Patel — 2nd place, Database Applications; Himani Vyas — ­ 2nd place, Visual Basic/C# Programming; Kevin Chang ­— 3rd place, Fundamentals of Web Design; Kartik Kulkarni — 3rd place, Basic Office Systems & Procedure.

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Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America

Hoffman Estates High School — Family, Career, & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) Coaches Laura Book, Suzanne Citron, and Jessica Ecker have been invited along with students: (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) Claudia Bravo — 1st place, Clothing Construction – Lined Garment Kylie Horvath — 1st place, Food Production – Relish Tray Mota-Perez — 1st place, Clothing Construction – Casual Wear Ashley Musial — 2nd place, Clothing Construction – Tailored Garment Yulissa Ramirez — 1st place, Food Production – Relish Tray Kinga Rzezinowska — 2nd place, Clothing Construction – Semiformal

Palatine High School — Family, Career, & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) Coach Kori Hibner has been invited along with students: (not pictured in order) Isabel Alanis — 1st place, Food Production – Relish Tray Glenda Arreola Sanchez — 2nd place, Food Production – Relish Tray Karlee Darow — 2nd place, Pastry Arts – Decorated Cookie Izabel Favela — 1st place, Children’s Literature Grace Hanson — 2nd place, Children’s Literature Erika Hernandez — 3rd place, Apparel Construction Molly Kunstbeck — 2nd place, Children’s Literature Arin Lieberman — 2nd place, Pastry Arts – Decorated Cookie Kendra Luksch — 1st place, Preschool Lesson Paola Malagon — 2nd place, Apparel Construction Rachel Maniscalco — 1st place, Children’s Literature Alison McNichols — 2nd place, Children’s Literature Diana Medina Hernandez — 2nd place, Children’s Literature Travis Parks — 2nd place, Children’s Literature Medaline Plesnicar — 1st place, Preschool Lesson Carlito Luiz Ramos — 2nd place, Food Production – Salad Skyler Russell — 1st place, Children’s Literature Amanda Tainter — 1st place, Children’s Literature

Schaumburg High School — Family, Career & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) Coach Linda Serafini has been invited along with students: (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) Nicole Albright — 1st place, Semiformal/Formal Apparel Construction & Most Outstanding Monika Alcheikh — 1st place, Semiformal/Formal Apparel Construction Taquis Anderson — 1st place, Semiformal/Formal Apparel Construction Marissa Holmquist — 2nd place, Semiformal/Formal Apparel Construction Lisa Howaniec — 1st place, Tailored and Lined Apparel Construction Lisette Hurtado — 1st place, Casual Wear Apparel Construction Michael Kelly — 1st place, Casual Wear Apparel Construction Hajera Khan — 1st place, Casual Wear Apparel Construction & Most Outstanding Zhdanka Nykiel — 2nd place, Semiformal/Formal Apparel Construction Rhaldo Schimper — 1st place, Casual Wear Apparel Construction & Most Outstanding Rebecca Tidaback — 1st place, Semiformal/Formal Apparel Construction Susan Walser — 1st place, Casual Wear Apparel Construction

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James B. Conant High School — Family, Career & Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) Coach Jacqueline Brown has been invited along with students: (not pictured in order) Lauren Delgado — 1st place, Clothing Construction – Casual Wear Lucy Elkin — 1st place, Clothing Construction – Casual Wear Julianna Garcia — 1st place, Clothing Construction – Casual Wear Erin McLaughlin — 1st place, Clothing Construction – Casual Wear Alexia Serediuk — 2nd place, Clothing Construction – Casual Wear Emily Weingart — 2nd place, Clothing Construction – Semiformal Wear

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This is William Fremd High School students Julie Cai and Sydney Hill won Achievement in Writing Awards from the National Council of Teachers of English. This is the most prestigious national recognition in writing for high school students.

Seven High School District 211 students were named 2015 Golden Apple Scholars by the Golden Apple Foundation. Each year, thousands of Illinois high school students who are interested in entering the teaching profession are nominated for this prestigious distinction, of which just 200 were selected in an intense and competitive process. (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) These students represent the “best and brightest young men and women in Illinois.” Peter Alberto, Schaumburg High School; Emily Baldwin, Schaumburg High School; Samantha Buresch, James B. Conant High School; Eric Cisneros, Palatine High School; Katrina Miley, James B. Conant High School; Anthony Solano, James B. Conant High School; Samantha Sylverne, Schaumburg High School.

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Outstanding Students

William Fremd High School Group Interpretation State Champions Coach Judy Klingner was invited along with students: (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) Caitlin Adolphsen, Hannah Adolphsen, Aastha Agarwal, Katherine Anderson, Mary Baughman, Lauren Berryhill, Connor Bradshaw, All-State Cast; Nicole Calvaresi, Gurpreet Dhaliwal, Haley Dirkes-Jacks, All-State Cast; Julia Dirkes-Jacks, Paige Dirkes-Jacks, All-State Cast; Christopher Filarski, All-State Cast; Rose Ann Gallo, Allison Gile, Ryan Haas, Grace Haffner, Katherine Haggett, William Helgren, Hansung Kim, Allison Kiolbassa, Chiranth Kishore, Eshwar Kishore, Braden Kobeski, Christine Latourette, Joshua Levin, Luke Madden, Benjamin Mathew, Emily McHugh, Caleb Muller, Melissa Nakazawa, Allison Nakazawa, Jared Narter-Slezak, William Pagenkopf, Walter Panfil, Natalie Perkins, Kyle Price, Angela Rublaitus, Carly Sanofsky, Dimitri Sotos, Aidan Stadler, Jaxon Stout, An Yamamoto. William Fremd High School Journalism Adviser Grant Dawson (far right) was invited along with students: (back row, left to right) Theresa Christensen (adviser) Adam Bieda — 2nd place, Newspaper Design; Matthew Nicholson — 1st place, Sports Writing. (front row, left to right) Michael Wu — 5th place, Review Writing; Jenna Chin — 2nd place, Editorial Writing; Emma Davies-Hogg — 1st place, Broadcast News; Emma Gattuso — 6th place, Info Graphics.

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This is Health Occupations Students of America from James B. Conant High School were honored as State Medalist place winners at the 2015 HOSA State Competition. Front row, left to right: Paritosh Joshi — ­ 2nd place, BioMedical Debate; Dhvanii Raval — 2nd place, BioMedical Debate and 3rd place, Prepared Speaking; Aditi Katwala — 2nd place, BioMedical Debate; Monika Byanna — 1st place, Extemporaneous Writing; Back row, left to right: Mrs. Sharon McCoy (Coach), Allison Gade — 2nd place, Health Career Display; Varoon Kumar — 2nd place, Prepared Speaking; Mr. Erik Hauser (Coach)

James B. Conant High School student Sruthi Gurudev’s poetry anthology earned a Gold Key Award, the highest recognition level, in the 2015 National Scholastic Writing Competition.

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A Variety of Student Achievements A team of Hoffman Estates High School students won the Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Midwest ROV Competition in Chicago. The competition was designed to challenge students to apply physics, mathematics, electronics, and engineering skills they are learning in the classroom to solving problems from the marine workplace. Team Coach and Applied Technology Teacher Wayne Oras (far right) is pictured with students (back row, left to right) Thomas Schaefer, Dillon Vadgama. (middle row, left to right) Grace Wilkins, Laura Turf. (front) Miraj Shah.

William Fremd High School students Samuel Robar, left, and Curtis Robinson, right (pictured with teacher Steve Elza, center) earned honors in the 30th-Annual Ford/ AAA Student Auto Skills Competition. The students worked as two-person teams to diagnose and repair numerous “bugs” that were placed in an automobile to simulate real-world problems.

James B. Conant High School art student Ryoka Lulu Matsuno earned first place in the 2015 Congressional Art Competition. Her original artwork, entitled “Tokyo” (above left) will be displayed for the next year as part of an exhibit at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. This elite award highlights Ryoka’s dedication and artistic vision. James B. Conant High School Art Teacher Jamie Peterson is pictured with Ryoka.

William Fremd High School student Edward Li (right), was recognized for winning 1st place in state, Algebra I Written. Math Team Coach Christopher Grattoni is pictured with Edward.

Palatine High School student Spencer Poklop (right) was awarded 1st place, Stock Market Investment Challenge by the Distributive Education Clubs of America. Cliff Watanuki, coach, is pictured with Spencer.

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Debate

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The Board of Education honored Debate students for their achievements (not all students are pictured, not pictured in order)

Palatine High School: Brenda Moreno, coach and Anand Shah, Octafinalist (pictured above) Jacob Gordon, Quarterfinalist/All-State Team; Charles Bowman, Quarterfinalist. William Fremd High School: Martin Zacharia, coach; Madisen Hursey, All-State Debate Team and Congressional finalist; John Komoll, All-State Debate Team and Public Forum Octafinalist; Matthew Carlins, Public Forum Octafinalist; Rebecca Beale, All-State Debate Team and Public Forum Quarterfinalist; Eric Simon, All-State Debate Team and Public Forum Quarterfinalist; Zachary Jordan, Public Forum Semifinalist; and Ishan Taparia, Public Forum Semifinalist.

Chess Honored for his Chess victory, 2nd place, 4th Board, Hoffman Estates High School student Pranav Raman is pictured with Principal James Britton. At right: Palatine High School Chess Coaches Sean Fisher-Rohde (far right) and Thomas Albert Miller (far left) are pictured with students Tyler Johnson, 2nd place, 8th Board, and Jacob Wojtasik, 7th place, 8th Board.

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Schaumburg High School: Darrell Robin, coach, 1st/Congressional Team; Xing Yu Liu, Rebecca Lii, Kruti Merchant; Melissa Tran, 1st/Congressional Debate; Srini Cherukuri, 3rd/Congressional Debate; Karolina Skarzynska, 4th/All-State Congressional Debate; Kimberly Jimenez, 6th/Congressional Debate; Kshitij Vashi, 7th/All-State Congressional Debate; Shraddha Patel, 8th/All-State Congressional Debate; Valeria Gololobova, 8th/Congressional Debate and 2nd/Lincoln-Douglas; Nathaniel Leonhardt, Medallion; Hannah Hyman, 5th/All-State Lincoln Douglas; Ameel Sheth, 9th/Octafinalist Lincoln Douglas; Raza Haque, 1st/AllState Public Forum; Jessica D’Souza, 3rd/All-State Public Forum; Craig Soares, Semifinalist Public Forum; Cole Miller, Semifinalist Public Forum; Zohra Tabassum, Octafinalist; and Adrian Chendra, Octafinalist.

Palatine High School Science Olympiad students placed in state: Joshua Soloway, 3rd/Scrambler Max Honermeier, 3rdScrambler Amanda Diana, 4th/Hydrogeology Kathryn Jefferson, 4th/Hydrogeology Carl Garrison, Coach No picture available

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Soccer

William Fremd High School Boys Soccer placed 3rd place in State. Coach Steve Keller and student-athletes were recognized for this achievement (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) Robert Burk, Michael LaBarge, Ryan McCoy, John Roubik, Ivan Martin, Andrew Castro, Tyler Johanson, James LeFevre, Maeson Norris, Luke Schoffstall, Tyler Alfirevic, Michael Arbour, Michael Guedel, Seiya Iguchi, Michael Kramer, Rohan Menon, Ryan Rowden, Benjamin Borst, Daniel Burton, Jacob Cuthbert, Luke Kosacz, William LeFevre, Matthew McCarty, Tomas Peleckas, Benjamin Poder, Kurt Rettke, Zachary Schoffstall, Emily Bieda, Emma Gattuso, and Emily Rogers.

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More Student Achievements

(Not pictured in order, not all students are pictured) Girls Basketball - Conant High School student Nireet Dhillon, Class 4A Three-Point Champion, 3rd in State. William Fremd High School Girls Basketball, with Coach David Yates, 2nd in state: Haley Gorecki, Emily Bieda, Megan Chernich, Caroline Macius, Erin Lenahan, Brianna Lewis, Bryana Hopkins, Jenna Simios, Amanda McCartney, Lauren Glaser, MacKenzie Bednarek, Rebecca Stapleton, Melissa Adrian, Hayley Williams, Emilija Peleckas, Grace Tworek, Julia Wacker, Midori Williams, Anna LaValle, and Eric Ruzanski.

Palatine High School students were honored for their achievements in Journalism: Teresa O’Brien, 1st/Review Writing Laura Plata, 1st/News Writing Paige Powell, 2nd/Advertising No picture available

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Fremd High School student Soumyaa Mazumder was recognized by the Board of Education for being a Presidential Scholar Semifinalist. No picture available Hoffman Estates High School Math Team member Shreyas Gandlur was recognized by the Board of Education for placing 3rd in Algebra II. No picture available

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More Student Athletes

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William Fremd High School Girls Swimming and diving athletes were recognized for placing in statewide competitions. Coach Andrew Kittrell (back row, left to right) is pictured with his team Julia Portmann 8th/400 Yard Relay; Erica King - 9th/200 Yard Freestyle, 9th/500 Yard Freestyle; 7th/200 Yard Freestyle Relay; 8th/400 Yard Freestyle Relay; Loretta Stelnicki - 4th/200 Yard Medley Relay, 7th/200 Yard Freestyle Relay, 8th/400 Yard Freestyle Relay; (front row, left to right) Saki Takumiya, 4th/200 Yard Medley Relay; Grace Grzybek 4th/200 Yard Medley Relay, 7th/200 Yard Freestyle Relay. Not pictured: Grace Kneller - 4th/200 Yard Medley Relay; 12th/100 Yard Freestyle Relay; 7th/200 Yard Freestyle Relay; 8th/400 Yard Relay. Also honored, not pictured - Sarah McTague, 11th in state for diving.

Palatine High School Girls Cross Country Team placed 2nd in State. Coach Joseph Parks is pictured with his team (not pictured in order:) Megan Beach, Anna Buckstaff, Kara Burton, Rebecca Duran, Jaclyn Frank, Amy Kieiszewski (22nd place), Samantha Lechowicz, Kelly O’Brien (3rd place), Kelly Ocock, Lauryn Simons, Izabela Stankiewicz, Sabina Yosif.

Palatine High School student athlete Graham Brown is pictured with Coach Chris Quick. Graham placed 16th in state in Boys Cross Country. Schaumburg High School student athlete Alexandria Gutt is pictured with Coach Courtney Smith. Alexandria placed 25th in State in Girls Cross Country.

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James B. Conant High School student Zachary Dale was recognized by the Board of Education for placing 2nd in state in Cross Country No picture available

James B. Conant High School Cheerleaders placed 2nd in state - pictured above with coaches Amanda and Christina Schweinebraten are (not pictured in order): Grace Hahn, Rachael Repeta, Amy Roberts, Annie Egan, Joseph Bolbot, Elizabeth Fillmore, Jeffrey Bolbot, Kylie Melbourne, Toni Bartuch, Justine Ewald, Christina Gurrieri, Nicolette Makris, Tiana Graff, Elizabeth Senase, Mucia Burke, Kristina Bynes, Meredith Fleck, Cole Aykroid, Sky Chapp, Kylie Cosentino, Tyler Teague, Evan Teague, Sarah Prill, Patricia Faso, Tracey Taaffe, and Kassandra Pritscher.

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More Athletic Achievements

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Schaumburg High School Boys Track: (left to right) Daniel Galovich - 6th/4 x 100 Meter Relay; Jack Wagner - 6th/4 x 100 Meter Relay; Coach Ryan Senica; and Shandall Thomas - 6th/4 x 100 Meter Relay, 3rd/100 Meter Dash, and 8th/200 Meter Dash. (Not pictured: Jarman McMillon - 6th/4 x 100 Meter Relay) No picture available James B. Conant High School Boys Track student Zachary Dale, 3rd/1600 Meter Run No picture available Palatine High School Boys Track student Jacob LaRocca, 1st/Pole Vault

James B. Conant High School wrestling coach Chad Hay accompanied two students being recognized for their achievements: (left to right) Daniel Andress - 4th place / 160 lb. weight class and Bobby Alexander - 3rd place / 138 lb. weight class. Not pictured: Schaumburg High School student Hazen Rice - 5th place / 106 lb. weight class.

No picture available Palatine High School Boys Gymnastics student Dylan Patton, 5th/ Floor Exercise

Girls Track and Field State Award Winners (not pictured in order, not all are pictured) Palatine High School: Coach: Joseph Parks; Kelly O’Brien - 3rd/1600 Meter Relay and 2nd/3200 Meter Relay, Kara Burton - 2nd/3200 Meter Relay, Samantha Lechowicz 2nd/3200 Meter Relay; Megan Beach - 2nd/3200 Meter Relay. William Fremd High School: Coach: Jeremy Herriges; Katelyn Escobar - 3rd/4 x 800 Meter Relay, Lauren Ciardiello - 3rd/4 x 800 Meter Relay, Nora Finegan - 3rd/4 x 800 Meter Relay, Ayako Higuchi 9th/1600 Meter Run and 3rd/4 x 800 Meter Relay. Schaumburg High School: Coach: Courtney Smith; Lauren Kubinski - 6th/4 x 800 Meter Relay, Alexandria Gutt - 6th/4 x 800 Meter Relay, Madison Marasco - 6th/4 x 800 Meter Relay, Erin Falsey - 6th/4 x 800 Meter Relay. Hoffman Estates High School: Coach: Kirk Macnider; Meagan Biddle - 8th/1600 Meter Run.

William Fremd High School studentathlete Stephanie Mbi placed fourth in state in Badminton. She is pictured with coach Robert Hanson. Yearim Choi (not pictured) also placed fourth.

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William Fremd High School Girls Gymnastics coach Elise Ference was honored with her team who placed 3rd in state: Sydney Plichta, Christine Radochonski, Carly DeFilippo, Gabrielle Lytle, Lisa Radochonski, Alyssa Garcia, Margaret Betti, Grace Korn, Mariah Gura, Kailyn Bryk, Kaylin Lemajeur, Hollis Emily Neal, Abigayle Moran. Not pictured in order.

William Fremd High School student Daniel Suero was recognized by the Board of Education for his swimming accomplishments as an Athlete with Disabilities: 5th / 200 yard Freestyle; 6th / 50Yard Freestyle; 5th / 100 Yard Freestyle; 2nd / 100 Yard Breastroke. No picture available

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District 211 Staff

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Hoffman Estates High School Science Teacher Tanya Katovich has been named the 2015 Davidson Award recipient, an honor presented annually by the Chemical Industry Council of Illinois and the Illinois Chemical Education Foundation to the outstanding chemistry teacher in the state.

Palatine High School Principal Gary Steiger was named 2015-2016 High School Principal of the Year by the Illinois Principals Association. Each year, this organization recognizes school principals who have demonstrated a positive impact on their students and learning community.

James B. Conant High School Teacher and District 211 Orchestra Program Director Joseph Malmquist was named 2014 Youth Orchestra Conductor of the Year by the Illinois Council of Orchestras as well as a Distinguished Service award from the Illinois Chapter of the American String Teachers Association.

William Fremd High School Physical Education Teacher and Boys Soccer Coach Steven Keller was named Coach of the Year by the Illinois High School Soccer Coaches Association. Palatine High School Mathematics Teacher Joseph Grzybek was awarded national certification through the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. This is the highest professional credential in the field of teaching.

William Fremd High School Science Teacher and Track & Field Coach James Aikens was a finalist for the National High School Athletic Coaches Association (NHSACA) Coach of the Year.

Hoffman Estates High School English Teacher Katherine Phillips was honored with the John Hire Award for Distinguished Service from the Illinois Speech and Theater Association. No picture available William Fremd High School teacher Ronald Cregier was inducted into the Illinois Basketball Coaches Association Hall of Fame. No picture available

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Each year, the Illinois State Board of Education sponsors “Those Who Excel” awards to honor individuals who have made significant contributions to our state’s schools. Above are the winners for 2014 from District 211 (listed alphabetically): Sally Cimmarusti (Secretary to the Superintendent), Educational Service Personnel, G.A. McElroy Administration Center; Susan Elk (Head Librarian), Student Support Personnel, Schaumburg High School; Steven Elza (Applied Technology Teacher), 2015 Illinois Teacher of the Year, William Fremd High School, Classroom Teacher; Dane Henning (Teacher), Early Career Educator, District 211 Academy-North; Robert Small (Assistant Principal), School Administrator, James B. Conant High School; SOAR Core Committee (Hoffman Estates High School), Team. Team Members include: Brigit Cain, Angelica Cordova-Rajoo, Anthony Ganas, Brian Harlan, Christine Jenkins, Elizabeth Lambert, Kerri Largo, Kirk Macnider, Kelly O’Connor, Beth Roesner, Joshua Schumacher, and William Scully.

A special thank you... Each year District 211 partners with local businesses to establish worksites for students with special needs. Through these partnerships the District is able to provide students with true-to-life work experiences that help prepare students for their lives after high school. The Board of Education expressed its appreciation to: Buehler YMCA, Cintas, Countryside Association, eWorks, GFS Marketplace, Good Shepherd Health & Fitness Center, Harper College – Food Service Training Program, Home Goods of Schaumburg, Home Goods of Palatine, IKEA, Learning Loft, Lifetime Fitness, Nordstrom Rack, Renaissance Hotel & Convention Center, Richelieu Hardware, Rosewood Care Center, Savers, Subway, T.J. Maxx of Palatine, T.J. Maxx of Hoffman Estates, Transition Industries, Walgreens, and Willow Creek Care Center. 41

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Booster Clubs

In April of 2015, the Board of Education honored a special group of people who play a major role in the success of District 211 schools by providing leadership for parent organizations. Each of these parent leaders is committed to providing excellence in education for students, and works tirelessly toward that goal. Under their dedicated leadership, District 211 Booster Clubs collectively awarded 85 scholarships totalling over $110,000. Boosters were also able to offset student costs to attend alcohol-free and drug-free Post-Prom events by over $100,000. During the 2014-2015 school year, the Pirate Booster Club President was Alissa DePue, serving her first year as president. The Palatine Boosters’ largest fundraisers were a Dinner Auction Event and corporate contributions. They also raise money through concession sales and host a very successful craft fair. The Fremd Viking Boosters President Peter Carlson served his second year in that role. The Boosters were extremely proud of their Dinner Dance and a very popular Craft Fair fundraiser. The Fremd Music Association has co-presidents, Jane Krout and Jennifer Mondy, both serving their first year. The group hosted a Band Benefit with dinner, raffle, and musical performances, as well as their popular cookie dough sale. Piali Roy served her first year as the Conant Booster President. The Booster Club’s Craft Fair, Manna Gift Cards, and the Conant Community Social were its largest fundraisers. The Conant Band Booster Club President was Michael Anzalone for his second year. They fundraise through the Woodfield Greeters program, as well as hosted a Band Dinner and local store and restaurant Family Nights. Schaumburg VIPs also had Co-Presidents, Pam Pelarinos

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Graduation Requirements

Front row: Piali Roy, Conant Booster President; Jane Krout, Fremd Music Association CoPresident; Pam Pelarinos, Schaumburg VIP Co-President. Back row: Michael Anzalone, Conant Band Booster President; Madelynn Brossard, Schaumburg VIP Co-President; Pete Carlson, Fremd Viking Booster President.

1. Complete 18 academic units of credit 2. Physical education credit for each semester of attendance (or equivalent) 3. Successfully complete: a. One unit of United States History b. One unit of Social Science Survey or 1/2 unit each of Government and Economics c. Three years of mathematics course work, with successful completion of a 300-level course. One of the three required units must be Algebra I, and one unit must include Geometry content d. Two units of science (1 year — Biological Science/ 1 year — Physical Science) e. One unit of art, world language, music, or vocational education (Applied Technology, Business Education, Family and Consumer Sciences)

f. Four units of English g. Two years of writing-intensive courses, one of which must be English h. One-half unit of Consumer Education (or equivalent) i. One-half unit of Health 4. Complete 30 hours of instruction in safety education (Driver Education classroom instruction) 5. Pass a qualifying examination on the State and Federal Constitutions, Declaration of Independence, use of the American flag, and the Australian (secret ballot) method of voting 6. Participate in State testing at an appropriate level

Enrollment by Class

(second year) and Madelynn Brossard (first year). Their biggest fundraisers were a Trivia Game Night, SAA Cheer Competition, and Concessions sales. The Schaumburg Band Booster President Tom Lober served his first year; the organization’s largest fundraisers were the Holiday Concert Raffle, Visitor Concession Stand, and Dine-In Nights. Jean Lemp served her first year as President of the Hoffman Estates Loyal Parents; the biggest fundraisers were the hugely popular Trivia Game Night and Craft Fair.

Class Boys Girls Freshman (Class of 2018)................................... 1,541........... 1,456 Sophomore (Class of 2017)................................ 1,525........... 1,389 Junior (Class of 2016)......................................... 1,492........... 1,454 Senior (Class of 2015)......................................... 1,602........... 1,574 Totals.................................................................. 6,160........... 5,873 Total All Students................................................................ 12,033

District 211 Foundation

The High School District 211 Foundation was founded in 1995 and its historical function of accepting and disbursing scholarship monies to students continues. However, the Foundation’s scope was expanded in 2007 to focus on providing funds for innovative programs and materials to enhance and enrich students’ educational experiences. To date, nearly $200,000 in grants have been awarded to fund projects directly related to leadership, technology/science, college and career planning, community, wellness, cultural perspectives, arts and creativity, and positive behavior intervention and support. All District 211 high schools have received grants that fund activities, programs, and materials that are not funded by the regular school budget. Through tax-deductible donations, the District 211 Foundation will continue to provide new and enhanced learning experiences for students that would not be possible without financial assistance. Information about making a tax-exempt donation to the Foundation and information about Innovation Grants and Foundation events can be found on the website: www.d211foundation.org.

2014 - 2015 Board of Trustees Dan Artman, Chair Deborah Lemonidis Vice-Chair, Projects

Percentage of College-Bound Students

Scot Leonard Vice-Chair, Fund Development Kate Finneran, Secretary Janet Zelenka, Treasurer Mark Bratkiv Jacky Cartwright Bob Schmidt Bob LeFevre, Board of Education Daniel Cates, Superintendent

100% 90% 80% 70%

71%

74%

76%

78%

77%

19881989

19891990

19901991

81%

79%

79%

80%

19921993

19931994

19941995

82%

80%

82%

79%

80%

19981999

19992000

82%

82%

20002001

20012002

85%

84%

85%

20022003

20032004

20042005

88%

88%

87%

86%

84%

85%

85%

20052006

20062007

20072008

20082009

20092010

20102011

20112012

88%

89%

90%

20122013

20132014

20142015

60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 19861987

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2014 - 2015 Year in Review

This is

19871988

19911992

19951996

19961997

19971998

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2014 - 2015 Year in Review

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Curriculum Summary Number of Number of Enrollment Department Courses Offered Classes Taught by Department Applied Technology..........................................75.................................. 133............................. 2,326 Art.....................................................................29.................................... 72............................. 1,999 Business Education..........................................31.................................... 66............................. 2,587 English..............................................................73.................................. 404........................... 11,194 English as a Second Language........................16.................................... 26................................ 399 Family & Consumer Sciences..........................39.................................. 138............................. 2,751 Mathematics.....................................................67.................................. 286........................... 11,218 Music.................................................................. 16......................................21..............................1,910 Health/Driver Education/Physical Education.......63.................................. 323........................... 13,827 Science.............................................................35.................................. 189........................... 10,339 Social Studies...................................................45.................................. 287............................. 8,129 Special Education.............................................87.................................. 316................................ 863 Student Services..............................................25.................................... 18.................................. 63 World Language...............................................30.................................. 107............................. 6,178 Non-Departmental.......................................... 119.................................. 353............................. 1,619 Totals.............................................................750............................... 2,739........................... 75,402

Athletic Summary

Sport Boys Girls Badminton...............................–..................193 Baseball...............................303......................– Basketball............................289..................208 Bowling....................................–..................100 Cheerleading...........................–..................453 Cross Country.....................176..................178 Football................................757......................– Golf......................................112....................94 Gymnastics..........................209..................169 Lacrosse..............................324..................283 Soccer.................................505..................383 Softball....................................–..................192 Swimming............................224..................238 Tennis..................................186..................176 Track....................................505..................385 Volleyball.............................180..................202 Water Polo...........................130..................131 Wrestling..............................316......................– Totals...............................4,216...............2,393 Total.........................................................6,609

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Activity Summary

Type of Organization

Participants

Competitive Groups...............................1,718 Career Clubs............................................612 Honoraries................................................904

Teacher Preparation

Total.................................................... 11,637

Classroom Teachers........................................634 Special Education Teachers, English as a Second Language.....................134 Counselors, Social Workers, Psychologists......80 Administrators...................................................52

64% with Master’s Degree +30 hours

13% with Bachelor’s Degree 23% with Master’s Degree

Media Specialists..............................................13 Nurses.................................................................3 Total.............................................................1,008 *Department Chairs also have teaching assignments.

Support Service Student Supervisors/Teacher Assistants.........349 Secretarial/Clerical..........................................171 Custodial/Maintenance....................................180

Teacher Experience

Transportation.................................................154 Cafeteria..........................................................106 Technology Services.........................................30 Media Assistants...............................................15 Police Consultants...............................................5 Therapists..........................................................10

Publications..............................................397 Student Government................................837

Certificated

Department Chairs*...........................................92

Performing Arts......................................2,914 Special Interest Clubs...........................4,255

District Staff

Nurses.................................................................3 6-10 years 24%

0-5 years 19%

11-15 years 26%

Total.............................................................1,023

More than 15 years 31%

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This is

2014 - 2015 Financial Year in Review

For 2014-2015, the District continued to build on its financial commitment to the community by maintaining a balanced budget that supports the overall instructional program, sustaining healthy reserve fund balances, and reducing the debt service levy by $2.0 million. With local revenues restricted in accordance with property tax caps and State sources limited based on the continued bleak state fiscal condition, the District has maintained prudent management of its financial resources in order to keep expenditures at or below anticipated revenue. These constrained budget measures have focused on maintaining lower costs attributed to staffing efficiencies, cost sharing for health insurance, energy savings, and bid savings on contracted services, supplies and capital items. As part of a multi-year levy reduction plan, the District reduced the 2014 levy by $2.0 million. The debt service levy reduction provides for the ongoing use of existing reserves to pay a portion of principal

and interest on outstanding bonds. Since 2007, the District has reduced the debt service levy by $28.3 million. In addition, existing reserves of $19.7 million were utilized to fund capital improvements on a variety of projects including: main office/ guidance area remodel at Conant High School; renovation of the Higgins Education Center; media center renovations at Schaumburg and Conant High Schools; pool renovations at Conant, Fremd, and Schaumburg High Schools; and expanded Districtwide wireless access. Additionally, $2.1 million in existing reserves were used to support the One-toOne program by funding the iPad capital lease. In Fiscal Year 2015, the District utilized a portion of the general obligation bonds for the purpose of funding required Life Safety compliance improvements, including replacement of air handling units, boilers, chillers, and masonry work at all schools. These capital improvements and Life Safety compliance projects will continue over the next several years.

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Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence

James B. Conant High School

William Fremd High School

700 East Cougar Trail, Hoffman Estates, Illinois (847) 755-3600 • chs.d211.org Julie C. Nowak, Principal

1000 South Quentin Road, Palatine, Illinois (847) 755-2600 • fhs.d211.org Kurt A. Tenopir, Principal

Hoffman Estates High School

Palatine High School

1100 West Higgins Road, Hoffman Estates, Illinois (847) 755-5600 • hehs.d211.org James A. Britton, Principal

1111 North Rohlwing Road, Palatine, Illinois (847) 755-1600 • phs.d211.org Gary P. Steiger, Principal

Schaumburg High School

Total Revenue Category Local Property Tax........................................ $208.1 Interest on Investments...................................... 0.3 General State Aid............................................... 5.9 Categorical State Aid.......................................... 8.1 Food Service Sales............................................ 3.3 Corporate P.P.R. Tax.......................................... 3.2 Fees & Other...................................................... 5.2 Tuition................................................................. 1.1 Federal Aid......................................................... 6.5 Total Direct Revenue............................ $241.7 (Dollars in Millions)

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Total Expenditures Category Salaries........................................................ $138.5 Employee Benefits........................................... 50.4 Purchased Services......................................... 11.0 Supplies & Materials........................................... 8.9 Utilities................................................................ 4.1 Capital Outlay................................................... 31.8 Debt Service....................................................... 7.4 Tuition................................................................. 7.9 Miscellaneous..................................................... 1.5 Total Direct Expenditures..................... $260.1 (Dollars in Millions)

1100 West Schaumburg Road, Schaumburg, Illinois (847) 755-4600 • shs.d211.org Timothy J. Little, Principal

Alternative Schools

Higgins Education Center

Academy-North

1030 W. Higgins Road • Hoffman Estates, Illinois (847) 755-6640 • cntr.d211.org Amy Friel, Program Administrator

335 East Illinois Avenue • Palatine, Illinois (847) 755-6700 • ano.d211.org Francesca Anderson, Program Administrator

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Board of Education

Mucia Burke, Board of Education President, was elected to the Board of Education in 2011 and re-elected in April 2015. She was elected Board president in 2015 after serving as Board vice president since May 2013. Mrs. Burke has been raising her family as a full-time stay-at-home mom since 1997. Prior to this, she was employed by Woodfield Business Products as a sales agent (1994-1997) and an accounts receivables manager (1992-1994). Mrs. Burke earned her bachelor of science degree in exercise physiology and a minor in nutrition from Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Conn. Mrs. Burke is a member of the Conant High School Booster Club and has been a PTA member since 2002. She is PTA president at Mead Junior High School, serving since 2012, and served as Nerge Elementary School PTA president from 2007-2009. She also served as first vice-president and secretary of the Schaumburg Council of PTAs from 2010-2013. Anna Klimkowicz, Board of Education Secretary, was elected to the Board of Education in 1997 and re-elected in 2001, 2005, 2009, and 2013. She is currently serving as Board secretary, having previously served from 1999-2001 and 2007-2009. Mrs. Klimkowicz has been recognized by the Illinois Association of School Boards as a “Master School Board Member” and is currently resolutions chair for the North-Cook Division of IASB. She serves on the governing board of the Northwest Suburban Special Education Organization as the District representative (since 2011), having also served from 1998-2008 and was vice president from 2000-2006. Mrs. Klimkowicz is employed by CEDA Northwest as a family case manager. She holds a bachelor’s degree in business education from Northern Illinois University, and earned a master’s degree in public administration from Roosevelt University and a second master’s degree in Human Services from National-Louis University. She is a licensed professional counselor. She serves as the chairperson of the Village of Schaumburg Peer Jury Oversight Committee. Mrs. Klimkowicz has been the Schaumburg Township Council of PTA’s president and treasurer. In addition, she served as president of Jane Addams Junior High School and Blackwell Elementary PTAs. Mrs. Klimkowicz was an advisor to the Girl Scouts, and received the organization’s Outstanding Volunteer Award in 2002, Beaman/Denoyer Award in 2003, and the Outstanding Leader Award in 2004. She also served three years as vice president of Boy Scouts Learning for Life Program. Mrs. Klimkowicz received a “Those Who Excel” award from the Illinois State Board of Education in 2002. Will Hinshaw was elected to the Board of Education in April 2015. Mr. Hinshaw is Assistant Controller at Deublin Company, a global manufacturer and distributor of mechanical rotating unions, in Waukegan, Ill. Mr. Hinshaw graduated from Georgia State University in Atlanta with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Accounting. He is currently serving as Administrative Vice President of the Illinois Jaycees and is a Past President of the Palatine Jaycees. Lauanna Recker was elected to the Board of Education in April 2015.

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Robert LeFevre, Jr., Board of Education Vice President, was elected to the Board of Education in 2005, and re-elected in 2009 and 2013. He was elected Board vice president in 2015, and he served as Board president from 2007 until 2013. He served as a Trustee for the District 211 Foundation from 2007 until 2015. In 2010, Mr. LeFevre was recognized by the Illinois State Board of Education with the Those Who Excel Award of Meritorious Service. Mr. LeFevre has been a Palatine resident for 45 years and practicing public accounting as principal of LeFevre & Associates since 1990. Mr. LeFevre is a 1985 graduate of William Fremd High School, has a bachelor of science degree in accounting, a master of business administration from Northern Illinois University, and a master of science degree in taxation from DePaul University. He is a licensed Certified Public Accountant, a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ practitioner, and a Registered Investment Advisor. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Illinois CPA Society, and the Fremd High School Booster Club. Peter Dombrowski was elected to the Board of Education in April 2015. Mr. Dombrowski is a Licensed Structural and Professional Engineer. He has been the chief bridge engineer at A. Epstein and Sons International, Inc., based in Chicago, since 2012. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering from Purdue University in 1997, and his Master of Science degree from the University of Illinois-Chicago in 2003. In 2007, he was certified as a Model Law Structural Engineer. Since 2009, Mr. Dombrowski has been a volunteer with the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Survey (NCEES), assisting with structural engineering licensing exam development and grading. He has been a member of the School Advisory Board at St. Hubert’s Parish in Hoffman Estates since 2010. He also has served as a mentor in the school’s Future City Competition in 2014, helping introduce 6th, 7th, and 8th graders to engineering. He has served as a judge at the University of Illinois-Chicago’s annual Engineering Expo since 2010. Mike Scharringhausen was elected to the Board of Education in April 2013. Mr. Scharringhausen is currently employed at Freedom Fastener as a General Manager. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Roosevelt University and has been involved in numerous community organizations such as Rotary, Kenneth Young Center, and Schaumburg Athletic Association as coach, commissioner, and exceutive board member. Mr. Scharringhausen also has served School District 54 as PTA President at Frost Junior High School, executive board member for the Schaumburg Township Council of PTAs, and served on districtwide committees, most recently the 2013 District Goals Committee and the 2013 Budget Committee. He is a member of the Conant High School Booster Club and serves on the board of Parents Supporting Conant LaCrosse. Over the years, Mr. Scharringhausen has been involved in a host of additional associations and chambers and has held numerous leadership roles. Major responsibilities of the Board of Education are to express and represent the view of the community in matters affecting education, determine education standards and goals, adopt policies for the administration of the school system, employ a Superintendent of Schools, authorize the appointment of teachers and other staff members, approve curriculum, secure money for school operational needs and building programs, and authorize expenditures.

This is

This is

Township High School

DISTRICT

TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 211 1750 South Roselle Road, Palatine, Illinois 60067-7336 Telephone: (847) 755-6600 • Website: adc.d211.org

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS OF EXCELLENCE

Serving the Community

Board of Education Mucia Burke, President Robert LeFevre, Jr., Vice President Anna Klimkowicz, Secretary

Township High School District 211 serves the communities of Hoffman Estates, Inverness, Palatine, and Schaumburg and parts of Arlington Heights, Elk Grove Village, Hanover Park, Rolling Meadows, Roselle, Streamwood, and South Barrington in the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Illinois.

s cation Publi



Peter Dombrowski • Will Hinshaw Lauanna Recker • Mike Scharringhausen Daniel E. Cates Superintendent of Schools