DRAFT ANNUAL REPORT, 2013

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB NORTHERN RURAL GROWTH PROGRAMME (NRGP) IFAD LOAN No. 734-GH IFAD GRANT No. 994-GH AfDB LOAN N0. 2100150015795 DRAFT ANNUAL REPORT, 2...
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MOFA/IFAD/AfDB

NORTHERN RURAL GROWTH PROGRAMME (NRGP)

IFAD LOAN No. 734-GH IFAD GRANT No. 994-GH AfDB LOAN N0. 2100150015795

DRAFT ANNUAL REPORT, 2013

Prepared by: The Prog. Management Unit NRGP, Tamale

February, 2014

TABLE OF CONTENT 1.0

PROGRAMME BASIC INFORMATION ....................................................................................................... v

1.2

Background of Programme ...............................................................................................................................6

1.3

Programme Components ..................................................................................................................................7

2.0

REVIEW OF THE PERFROMANCE OF 2013 BY COMPONENTS ............................................................8

2.1

COMPONENT A: COMMODITY CHAIN DEVELOPMENT ....................................................................................8

2.2

COMPONENT B: RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT ...........................................................................32

2.3

COMPONENT C: ACCESS TO RURAL FINANCE SERVICES .................................................................................43

2.4 COMPONENT D: PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT, COORDINATION AND MOINTORING & EVALUATION ...........................................................................................................................................................48 Programme Management and Coordination ..............................................................................................................48 Monitoring and Evaluation ..........................................................................................................................................52 Gender Mainstreaming................................................................................................................................................53 3.0 LESSONS LEANRT & CHALLENGES ..............................................................................................................56

ii

List of Acronyms ACDEP ADVANCE AEA AfDB AGRA AWP&B BAR CBP CDF DFR EPA FA FBB FBO GAP GHS GIDA GLDB GLSS GOG GPS IA ICOUR IFAD IFDC IPB JADA METASIP MIX MOFA MOH NA NGO NPSC NR NRGP NSA PFI PMU PO RCB RCBs RFP

-

Association of Churches Development Projects Agric Development and Value Chain Enhancement Agric Extension Agent African Development Bank Agric. Green Revolution in Africa Annual Work Programme and Budget Brong Ahafo Region Commodity Business Plans Commodity Development Fund Department of Feeder Roads Environmental Protection Agency Facilitation Agent Farmer Business Book Farmer Based Organizations Gender Action Plan Ghana Health Service Ghana Irrigation Development Authority Grains and Legumes Development Board Ghana Living Standards Survey Government of Government Geographic Positioning System Implementation Agreement Irrigation Company of Upper Region International Fund for Agricultural Development International Center for Soil Fertility and Agric Development Inter-professional Bodies Joint Action for Deprived Areas medium Term Agric Sector Investment Plan Microfinance Information Exchange Ministry of Food and Agriculture Ministry of Health Not Applicable Non Governmental Organization National Programme Steering Committee Northern Region Northern Rural Growth Programme National Soya Alliance Participating Financial Institutions Programme Management Unit Producer Organization Rural and Community Bank Rural and Commercial Banks Request for Proposals iii

RIMs SARI SDR SFMC SNV TOR UA USD VC VCTF VEPEAG

-

Results and Impact Management Systems Savannah Agric Research institute Special Drawing Rights Savannah Farmers Marketing Company Netherlands NGO Terms of Reference Unit of Accounts United States Dollar Value Chains Venture Capital Trust Fund Vegetable Producers and Exporters Association of Ghana

iv

1.0

PROGRAMME BASIC INFORMATION

PROJECT TITLE

:

NORTHERN RURAL GROWTH PROGRAMME

SECTOR

:

AGRICULTURE

IMPLEMENTING AGENCY

:

MINISTRY OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

FUNDING AGENCIES

:

GOG, IFAD AND AfDB

LOAN NUMBERS

:

IFAD LOAN

-

734-GH

IFAD GRANT

-

994-GH

AfDB LOAN

-

2100150015795

DATE OF SIGNING LOAN FACILITY

:

IFAD -

12TH SEPTEMBER, 2008

AfDB -

4TH MARCH 2008

DATE OF EFFECTIVENESS (IFAD)

:

24TH OCTOBER, 2008

LOAN EXPIRY DATE

:

IFAD -

24TH OCTOBER 2017

:

AfDB -

31ST DECEMBER 2015

PRGRAMME LOCATION

:

TAMALE

COVERAGE AREA

:

THE PROGRAMME COVERS DISTRICTS IN THE 3 NORTHERN RGEIONS AND 5 DISTRICTS IN BRONG AHAFO REGION (BAR) (i.e. Kintampo North and South, Sene, Pru and Tain)

PROGRAMME DURATION

:

IFAD AfDB -

v

8 YEARS 6 YEARS

1.2 BACKGROUND OF PROGRAMME IFAD in December, 2007 approved a loan and grant to support the implementation of the Northern Rural Growth Programme (NRGP), which became effective on 24th October, 2008. The Programme is co-financed with loan from the African Development Bank and with commitment from the Government of Ghana. The Programme is an eight year programme and to be completed by 24th October, 2017. It was designed into two (2) Phases, the first of which would establish the structures, systems and procedures for implementation and test in the filed a range of innovative approaches to increasing rural development and reducing poverty and the second phase was to build on the successful approaches and expand the coverage of the programme. 1.2.1. Background of Programme Area The Programme area covers the three northern regions (Upper East, Upper West and Northern Region) and the contiguous northern districts of Brong Ahafo Region, comprising Tain, Pru, Kintampo North, Kintampo South and Sene Districts. The area exhibits the highest incidence of poverty in Ghana. A number of factors account for the high poverty levels in Northern Ghana. These include: (i) low agricultural productivity due to dependence on erratic rains and low soil fertility; (ii) seasonal hunger and malnutrition; (iii) demographic pressure on natural resources, extensive production system and a sub-optimal use of water resources; (iv) limited availability of marketing outlets, and difficult access to main markets in the south and abroad. Despite efforts to increase access to irrigated agriculture, the region’s agriculture remains strongly dependent on rain-fed cultivation making it highly vulnerable to climate change risks. Agricultural growth will thus have to rely on increasing both rain-fed and irrigated production and promoting processing and marketing of agricultural produce of the three northern regions. The overall goal of the Programme is to achieve sustainable agricultural and rural livelihoods and food security for the rural poor particularly those in deprived areas, rural women and other vulnerable groups in the programme area. The specific objective is to develop inclusive and profitable commodity and food chains to generate agricultural surplus production and orient it towards remunerative markets in southern Ghana and abroad. This is to be achieved through the Commodity Value Chain approach. The provision of relevant irrigation and market infrastructure, access to finance and establishing viable Farmer Based Organizations and Value Chain Committee are key features of the programme. Overall approach. The Programme will be anchored in a private sector approach (along IFAD’s Private-Sector Development and Partnership Strategy) by a demand-driven approach and would select both rainfed and irrigated food and commodity chains to be developed based on their capacity to meet local and international demand or substitute for imports. Central to NRGP design is the issue of building pro-poor commodity chains as market mechanisms are not automatically conducive to poverty reduction and improved livelihood of small producers. This will be done by (a) establishing and strengthening District Value Chain Committees by which better governance of supply chains should be ensured; (b) using new participatory tools for assessing commodity chains’ potential for innovation and development allowing small producers to participate in value chain analysis and take informed decisions; (c) granting equity of supply chain facilities to farmer based organizations that allow them to better orient their marketing, increase their bargaining power within the supply chain and increase farm gate prices as well as provide collateral for improving access to credit; (d) 6

putting priority on the development of supply chains of one neglected crops mostly grown by women; (e) developing special financial products suited to small producers’ needs and gradual build-up of their business that suits small producers’ capacity; and (f) linking up with community driven development initiatives so as to complement private goods provision with public goods delivery.

1.3

PROGRAMME COMPONENTS

The Programme has four main components:

Component A: Commodity Chain Development i.

Strengthening of Farmer-Based Organizations (FBOs)

ii.

Establishment of District Value Chain Committees (DVCCs)

iii.

Development of Value Chain Organizations

iv.

Establishment of Productivity Investment Fund (PIF)

Component B: Rural Infrastructure (i) Small scale irrigation development; and (ii) Marketing infrastructure development.

Component C: Improving Access to Financial Services (i) Institutional strengthening of Participating Financial Institutions; and (ii) Providing funding through Matching Grants and Micro Leasing.

Component D: Programme Coordination, Management, Monitoring and Evaluation i. ii.

Programme Management and Coordination Programme Monitoring and Evaluation

7

2.0

REVIEW OF THE PERFROMANCE OF 2013 BY COMPONENTS

This section presents the Programme performance and achievements for the 2013 fiscal year. It presents a global picture in terms of programme level indicators and also gives details by components. 2.1

COMPONENT A: COMMODITY CHAIN DEVELOPMENT

The objective of the Commodity Chain Development component is to select and support commodity chains based on models that link small producers to private operators (processors, traders, aggregators, exporters, etc) and fill gaps created by policy failures by; a. Strengthening Farmer Based Organizations (FBOs) through capacity building and skills training b. Improving irrigation, market and transport infrastructure c. Enhancing agricultural support services (extension, research and financial services) through building of mutually beneficial linkages among key stakeholders in identified value chains.

The Commodity Chain Development Component rests on four pillars of activities or subcomponents; 

Strengthening of Farmer-Based Organizations (FBOs)



Establishment of District Value Chain Committees (DVCCs)



Development of Value Chain Organizations



Establishment of Productivity Investment Fund (PIF)

Programme Target Groups and Targeting Strategy The criteria for Programme intervention in these commodity chains are based on market potential, financial viability, outreach, women preference and risk – which is determined by farmers’ familiarity with production technology, pro-poor and environmental sensitivity considerations. The Clients of NRGP in the component Clients of the Commodity chain development component of the Programme include the following: i.

Large Smallholder farmers organized into groups along the selected commodities

ii.

Limited number of relatively well-endowed farmers who are receptive to innovations and technologies. They are used as conduits to reach out as to additional numbers of 8

smallholder farmers who will not ordinarily be able to access services from other chain actors iii.

Participating financial institutions who provides financial services to the smallholder farmers

iv.

Input dealers

v.

Mechanization Service Provides

vi.

Regional and District Agricultural Development Units of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture

vii.

Research and other development institutions who develop innovations and technologies for onward transmission to farmers and other clients of the programme

Performance of Key Indicators The table below shows the performance and the key outcomes and output indicators for the Component. Table 1 below shows the performance of the key performance outcomes and output indicators for Component A of the Programme. Since programme inception, strides have been made towards achieving programme objectives. Average yields for smallholder farmers supported by NRGP have increased by 212.5%, 200% and 160% for maize, soya and sorghum respectively. In absolute terms, maize yields have increased from 0.8mt/ha to 2.5 mt/ha, soya increased from 0.5mt/ha to 1.5mt/ha whilst sorghum increased from 0.5mt/ha to 1.3mt/ha. This is due to the use of improved planting materials and training on good agricultural practices. It is expected that, yields in 2013 will increase to 3mt/ha for maize, 2mt/ha for soya and 1.5mt/ha for sorghum and 3mt/ha for rice A Participatory Outcome Assessment (POA) conducted showed that, farmers’ incomes have almost doubled since participating in the programme. The survey revealed that, the average annual income of farmers increased from GHC302.70 to GHC709.60 from their farm operations. A more elaborate Participatory Outcome Assessment is being conducted in 2013. This is higher for those engaged in irrigated agriculture as they are able to cultivate more than once in a year. This is because farmers have improved their yields and are also assured of market. Nine hundred (900) farmers assisted with pumping machines by NRGP are now able to produce all year round. In some cases, farmers are able to cultivate 3 times in the year.

With respect to the formation of District Value Chain Committees, the Programme has established DVCCs in all 43 Districts which are different levels of maturity. Fifteen (15) were first established in 2011, 20 in 2012 and 8 in 2013 bringing the total number to 43. All DVCC executives have been trained in group dynamics, gender and financial management. These DVCCs have been instrumental in the sourcing of credit, inputs and market for their members. In 2013, the Programme through ACDEP has prepared the modalities for the establishment of Regional Value Chain Committees who will have representation from the District levels.

9

Table 1: Component

Strengthening Pos

Performance of Key Outcome and Outputs Indicators for Component A % Achieved

Cumm.

MTR1 Target

%

NA NA NA NA NA NA

258%

588%

226%

700%

150% 160% 58%

182%

500%

-

134%

%

134%

5,000

134% (from GHC 302.70 to GHC 709.60) -

-

39,100

300,000

13%

No

500

520

104%

1,507

2,000

75

No.

10,000

8,020

80.20%

29,799

50,000

47.79

No.

100

53

53

98

400

24.50

No.

600

256

42.66

937

-

-

Performance Indicator Increase productivity and production of smallholders by 7% by 2011 and 20% by 2017  Maize (0.8mt/h a)  Soya (0.5mt/h a)  Sorghum (0.5mt/h a)  Increase incomes of rural households by 6% in 2011 and 15% by 2017 Number of jobs created

Unit

AWP&B Target

Up Dec

15%

20%2

15 %

36%

15%

11%

%

6%

No

No. of POs formed and strengthened No of additional individuals benefitting from programme support No. of radio Broadcast to disseminate technologies Number of

to

Remarks

%

1

The Yields target for maize at MTR is 588% from 0.8mt/ha in 2007 to 5.5mt in 2017, Soya expects 700% increment from 0.5mt/ha in 2007 to 4mt/ha in 2017 whilst sorghum is targeted at 500% from 0.5mt/ha in 2007 to 3mt/ha in 2017 2

Yields for maize has increased from 2.5 mt/ha in 2012 to 2.86mt/ha in 2013, soya has increased from 1.5mt/ha in to 1.63mt/ha in 2013 whilst sorghum has increased from 1.17mt/ha in 2012 to 1.41mt/ha in 2013. 10

2012 POA. Results of 2013 POA is yet to be released

As a result of production, marketing and construction of infrastructure

12,755 males and 17,044 females benefitted directly from entire prog

Value chain,

Component

DVCC established Development of Value Chain Organizations

PIF established and disbursed

Unit

Number farmers trained

No.

10,000

11,286

112.86

33.065

50,000

66.13

% of women holding leadership positions Vol. of produce produced Number of DVCCs Number of Value Chain Organizations developed

%

30

49

49

42

40

93

Mt

19,635

66,267.4

337.5

98,185.43

311,552.18

31.51

No.

8

8

100

43

43

100

No

4

3

75

7

-

% of PIF disbursed

%

2

1.8

90

1.8

80

2.25

11 Commercial ventures are established

Number

4

3

75%

12

12

100

12 Private Partnership established for managing

Number

1

0

0

12

0

of

AWP&B Target

Up Dec

11

to

% Achieved

Cumm.

MTR1 Target

Performance Indicator Agric Staff trained

%

Remarks M & E, Gender & Aflatoxin trainings. Rest of trainings yet to be carried out Group dynamics, gender, financial mgt, irrigation, improved techn. etc

Established in all districts In addition to ACDEP, SNV, Nestle & SFMC, new PPP has been established with Trias, AVNASH & SIFA This is based on the water pumping machines acquired by farmers. These machines have already been bought but the concept was used in distributing them Trias, SIFA & AVNASh Also 34 SPVs established Infrastructure (warehouses) yet to be completed.

Component

Performance Indicator facilities

Unit

AWP&B Target

Up Dec

to

% Achieved

Cumm.

MTR1 Target

%

framework for its operations being developed

Achievement/implementation status of 2013 The Sub-component registered the following achievements during the implementation of the 2013 Programme. Strengthening of Farmer Based Organization a. Farmer Registration for 2013 In addition to the 2,876 farmer groups registered in 2012, the programme continued to register new farmers onto the programme for 2013. As at the end of June, 2013, Five Hundred and Twenty (520) farmer groups made up of Eight Thousand and Thirty-seven (8,037) farmers; comprising Four thousand Four Hundred and Seventy-eight (4,478) males and Three Thousand Five Hundred and Forty-two (3,542) females registered to participate in the 2013 cropping season and facilitation and registration and data capture on additional farmer groups still on-going and will be completed by end of July, 2013. The number so far captured is expected to cultivate area of Eight Thousand, One Hundred and Forty-seven (8,147.0) Hectares. Table 2: Farmer groups registered and supported with financial services Year

No of Groups

Membership M

F

T

Area (Ha)

Amount Disbursed (GHȼ)

Amount Disbursed (US$)

2009

19

157

51

208

115.00

24,931.52

20,776.30

2010

162

1517

511

2028

2,234.78

205,177.00

144,490.85

2011

656

5315

8,826

14,141

4,556.70

1,055,759.50

703,839.66

2012

987

8,277

13,502

21,779

9,561.50

2,643,915.50

1,406,337.50

2013

1,5073

12,755

17,044

29,799

20,967.30 1,330,417.67

Total

1,507

5,260,201.19

667,612.39 2,943,056.70

As a step towards building the capacity of these FBOs into formidable well-groomed market oriented and self-sustaining entities, the Programme through the facilitation agency ACDEP has engaged the Department of Co-operatives (DOC) to build the capacity of these FBOs through training and capacity building in Co-operative development and principles. 3

Remarks

520 additional groups were added in the year 2013 12

As a first step, the DOC has been commissioned to undertake a quick assessment of the Six Hundred and three (603) FBOs that have so far received facilitation and mentoring from ACDEP. The assessment will determine which of these FBOs will qualify for registration as co-operative entities this season. The assessment exercise has been completed and all the 603 FBOs qualified for registration. The DOC is in the process of registering the groups. The above mentioned groups are all farmers in the industrial crops commodity window. Whiles awaiting the recruitment of a facilitation agency for Sesame and the other women’s crop, the programme has also initiated efforts at organizing some smallholder farmers with interest in cultivating sesame into groups.

Performance of Major Commodities Supported by the Programme Major commodities supported by the programme include; maize, soya, sorghum and lately rice. The rice value chain was added as a result of a partnership arrangement with AVNASH, a rice processing firm in 2013. To date, a total of 37,719.5 ha of maize, 8,182.01 ha of soya, 1,101 ha of sorghum and 1,409ha of rice have been put to cultivation since the programme inception. Average yields for smallholder farmers supported by NRGP have increased by 212.5%, 200% and 160% for maize, soya and sorghum respectively. In absolute terms, maize yields have increased on average from 0.8mt/ha to 2.86mt/ha even though some farmers have achieved above 3.5mt/ha. Soya increased from 0.5mt/ha to 1.63mt/ha in 2013 whilst sorghum increased from 0.5mt/ha to 1.41mt/ha in 2013. This is due to the use improved planting materials, training on good agricultural practices and access to credit for the purchase of inputs and timely land preparation.

13

Table 3: Performance of Major Commodities Supported by the Programme YEAR

MAIZE

Area (ha)

2009

103.00

SOYA

Yield (Mt)

Production (Mt)

1.07

110.21

12.00

Area (ha)

Yield (Mt/ha)

SORGHUM

Yield (Mt)

RICE

Production (Mt)

Area (ha)

Production (Mt)

1.04

12.48

-

-

-

-

-

-

Area (ha)

Yield (Mt)

Production (Mt)

2010

1,998.00

1.13

2,257.74

152.00

1.04

158.08

85.00

0.93

79.05

-

-

-

2011

3,393.70

2.00

6,787.40

944.00

1.30

1,227.20

219.00

1.08

236.52

-

-

-

2012

8,661.70

2.50

21,654.25

730.00

1.50

1,095.00

169.80

1.30

220.74

-

-

-

2013

23,563.10

2.86

67,390.47

6,344.01

1.63

10,340.74

627.20

1.41

884.35

1,409.00

98,200.07

8,182.01

12,833.50

1,101.00

1,420.66

1,409.00

Total

37,719.50

14

2.81

3,959.29

-

3,959.29

Sesame Production To date, a total of one hundred and seventy-eight farmers made up thirty (30) males and one hundred and forty-eight (148) females. The table below summarizes the groups, number of farmers involved and acreage cultivated for the Sesame Production programme. Table 4: Summary of Groups for Sesame Production - Upper East Region No.

1

District

Kassena-Nankana West

Name Of Group

Membership

Area Cultivated (Acres)

M

F

TOTAL

Gasingo Young Farmers

8

2

10

Atoodichiga Women

-

20 20

Dezendani Women

-

20.00 22

22 Sakpenia Farmer

-

22.00 17

17 Tazienka Women Asso.

-

17.00 52

52 Banyono Farmer

-

52.00 10

10 Gasingo Farmers 2 GaruTempane

Tempane So'od Farmers

3 Bawku West

Toende Farmers

10.00

10.00 9

7

2

3

7

12

16

9.00 10 10.00 28

TOTAL

148

53.50 178

30 Average yield=1.4

203.50 Total Production

284.90 mt/ha

The Programme is also collaborating with SNV on the promotion of Sesame production. A proposal has been submitted by SNV and an agreement being finalized to engage them to facilitate and promote the production of the commodity.

15

Registration of Farmers for Partnership with AVNASH industries for Rice Production Following recommendations from the Inter-Phase Review (IPR) mission, the programme has initiated steps to register interested rice farmers for programme facilitation. The programme has registered four hundred and seventy-nine (479) farmers made up of two hundred and eighty-seven (287) males and one hundred and eighty-seven (187) females. A total of 1,409 acres have been cultivated under this partnership. The table below summarizes the names of groups, acreages cultivated and the location of fields. The table 5: FBOs registered under the Partnership with AVNASH No

Name of Groups

MEMBERSHIP Male

Female

Location

Area to Cultivate

Contact Person

Mobile

Total (Acres)

1

Suglo Farms (SPV)

40

18

58

Savelugu

410

Alhaji Abdul Mumin Issahaku

0244 434002

2

Suglo Veilla Group

25

26

51

Nabogu

100

Yakubu Issahaku

0240 514659

3

Tisogtaba Group (SPV)

21

8

29

PongTamale

120

Peter Nyagri

0242106846

4

Suglo Veilla Co-operative Food Farming and Marketing Society

25

5

30

Savelugu

224

Ahmed Hamidu (Secretary)

0266539279 - 114.9 acres @ Gbumlini - 53.7 [email protected] Bagurugu - 55.40 [email protected] Maligunaayili

5

Kulaa Kunol Veila Farmers

4

46

50

Kulaa

94

6

Wovogu Tiyuniba Farmers

30

10

40

Wovugu

76

7

Taha Suglo Malnyori

37

13

50

Taha

85

8

Gbalahi Suglo Mbor Buni Farmers

37

13

50

Gbalahi

101

9

Wovuguma Suglo Mbora Farmers

25

25

50

Wovoguma

78

10

Gbalahi Tiyumtaba Farmers

21

12

33

Gbalahi

58

11

Taha Yem Nyeremi Farmers

22

16

38

Taha

63

TOTAL

287

187

479

1,409

16

0205349407;

DDA Sagnarigu

0267758225

b. Training and Capacity Building Activities The programme has carried out a number of capacity building activities to enable these smallholder farmers to profitably engage the other chain actors. Farmers under the programme continue to receive training on good agricultural practices. During the period under review, the newly identified FBOs have received training on the underlisted. - Crop Budget preparation - Proper land preparation and tillage practices - Improved soil and water conservation - Training of farmer group leaders on group dynamics and principles - Gender mainstreaming and leadership skills in groups - Business and financial management An initial 11,286 farmers made up of 6,546 males and 4740 females have been trained on above. Further training on Good Agricultural Practices and farm management as well as production demonstrations will be conducted in selected districts and locations for all category of groups (old and new) during the third and subsequent quarters of the year. Demonstrations Plans to implement demonstrations on use of improved varieties of maize (Yellow maize, Aposoe, Etubi, Pannar) and soyabean (Janguma and Quarshie) in combination with good agricultural practices is being conducted in selected districts and locations. The FA has met with MOFA and the respective co-operating farmers on implementation arrangements and some of the stakeholders such as Input dealers and collaborating partners have agreed to fund key inputs (land preparation, seed, weedicides and fertilizers) of these demonstrations. The table below summarizes the number of these demos per region, lead (co-operating) farmers involved, type of crops and acreage per demonstration plot. The demonstrations were mostly maize and soya using the above mentioned varieties. Table 6: Demonstrations per Region Region

Target Demos

No. of demos

Host /lead farmer

Crop

Size of plot (acre)

Source of inputs

UWR

36

48

48

Maize/ Soya

1

UER

36

31

31





IDs, TSPs, FBOs, Yara, ADVANCE, AEAs, MoFA

NR

80

54

54





BA

20

33

33





Totals

172

166

166

Maize/soya

1

In all, 166 of the 172 demonstrations targeted were carried out representing 96.51% achievement. This involved 166 farmers cultivating 166 ha and average of 1 ha per co-operating farmers. The average yield recorded was 3.48 mt/ha.

17

Demonstrations on Soil fertility restoration/conservation using bunds In addition to the above demonstrations, SARI facilitated the conduct of demonstration on integrated soil fertility management using PLAR methodologies. These were carried out in thirteen (13) out of sixteen districts whose staff and farmers have been trained in previous years on participatory learning and action research on integrated soil fertility management. Each district was to undertake an average of 5 demonstrations but due to erratic rainfall and the late start of the rains, some districts could not do 5 demonstrations. Table 7: Districts Participating in Soil Fertility restoration/conservation demonstrations Region

District

No of Groups

No of Farmers

Northern Region4

Tolon

5

200

West Gonja

5

200

Bunkpurugu

2

80

Nanumba Norther

5

200

West Mamprusi

4

160

21

840

Wa West

5

200

Lawra

3

120

Jirapa

5

200

13

520

Garu Tempane

5

200

Bawku Municipal

1

40

Bongo

5

200

Bawku West

3

120

Talensi

2

80

Sub-total

16

640

Total

50

2,000

Sub-total Upper West Region

Sub-total Upper East Region

4

Saboba and Savelugu District could not carry out the demonstration due to the late start of the rains 18

In all, a total of 2,000 farmers are directly participating in the demonstration of ISFM and bunding in the three regions as contained in the table above. Methodology used At each site, an acre of land was ploughed and harrowed with a tractor, a bullock or hand hoe. This was divided into two parts along the slope. The recommended fertilizer (2 bags compound and one bag ammonia/acre) was applied to the maize in the first part. The maize variety used as the test crop in the demonstration was Obatampa. Half rate of organic manure/ha from the farmers’ pen (4 tons/ha) was used to apply to the second part of the plot and worked in before planting the maize. In addition, half the rate of compound fertilizer and ammonia/acre was also applied to the same plot at the appropriate periods. The second plot treated with both organic and inorganic fertilizers was in each case bunded. Earth bund was constructed round this second plot in each case to enable the plot retain moisture after rains. The farmers were sensitized to cut open the bunds in case of frequent rains since maize cannot tolerate standing water. The bunds are therefore effective in times of intermittent drought during the cropping season. Before the establishments of these demonstrations, some of the field officers and the participating farmers were trained in the identification of slope and the construction of bunds. The yields will be monitored to see the effect of this technology on improvement of yields. Training of Water Users Associations During the period under review, One Hundred and Fifty (150) farmers made up of 123 males and 27 females have been trained and provided skills in 

Irrigation water management,



Pump maintenance and repairs and



Safe and Good Agricultural practices with respect to pump irrigation.

Butternuts Production The Programme also introduced butternuts squash in 2011 where 3.2 ha of the commodity was demonstrated producing 64mt for export. As a result of the success in the production of the commodity, 56 ha was put to its cultivation in 2012 and harvested in the first quarter of 2013 producing 1,123mt of which 60% representing 673.80mt was exported. The remaining 40% was sold in local shopping malls. The local consumption of the commodity is also being promoted. In 2013, over 112 ha has been put to cultivation yielding on the average 19.4 mt/ha. NRGP is collaborating with Savanna Accelerated Development Authority in the promotion of the commodity. Protection of River Banks The Programme (NRGP) as part of its objectives of promoting dry season farming has provided water pumps to interested farmers in the programme area. As part of the environmental safeguards implementation in using these pumps the programme has procured and distributed 19

tree seedlings (4000 grafted mangoes, 2000 acacia and 2,000 shea) to the beneficiary farmers for planting to protect and enrich the buffer zones (revering vegetation) of the perennial water bodies being used for the irrigation. Table below gives the breakdown for the distribution and planting so far (as of 1st October 2013) the survival rates. Table 8: Seedling Distribution and Planting by Farmers (a) No

Phase One (2013) Region

Districts

Seedlings Mangoes

Acacia

Survival Rates (%) Total

1

Upper East

Bawku Municipal/Binduri District (Ganaga200, Bekko-200, Bansi-300, Yaligu-200)

900

400

1,300

20%

2

Northern

Central Gonja (Buipe)

600

400

1,000

50%

3

Upper West

Jirapa (Gbetuouri)

500

275

775

70%

4

Upper West

Lawra (Metor)

700

275

975

70%

2,700

1,350

4,050

Total

(b) No

Phase Two (2013) Region

Districts

Seedlings Mangoes

Acacia

Shea

Total

Brong Ahafo

Pru/Sene/Kintampo Municipal

560

650

1100

2,310

1

Upper East

Garu Tempane/Bawku West/ Wa Municipal

85

-

900

985

2

Northern

Yet to be supplied

-

-

-

3

Upper West

Yet to be supplied

-

-

-

645

650

2,000

Total

3,295

All the areas being used by pump farmers for dry season irrigation usually get flooded during the rainy season. This forces them to vacate these areas and farm elsewhere in the major season (rainy season). The level of flooding in these areas is also unpredictable as there are factors such as construction of the Bui Dam which hinders especially the Black Volta flow hence affecting the upstream water levels. Taking cognizance of the peculiarity of these sites, the tree planting activities were carried out in the dry season (April-May 2013). This has also placed additional responsibility on the farmers to water these seedlings until their roots are established and the rains set in.

20

The following pictures illustrate the distribution and planting of the seedlings in the various regions.

Figure 4: Tree planting by farmers in Upper East Region (Bawku Municipal and Binduri Districts)

Figure 5: Tree planting by farmers in Northern Region (Central Gonja - Buipe)

21

Figure 6: Tree planting by farmers in Upper West Region (Jiraba District)

Figure 7: Tree planting by farmers in Upper West Region (Lawra District)

Training of Farmers on Safe Use and Handling of Agrochemicals and ControllingBushfires Training on Agrochemical Use In Upper East Region (UER) four (4) communities (around Tono irrigation sites, Pawlugu, and Senteng) were educated on safe use and handling of agrochemicals. Resource persons were drawn from Environmental Protections Agency (EPA), Forestry Services Commission and MOFA. Videos on the activity were featured both on GTV and Radio Ghana today. It was also feature by a local FM station (RADIO-AI that is 101.1). In Upper West Region (UWR), 500 farmers (males -350 females -150) were sensitized on bush fire prevention. Radio discussions carried out (covered the whole of UWR) on the harmful effects of bush fires, pollution of water bodies, causes of climate change and its adaptation strategies. In the Northern Region, Radio discussions were also carried out at local radio stations at Might Fm in the Savelugu-Nanton District, Saboba Radio in the Saboba District and Radio Pad in the West Gonja District. Various local dialect of areas was used for the discussions to educate and sensitize farmers on the selection, safe use, handling and disposal of agro-chemicals (pesticides: weedicides /herbicides). This was targeted to reach over 30,000 farmers in these areas. In all of these trainings, farmers were taught the seven golden rules of safe use and handling or dealing with agro-chemicals which are as follows: 22

1. Apply the right insecticides, weedicides and fungicides to insect pests, weeds and fungicides respectively; 2. Buy pesticides from approved shops; 3. Read and understand the instructions on the pesticide container carefully before use; 4. Practice good personal hygiene and avoid pesticide poisoning through skin contact, inhaling and food contamination; 5. Wear protective clothing (goggles, nose mask, gloves, apron, long boots, trousers, long sleeves shirt etc.) when handling pesticides; 6. Never mix pesticides with your bear hands; and 7. Avoid spraying too close to crops to reduce contamination.

Figure 8: Recommended Personal Protective clothing and Equipment

Figure 9: The MOFA Information Van used for the Video shows and Campaigns

Campaigns on Bushfires Campaigns on bushfires and other unhealthy environmental practices took place in three communities in the Builsa North and South district which are prone to bushfires especially during the rice harvesting season. The resourse persons were drawn from the District Assemblies, Ghana National Fire Service (GNFS), foresters and personnel from the media and MOFA. At the fora, communities were taken through the hazards of bushfire and how they can cause food insecurity issues for the region as a whole. The various resource persons took turns to educate the communities on the issue of bushfires and the overall impact on national food security issues and the need to collectively fight bushfires by enacting and enforcing the District Assemblies’ bye laws. 23

In Builsa District, Radio Builsa held a talk show to discuss bushfires and how communities could fight it jointly. c. Establishment of District Value Chain Committees (DVCCs) The District Value Chain Committees (DVCCs) is NRGP’s approach to the development of the Commodity Inter-Professional Bodies (IPBs) through the initial formation of these “grass roots” institutions. They comprise a cross-section of actors, support institutions, as core members and sometimes engage facilitators, referees or even brokers to ensure equity amongst actors especially in price negotiation during marketing. The ultimate aim of the DVCC is to ensure efficiency in the value chain, equity in the sharing of value-added, direct research and investment decisions in the value chain for continuous upgrading, profitability and growth. They also provide an important role in determining priority needs for investment in the respective value chains, as well as providing for the development of trusted commercial linkages within their membership and amongst the various actors and stakeholders. The DVCCs will continue to receive capacity building with the view to making them the foundations for sustainable value chain governance institutions. The Programme started with an initial establishment of 15 DVCCs in 2011, increase number to 35 in 2012 and finally 8 DVCCs were added in 2013, thus covering all the districts in the programme area. There are now 43 DVCCs (1 per each Programme District) functioning at different levels of maturity and development in the “industrial crops” value chains (soybeans, maize and sorghum). Regional distribution of these DVCCs is as capture in the table below. Table 9: The regional breakdown of DVCCs distribution No 1 2 3 4

Region Northern Upper East Upper West Brong/Ahafo TOTAL

No of DVCC (2011) 4 3 6 2 15

No of DVCC (2012) 12 9 9 5 35

No of DVCC (2013) 20 9 9 5 43

Within the period under review, 3 Executives of each DVCCs have been trained in group dynamics, gender mainstreaming and business and financial management. d. Establishment of Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) The Programme after two (2) years implementation identified that support and other project interventions due small-holder farmers do not get to the many targeted clients due to limited human resource of FAs and MOFA’s DADUs and RADUs. These smallholder farmers also have limited/no access to inputs like fertilizers, agro-chemicals, extension service delivery, improved, high yielding and disease-resistant varieties which is further compounded by limited access to marketing opportunities.

24

The programme after field operations and based on lessons learnt, decided to use an innovative approach to enable many of these smallholder farmers improve on their access to production facilities that will increase their productivity and production and also help the smallholder farmers’ access to market and good pricing. The instrument used to achieve the above was the Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV). The SPVs are relatively well-endowed farmers who have access to productive resources and are ready to support other smallholder farmers in their operational enclaves. They also have the capacity to organize these farmers into production, facilitate their access to extension services, and other production inputs as well as enhance the post production activities of the smallholder farmers by mobilizing their produce for better and assured markets. Productivity and Production by SPVs In 2011, this innovation was tested on a pilot basis in the Northern Region with 2 of such SPVs who were previous National farmers Award winners and also have access to financial institutions like Stanbic bank, Agricultural Development Banks and Tizaa Rural Bank. Through NRGP facilitation, the 2 SPVs got credit to the sum of GH¢286,850.00. This credit was in the form of supply of equipment like tractors and accessories, agricultural production inputs as well as some cash for some services that demand the direct payments from the SPVs. During this year, the 2 SPVs were able to organize 52 out-grower farmer groups for production of maize and soyabeans. These outgrower groups are made up of 1,040 members comprising 758 males and 282 females, who cultivated 1860 ha of maize and 1500 ha of soyabeans. These farmers received services from the SPVs in the form of ploughing their fields, supply of agro-inputs (fertilizer, seed, and agro-chemicals) and as well extension from MoFA. Farmers under this arrangement experienced increased in productivity from an average of 2.0mt/ha in 2011 to 2.5mt/ha in 2012 for maize. In the case of soyabeans, from an initial average of 1.85mt/ha in 2011 to an average of 2.3 mt/ha in 2012 as a result of the smallholder farmers’ enhanced access to farm service delivery through their SPVs. Similarly, acreages have increased from an average of below 1ha in 2011 to 2.5ha in 2012 for the smallholders under the SPV model. Under this arrangement, farmers have access to reliable markets for their produce through the mobilization scheme by the SPV. In 2011, farmers under the scheme have sold off their produce without the usual problems associated with marketing problems. This developed encouraged the coming on board of many other farmers into the existing Outgrower groups. This development also signaled the Programme to expand the approach to the other regions in 2012. During the 2012 major cropping season, the programme facilitated new SPVs into the programme. The number of SPVs rose to a cumulative total of 34 and reached out to a total of 222 outgrower groups with 5,294 farmers made up of 3,971 males and 1323 females. Table below elaborates the achievement.

25

Table 10: Outgrower Participation with SPVs No

Year

No. of SPVs

No. of Outgrower Groups

Membership M

F

T

1

2011

2

52

758

282

1040

2

2012

34 (2011 &2012)

222 (2011-2013)

3971

1323

5294

3

2013

37 (2011+2013)

458 (2011-2013)

4074

1815

5889

A total of 16,899.80 ha have been to cultivation of the various commodities (Maize = 9,238.40 ha Soyabeans = 6,907.90 ha, Sorghum = 754 ha). The SPVs registered improved productivities for the various commodities. During the second year (2012), the average yield registered for maize stood at about 2.6mt/ha as against the 2.5mt/ha in 2011. The average yield for soyabeans came to 1.9mt/ha as against 2.3 for 2011 registering a drop to the base figure (2.3mt/ha) for the SPV in 2011. However, this figure (1.9mt/ha) is still an improvement on the smallholders’ base yields which was 1.85mt/ha before the intervention in 2011. During the third year of the model, the number of SPVs increased to 37. These SPVs have facilitated production for a total of 458 outgrower groups comprising 5889 members (4074 males and 1815 females). These individual farmers have put under cultivation a total of 24583ha (Maize = 14,657ha, Soyabeans = 9,172ha and Sorghum = 754ha). Yields for the various commodities are yet to be established through yield studies by MoFA and confirmation from the farmers’ harvest.

26

The table below gives regional basis on the achievement of NRGP facilitation for 2011-2013 Table 11:Performance of SPVs YEAR

2011

2012

2013

REGION

NO OF SPVs

ADDITIONAL OUTGROWER GROUPS PER ANNUM

MEMBERSHIP

ACREAGE (HA)

AVERAGE YIELDS (MT/HA)

PRODUCTION (MT)

M

F

T

MAIZE

SOYA

SORGHUM

MAIZE

SOYA

SORGHUM

MAIZE

SOYA

SORGHUM

BAR

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NR

2

52

758

282

1040

1860

1500

0

2.5

2.3

0

4650

3600

0

UER

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

UWR

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

52

758

282

1040

1860

1500

0

2.5

2.3

0

4650

3600

0

BAR

4

13

519

103

622

490

0

0

2.5

0

1235

0

0

NR

2

75

476

91

567

5050

5050

250

2.7

2.0

1.9

13885

10085

475

UER

14

44

1285

398

1683

2960.4

619.4

0

2.6

1.90

0

7740

1150

0

UWR

12

38

933

449

1382

1228

1238

504

2.5

1.9

1.7

3077

2380

883.2

32

170

3213

1041

4254

9728.4

6907.4

754

2.58

1.93

1.8

25937

13615

1358.2

BAR

0

15

533

244

777

990

0

0

3.2

3168

0

0

NR

1

86

851

269

1120

6495

5280

250

3.2

20784

12672

525

27

2.4

2.1

UER

2

71

1712

812

2524

5000

1500

0

2.7

2.1

UWR

0

64

978

490

1468

2172

2392

504

2.9

2.2

3

236

4074

1815

5889

14657

9172

754

3.0

2.27

28

13500

3150

0

1.8

6298.80

5262.4

907.2

1.95

43750.8

21084.4

1432.2

29

Credit Leveraged to SPVs From 2011 to 2013, the use of the SPV model has improved credit delivery to farmers just as they have had improved access to market, extension services and other services. Since the introduction of this model, the pilot SPVs received a total of GHC 286,850.00 to reach out to the 52 outgrower groups they are servicing. This benefited a total of 1040 individual farmers comprising 758 males and 282 females. In 2012, the total number of SPVs operating (34), had access to GHC 1,610,600.00 to facilitate the production activities of 222 outgrower groups (52 old ones and 170 new ones). These groups were made up of 4254 individuals comprising 3213 males and 1041 females. In 2013, the scheme made extra improvement by increasing the number of SPVs to 37, thus an increase of 3 SPVs to the existing. They sponsored a total extra number of 236 outgrower farmers groups bringing the total of outgrower groups to 458 made up of 5889 individual farmers comprising 4074 males and 1815 females. The SPVs were able to moblise a total of GHC 1,695,948.76 to finance the operations of the outgrower groups and their individual farmers. Table 12: Credit Leveraged to SPVs Year

2011

Region

No. SPVs

Membership

0

ADDITIONAL Outgrowers Groups/ANNUAL 0

BAR

Amount of Credit Received (GHC)

M 0

F 0

T 0

0.00

NR

2

52

758

282

1040

286,850.00

UER

0

0

0

0

0

0.00

UWR

0

0

0

0

0

0.00

Total

2

52

758

282

1040

286,850.00

BAR

4

13

519

103

622

457,700.00

NR

2

75

476

91

567

98,500.00

UER

14

44

1285

398

1683

496,816.00

UWR

12

38

933

449

1382

557,584.00

Total

32

170

3213

1041

4254

1,610,600.00

BAR

0

15

533

244

777

210,700.00

NR

1

86

851

269

1120

1,050,000.00

UER

2

71

1712

812

2524

155,988.76

UWR

0

64

978

490

1468

279,260.00

Total

3

236

4074

1815

5889

1,695,948.76

2012

2013

NRGP e. Collaboration with Research and other stakeholders in the dissemination of improved Technologies The programme in partnership with IFDC has developed farmer-to-farmer video training materials DVD on some improved technologies in seven (7) local languages of the programme area. These videos are on: -

Contour bund approach for land and water conservation Urea Deep Placement technology Drip Irrigation in Tomato Maize/mucuna based system for soil fertility restoration.

The DVDs in English and the seven languages (Dagaare, Dagbani, Grune, Sisaali, Buli, Kusaal and Gonja) on Urea Deep Placement technology and Drip Irrigation in Tomato have been received. The local language versions of Contour bund and maize mucuna based system for soil fertility restoration will be received in due course. These video training materials will be used during farmer training sessions either alone or in combination with other training media. Discussions are being held with some radio stations to discuss the possibility of airing the audio versions on radio. These are planned for the last quarter and the first quarter of next year. The Programme will jointly search for similar videos on conservation agriculture to facilitate the Programme’s planned introduction of conservation agriculture to beneficiaries

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 31

NRGP

2.2

COMPONENT B: RURAL INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

The Rural Infrastructure Development component is to develop the potential for irrigation and integrated water management to shift from the over dependent on rainfed cultivation which is highly vulnerable to climate change risks. The approach to rural infrastructure development takes into consideration the need to establish clear links between infrastructure interventions and commodity chains development from both geographical and technical point of view. This component is made up of the following sub-components;  Irrigation Development (Small dams and river pumping schemes)  Marketing infrastructure development (includes the construction of feeder roads, farm access track and warehouses and packhouses)  Flood recession and water conservation schemes However, due to challenges encountered during implementation with respect to the targets and budgetary allocation, many of the targets could not be achieved. The programme therefore called for an early Mid Term Review (MTR) which was fielded in November 2011 and the sub components and targets were revised. The revised sub-components were: (a) Small Scale Irrigation Development;  River pumping schemes  Water Conservation schemes and (b) Marketing Infrastructure Development  Roads infrastructure development ( feeder roads, farm access tracks); and  Marketing infrastructure (warehouses and packhouses) The revised targets and costing are detailed below Table 13: REVISED TARGETS AND COSTING AT MTR Category

Total (UA’000)

Unit

Target

1.1 Feeder Roads/Farm access tracks

Km

600/200

16,732.34

1.2 Completion of 12 SSIDP Irrigation Schemes in NRGP Area

Ha

1499

5,319.11

1.3 Completion of 9 SSIDP Schemes in expanded Area

Ha

696

2,618.40

1.4 Completion of 20 IVRDP Schemes

Ha

633.6

2,843.93

1.5 Warehouses and Pack houses

No

14

3,385.48

1.6 Flood Recession Schemes

Ha

1000

1. Civil Works

Sub-Total (Works)

770.89 31,670.15

2. Goods 2.1 Vehicles

No

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

9

174.19

Page 32

NRGP 2.2 Irrigation Pumps

No

2.3 Office Supplies 2.4 Environment and health

150

614.10

Lumpsum

100.00

Lumpsum

900.01

Sub-Total (Goods)

1,788.30

3. Services 3.1 Engineering Design and Construction Supervision

Lumpsum

1,736.27

3.2 Technical Assistance, Audits

Lumpsum

1,000.00

3.3 Training, Meetings, Workshops with UDS, GIDA etc

Lumpsum

1,500.00

3.4 Services by Dept of Feeder Roads

Lumpsum

692.83

3.5 Supervision/Training Services by GIDA

Lumpsum

129.03

-

5,058.13

Sub-Total (Services) 4. Personnel 4.1 Rural Infrastructure Specialist (3 years)

No

1

81.29

4.2 Procurement and Contract Mgt. Specialist (3 years)

No

1

69.68

4.3 Irrigation Engineer (3 years)

No

1

69.68

4.4 Two (2) Drivers (3 years)

No

2

23.23

4.5 Office Assistant (3 years)

No

3

11.61

Sub-Total (Personnel)

255.49

5. Operating Expenses 5.1 Monitoring, Training and Other Activities

Lumpsum

700.00

Lumpsum

527.93

6. Miscellaneous 6.1 Unallocated Total

40,000.00

2.2.1 Review of 2013 Performance of Component B Since the MTR, a lot of progress has been made so far as implementation of the infrastructure component is concerned. This session reviews the implementation of the component. Table 14: Key Performance indicators for component B Component

Performance Indicator

Uni t

Small Scale irrigation developed

Increase in area under irrigation

Ha

41 small scale irrigation schemes constructed

No

AWP& B Target 900

Annua l 516

% Achieve d 57.33

Cumm .

Appraisa l Target

516

4,500

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

50

Midterm target 2,828.6 0

%

Remarks

18.2 4

41

-

86 pumps have been distributed and accounts for this acreage in cultivation. Consultants have been recruited to validate the earlier designs for

Page 33

NRGP Component

Market infrastructur e developed

Performance Indicator

Uni t

AWP& B Target

Annua l

% Achieve d

Cumm .

Appraisa l Target

Midterm target

%

Flood Recession Schemes constructed and Soil and water conservation techniques promoted

Ha

200

100

50

300

400

1,000

30

Number of WUAs established and functional

No

30

30

100

99

325

200

49.5 0

Km of feeder roads rehabilitated/construct ed

Km

200

50

0

158

600

600

26

Farm access tracks reh/constructed

Km

0

0

0

0

800

200

0

Warehouses constructed

No

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

No

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

Pack constructed

houses

Remarks

constructio n 300 ha of land conservatio n programme is carried out in UER These are WUAs organized along perenial water bodies using pump machines 16 of 69 lots have been completed. Consultants are being recruited to design these farm access track Consultant has been recruited to design them

Consultan t has been recruited to design them

Since the MTR, a lot of progress has been made so far as implementation of the infrastructure component is concerned. This session reviews the implementation of the component. Small Scale Irrigation Development Completion of Agricultural Water management (AWM) schemes The Programme coverage area has been expanded now to include sites where construction of irrigation infrastructure were initiated under the Inland Valley Rice Development Project (IVRDP) and the Small Scale Irrigation Development Project (SSIDP) but were not completed for use by the stakeholders. The sites comprise of 20 IVRDP Schemes located in Brong Ahafo Region (2), Ashanti Region (8), and Western Region (10) with a total design area of 633.6ha and twenty one (21) SSIDP sites located in Volta Region (6), Central Region (2) and Ashanti Region (1), Brong Ahafo (2),

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 34

NRGP Northern region (4); Upper East Region (2), Upper West Region (4) with a design area of 2195 Ha. These schemes have been grouped into five (5) zones and for each zone one consulting firm has been recruited to provide the design and construction supervision services. The zones and the estimated number of irrigation infrastructure sites to be developed are detailed below: Table 15: Location of Irrigation schemes for construction Zone

Regions Covered

Districts Covered

I

NORTHERN, UPPER EAST. UPPER WEST, BRONG AHAFO BRONG AHAFO, ASHANTI

Bawku West; Central Gonja; Savelugu Nantom; Wa Municipal; Jirapa, Sissal West; Kintampo North Ejisu Juaben; EjuraSekyedumasi; Ahafo Ano North; Ahafo Ano South; Attebubu Aowin Suaman; Sefwi Wiawso; Juaboso; Mpohor Wassa; Wassa West; Mfantsiman Dangbe West;North Tongu; South Tongu; Hohoe

II III

IV

WESTERN, CENTRAL

V

GREATER ACCRA, VOLTA

TOTAL

Irrigation Infrastructure Schemes Small Scale Inland Total Valley Area(Ha) 6 0 878 6

0

621

1

10

355.6

2

10

314

6

0

660

21

20

2,828.6

The consulting firms recruited to provide the designs and also supervise the construction are provided in the table below and the progress of works so far made by the consultants. Table 16: Consulting Firms and Progress of work made Lot No.

Operating Regions

Consultant/Firm

1

Northern /Upper East

GITEC /MDC(Ghana)

2

Brong Ahafo/Upper West

3

Ashanti/Brong Ahafo

FAS Consult (Ghana)

Date contract was Signed

29/05/13

Contract Amount

Status on Contract

USD 909,398.00

 Field verification done and Inception report submitted  Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted  Field verification done and Inception report submitted  Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted

USD 798,450

 Field verification done and Inception report submitted  Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted  Advert Placed for Contractors  No Objection obtained from Bank

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 35

NRGP 

4

Western

WAPCOS(INDIA)/J&M Partners(Ghana)

4/6/13

USD 990,175.00

5

Central/Greater Accra/Volta

MSV (USA)/BANS Consult(Ghana)/Hydroterra (Ghana)

10/6/13

USD 784,998.32

Contract awarded

 Field verification done and Inception report submitted  Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted  Advert Placed for Contractors  No Objection obtained from Bank  Contract awarded  Field verification done and Inception report submitted  Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted  Advert Placed for Contractors  No Objection obtained from Bank  Contract awarded

Flood recession schemes/moisture conservation schemes Under the flood recession schemes, the sites have been identified in consultation with the Regional Managers of GIDA and the Regional and Districts Directorates of Agriculture. GIDA is supporting the programme to survey and design of these areas. The identified irrigable areas under water conservation that can be developed at these sites are shown in the table below Table 17: Flood recession and moisture conservation sites Region Upper East Region

Community Wiensi Gbedembilisi (1) Gbedembilisi (2)

Area Identified (ha) 53 350 249

Potential Clients 53*2 350*2 249*2

Northern Region

Sabari

170

170

Demon/Kbalga

60

60

Mogneigu Valley

100

100

Total

982

982

Other sites are being investigated in Upper West and Brong Ahafo Regions. Ghana irrigation Development Authority (GIDA) and Agricultural and Engineering Services Directorate (AESD) MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 36

NRGP of MoFA have been selected to provide surveys designs and construction supervision of the sites. GIDA has just started surveys at Wiensi site. River Pumping Irrigation 

Over 40 communities along the perennial water with potential for water pumping irrigation were sensitized. These sensitization involved the District Assemblies. As a result 6 District Assemblies have procured pumps from NRGP for irrigator farmers in their districts. In all 86 pumps have been distributed.



Within the reporting period, over 516 ha of land were put to cultivation of various vegetables including fresh maize, pepper, tomatoes, onions and butternut squash. Whereas yields in rainfed for maize production has been 2.4mt/ha, under irrigation, farmers obtained over 3.5mt/ha.



ESMPs have been prepared and are being implemented for the pumping schemes as well as small dams development.

Marketing Infrastructure Development The following revised targets were reached during the Mid-Term Review (MTR) in November 2011 under the marketing infrastructure development component: i.

rehabilitation / spot improvement of 600 km of feeder roads;

ii.

construction of 200 km of farm access track; and

iii.

Construction of 10 warehouses and 4 pack houses.

Rehabilitation/Spot improvement of 600 km of Feeder roads Out of the 16 lots of roads awarded in 2011, only 11 were completed. The remaining 5 which were not completed have been re-awarded. The table below presents the uncompleted roads and the new contractors Table 18: Repackaged Feeder roads for completion REPACKAGED ROAD No

Name of road

Length (km)

New Contractor

Old Contract Value (GHC)

New Contract Value (GHC)

Region

District

1

Kokubilla–Mallam Farm

4.50

Aschal Investment

537,918.48

142,264.50

Northern

SaveluguNanton

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 37

NRGP 2

Datoyilli – Golinga

4.20

Ricanda

177,889.36

249,270.12

Northern

TolonKumbungu

3

Nasia – Mimima PH 2

14.00

Alhaji Iddrisu Adjei

206,709.80

1,020,743.95

Northern

West Mamprusi

4

Mognori–Kpelumb PH 1

19.95

B. K. Nsiah

567,067.70

1,014,120.56

Northern

West Gonja

5

Siroo – Vieri

12.00

Dachese Gh. Ltd

536,071.70

417,829.61

Upper West

Wa West

Total

54.65

2,025,657.04

2,844,228.74

For the second batch of 53 lots of Feeder Roads (totalling 492 km), the performance according to regions was mixed. The physical progress and financial progress as September 2013 according to regions were Northern Region (20 Lots) 60% and 35%; Brong Ahafo Region (10 Lots) 51% and 30% respectively; Upper East Region (11 Lots) 49% and 26% respectively and Upper West (12 Lots) 38% and 21% respectively. Some of the contractors are behind schedule and 4 contractors have not remobilize to their sites inspite of various warnings. A summary of physical and financial progress per regions to date is indicated in table below. Table 19: Physical and Financial Progress of Feeder Roads Contracts No

Region

Lots

Length (km)

1 2 3 4 Total

Northern Upper West Upper East Brong Ahafo

20 12 11 10 53

203.30 107.05 103.70 77.95 492.00

Contract Amounts (GH¢) 10,911,612.36 7,909,058.80 7,159,927.17 4,780,135.82 30,760,734.15

Average Physical Prog (%) 60.30 37.87 49.27 51.36 49.70

Of great concern is the long time it takes from contractors’ request for payment and when the application is submitted to the Bank for payment. This has led to some contractors demobilizing temporarily from site due to cash flow challenges. In addition, there is a time lapse (in one case of up to 3 months) between the due date given by the Bank and the time the contractors received payments in their accounts. Farm access tracks At MTR, 200km of farm access tracks have been targeted for construction. Long-list of firms capable of undertaking Consultancy Services for Engineering Design and Contract Supervision of Farm-tracks using Consultant Qualification Selection (CQS) method of procurement and Request for proposals have been submitted to the Bank for their No objection.

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 38

NRGP Selected firms were provided by the DFR and the bank approved of the TOR and shortlisted firms. RFP' s were submitted by the firms . Evaluation and negotiations have been done and a firm have been contracted to identify the access tracks, design these tracks and supervise the construction. Warehouses and Packhouses At MTR, 10 warehouses and 4 packhouses were recommended for construction. : Procurement of Consultancy Services for Engineering Design and Contract Supervision of the 10 Warehouses and 4 Packhouses have been completed. Consultant has been procured and has started work, Inception report has been received by the Programme. Table 20 The locations of the 10No Warehouses and 4No pack houses Districts Facilities Regions Warehouse Packhouse Warehouse Packhous e Northern Chereponi, Nanumba Savelugu/Nanton, 4 1 North, Gushiegu Sawla-Tuna-Kalba. Upper Sissala West, Lawra, Jirapa 3 1 West Nadowli Upper East Builsa, Garu-Tempane Kassena-Nankana 2 2 East, TalensiNabdam Brong Tain 1 0 Ahafo Total 10 4

Total 5

4 4

1 14

Environmental and Social Safeguards Implementation The 2013 environmental and social safeguards implementation focuses on the activities with environmental and social impacts and how they were or are being addressed. Overview of the 2013 E&S safeguards implementation covers the following: 1. Environmental and social safeguards monitoring of feeder roads construction works; 2. Environmental and social safeguards for dry season farming (tree planting activities); and 3. Training of farmers on safe use and handling of agrochemicals and controlling bushfires. Environmental and Social Safeguards Monitoring of Feeder Roads Construction Works The feeder roads rehabilitation works involve roads with existing right of way. The various scopes of works involve rehabilitation works (major and minor) and spot improvements. The maximum length of these roads is 20km and the minimum 2.4km. A maximum of 12 months is required for the longest period of works and 8 months for the minimum scope of works. There MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 39

NRGP are a total of 492km for rehabilitation consisting of 53 lots of roads with 20 lots in Northern Region, 11 lots in Upper East, 12 lots in Upper West and 10 lots in the five adjoining districts in the Brong Ahafo Regions. Status of Environmental and Social Safeguards Implementation of Feeder Roads Construction As part of ensuring the implementation of adequate environmental and social safeguards measures during the road construction works, monitoring visits were carried out by PMU, DFR, MoFA, etc to assess the levels of compliance and non-compliance. Discussions were also held with the Consultants (DFR) and Contractors on ways of improving compliances. The specific activities which are likely to impact negatively on the environment and have social implications for which there is a need for environmental and social safeguards are as follows: 

Land clearance for the right of way;



Road formation;



Road diversion;



Water course diversion;



Culvert construction;



Raw material sourcing; and



Gravelling.

The following are the major environmental safeguards which are being used to assess compliance of each Contractor: 1. Erosion prevention; 2. Prevention of loss of topsoil; 3. Water pollution prevention; 4. Provision of signs for road obstruction/diversions; 5. Dust control; 6. Waste management; 7. Noise control; 8. Controlled vegetation clearance/disturbance; 9. Vegetation reinstatement;

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 40

NRGP 10. Workers’ health and safety protection; and 11. Avoidance of stagnant waters. Each road is assessed on each of the above safeguards for compliance and non-compliance. Reminders are also sent to the Contractors on these assessments at their site meetings. The Tables 1 - 4 below provide the results of safeguards assessment for each site for the various regions: Provide operational support to EPA to carry out E&S compliance monitoring of NRGP’s projects: The construction of infrastructure has its own effect of environmental challenges. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has therefore been identified to provide support to PMU by way of ensuring that, all infrastructure constructed meet the barest minimum environmental challenges. Logistical support is being provided to EPA to enable them carry out this key role. The activities included visits to infrastructure development activities, training workshops, acquisition of any relevant permit and compliance monitoring by EPA amongst others. c) Train GIDA engineers and supervisors on procurement and other improved technologies for design, report writing etc The Programme is expected to build the capacity of GIDA in procurement, and improved design technologies, report writing and other training needs that may be identified. The Programme as part of 2013 budget was to strengthen the Government’s capacity in the field of Irrigation delivery. The NRGP organized one-week training course for GIDA technical staff from all the Regions. The 6-day training course was conducted from the July 29th , to August 4th 2013. Thirty-Three (33) Engineers and Technical staff have been trained in the following areas: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. ix. x. xi.

Site Selection and project design: feasibility study Site Selection and project design: water resources development Site Selection and project design: irrigation systems design Works Procurement, contract management and project supervision Planning and project preparation Computer design skills: Autocad, Aquacrop Challenges and prospects of different AWM/Irrigation Systems in Ghana Typologies of AWM Systems in Ghana and their Importance Land Tenure and Water use Challenges on Irrigation Sites Irrigation Agronomy and Extension: What exists and which way forward Field trip to some Irrigation sites: pump system and Gravity system.

d) Develop Operation and Maintenance Manual for the completed schemes Operation and maintenance manuals have been developed by the Programme to guide the Water User Associations (WUAs) in the operations and maintenance of these schemes. A amount of US$15,000 was used to develop these manuals. This cost involved the payment of fees, DSA and MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 41

NRGP travelling expenses of experts that were identified to carry out this activity. Most of the schemes were found to be non operational, due to difficulties of farmers getting water to their fiels. Land development and water distribution was a big challenge in most of the schemes. Implementation Agreements Implementation agreements in the form of MOU’s have been signed between DFR and the Programme for the supervision of the feeder roads that have been awarded on contract. Four (4) pickups have been procured and delivered to the DFRs. Twenty percent (20%) of the fees have been disbursed and so far works are progressing Implementation agreements in the form of MOU’s have been signed between Ghana irrigation Development Authority (GIDA), Agricultural Engineering Services Division (AESD)of MoFa and NRGP in identification ,design, and construction supervision of water conservation schemes. This has greatly accelerated the implementation of this component of the Programme Challenges and Lessons Learnt 

The key success factor of the subcomponent will be: (a) a strict respect to timing; (b) adherence and respect to MOUs, no-objection requests; and (c) performance efficiency of all stakeholders.



The PMU has now fully scaled up activities on this component. Planning of activities have been done and responsibilities placed on technical staff. Monitoring of works will be done on monthly basis.



Collaboration has been with Implementing partners, GIDA and AESD.



It is learnt that, contractors need close supervision to enable them perform.



Long delay in payment to contractors has been shortened by the use of courier system in transmitting documents from the Regional Offices of DFR, NRGP, NoFEP and the AfDB.

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 42

NRGP

2.3

COMPONENT C: ACCESS TO RURAL FINANCE SERVICES

The objective of the Component is to strengthen linkages with financial Institutions in order to improve access of financial services to smallholder farmers, women, micro entrepreneurs and agro- businesses in the programme area. This is to be done through capacity building of Participating Financial Institutions (PFIS). The capacity building exercise involves:    

Technical assistance i.e. training of PFIS in Rural and Agricultural Finance Development of Innovative Products and Services Logistical support ( provision of motor bikes and maintenance cost) and Operational support for PFIs ( top up allowance for credit staff of PFIS who will be dedicated to NRGP agricultural loans)

REVIEW OF PERORMANCE OF THE COMPONENT Table 21: Key Performance Indicators Component: Access to Rural Financial Service

Performance/Output Indicator

Unit

Period: Jan-Dec 2013 AWP&B Actual

%

Cumm.

MTR target

%

Number of clients financed by Banks Number of PFIs participating and financing beneficiaries

Number

10,000

8,020

80.20

29,799

50,000

47.79

Number

8

0

0

24

-

0

Number of Banks staff trained

Number

60

40

66.66

125

-

Number of increased

borrowers

Number

10,000

8,020

80.20

29,799

50,000

Number of private sector investors cofinancing the establishment of commodity value chains

Number

34

2

5.88

36

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Remarks

All 22 RCBs in prog and 2 area have been sensitized and as a result are participating in the programme with 2 National Banks These were FNGO and CU were trained in agric value chain financing

47.79 The Prog is collaborating with AVNASH & SIFA who are co-

Page 43

NRGP Component: Access to Rural Financial Service

Performance/Output Indicator

Unit

Period: Jan-Dec 2013 AWP&B Actual

Cumm. %

MTR target

%

Remarks

financing investment on value chain Outreach of partner financial institutions expanded  Value of gross loan disbursed  Loan repayment

Number

0

0

0

0

0

Amount (US$) %

2,000,000

1,530,322.83

76.31%

3,795,919.83

3,000,000

100

0

0

98.00

126

Financing of FBOs for 2013 Credit Disbursement by PFIs The total formal credit from banks disbursed to FBOs under the programme in 2013 was GHC 1,330,417.67. Large numbers of FBOs were refused credit because the banks were reluctant to entertain late applications due to delayed rainfall and in some cases limited capacity of some of the Rural & Community Banks The reduction in formal credit to FBOs in 2013 compared with GHC 2,643,91.50 in 2012 was as a result of delayed rainfall in the Programme area and the fact that Banks and a good number of farmers did not want to take risk in financing under virtually drought situation. Large number of FBOs resorted to self-financing to undertake their farming activities. Table 22: Credit Disbursement by Region AMOUNT (GHC) REGION

APPROVED

DISBURSED

NR

491,244.24

448,710.87

UWR

381,822.50

381,822.50

UER

377,446.30

377,446.30

BAR

147,337.00

122,438.00

1,397,850.04

1,330,417.67

210,700.00

210,700.00

1,050,000.00

1,050,000.00

UER

155,988.76

155,988.76

BAR

279,260.00

279,260.00

Sub Total SPVs

1,695,948.76

1,695,948.76

Grand Total

3,093,798.80

3,026,366.43

Sub Total for FBOs NR UWR

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 44

NRGP

Credit Recovery Recovery rate for disbursed loans as at December, 31st 2013, stood at 98%. In spite of the relatively good recovery rate, there was a delinquency rate of 15.4% as at 31st March 2013. This was due to the fact that the 2012 farming season registered bumper harvest and the main aggregator of our cashless credit model, Savannah Farmers Marketing Company, was liquidity constraint and could not purchase volumes of maize produced by FBOs. FBOs therefore could not fully pay their loan as there was excess maize that was not paid for. Between April and June there was a massive drive for market access or\ surplus maize and some new aggregators namely; 18th April Company limited and CDH Commodities were brought in to mob up the excess. And these activities helped to increase recovery to 90% in May and 98% as at the end of December, 2013. FBOs were also encouraged to use other sources of income and also sell in selling the open market to defray their outstanding loans with the banks. Table 23: 2012 Credit Recoveries REGION

Average Recovery as at 31st March (Due Date)

% of outstanding loan as at 31st March

Average Recovery as at 31st May

% of outstanding loan as at 31st May

AVERAGE % RECOVERED

NR

74

26

80

20

94

UWR

89.5

10.5

90

10

100

UER

89

11

89

11

98

BAR

86

14

100

0

100

AVERAGE

84.6

15.4

89.75

10.25

98

With the period under review, a total amount of GHC1.4m was approved as credit for FBOs, however, only GHC1.33m was disbursed. Many of the FBOs could not take the credit because the rains delayed. In some cases, the loans were approved late. To avoid high default rates the MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 45

NRGP farmers postponed the use of the credit to next cropping season. Many of the small holder farmers however , cultivated using their own funds. Table 24: 2013 Credit Disbursements AMOUNT (GHC) REGION NR UWR UER BAR TOTAL

APPROVED 491,244.24 381,822.50 377,446.30 147,337.00 1,397,850.04

DISBURSED 448,710.87 381,822.50 377,446.30 122,438.00 1,330,417.67

Repayment of 2012 Loans Recoveries of 2012 loans are still on-going. On the average, 98% recoveries have been made. Some farmers are yet to market their produce to offset their credit. The Programme is making frantic efforts to achieve 100% before the end of the year. Table 25: 2012 Credit Repayment REGION NR UWR UER BAR AVERAGE

AVERAGE % RECOVERED 94.00 100.00 98.00 100.00 98.00

Activities in the 2013 Annual Work plan and Budget that have been implemented include the following; a) Workshop on financial Management for special purpose vehicles (SPVs) Twenty (20) SPVs were trained on financial accounting standards for them to better manage their agribusinesses to increase productivity and that of small holder farmers who are engaged as out growers. This activity was undertaken in April and May, 2013 b) Workshop on Financial Management for Executives of DVCCs 120 DVCCs Executives from all the districts in the programme area were trained on proper accounting standards to improve upon the financial management of FBOs and other value chain actors that they represent. This activity was implemented between April and May 2013

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 46

NRGP c) Stakeholders workshop on Re-focusing the matching Grants facility to promote VC financing As part of efforts to popularize and re-focusing the matching grant concept in the programme implementation area. Major stakeholders including Regional and District Directors of Agriculture, 30SPVs, 86 DVCC Executives and 20 Equipment vendors ) were sensitized on the objectives and procedures for accessing matching grants as a financial instrument to leverage investments in the selected agriculture commodity value chains being promoted by the programme. d) Provision of motor-bikes and their associated maintenance allowances to PFIs. The programme allocated 10 motorbikes at the end of August, 2013 to some selected 10 RCBs based on their participation and performance in the value chain finance mechanism of the programme. e) Workshop on Value Chain Financing was organized for FNGOs and CUs who are currently being engaged to participate in the value chain financing in Programme areas where there are no Banks. 35 staff of FNGOs and CUs attended The following activities which could not be implemented because of certain constraints have been incorporated in the 2014 AWP&B

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 47

NRGP 2.4 COMPONENT D: PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT, COORDINATION AND MOINTORING & EVALUATION The objective of this component is to ensure efficient and effective management and coordination of the Programme. It sees to the day to day management of the Programme and coordinates the activities of all implementing partners. It also ensures that, Programme implementation is on track using M & E as a management for feedback and planning The component has 2 main sub-components namely; a) Programme Management and Coordination which is responsible for the day to day implementation and coordination of the programme and b) Support to Monitoring and Evaluation which is responsible for tracking the overall implementation of the programme. Review of Progress of Implementation PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT AND COORDINATION

The Programme management and coordination oversees the implementation of the programme and also establishes the linkages and synergies among other programme partners. This includes the PMU and the National Programme Steering Committee (NPSC) which orients programme implementation strategy, oversee planning, review progress and impact, and ensure effective linkages with related projects, government services and other programme implementing entities. Within the year under review, the Programme carried out the following activities; a) Recruitment of Staff So far the Programme has a full complement of staff except the recruitment of an administrator and 3 Secretaries. This recruitment delayed for lack of office space. After the renovation of an office building offered by MOFA, an administrative officer has now been recruited whilst the recruitment of the 3 secretaries is pending but will be recruited before the end of the year. Four (4) Drivers have also been recruited for the newly recruited officers recommended by AfDB. Table 26: List of PMU Staff # Position 1 National Programme Coordinator 2 Financial Controller

No 1 1

3

M & E Specialist

1

4

Producer Organizations Specialist

1

5

Gender Specialist

1

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Remarks At Post At Post At Post At Post At Post Page 48

NRGP # 6

Position Rural Engineer

No 1

7

Value Chain Specialist

1

8

Rural Financial Services Specialist

1

9

Procurement Specialist

1

10

Environment Specialist

1

11

Senior Rural Infrastructure Engineer

1

12

Senior Procurement and Contract Management Specialist Irrigation Engineer

1

1

16

Management Information Systems Officer Accounts Officer

17

Administrator

1

18

Office Assistants

2

19

Accounts Assistant

1

20

Drivers

15

Total

34

13 15

Remarks At Post Resigned At Post At Post At Post At Post At Post

1

At Post At Post

1

At Post At Post At Post Casual At Post

b) Provision of Office Equipment Various office equipment were procured by the PMU to facilitate the smooth implementation of the programme activities. They include 10 4WD pickups, 1 station wagon, 2 desktops, 5 laptops and various assorted office stationary. Four (4) of the vehicles (pickups) were given to Department of Feeder roads for the supervision of the construction of 69 lots of feeders roads being constructed all over the Programme area.

c) Recruitment of Consultants for the Design and Supervision of Irrigation Schemes Within the period under review, the Programme recruited the following consultants for the design and supervision of irrigation schemes. Table 27: Consultants for the design of Irrigation Schemes Lot No.

Operating Regions

Consultant/Firm

Date contract

Contract Amount

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Status on Contract

Page 49

NRGP was Signed 1

Northern /Upper East

2

Brong Ahafo/Upper West

GITEC /MDC(Ghana)

USD 909,398.00



Field verification done and Inception report submitted  Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted These consultants have been disqualified due to a ban on them by the World Bank. 

 3

Ashanti/Brong Ahafo

FAS Consult (Ghana)

29/05/13

USD 798,450



  4

Western

WAPCOS(INDIA)/J&M Partners(Ghana)

4/6/13

USD 990,175.00

    

5

Central/Greater Accra/Volta

MSV (USA)/BANS Consult(Ghana)/Hydroterra (Ghana)

10/6/13

USD 784,998.32

     

Field verification done and Inception report submitted Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted Field verification done and Inception report submitted Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted Advert Placed for Contractors No Objection obtained from Bank Contract awarded Field verification done and Inception report submitted Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted Advert Placed for Contractors No Objection obtained from Bank Contract awarded Field verification done and Inception report submitted Design Report Drawings and Bidding Documents submitted Advert Placed for Contractors No Objection obtained from Bank Contract awarded

d) National Programme Steering Committee Meetings The National Programme Steering Committee (NPSC) met once within the period under review to review the progress of implementation of the Programme but will be meeting again before the end of the year to review and approve the 2014 AWP&B. The NPSC meetings are often organized with field trips to enable the NPSC members interact with stakeholders to get first hand impression about how the programme affects their livelihoods. MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 50

NRGP So far, the NPSC members were impressed with the implementation of the Programme at the field level.

e) Training Nine (9) staff have participated in various training programmes including knowledge management and capitalization and procurement procedures using AfDB procedures, fiduciary clinic & procurement, Gender Action Learning Systems (GALS) and Monitoring and Evaluation of Donor Funded Projects. Staffs have acquired the requisite skills to enhance their delivery at work. For example, as the result of the training on knowledge management and capitalization, the staffs have documented a success story on the operation of the District Value Chain Committees which is yet to be published. Also, GALS training is being replicated for PMU and Gender Officers of MOFA and District Assembles. Table 28: Training attended by Staff #

Type of training

Institution & location WARF, Senegal

No of Participants 3

Duration (Start date to end date) 25th -28th June, 2013

1

Knowledge Management & Capitalization training Workshop

Fiduciary Clinic on Procurement and Programme Implementation

AfDB, Accra

2

23rd -25th Sept, 2013

3

Gender Action Learning System (GALS)

IFAD, Sierra Leone

1

22nd -27th January, 2013

4

Monitoring & Evaluation of Donor Funded Projects

MDPI, Mbabane, Swaziland

2

25th Feb-22nd March, 2013

5

Sharing Practices in Project Leadership Planning & Implementation

IFAD, Accra

1

7th -11th October, 2013

2

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Remarks (effect of training) Participants acquired the skills to document success stories of the programme Refreshed Skills on procurement of goods, works and services using AfDB procedures Useful training and will be replicated for PMU & Genders officers of MOFA District Assemblies in 2014 Useful training attended by MISO and an Officer from MOF Skills in leadership planning & implementation updated

Page 51

NRGP MONITORING AND EVALUATION

a) Review of Logical framework of the Programme Within the period under review, the logical framework of the programme was revised with the view of incorporating the Inter-phase Review Report Comments. This involved the MOFA regional M & E Officers, M & E officers of Implementing Partners as well as PMU Specialist. b) Preparation of Reports The programme has organized participatory report preparation workshops involving 35 key stakeholders as well as PMU Specialist. As a result, the quality of reports have improved. These reports are distributed to funding agencies, the Ministry of Food and Agriculture and other stakeholders. c) M & E Training for Stakeholders An M & E training programme was organized for all 10 PMU Specialist and 36 field level staff and Implementing Partners. This was to train participants on NRGP M & E System and the reporting formats. d) Review of Farmer Business Book (FBB) The FBB is an M & E tool for collecting primary data from Farmers and other value chain actors. These were published 3 year ago used and had to be reviewed to accommodate comments from stakeholders. This was reviewed by PMU and circulated for all stakeholders to make an input. Subsequently, a workshop was organized to discuss the comments and finalized the document. The printing of the document has been awarded on contract. e) Participatory Outcome Assessment To assess the outcomes of NRGP interventions, the M & E Unit conducted a participatory outcome assessment. This was conducted in 10 districts (5 in Northern Region, 2 in Upper West Region, 2 in Upper East Region and 1 in Brong Ahafo Region) in Collaboration University of Development Studies and IFAD Senior/Junior Twining Programme. Data has been collected and currently being analyzed for report writing.

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

Page 52

NRGP GENDER MAINSTREAMING

a) Training Workshop on Leadership for DVCC members A Leadership training was organized for 43 women District Value chain committee members (DVCC) and 43 District Assembly Gender Desk officers representing the districts in the programme area. The training was aimed at equipping rural women with leadership skills as a way of promoting womens participation in decision- making, having a voice and holding leadership positions in rural communities and especially in farmer –based organizations. The training is part of a process of: 1. Identifying, developing, and recognizing the skills and knowledge of rural women to become leaders in Farmer-based organizations and in their community and to take active roles in decision making processes 2. Establishing support mechanisms to assist these women on a longer term basis 3. Providing training and support for women from a diverse range of backgrounds to ensure access and equity to leadership roles 4. Developing awareness of the importance of women as leaders and decision makers. This training in particular was to build their confidence, self-esteem, assertiveness and to help them communicate effectively.

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

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NRGP b) Leadership Forum A leadership forum was organized for 102 participants including; 43 women District Value chain committee members (DVCC) and 43 District Assembly Gender Desk officers representing the districts in the programme area. Also present at the forum were: 4 Regional officers of Women in Agricultural Development (WIAD) under Ministry of Food and Agriculture, 4 Regional Directors of Department of Gender and Social Inclusion and 4 officers from ACDEP, the Facilitating Agency for the Industrial crop window. In attendance were also representatives of the 4 Regional houses of chiefs in the programme area and also 4 women chiefs. Distinguished women in society were identified as chairperson (head of Institute of Local Government Studies) and guest speaker (Development practitioner specializing in women in leader) of the programme. This is to offer inspiration to participants to take the challenge of taking up leadership positions. The forum was aimed at promoting womens’ participation in decision- making and holding leadership positions especially in farmer –based organizations. It is envisaged that at the end of the day some level of awareness will be created and there will be more insight into more effective solutions for empowering and promoting women’s leadership in FBOs and rural communities. At this forum, Paramount chiefs and opinion leaders were invited to listen to the voices of women pursuing their aspirations. The objective was to let the women articulate their practical and strategic needs. Hitherto, the women had received leadership training. At this forum where they had audience with the representatives of the 4 Regional house of chiefs they practiced what they had learnt by speaking out at the forum in front of these powerful Paramount chiefs on various topics as was discussed during the training. The forum was in celebration of the International women’s Day.

The DVCC women were given the opportunity to participate in discussions that were impeding womens’ participation in decision-making and holding leadership positions. The forum discussed three main issues: MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

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NRGP The forum was a platform for the women to put their issues before the chiefs. This set the tone for the open forum where the participants were guided by the questions stated below; 1. What role can the stakeholders play? 2. What can women do for themselves? 3. What role can the chiefs play? 4. What are the problems to women’s leadership?

c) Television Programme Organized Sensitizing, creating awareness and making women and their issues visible is one of the powerful ways of driving home the need of developing gender relations. The media is able to give a wider coverage of these issues. In this regard the leadership forum was telecasted on the Ghana Television Corporation (GTV) as a news item and as a complete programme on “Pagba Saha” that is “time with women” a programme that discusses issues that are to do with women and is shown on Sundays mornings from 9am-10am. The training in leadership will indeed inspire the women to participate in decision- making and leadership this was seen in the way these women participated in the leadership form. The leadership forum was to give women exposure and to let them understand that they are the best people to articulate their problems, voice out these needs and then take their rightful positions in their communities and society. The forum also gave the women and their issues visibility so that all other stakeholders can work together towards solutions. The forum was not a one stop shop but a part of process of empowering and promoting women in the decision-making and leadership. The objectives of the forum were met and it is envisaged that more women will become leaders. The TV programme also gave more women the opportunity to understand the issues that women face.

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NRGP

3.0 LESSONS LEARNT & CHALLENGES The Northern Rural Growth Programme is the first large programme to implement the value chain concept adopted by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture. Through the first few years of implementation, a number of lessons have been learnt which will guide the rolling out of the programme in the subsequent year. Some of the lessons learnt include the following: 

    

Coordination – The addition of 2 closed projects (IVRDP and SSIDP) to NRGP has placed a heavy burden. NRGP is already a complex project implementing 8 commodity value chains, feeder roads, irrigation schemes, warehouses & packhouses and valleybottom schemes. It has now been realised that the current staffing position is inadequate to cope with contract management, technical reviews, monitoring & supervision As it is now, NRGP covers all 10 regions with the addition of IVRDP and SSIDP and each sub project requires close monitoring & supervision Even though RCBs appreciate the value chain financing, they have inadequate funds to cover majority of the small scale farmers asset and term financing. National Commercial Banks are yet to get on board in the financing of small farmers. They have the capacity for asset financing and the project is using success stories from RCBs to entice them Market Access is still a major challenge in many districts due to lack of infrastructure, e.g. roads and warehouses Lack of basic storage facilities by farmers is a hindrance to managing post-harvest challenges.

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APPENDICES Appendix 1: Physical progress measured against AWP&B, including RIMS indicators Period: January to December 2014 Component/ Sub-component or Output Indicator Component 1: Commodity Chain Development Sub-component: Households receiving project services Strengthening Farmer Based Organizations Groups receiving project services

Appraisal/MT R Target %

Unit

AWP&B

Actual

%

Cumulative Actual

No

8,000

6,416

80.2

23,882

45,000

53.10

No

500

520

104

1,507

2,000

75.35

People receiving project services

Male

6,000

4,478

74.63

12,755

30,000

42.52

Community groups formed/strengthened5

Female No

4,000 500

3,542 520

88.55 104

17,044 1,507

20,000 2,000

85.22 75.35

Male

6,000

4,478

74.63

12,755

30,000

42.52

Female

4,000

3,542

88.55

17,044

20,000

85.22

No

200

96

48

548

900

60.88

Mt/Ha

3.0

2.86

2.86

2.52

5.5

45.81

People in community groups formed/strengthened

Community groups with women in leadership position Increase productivity6 and production of smallholders by 7% by 2011 and 20% by 2017 Maize (0.8mt/ha) Soya (0.5mt/ha)

5

This does not include Shea groups for 2013 as the figures are yet to be validated

6

Productivity for maize has increased by over 258% over the base year, soya by over 226% over the base year and 182% for sorghum over the base year.

NRGP Period: January to December 2014 Component/ Sub-component or Output

Sub-component: Commodity IPB established

Appraisal/MT R Target % 4 37.5 3 43.3

Indicator Sorghum (0.5mt/ha)

Unit Mt/Ha Mt/Ha

AWP&B 2.0 1.5

Actual 1.63 1.41

% 1.68 -

Cumulative Actual 1.5 1.3

Increase incomes7 of rural households by 6% in 2011 and 15% by 2017

%

20

134

-

134

15

-

No. of radio Broadcast to disseminate technologies Number of Agric Staff trained Vol. of produce8 produced

No

100

53

53

98

400

24.50

No Mt

600 20,000

256 -

42.66 -

937 31,918

311,552

10.24

Apex organisations formed/strengthened

No

2

0

0

3

6

50

DVCCs established

No

8

8

100

43

-

-

No

2

2

100

49

4

50

Sub-component: Prepare and Number of CBPs prepared and implement Commodity implemented Business Plans

Sub-component CDF 7

A participatory Outcome Assessment (POA) showed that, average incomes of farmers had increased from GHC302.7 to GHC709.60 representing an increase of 134%. A new POA has been conducted, but the results are yet to be finalized 8

The produce are yet to harvested for 2013.

9

4 CBPs have been drafted but only 2 have been fine-tuned and elaborated

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NRGP Period: January to December 2014 Component/ Sub-component or Output established and disbursed

Indicator

Unit

AWP&B

Actual

%

% of CDF disbursed 11 Commercial ventures are established

% No

2 10

1.8 3

90 30

1.8 37

80 100

2.25 37

Ha

900

182

20

414

2,828.60

14.64

41 small scale irrigation schemes10 constructed Flood Recession Schemes constructed and Soil and water conservation techniques promoted

No

41

0

0

0

41

0

Ha

200

0

0

200

1,000

20

Number of WUAs established and functional

No

20

21

105

69

325

34.50

Roads constructed

Km

200

0

0

108

600

18

Farm access tracks reh/constructed

Km

0

0

0

0

200

0

Storage facilities constructed/rehabilitated

No

0

0

0

0

10

0

Pack houses constructed

No

0

0

0

0

4

0

Groups managing infrastructure formed/strengthened*

No

0

0

0

0

0

0

Component 2: Rural Infrastructure Development Sub-component: Irrigation Land under irrigation schemes Infrastructure Development constructed/rehabilitated

Sub-component: Marketing11 Infrastructure Development

10

Appraisal/MT R Target %

Cumulative Actual

The Irrigation schemes are still being designed for construction

11

Under the Marketing Infrastructure Development Component, apart from feeder roads which has commenced, the farm access tracks, the warehouses/pack houses are still being designed for construction.

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NRGP Period: January to December 2014 Component/ Sub-component or Output

Component 3: Access to Rural Finance

Appraisal/MT R Target %

Indicator

Unit

AWP&B

Actual

%

Cumulative Actual

People in groups managing infrastructure formed/strengthened

No

0

0

0

0

0

0

Groups managing infrastructure with women in leadership position

No

0

0

0

0

0

0

Financial institutions participating in the project

No

8

0

0

24

30

80

Saving and credit groups formed/strengthened

No

500

520

104

1,507

2,000

75.35

People in saving and credit groups formed/strengthened

Male

6,000

4,478

74.63

12,755

30,000

42.52

Female No

4,000 200

3,542 96

88.55 48

17,044 548

20,000 900

85.22 60.88

Staff of financial institutions trained

No

60

75

125

85

100

85

Enterprises accessing financial services facilitated by the project

No

34

37

108.8

37

100

37

Value of gross loan portfolio

USD

1,842,100

1,513,183.22 82.14

3,788,690.22

3,000,000

126.29

Value of voluntary savings

USD

184,210

281,133.57

152.62

508,683.67

300,000

169.56

6,000

4,478

74.63

12,755

30,000

42.52

4,000

3,542

88.55

17,044

20,000

85.22

Saving and credit groups with women in leadership position

Active borrowers (disaggregated by gender) Male Female

MOFA/IFAD/AfDB, Northern Rural Growth Programme, Progress Report, 2013

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NRGP Period: January to December 2014 Component/ Sub-component or Output

Component 4: Programme Mgt, Coordination & M & E

Appraisal/MT R Target % 30,000 42.52 20,000 85.22

Indicator Active savers (disaggregated by gender)

Unit Male Female

AWP&B 6,000 4,000

Actual 4,478 3,542

% 74.63 88.55

Cumulative Actual 12,755 17044

No of NPSC meetings held

No

2

2

100

8

16

50

AWP&B prepared and approved by NPSC No by 1st November of the year

1

0

-

4

8

50

AWP&B prepared and submitted to Financing Agencies for approved by 1st December of the year

No

1

0

100

4

8

50

Number of Quarterly, Annual and Audit reports submitted on time

No

4

2

50

16

32

50

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