PRODUCT LIST

1 CONTENTS How to use The Directory 4 FOREWORD 6 GENERAL INFORMATION About ZimTrade 9 Zimbabwe Facts &Figures 11 Zimbabwe in brief 18 Inv...
Author: Doreen Parrish
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CONTENTS How to use The Directory

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FOREWORD

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GENERAL INFORMATION About ZimTrade

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Zimbabwe Facts &Figures

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Zimbabwe in brief

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Investment Opportunities In Zimbabwe

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Role of the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority

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The Transport Sector in Zimbabwe

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USEFUL ADDRESSES Banking Institutions

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Trade Facilitation Organisation

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Foreign Representation in Zimbabwe

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Zimbabwe Diplomatic Missions Abroad

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Selected Government Ministries

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Hotels in Major Towns

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PRODUCT LIST Alphabetical Listing of Export Products

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Alphabetical Listing of Import Product

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Alphabetical Listing of Services

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COMPANY PROFILES Alphabetical Listing of Companies and their respective products and services Publisher: E-mail: Website:

ZimTrade [email protected] www.zimtrade.co.zw

Marketing & advertisements Design & Layout: E-mail: Website:

WhiteSands Communications P/L Anotida Bangure & Badwell Mahwite [email protected] www.whitesandscomms.com

Cover Design: E-mail:

Elletech [email protected]

This publication is the exclusive property of ZimTrade. All rights reserved. No article or picture may be reproduced, copied or transmitted in any form whatsoever without the written consent of ZimTrade.It is criminal offence to reproduce copyright material. Whilst every care has been taken in the preparation of this publication, ZimTrade does not accept any responsibility for inaccurate information and transactions conducted with companies or organisations listed in this directory.

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HOW TO USE THE DIRECTORY THE DIRECTORY IS DIVIDED INTO SEVEN SECTIONS

1. General Information: This section gives relevant facts and figures on Zimbabwe, followed by a general overview of the Zimbabwean economy and key sectors. 2. Useful Addresses: The section provides contact information for various business organizations i.e. Banking Institutions, Trade Facilitation Organisations, Selected Government Ministries and Departments, Foreign Representation in Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe Diplomatic Missions Abroad and Hotels. 3. Export Product Listing: Contains an alphabetical list of export product groups. Below each product group are the names of the exporting companies. Users intending to contact Zimbabwean companies should start by looking for the product group and select any company below it, then refer to the company profiles (Section 6) for more details on the selected company. 4. Import Product Listing: Contains an alphabetical list of import product groups. Below each group are the names of importing companies. Users intending to contact Zimbabwean companies should start by looking for the import product group and select any company below it, then refer to the company profiles (Section 6) for more details on the selected company.

6. Company Profiles: Lists companies (Export and Import) alphabetically. More detailed information on each company is given in this section, such as telephone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail and website addresses as well as product/service descriptions. 7.Company Profiles (Late Entries): Lists companies (Export and mport) alphabetically. More detailed information on each company is given in this section, such as telephone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail and website addresses as well as product/service descriptions.

CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMMES

MARKET RESEARCHES

TRADE MISSIONS

Export Marketing Training Programme Harare July 2014 2014 July

Kenya August 2014

Tete, Mozambique June 2014

Export Marketing Training Programme Bulawayo July 2014 Export Marketing Training Programme Kwekwe July 2014

EXHIBITIONS/ TRADE FAIRS Zimbabwe International Trade Fair 22 - 26 April 2014 Source Africa International Trade Fair 18-20 June 2014 Kenya Solo Exhibition June 2014 Luanda Int. Trade Fair (FILDA) 22-27 July 2014

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5. Services: This section lists services provided (export and import) alphabetically. Users should note the service provider and then consult the company profiles (section 6) for more details.

Limpompo Province, South Africa May 2014 Angola May 2014

INFORMATION DISSEMINATION SEMINARS Harare June 2014 Bulawayo June 2014 Kwekwe June 2014

CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMMES Annual General Meeting August 2014 Exports’ Conference and Awards August 2014

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FOREWORD

TRADE DIRECTORY OF ZIMBABWE

Similarly, it is also essential to acknowledge the continued efforts and initiatives by the Government on the need to promote value added exports. A case in point is the Government’s economic development policy thrust espoused through the Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation (Zim Asset) 2013–2018, that is currently under implementation. The economic blue print places emphasis on value added manufactures to spur industry development in order to boost economic growth.

S. P. Pilime (Ms)

Chief Executive Officer Welcome Welcome to to the the 2014 2014 Trade Trade Directory Directory of of Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe. In the fast changing global trading sphere, information infrastructure is a key tool towards ensuring full integration into international markets. A Trade Directory is thus one such strategic information dissemination tool that can play a pivotal role in this process. It, therefore, becomes prudent that a Trade Development and Promotion Organisation invests time in producing such a product, which will go a long way towards easing business transaction costs and thus effectively facilitate trade of goods and services. In view of this, it is the privilege of ZimTrade to fulfil its role of providing relevant information on trade and exports to existing and potential stakeholders. We publish the Trade Directory of Zimbabwe annually in an endeavour to make available the latest trade information to both domestic enterprises, regional and international buyers and sellers. We highly regard this Trade Directory as an invaluable resource for companies with interest to export, buy, sell and invest. Certainly, the publication acts as a revered platform to showcase the diversity of Zimbabwean products and services. Given the widening trade deficit being experienced by Zimbabwe, which stood at $4.2 billion as at December 2013, it is critical to continuously develop export markets in order to compliment efforts towards generating and sustaining economic growth. As ZimTrade, we will relentlessly pursue our agenda to promote exports in the region and beyond. The Trade Directory is one such instrument towards empowering the trading community in Zimbabwe and beyond our borders, with current information on our exporters and their products as well as services.

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ZimTrade will, therefore, play its part towards ensuring that the trade objectives set out under Zim Asset are realised in the medium to long term. We will also intensify our advocacy initiatives to compliment other industry lobby platforms such as the Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI), the Zimbabwe National Chamber of Commerce (ZNCC) and the umbrella body, the Business Council of Zimbabwe (BCZ), to rally Government to improve the business operating environment. This should boost business confidence and lay a firm foundation for export competitiveness. In line with today’s technological advancement, stakeholders need instant information, therefore, we have uploaded the Directory link onto our Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn platforms. This is as a stepping stone towards full integration into the global business cyber platform for enhanced and effective market penetration for Zimbabwean exports. This should also improve our market reach, thus providing us the latitude to reach out to our target audience within the domestic and international market place. Current, new and potential exporters can leverage on these e-tools to enhance product and service visibility. It, therefore, gives me great pleasure, on behalf of ZimTrade, to offer this important resource to our stakeholders. May I also take this opportunity to convey my sincere gratitude to companies who made this publication a reality through pitching advertisements as well as providing information. We look forward to your continued support for future production of this strategic trade information dissemination tool.. Lastly, let me pledge my assurances that ZimTrade remains committed towards delivering its mandate, that is, trade development and promotion. We stand ready to service the needs of existing, new as well as emerging exporters.

……………………………………. S. P. Pilime (Ms) Chief Executive Officer

STEWARD BANK

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• develop, manage and deliver facilitate an efficient trade advisory service to relevant stakeholders • foster increased export activity through effective communication with all stakeholders on trade issues.



ZimTrade, the national trade development and promotion organisation, is a unique joint venture partnership between the Private Sector and the Government of Zimbabwe. It was established in 1991.

ZimTrade strives to be the regional nerve center for effective trade information through its services available at both the Head Office in Harare and Regional Office in Bulawayo.

VISION Growth in prosperity and employment generation in Zimbabwe through increased trade.

The organisation is ISO 9001:2008 certified and is committed to continually improve its services and service delivery.

MISSION To provide world standard services to Zimbabwe’s OUR SERVICES exporting community so as to enhance global competitiveness, mindful of the environmental impact of Trade Information business operations ZimTrade provides a wealth of information through a host of channels, that is: VALUES • Trade Information Centre • Client Focus • Trade Databases e.g. Zimbabwe Company • Responsiveness Database (which contains profiles of exporters • Integrity and importers) • Teamwork • In-house Publications (Trade Directory of • Innovation Zimbabwe, Weekly Bulletins, Monthly Newsletter and Trade User Guides). These are produced for OUR CORE BUSINESS local and international distribution • The ZimTrade website: www.zimtrade.co.zw ZimTrade’s core business is to: • collate and disseminate relevant and timely trade information to all its stakeholders • assist the manufacturing and horticulture sectors to improve production efficiencies and hence competi tiveness of their products in partnership with other stakeholders • identify new and potential exporters (SMEs), establish their needs, inculcate an export culture and train them in export marketing skills •manage trade promotion and facilitation activities to consolidate existing export markets and ensure maximum harnessing of new external business opportunities by Zimbabwean enterprises •enhance and improve understanding of topical trade related matters such as COMESA Customs Union, SADC Trade Protocol and Economic Parnership Agreements, among others • advocate and lobby for a conducive operating environment for exporters

Capacity Building ZimTrade offers export training programmes and tailor-made sector specific exposure missions that groom companies and develop skills necessary to exploit external market opportunities. The programmes are in the form of: a.Export Marketing Training Programme (EMTP), covering the following: • Export Business Plan • Export Product Development and Packaging • Export Market Research • Export Documentation, Inco-terms and Trade Agreements • Export Costing and Terms of Payment • Negotiation Skills and Closing Sales Techniques • Information Technology • Standards and Good Housekeeping.

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• Export Promotion Strategies • Negotiation Skills and Closing Sales Techniques • Information Technology • Standards and Good Housekeeping. b. Seminars and Workshops These are intensive training programmes tailored to suit different sectors on topical issues for the benefit ofthe exporter. Export Development The development of an export culture and increasing the number of exporters as well as the volume of exports is paramount to ZimTrade. ZimTrade is working with the following sectors: • Clothing and Textiles • Leather, Footwear and Leather Goods • Horticulture • Engineering

• Agricultural Inputs and Implements • Furniture • Processed Foods and Beverages • Building and Construction • Pharmaceuticals • Packaging • Art and Crafts • Motor Vehicle Components • Household and Electrical Goods • Jewellery Export Promotion ZimTrade facilitates the marketing of Zimbabwean products and services to the global market. It also facilitates and organises participation by companies in promotional events such as: • Regional and wInternational Trade Fairs • Trade Missions • Solo Exhibitions • Seller Missions • Buyer Missions

CONTACTS:

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Head Office

Regional Office

ZimTrade 904 Premium Close Mount Pleasant Business Park Harare - Zimbabwe Tel: +263 4 369330-43 Fax: +263 4 369244 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.zimtrade.co.zw

ZimTrade 48 Josiah Tongogara Street Bulawayo Zimbabwe Tel: +263 9 66151, 62378 Fax: +263 9 62397 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.zimtrade.co.zw

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF ZIMBABWE: FACTS & FIGURES Location – Zimbabwe is located in Southern Africa, between the Zambezi and Limpopo rivers. It is bordered by South Africa to the South, Botswana to the west, Mozambique to the East and Zambia to the North. Area: 390 757km2 Population: 13 061 239 (2012 census) Time Zone: +2 hrs GMT Capital City: Harare Other Cities: Bulawayo, Gweru, Masvingo, Mutare Travel Requirements: All travellers are required to have a valid passport Official Language: English Other Languages: Ndebele, Shona GDP per capita (2012): US$428.54 GDP @ constant prices (2012): US$9 493 830 617.76 GDP real growth rate (2012): 10.6% Inflation (dec 2013): 0.33% Currencies: Zimbabwe adopted a multiple currency system. (United States Dollar, South African Rand, British Pound, Botswana Pula, Chinese Yuan, Japanese Yen, Australian Dollar and the Indian Rupee) Membership in International Trade Organisations: WTO, SADC, COMESA, IMF, ILO, UN, AU

Business Hours: Companies:

0800hrs – 1700hrs (Monday to Friday)

Banking Hours: 0800hrs – 1500hrs (Monday to Friday) 0800hrs – 1130hrs (Saturdays) Government Departments: 0745hrs – 1645hrs (Monday to Friday)

National & Public Holidays 2014 • New Year’s Day

January 01

• Africa Day

May 25

• Independence Day

April 18

• Public Holiday

May 26

• Good Friday

April 18

• Heroes’ Day

August 11

• Easter Saturday

April 19

• Defence Forces Day

August 12

• Easter Sunday

April 20

• Unity Day

December 22

• Easter Monday

April 21

• Christmas Day

December 25

• Workers’ Day

May 01

• Public Holiday

December 26

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF ZIMBABWE: FACTS & FIGURES Table 1: Zimbabwe Top Ten Export Markets 2013

Country

Export Figure US$

Percentage Share

Total Exports

3,507,434,859

1

South Africa

2,613,935,363

75

2

Mozambique

369,624,239

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3

United Arab Emirates

229,096,719

7

4

Zambia

115,683,392

3

5

Botswana

44,011,166

1

6

Israel

39,596,679

1.1

7

China

30,903,125

0.9

8

Belgium

26,661,213

0.8

9

Democratic Republic of Congo

11,540,948

0.3

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Namibia

7,972,438

0.2

18,409,576

0.5

Other Source: Zimstat

Source: ZimStat

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF ZIMBABWE: FACTS & FIGURES Table 2: Zimbabwe Top Ten Export Products 2013 Product Total Exports

3,507,434,859

1

Minerals

969,600,420

28

2

Tobacco

908,414,398

26

3

Nickel and articles thereof

450,740,496

13

4

Nickel Ores

342,098,199

10

5

Ferro-chromium

159,384,473

4h

6

Cotton

119,348,379

3

7

Sugar and sugar confectionery

93,627,332

3

8

Cement

57,074,801

2

9

Raw hides and skins

35,690,850

1

10

Electrical Energy

33,470,622

1

337,984,888

10

Other Source: ZimStat

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Export Figure U$ Percentage Share

ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF ZIMBABWE: FACTS & FIGURES Table 3: Zimbabwe Top Ten Import Sources 2013 Country Total Imports

Import Figure US$

Percentage Share

7,704,223,094

1

South Africa

3,658,606,645

48

2

United Kingdom

1,415,581,332

18

3

China

438,790,349

6

4

Zambia

262,113,095

3

5

Mozambique

200,455,012

3

6

Botswana

175,940,100

2

7

United States

167,339,204

2

8

India

156,700,917

2

9

Japan

139,358,092

2

10

United Arab Emirates

102,058,651

1

Other

987,279,696

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Source: Zimsta

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF ZIMBABWE: FACTS & FIGURES Table 4: Zimbabwe Top Ten Import Products 2013 Import Product Total Imports 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Fuel (Petrol & Diesel) Fertilisers Motor Vehicles Machinery and mechanical appliances Electrical machinery and equipment and parts Cereals Plastics Pharmaceutical products Soya Cake Galvanised zinc and coated steel coils Other

Source: ZimStat

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Import Figure US$

Percentage Share

7,704,177,972 1,617,409,026

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1,077,043,118

14

717,488,867

9

654,971,336

8

427,436,431

6

324,947,245

4

222,600,521

3

220,170,933

3

134,270,152

2

124,757,070

2

2,183,083,273

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF KEY ECONOMIC SECTORS AGRICULTURE Agriculture is the main anchor of the economy and has the potential to reduce poverty and enhance economic turnaround prospects for Zimbabwe. The sector provides employment to approximately 70% of the population, supplies 60% of the industrial raw materials and contributes 40% towards export earnings. There are strong backward and forward linkages between agriculture and other sectors of the economy, thus providing an anchor for the country’s economic turnaround prospects. It contributes between 15% and 19% to the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

chain development. Table 1 shows agricultural production statistics with emphasis on the relative contribution of the commodities to national output and annual growth rates for the specified crops. MANUFACTURING The manufacturing sector contributes 14% to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and 27% of total exports. Zimbabwe’s manufacturing sector stands out as a well diversified outfit in Sub Saharan Africa (SSA), with a fair balance of both vertical and horizontally intergrated production models.

The sector is characterised by strong direct linkages with the agricultural and mining sectors. Nearly 60% The agricultural sector, which initially took a produc- of the sector’s inputs come from agriculture and the tion knock due to the transitional costs of land re- remaining from the mining sector, whilst most of its form in 2000, has since posted significant recovery output is also consumed by the agriculture and that became pronounced during the period 2009 mining sectors. Major manufacturing industries -2012. The current recovery is mainly bouyed by include agro-processing, clothing and textiles, wood, growth in tobacco, horticulture and soya bean pro- food and beverages and chemicals, among others. duction. During 2014 the sector is projected to grow by 9% mainly driven by growth in the production of The Zimbabwean economy has witnessed a maize (62.8%), cotton (27.8%), soya beans (26.7%), slowdown in terms of growth and economic activity. and groundnuts (56.8%), among other crops. The manufacturing sector has not been spared either Investment opportunities exist in the sector with huge prospects for both infrastructure rehabilitation and development, agro-processing and agro-value Table 1: Agricultural Production-Annual Percentage Change

as highlighted by the Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries (CZI) State of the Manufacturing Sector Szrvey Report for 2013. The sector’s capacity utilisation declined from 57.2% in 2011 to 44.2% in 2012 and further down to 39.6% in 2013 due to working capital constraints, water and power shortages, antiquated machinery and low domestic demand among other inhibiting factors. The 2014 National Budget postulated moderate growth rates of 3.2% in 2014 and 6.5% in 2015 for the sector driven by foodstuffs, tobacco and beverages sub-sectors. Also, in support of efforts by the local industry to re-tool, Government suspended duty on imported capital equipment to reduce the cost of technology upgrading initiatives. Furthermore, a 90 day Value Added Tax (VAT) deferment facility is available for the importation of industrial and capital equipment by companies in the manufacturing sector.

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF KEY ECONOMIC SECTORS In order to stimulate domestic and foreign investment, Government is working towards the establishment of Special Economic Zones (SEZ). SEZs are going to be geographically defined and will target modern manufacturing and technology sectors with the potential to increase exports and create new jobs. The SEZs will benefit from Government fiscal and policy incentives to stimulate production and hence, boost the country’s economic recovery and growth prospects in the medium to long term. Growth in the sector has remained sluggish over the last two years though projected to recover in 2014 as captured in Table 2 below:

Table 3 below shows the cumulative minerals output for 2012 and 2013 (first seven months) and forecasts for 2014. Table 3: Summary of Mineral Output for 2012-2014 Estimates

Forecasts

-

Table 2: Index of Manufacturing Output(%)

-

BANKING The banking sector has remained generally stable despite various underlying macro-economic challenges facing the country. Currently the sector comprises 19 banking institutions consisting of 14 commercial banks, 2 merchant banks, 2 building societies and 1 savings bank. This is shown in Figure 1 below. In addition, there are 146 microfinance institutions.

MINING

Figure 1: Composition of Banks

The mining sector continues to be a major foreign currency earner, pitting it as one of the main pillars for economic growth mainly through value addition and beneficiation. The sector continues to lead the country’s economic recovery since 2009 with an average annualised cumulative growth of more than 30% in 2013 and an estimated 40% contribution to GDP. The mining sector is projected to improve by 9.8% in 2014 mainly driven by growth in gold, diamonds, nickel, platinum and coal. The growth will be underpinned by the recovery in international commodity prices projected in 2014 and investment in the energy sector among other things.

The Government is making inroads towards restoring the role of the Central Bank through re-capitalisation of the institution to enable it to be the Banker for Government and Lender of Last Resort. These reforms will enable the bank to take an active role towards resuscitation of the inter bank market. The

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ZIMBABWE IN BRIEF KEY ECONOMIC SECTORS reforms will, in the ultimate, strengthen the banking sector’s underwriting capacity, and hence ease the critical liquidity challenges that have chocked the productive and export sectors of the economy.

Figure 3: Tourism Revenue Trends

(US$ millions)

With the positive developments in the banking sector, it is envisaged that banks will progressively reduce the quantity of precautionary cash balances they currently hold and expand their lending capacity to productive sectors of the economy. The skewed sectoral credit distribution shown in Figure. 2 below shows that individuals constitute the highest proportion of banks’ loanable portfolio, accounting for 24% followed by the services sector at 18% with manufac- Buoyed by the peaceful political environment and the successful co-hosting, by Zimbabwe and Zambia, of turing and agriculture on par at 15%. the UNWTO General Assembly, there is a projected Figure 2: Borrowing by Sector contribution growth in revenue of about US$5 billion and 5 million tourist arrivals with a 15% projected to GDP by 2018. Through the implementation of the Tourism Master Plan (2013–2015), Government hopes to engender a conducive and enabling environment for sustainable growth in the tourism sector. Coupled with the resumption of local and regional flights by Air Zimbabwe, linking tourist destinations, it is projected that tourism will post a cumulative growth of 17.2% by 2015 from a low base of 4.3% in 2012 as show under Table 4 below:

This scenario is unsuitable and does not bode well for Table 4: Tourism Growth rates the country’s growth prospects. However, this is likely to change significantly as the Central Bank resumes its role as a lender of last resort and hence a major player on the inter bank market. Commercial banks will, therefore, be able to reshuffle their lending ART AND CRAFTS portfolios as the liquidity conditions ease against the The Art and Crafts Sector in Zimbabwe has registered back drop of a recapitalised Central Bank. steady growth since 2005, with Zimbabwe now increasingly being recognized as a country with a strong creative and artistic foundation. The craft TOURISM items being developed and created in Zimbabwe Tourism is increasingly becoming an important com- can be found across Southern Africa as the country’s traders have been supplying and maintaining ponent of Zimbabwe’s economic growth equation. During 2013 the sector contributed approximately markets in the region. International players are also 10% of the country’s GDP and recorded 1.8 million keen to engage Zimbabwean artists and crafts people tourist arrivals, which translated to approximately largely because of the strong skills base and the experiUS$846 million revenue inflows as shown in Figure 3: enced and experimental approach to creative practice.

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INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN ZIMBABWE Zimbabwe’s investment regime offers investors an as mining. In this regard, potential investors can tilt array of opportunities across mining, infrastructure, the shareholding in their favour on a case by case manufacturing, tourism and agriculture sectors. Gov- basis, and depending on the sector that would host ernment’s priority focus is on value addition and their investment. During his inaugural Speech on 22 secondary processing industries. Other investment August, 2013 acknowledging his Election victory, His opportunities exists in retail, information communi- Excellency the President of Zimbabwe, Robert cation technology, banking and services. That aside Mugabe noted the need for that flexibility. This was Government, has been implementing the Indigeni- further buttressed by Hon. Minister of Finance and zation and Empowerment Act which provides for an Economic Development, Patrick Chinamasa on the equity structure of 51% local and 49% foreign across occasion of his presentation of the 2014 Nationall sectors of the economy. Government has how- al Budget on the 19th of December, 2014 to Parliaever, agreed to a more flexible approach for those ment that Government will uphold this flexibility. sectors that may require huge capital injections such

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Source: Zimbabwe Investment Authority

Getting to Zimbabwe by Air 1. Harare International Airport Harare International Airport is located 15 kilometres south of the City of Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. It is the main gateway into Zimbabwe and alternate entry point into Central and Southern Africa. The runway is 4,725 metres long and 46 metres wide. 2. Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo Airport Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo Airport is located 20 kilometres east of Bulawayo, the second largest City in Zimbabwe. Renamed after one of the founders of Zimbabwe Dr. J. M. Nkomo, the airport is the gateway to the City of Kings and Queens as well as to world heritage sites such as the Khami Ruins (ancient architecture) and Matobo Hills (bald heads). It also caters for regional traffic, playing host to flights from South Africa into Zimbabwe and to Victoria Falls. The runway is 2,588 metres long and 45 metres wide. The airport operates 24 hours per day. 3. Victoria Falls Airport Victoria Falls Airport is located 21 kilometres from the Victoria Falls Town Centre. It provides direct

access to the Seventh Natural Wonder of the World and Heritage Site, Mosi-oa-Tunya on the River Zambezi, also known as the Magnificent Victoria Falls. The runway is 2,286 metres long and 30 metres wide. The airport operates 12 hours per day.

Getting into Zimbabwe by Road Below are the border posts that people/goods can use to come to Zimbabwe and they are outlined as to which country Zimbabwe shares the border with. 1. Zimbabwe and Botswana • Plumtree Border Post • Kazungula Border Post 2. Zimbabwe and Mozambique • Forbes Border Post (Mutare) • Nyamapanda Border Post 3. Zimbabwe and South Africa • Beitbridge Border Post 4. Zimbabwe and Zambia • Chirundu Border Post • Kariba Border Post • Victoria Falls Border Post

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ZIMRA’S ROLE IN TRADE FACILITATION

The Vision of the Zimbabwe Revenue Authority • Simplification of requirements and formalities in respect of the release and clearance of goods (ZIMRA) is “to be a beacon of excellence in the provision of fiscal services and facilitation of trade • Improved working methods and ensuring transparency and efficiency of Customs operations and travel”. • Reduction, simplification and standardisation of data in the documentation required by Customs ZIMRA, therefore, plays a multifaceted role in both local and international trade as the gate-keeper at • Application of modern Customs techniques, including risk assessment, simplified procedures for the country’s ports of entry/exit which include airports, border posts and inland offices. It also plays entry and release of goods, post release controls and company audit methods a midwifery role for Zimbabwe’s exports to enter foreign markets while also acting as the con- • Provisions that facilitate the importation of goods through the use of simplified or pre-arrival duit for imports from other countries. Customs procedures and processes. ZIMRA represents Zimbabwe within the World Customs Organization (WCO) whose mandate includes The following are some of the modernization trends simplification and harmonization of clearance pro- which have been adopted by ZIMRA to enhance cedures, which is an important role to play both for trade facilitation: the country’s benefit and that of the African region as a whole for facilitation of trade. ZIMRA also hosts • Simplification of Customs procedures and improving a regional training centre under the auspices of Customs control that includes the introduction of WCO East and Southern Africa (ESA) Region to boost electronic lodgement of entries and the establishment of a One–Stop Border Post at capacity building in Customs issues. Chirundu which borders Zambia and Zimbabwe The Authority continues to work towards expediting • Post Clearance Audit • Provision of pre-clearance facility the movement, clearance and release of goods including goods in transit and with significant pro- • Computerised Customs Procedures – basically all gress having been made towards mobilisingtechnical Customs procedures are computerised (i.e. use of assistance and capacity building to ease trade flow ASYCUDA World) bottlenecks at ports of entry. This role also entails • Electronic Lodgement of Clearance Documents putting in place strategies to combat smuggling and – clearance documents are lodged electronically international trade crime. Trade facilitation is, there- from any place in the country • Use of non-intrusive inspection equipment fore, done within the confines of protecting civil society from dangerous substances and harmful (scanners) – to reduce time spent on actual physical drugs, among other prohibited and controlled prod- examination of goods. ucts. Among other things, ZIMRA, international • Policy on Integrity – a clear and well understood policy framework was developed to promote trade bodies and other Customs Authorities are integrity in ZIMRA’s operations. working on-:

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For all your chemical requirements Industrial Chemicals

Mining Chemicals

Soda Ash Light / Dense Sodium Tripolyphosphate Sulphonic Acid Bac-50 & - Bac 80 Ceta Stearyl Alcohol Sasol Wax White Oil Hydrogen Peroxide Glycerine Caustic Soda

Activated Carbon Sodium Cyanide Borax Mercury Hydrated Lime Copper Sulphate Penta Nitric Acid Steel Mill Balls Hydraulic Acid Sodium Silicates

Agro Chemicals

FUNGICIDES Curethane 80 WP (Mancozeb 80 WP) Copper Oxychloride INSECTICIDES Lancer (Acephate) Phoskill (Monocrotophos)

HERICIDES Metolachlor Alachlor Atrazine Paraquat Metribuzin (Fluazifop-p-butyl) Glyphocure(Glyphosate) SUCKERICIDES Sword (Pendimethalin) N-Decanol

Chemaron (Methamidophos) Fencure 20 EC (Fenvalerate) Chlorban (Chlorpyriphos) Lambdacure (Lambdacyhalothrin) Acetacure (Acetamiprid) Dimethoate 40EC (Chemogor)

Paint Chemicals Styrene Acrylic Emulsion Alkyd Resins 70% Long Oil & 55% Medium Oil Solvents Titanium Dioxide Rutile 902 plus and 706 Mi Mixed Driers Short Oil Alkyd Pigment Wetting and Dispersion Additives

Water treatment Chemicals

Food Chemicals Acetic Acid Glucose 42 DE Citric Acid Monohydrate Citric Acid Anhydrous Phosphoric Acid Bicarbonate Ammonium Bicarbonate Sodium Saccharin SodiumBenzoate

Corn Starch Dexttrose Monohydrate Maltose Syrup Corn Gluten Meal Grain Feed Malt Dextrin Inositol Modified Starch Sarbitol

Aluminium Sulphate Activated Carbon Calcium Hypochlorite Sodium Sulphate Floccalants Sulphiric Acid E Ion Exchange Resins

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THE TRANSPORT SECTOR IN ZIMBABWE AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO TRADE Zimbabwe is strategically positioned as a hub within the SADC region providing a convenient logistical gateway to markets within the region, Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and the East African Community (EAC). With the Heads of State of African Governments having since resolved to escalate the regional economic integration agenda towards an African Economic Community by 2017, the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA), that will unleash a combined COMESA-SADC-EAC market of 600 million, positions Zimbabwe at the centre of economic transformation in Sub- Saharan Africa. The TFTA is a major building block towards the African Economic Community.

bwe and the SADC region with strong South African links, the largest regional economy and home to one of the busiest ports in Africa. Zimbabwe is also stragically and logistically linked to other countries such as Mozambique, Botswana, Zambia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi and Tanzania through the North–South Corridor, the most extensive corridor system in the region. The railway network connects Zimbabwe to all its neighbouring countries and is linked to East Africa through the TAZARA Railway line.

Within Zimbabwe, the railway network connects all major mining areas, heavy industrial centers as well as the major agricultural collection centers. It also provides transport for the country’s exports and The three main transport modes that serve the imports e.g. minerals to seaports in South Africa and economy in Zimbabwe are road, railway, and Mozambique. aviation. The country has a relatively dense national road network of 100 km/1 000 square The aviation industry provides international and kilometers which is double the figure for neigh- local air transportation links. The full complement of bouring Zambia and almost triple that of airports consists of Harare International Airport as Mozambique. The network spanned to an the main hub, Joshua Nkomo International Airport in approximate value of 44 000 km in 2008. The Bulawayo, Victoria Falls and Buffalo Range in Masvinclassified network roads under state jurisdiction go. In addition to this, there are approximately 200 total 18 253 km, while there is an additional 5 000 km aerodromes of diverse standards and capacity that of urban roads and around 39 000 km of unclassified are distributed throughout the country and they roads. The rural-accessibility index in Zimbabwe is at contribute significantly to the country’s tourism 46% which is more than double the regional averages. industry. There are good road connections between Zimba-

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BANKING INSTITUTIONS CENTRAL CENTRAL BANK BANK Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe P.O. Box1283 Harare Tel: 263 4 703000; 703096 Fax: 263 4 707800 Email: [email protected] Website: www.rbz.co.zw COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL BANKS BANKS AfrAsia Bank Zimbabwe Ltd P.O. Box CY 3205, Causeway Harare Tel: 263 4 749948; 749400-9 Fax: 263 4 755201 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.afrasiabank.co.zw Agribank P.O. Box 369 Harare Tel: 263 4 774400-19/429; 773704; 757669; 748882; 731754 Fax: 263 4 777556 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.agribank.co.zw Allied Bank P.O. Box 4565 Harare Tel: 263 4 798300-17; 798251-60 Fax: 263 4 798295 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.zabg.co.zw

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BancABC P.O. Box 2786 Harare Tel: 263 4 369260-69; 369701-9 Fax: 263 4 369932 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.bancabc.co.zw Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe Ltd P.O. Box 790 Harare Tel: 263 4 758314/9 Fax: 263 4 750972 E-mail: [email protected] Website: zw.barclays.com CABS P.O. Box 2798 Harare Tel: 263 4 883823–59 Fax: 263 4 883804 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.cabs.co.zw CBZ Bank P.O. Box 3313 Harare Tel: 263 4 748050-79; 795101-16; 780880-4 Fax: 263 4 758077 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.cbzbank.co.zw EcoBank Zimbabwe P.O. Box BW1464 Harare Tel: 263 4 851642/9; 852252/69 Fax: 263 4 851630/9 E-mail: [email protected] ecobank.com Website: www.ecobank.com

FBC Bank P.O. Box 1227 Harare Tel: 263 4 783203-8; 783211; 797759 Fax: 263 4 701693 E-mail: [email protected] / [email protected] fbc.co.zw Website: www.fbc.co.zw MBCA Bank Ltd P. O. Box 3200 Harare Tel: 263 4 701636-52; 799291; 732227 Fax: 263 4 708005; 739084 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.mbca.co.zw MetBank Ltd P.O. Box CY177 Causeway Harare Tel: 263 4 700789; 700445; 795911; 706569 Email: [email protected] Website: www.metbank.co.zw

BANKING INSTITUTIONS POSB P.O. Box CY1628 Causeway Harare Tel: 263 4 793831-9; 729701 Fax: 263 4 708537 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.posb.co.zw

ZB Bank P.O. Box 3198 Harare Tel: 263 4 757471-94; 759660-5; 796841-4 Fax: 263 4 757497 Email: [email protected] Website: www.zb.co.zw

Stanbic Bank Zimbabwe Ltd P.O. Box 300 Harare Tel: 263 4 303749; 303664; 303875 Fax: 263 4 308088 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.stanbicbank.co.zw

DEVELOPMENT BANKS BANKS DEVELOPMENT

Standard Chartered Bank Zimbabwe Ltd P. O. Box 373 Harare Tel: 263 4 752852-8; 253801-8 Fax: 263 4 752609 Email: [email protected] Website: www.sc.com/zw Steward Bank P.O. Box 5220 Harare Tel: 263 4 791448; 791450/8; 253672/5 Fax: 263 4 791460 E-mail: [email protected] co.zw Website: www.stewardbank. co.zw

African Export-Import Bank P.O. Box 1600 Harare Tel: 263 4 700904/41 Fax: 263 4 729756 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.afreximbank.com Infrastructure Development Bank of Zimbabwe P.O. Box 1720 Harare Tel: 263 4 750171-8 Fax: 263 4 749012 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.idbz.co.zw

MERCHANT BANKS MERCHANT BANKS Capital Bank 13th Floor, Social Security Centre Harare Tel: 263 4 703675/85; 703686; 705477 Fax: 263 4 798420 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.capitalbank.co.zw Tetrad Investment Bank P.O. Box 1670 Harare Tel: 263 4 704271-5; 338401-6 Fax: 263 4 338400 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.tetrad.co.zw

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TRADE FACULTAION ORGANISATIONS TRADE FACILITATION ORGANISATIONS

Bankers’ Association of Zimbabwe 14177 Gunhill Avenue Gunhill P.O. Box 10521 Harare Tel: 263 4 798776-7 Email: [email protected] Chamber of Mines 20 Mt Pleasant Drive Mt Pleasant P.O. Box 712 Harare Tel: 263 4 334507; 334517 E-mail: [email protected] Commercial Farmer’s Union 42 Bates Street Milton Park Westgate Harare Tel: 263 4 309800-20 Fax: 309849 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.cfuzim.org

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Confederation of Zimbabwe Industries 31 Josiah Chinamano Avenue P.O. Box 3704 Harare Tel: 263 4 251490/6 Fax: 263 4 252424 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.czi.co.zw Construction Industry Federation of Zimbabwe Conquenar House 256 Samora Machel Avenue East Harare Tel: 263 4 746661; 746905 Fax: 263 4 746937 E-mail: [email protected] Credit Insurance Zimbabwe 69 Sam Nujoma Street Harare Tel: 263 4 738944/7; 706101/4 Fax: 263 4 706105 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.credsure.co.zw

Horticultural Promotion Council 23 Sloane Street, Highlands Harare Tel: 263 712 878442 E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected] Hospitality Association of Zimbabwe 129 Baines Avenue Harare Tel: 263 4 708872 E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.haz.co.zw Minerals Marketing Corporation of Zimbabwe 90 Mutare Road Msasa Harare Tel: 263 4 487200-4 E-mail: [email protected] mmczco.zw Website: www.mmcz.co.zw

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