The Body as Metaphor in Contemporary Cuban Women s Art

Reina Barreto Fall, 2014 The Body as Metaphor in Contemporary Cuban Women’s Art Reina Barreto        U    ntil recently, Amelia Peláez (1896...
3 downloads 0 Views 309KB Size
Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

The Body as Metaphor in Contemporary Cuban Women’s Art Reina Barreto   

   

U  

 ntil recently, Amelia Peláez (1896‐1968) and Antonia Eiriz (1929‐1995) were 

the  two  Cuban  women  artists  to  achieve  the  greatest  national  and  international  recognition.  As  art  historian  Luis  Camnitzer  states,  “…women  historically  were  not  a  quantitative  factor  in  the  production  of  Cuban  art”  (161).  In  addition  to  the  significant  contributions  of  Peláez  Juana  Borrero,  Nélida  Zaida  del  Río  as  other 

THIS STUDY FOCUSES ON CONTEMPORARY CUBAN WOMEN

and  Eiriz,  Camnitzer  lists  López,  Flora  Fong,  and  notable  Cuban  women 

artists  from  the  past. 

ARTISTS WHOSE VISUAL

numerous  women  artists 

ART REFLECTS A

from Cuba, working with 

a variety of styles, media, 

GENDERED NARRATIVE

and  thematic  topics,  who 

have increasingly become 

AND A

international  exhibition 

scholarly  reviews, 

PREOCCUPATION WITH THE FEMALE BODY.

documentaries. 

Today, 

the 

there 

are 

subject 

of 

books,  journal  articles,  interviews, 

and 

According  to  Cuban  art 

historian Abelardo Mena Chicuri, visual art by women in contemporary Cuba has been  broadly  reflected  in  the  mass media  and  in exhibitions,  catalogues,  and  books  and  has  expanded  the  discourses  of  gender,  race,  and  social  groups.  In  reference  to  contemporary  Cuban  art  today,  the  presence  of  what  art  critic  Adelaida  de  Juan  has  called “la mujer pintada” (“the painted woman”)—woman as both subject and object of  art—is often cited.   This  study  focuses  on  contemporary  Cuban  women  artists  whose  visual  art  reflects a gendered narrative and a preoccupation with the female body.1 In my analysis  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

1

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

I focus on seven prominent Cuban women artists whose work has recently and regularly  appeared in art museums and galleries across the United States: Ana Mendieta, Sandra  Ramos, Belkis Ayón, Marta María Pérez Bravo,  María Magdalena Campos Pons, Tania  Bruguera,  and  Elsa  Mora.2  Although  the  artists  featured  in  this  article  have  often  been  discussed  separately,  my  intention  is  to  study  their  work  side  by  side  and  explore  connections and similarities in their artistic production and their use of the female body.  This study examines how the artists mentioned above use the female body as a powerful  symbolic  form  in  their  art.  By  making  the  female  body,  particularly  their  own,  their  primary source of imagery, these artists reveal the body as a site for the exploration of  personal,  gendered,  ethnic,  and  national  identities.  In  the  work  of  the  women  artists  discussed here, the female body transcends its physical boundaries and becomes a space  for  metaphor  and  a  surface  where  female  representations  of  identity  are  generated,  inscribed, and negotiated. This study considers how Cuban women artists living on and  off  the  island,  and  working  with  a  diverse  range  of  styles,  media,  and  themes,  use  the  female body to define the self in relation to different social and cultural contexts. The use  of  the  female  body  in  Cuban  woman’s  art  provides  insights  into  the  female  condition  and  serves  as  a  discursive  strategy  for  expressing  a  preoccupation  with  self‐identity,  insularity, migration, spirituality, and memory.  In  order  to  explain  the  greater  visibility  and  acceptance  in  Cuban  society  of  women  artists  and  their  increase  in  number  in  the  1980s  and  1990s,  several  art  critics  point to recent historical events in Cuba (the collapse of the former Soviet Union in the  late 1980s, the tightening of the U.S. embargo on Cuba, and the Cuban economic crisis  known  as  the  “Special  Period”),  the  effects  of  globalization,  the  development  of  art  tourism, the Havana Biennial, and free access to higher level academic art training since  the  1976  opening  of  Cuba’s  Instituto  Superior  de  Arte  (ISA,  the  Graduate  Institute  of  Art).  The increase in the number of women artists also coincides with the development  and  wider  international  acceptance  of  performance  and  installation  art.  Art  critic  and  curator  Kerry  Oliver‐Smith  suggests  that  despite  the  collapse  of  the  Soviet  Union  and  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

2

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

the subsequent severe economic crisis in Cuba in the 1980s and early 1990s, “artists have  been able to work within a critical arena denied [to] other citizens” and that as a result of  economic  reforms,  “the  art  profession  experienced  a  dramatic  change”  (23,  24).  This  change included the permission given to artists to be self‐employed, earn dollars, travel,  and  contract  their  labor  overseas.  Oliver‐Smith  states:  “Essentially,  artists  were  able  to  negotiate  as  free  players  in  the  global  art  market”  (24).  Art  historian  Luis  Camnitzer,  however,  discusses  how  economic  factors  play  a  role  in  the  decision  of  many  artists,  including female artists, to live and work outside of Cuba today. Among scholars, it is  not  uncommon  to  hear  about  a  Cuban  art  diaspora,  and  artists  like  María  Magdalena  Campos Pons often make a diasporic identity the focus of their work.     Despite the changes to the art profession noted above, Sandra Ramos is the only  woman artist mentioned in this study who remains in Cuba. María Magdalena Campos  Pons and Elsa Mora now live in the United States, Ana Mendieta and Belkis Ayón are  deceased,  Marta  María  Pérez  Bravo  lives  in  Mexico,  and  Tania  Bruguera  resides  in  Havana  and  Chicago.  International  interest  in  Cuban  women’s  art  has  increased  in  recent  decades,  as  has  recognition  for  the  Cuban‐born  artists  who  have  contributed  to  the history of women’s art in the United States. The recent surge in interest can be noted  in  the  number  of  museum  exhibitions  and  galleries  featuring  the  work  of  various  generations  of  women  artists  from  Cuba.  In  addition  to  the  artists  mentioned  above,  established  Cuban‐born  artists  living  in  the  United  States  like  Gladys  Triana,  Demi,  María  Brito,  and  María  Martínez‐Cañas,  as  well  as  the  newest  generation  of  women  artists  from  Cuba,  are  increasingly  gaining  exposure  through  gallery  exhibitions  and  sales, and in academic studies throughout the United States.   Whether  they  express  themselves  through  photography,  performance  art,  installation  art,  sculpture,  painting,  printmaking,  or  a  combination  of  these,  the  recent  work of Cuban women artists recognizes the body as a product of social, cultural, and  political  processes.  Several  of  these  artists  illustrate  the  idea  explained  by  Elizabeth  Grosz  that  “some  concept  of  the  body  is  essential  to  understanding  social  production,  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

3

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

oppression and resistance; and that the body need not, indeed must not be considered  merely  a  biological  entity,  but  can  be  seen  as  a  socially  inscribed,  historically  marked,  physically  and  interpersonally  significant  product”  (140).  Their  work  consciously  engages with female embodiment or offers what Moira Gatens refers to as an “embodied  perspective”  (72).  Art  historian  Mena  Chicuri  describes  an  “embodied  perspective”  as  “expressing personal matters within a strong, social context” (60). While Gatens refers to  an “embodied perspective” when discussing women’s writing, this term can be applied  to Cuban women artists who, without claiming to represent all women, are in their own  manner  involved  in  investigating  the  ways  in  which  women’s  bodies  are  “constructed  and lived in culture” (72). This embodied perspective manifests itself in the work of the  Cuban  women  artists  mentioned  in  this  study  through  the  following  metaphors  often  cited  by  critics:  the  body  as  canvas,  the  body  as  vessel,  the  body  as  political  site,  the  body as performance, the body as fountain, the body as altar, the body as mythological  figure, the body as fetish, and the body as island. I would add the body as bridge, the  body as sacrifice, and the body as memory to the list of metaphors present in the work of  Cuban women artists today.   The  work  of  all  the  women  artists  mentioned  at  the  beginning  of  this  article  relates  to  political  themes  to  some  degree,  confirming  Kerry  Oliver‐Smith’s  suggestion  that political engagement is at the root of Cuba’s art of the 1980s and 1990s. My analysis  begins with the body as political site and the performance art of Tania Bruguera. Her art  reflects political themes, issues of power, control, and freedom, as well as a concern with  historical  memory.  Eleanor  Heartney  states:  “In  Brugueraʹs  world,  concepts  like  freedom,  liberty  and  self‐determination  are  not  abstract  ideals,  but  achievements  that  write  their  effects  on  our  physical  forms”  (par.  4).  The  photographic  images  of  Bruguera’s art reveal the body as a site of politics and performance. In Bruguera’s best‐ known  performances,  her  own  body  is  involved  in  ritual  acts  that  exemplify  what  Enrique  Fernández  describes  as  “the  personal/political,  national/cosmopolitan,  historical/modern and raw/artful dialectics of Cuban art” (par. 20). Art critic Sandra Sosa  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

4

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

Fernández  notes  that  during  Bruguera’s  performances  “an  individual  gesture  is  transformed into one with collective meaning” (par. 2). The photographs of Bruguera’s  performances portray the artist engaged in ritualized movements, which relate to Sosa  Fernández’s  comment  that  “primitive  ritual  reveals  the  most  hidden  corners  of  our  cultural memory and its signifiers. Human conduct becomes a means of understanding  society” (par. 2). The emphasis of Bruguera’s performance on the ritual act allows her to  explore  cultural  traditions  and  the  connections  between  personal  and  political  or  national identity. In the photographs of two of her best‐known performances from 1997  and  1998,  titled  “El  peso  de  la  culpa”  (“The  Weight  of  Guilt”)  and  “El  cuerpo  del  silencio” (“The Body of Silence”), Bruguera’s body is bare yet concealed behind a lamb’s  carcass and slabs of raw meat. The carcass that hangs across Bruguera’s body recalls the  body as a site of sacrifice and submission. Bruguera’s body is a social body, a collective  body, a political site of resistance, and a continual materializing of possibilities through  performative acts.       Like  Bruguera,  Ana  Mendieta’s  work  is  closely  tied  to  performance.  Mendieta,  who  chronologically  comes  before  the  other  artists  mentioned  above  and  whose  influence is acknowledged by the later artists, and especially by Bruguera, came to the  United States in 1961 at the age of twelve, and later served as a bridge connecting artists  in  the  United  States  with  artists  in  Cuba.  Her  art  reveals  a  transformative  identity:  closely  connected  to  Cuba,  nature,  the  earth,  and  the  female  body,  yet  transient,  changing, and ephemeral. Jane Blocker explains the performative quality of Mendieta’s  identity:  “No  one  true  identity  exists  prior  to  the  act  of  performing.  No  one  identity  remains  stable  in  and  through  performance”  (25).  As  Mendieta  negotiated  identities  through her art, she created hybrid earth‐body forms that would share similarities with  the female figures and self‐portraits produced by later Cuban women artists.      Before her untimely death in New York at the age of thirty‐seven, Mendieta had  a brief yet prolific career in environmental, performance, and installation art, as well as  in  photography,  video,  and  sculpture.  She  emerged  as  an  artist  in  the  1970s  and  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

5

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

embraced  the  feminist  politics  and  artistic  experimentation  of  the  time.  Mendieta  enrolled  in  the  University  of  Iowa’s  multimedia  M.F.A.  program  where  she  began  to  develop  her  own  hybrid  form  of  body  and  earth  art,  which  she  called  “earth‐body  sculptures.”  Between  1973  and  1980,  she  sought  to  establish  a  dialogue  between  the  landscape and the female body by shaping her own body or silhouette into the earth and  filling the space with flowers, water, fire, gunpowder, and blood to create her “Silueta  Series”  on  location  in  Iowa  and  Mexico.  Surrounded  by  earth  and  water,  and  transformed or erased by wind, water, and time, her sculptures represent a union with  nature and an effort to temporarily recover her lost homeland of Cuba and the origins of  her  identity.  Mendieta’s  creation  and  recreation  of  self‐identity  through  the  presence  and  absence  of  the  body  is  discussed  by  Whitney  Chadwick,  who  developed  the  following  representational  strategies  to  analyze  the  significant  presence  of  the  female  body and the self‐portrait in women’s art: “Self as Other,” “Self as Body,” and “Self as  Masquerade  or  Absence.”  In  relation  to  the  “Self  as  Absence,”  Chadwick  compares  Mendieta’s  work  to  that  of  Mexican  artist  Frida  Kahlo  by  stating  the  following:  “Both  have  enacted  the  self/body  through  a  registering  of  its  traces  and  through  images  that  suggest the absent body” (30). The body’s connection with performance and nature, and  the  allusion  to  the  rituals  and  symbols  of  the  Afro‐Cuban  belief  system,  Santería,  represent the various ways in which Mendieta re‐imagined the female body through her  art and sought ways to identify with Cuba.    The work of Marta María Pérez Bravo and María Magdalena Campos Pons, both  of whom use photography as their means of expression, echoes Mendieta’s combination  of the body as performance with the presence of Afro‐Cuban rituals and symbols. In her  photographs, Pérez Bravo’s body interacts with religious and symbolic artifacts, making  female  expression  a  process  of  fusion  and  hybridization.  From  her  early  works  to  the  present  the  following  three  elements  are  evident:  the  use  of  “her  own  body,  the  syncretism  of  her  culture,  and  her  search  for  meaning  and  identity”  (“M.M.  Pérez  Bravo”,  par.  2).  As  art  critic  Grady  T.  Turner  states:  “Subjectivity  is  central  to  Pérez  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

6

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

Bravo’s  photographs,  which  are  composed  with  an  underlying  symbolism  alluding  to  her  personal  experience  with  spirituality”  (par.  7).  Her  work  encourages  the  viewer  to  think symbolically, to consider the body “as an altar, a vessel, a gate, a temple” (“M.M.  Pérez Bravo”, par. 2). In her self‐portraits, Pérez Bravo uses white cloth, shells, candles,  beaded necklaces, knives, and herbs, objects often associated with Afro‐Cuban religious  rituals  and  beliefs,  as  extensions  of  her  own  body.  In  an  image  from  1999,  “Ya  no  hay  corazón” (“No More Heart”) from the series “Cultos paralelos” (“Parallel Cults”), Pérez  Bravo’s  torso  and  her  crossed  arms  appear  covered  with  mud  upon  which  countless  nails  have  been  inserted,  resembling  an  African  nail  fetish  figure.  Through  the  artist’s  use of black and white photography, the focus on the body and the objects is made clear.  Her poetic images appear to float in an enigmatic space, which unites art and spirituality  and allows the body to serve as a metaphor for personal dreams and visions.    Similar  to  Pérez  Bravo’s  self‐portraits,  the  female  body  in  Campos  Pons’  photographs  and  mixed‐media  installations  operates  as  a  metaphor  for  both  personal  experience and Cuba’s unique syncretic culture. She embraces the performative quality  of  photography  and  uses  her  art  as  a  way  to  explore  issues  of  identity,  displacement,  memory,  acculturation,  autobiography,  and motherhood.  Parts  of  her  body  blend  with  objects  to  create  an  embodied  narrative  that  tends  toward  abstraction  yet  expresses  Campos Pons’ views on immigration, exile, sexuality, and her exploration of her Afro‐ Cuban roots. Some of the repeated objects alluding to her Aftro‐Cuban heritage include  strings,  ropes,  and  boat‐shaped  vessels.  Campos  Pons’  works  reflect  her  concern  for  women, the body, the self, and the celebration of renewal and regeneration that comes  from the body.   Gendered  subjectivity  is  evident  in  Campos  Pons’  work  as  she  visually  comments  on  the  physical  and  psychological  implications  of  being  a  woman,  and  particularly  an  Afro‐Cuban  woman  living  in  the  United  States.  Her  installations  and  photography reflect a diasporic, shifting or divided identity, as well as an identity that is  productive  and  reflected  through  the  metaphor  of  the  body  as  fountain.  In  addition  to  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

7

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

her  body,  the  colors  and  objects  she  uses  in  her  performance‐based  photography  function on a symbolic level that alludes to her personal history, women’s history, and  Afro‐Cuban and Pre‐Columbian history. Campos Pons often uses her body as a canvas,  as evidenced by the various photographic images of her skin covered with white, blue,  red, or yellow paint. The painted and adorned surface of Campos‐Pons’ body acts as a  narrative of historical and personal memories, motherhood, ancestors, and Afro‐Cuban  religious rituals.   Similar  to  Campos  Pons,  Belkis  Ayón  and  Sandra  Ramos  use  a  combination  of  autobiography and cultural references with elements of national history. Belkis Ayón’s  Afro‐Cuban  heritage  serves  as  inspiration  for  her  large‐scale  black  and  white  collographs  based  on  the  characters,  symbols,  and  rituals  of  the  Abakuá,  an  all  male  Afro‐Cuban secret society established in the 1830s and still active in Cuba today. Ayón  combines Abakuá mythology with her own imagery to create a highly symbolic visual  narrative featuring the presence of a female figure called Sikán. Ayón uses her own body  as the model for Sikán and the other silhouetted figures in her prints that often appear  trapped  or  hidden  behind  masks  without  mouths.  For  JoAnn  Busuttil,  Ayón’s  “explorations of the female invading regional and gender restricted traditions were used  as  a  way  to  investigate  underlying  issues  of  a  more  personal  sexual/psychological  nature” (7). The female body as a site for the exploration of political, racial, and gender  relations  is evident  in Ayón’s  work.  Her  textured  and  layered  images  with  their  sharp  black  and  white  figures  and  their  titles,  such  as  “Arrepentida?”  (“Regretftul?”)  and  “Desobediencia”  (“Disobedience”),  reveal  a  conflicted  identity  portrayed  through  a  body that is often restless, silenced, and sacrificed.     As  with  Ayón’s  images,  Sandra  Ramos’s  paintings  and  prints  relate  to  what  Whitney Chadwick calls the “Self as Other,” by which the self is identified with women  from other times and places. Ayón identified with Sikán, a young woman from Abakuá  mythology,  while  Ramos  created  a  self‐portrait  that  merged  her  face  with  that  of  a  nineteenth‐century  Dutch  queen  and  the  Alice  of  Alice  in  Wonderland  illustrated  by  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

8

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

Tenniel. In addition to her recurring self‐portrait, at the center of Ramos’s images is the  theme  of  the  body  as  island.  In  several  of  her  works,  Ramos  merges  her  body  with  geographical characteristics related to Cuba, such as mountains, palm trees, the sea, and  the physical contours of the island itself. According to Orlando Hernández, insularity or  “the sensation of being isolated, separated from everyone, floating in the middle of the  sea,  has  been  a  strong  stimulant  to  the  imagination  of  Cuban  artists”  (27).  By  equating  her body with her island home, Ramos affirms her identity and associates her personal  history with the history and destiny of Cuba.   Elsa Mora, like several of the women artists this paper mentions, has produced  artwork  that  explores  the  female  body  through  the  use  of  photography.  Mora’s  introspective  and  symbolic  self‐portraits  reflect  aspects  of  personal  identity  that  are  revealed  through  powerful  metaphors  and  dramatic  images.  Her  two  photographic  series,  “Ejercicios  de  Silencio”  (“Silence  Exercises”)  and  “Perda  do  Sentido”  (“Loss  of  Sense”)  utilize  the  body  as  a  canvas  or  surface  to  express  feelings  and  tell  stories.  The  female  body  in  Mora’s  photographic  series  documents  personal  rituals,  fears,  and  a  sense  of  loss  and  loneliness.  Mena  Chicuri,  in  his  notes  on  Mora  in  Cuba  Avant‐Garde,  reveals  that  the  “Perda  do  Sentido”  series  was  in  response  to  the  suicide  in  1999  of  Mora’s  close  friend  and  fellow  artist,  Belkis  Ayón.  In “Perda  do  Sentido,”  Mora’s  face,  covered  in  black  makeup  with  the  piece’s  title  written  on  her  forehead,  and  her  hand,  placed  over  her  mouth  and  covered  in  black  painted  spots,  serve  as  a  canvas  for  expressing Mora’s sense of loss. The series “Ejercicios de Silencio,” completed during a  2000  residency  in  Mexico,  appears  to  engage  in  a  dialogue  with  Marta  María  Pérez  Bravo’s “Cultos Paralelos” (“Parallel Cults”) series begun in 1990. The black‐and‐white  prints  in  both  artists’  series  feature  the  female  body  engaging  in  private  rituals  with  various objects.   By  becoming  active  agents  in  expressing  their  own  experience  and  making  women’s  consciousness  of  self,  body,  and  exterior  world  a  major  subject  of  their  art,  contemporary Cuban women artists contribute to the history of female subjectivity and  Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

9

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

representation both on and off the island. The use of the female body as a symbolic and  personal means of expression combined with the experience of diaspora and an interest  in spirituality, particularly with the traditions of Santería, characterizes the work of the  Cuban  women  artists  in  this  analysis.  The  expression  of  an  “embodied  perspective,”  reflects  a  desire  to  imagine  and  re‐imagine  oneself  by  communicating  through  one’s  own  body.  The  metaphors  that  emerge  in  the  diverse  and  complex  work  of  Cuban  women  artists  today,  such  as  the  body  as  political  site,  the  body  as  performance,  the  body as canvas, the body as altar, the body as fountain, and the body as island, confirm  the body as a point of departure from which these artists can identify a sense of self and  create an immediate and personal connection to national and international issues.    

Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

10

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

Notes  1

The artists featured in this article are all Cuban born. Although some of the artists live outside of Cuba, they still identify themselves as Cuban artists. Flora González Mandri points out that such is the case with María Magdalena Campos Pons, who even goes further as to position herself in an “in-between” space; between homes, languages, cultures, and artistic media. See: Guarding Cultural Memory: Afro-Cuban Women in Literature and the Arts. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2006, 185. 2

I am specifically discussing women artists whose works I viewed while attending the 2007 exhibition “Cuba Avant-Garde: Contemporary Cuban Art From the Farber Collection” at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art (University of Florida, Gainesville) and the 2008 exhibition “Unbroken Ties: Dialogues in Cuban Art” at the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale.

 

 

Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

11

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

Works Cited    Blocker, Jane. Where is Ana Mendieta?  Identity, Performativity, and Exile.  Durham: Duke  UP, 1999. Print.  Busuttil, JoAnn.  Cuba: Five Odysseys.  Northridge: California SU, 2001. Print.    Camnitzer, Luis. New Art of Cuba. Austin: University of Texas P, 2003. Print.    Chadwick, Whitney.  Mirror Images: Women, Surrealism, and Self‐Representation.   Cambridge:  The MIT P, 1998. Print.  Fernández, Enrique. “Cuban Art, Multiple Themes Explored at UF Show.” Miami Herald.   17 June 2007. Web. 13 June 2014. .   Gatens, Moira. Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality. New York: Routledge,  1996. Print.  Grosz, Elizabeth. “Philosophy, Subjectivity and the Body: Kristeva and Irigaray,” in  Carole Pateman and Elizabeth Grosz (eds).  Feminist Challenges: Social and Political  Theory. Boston: Northeastern University P, 1986. Print.  Heartney, Eleanor. ʺTania Bruguera at LiebmanMagnan.ʺ Art in America 90.3 (2002): 131.  FindArticles.com. Web. 10 July 2014. .   Hernández, Orlando.  “The Pleasure of Reference.”  Art Cuba: The New Generation.  Ed.  Holly Block.  New York: Harry N. Abrams, 2001: 25‐29. Print.      Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

12

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

  Juan, Adelaida de. 1996.  “La mujer pintada en Cuba.” Temas 5 (1996): 38‐45. Print.  Mena Chicuri, Abelardo.  “María Magdalena Campos Pons,” in Kerry Oliver‐Smith.   Cuba Avant‐Garde: Contemporary Cuban Art From the Farber Collection.  Gainesville:  Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida, 2007. Print.  “M.M. Pérez Bravo: Past Exhibitions.” Paolo Curti/Annamaria Gambuzzi & Company. Paolo  Curti/Annamaria Gambuzzi & Company. 4 Nov. 1999. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.  .  Oliver‐Smith, Kerry.  Cuba Avant‐Garde: Contemporary Cuban Art From the Farber  Collection. Gainesville: Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, University of Florida,  2007. Print.  Sosa Fernández, Sandra. “Tania Bruguera.” The H Magazine. Ceiba Publications. 2003.  Web.  23 July 2014. .   Turner, Grady T. “Scene/Seen. Marta María Pérez Bravo.” Women in Photography International.   July‐Sept. 2001. Web. 9 Sept. 2014. .   

 

Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

13

Reina Barreto



Fall, 2014

About the Author  Dr. Reina Barreto earned a Ph.D. in Spanish from Florida State University. Her  current research focuses on Cuban women writers and artists and issues related to  gender, identity, and diaspora. Her publications include: “Transformation, Space,  and Creativity in Maya Islas’ Lifting the Tempest at Breakfast” (Women’s Gaze: Female  Visual Narratives and Narrations of the Visual in the Luso‐Hispanic World, a special issue  of Letras Femeninas); “Gender and Identity in the Art of Ana Mendieta, Belkis Ayón,  and Sandra Ramos” (Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Pacific Coast Council on  Latin American Studies); “Subversion in Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda’s Sab”  (Decimonónica); and “Utopia Deferred: The Search for Paradise in Julieta Campos’s El  miedo de perder a Eurídice” (Caribe). Dr. Barreto is a tenured professor at Peninsula  College.   

Discovery: A Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies | v.2 no.1 | xxxxxxError!

No text of specified style in document.

14

Suggest Documents