Year-End Geometry Review

Year-End Geometry Review  Objective To review the names and some of the characteristics of polygons, as well as the names of basic 3-dimensional sh...
Author: Bethany Holland
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Year-End Geometry Review



Objective To review the names and some of the characteristics of polygons, as well as the names of basic 3-dimensional shapes. o

www.everydaymathonline.com

ePresentations

eToolkit

Algorithms Practice

EM Facts Workshop Game™

Teaching the Lesson Key Concepts and Skills • Name, model, and describe plane shapes using straws and twist-ties. 

Family Letters

Assessment Management

Common Core State Standards

Ongoing Learning & Practice 1 2 4 3

[Geometry Goal 1]

• Name, model, and describe solid figures.  [Geometry Goal 1]

• Identify and describe attributes of plane shapes and solid figures.  [Geometry Goal 1]

Playing Time Match Math Masters, pp. 354, 355, and 359 My Reference Book, pp. 152 and 153 Children practice telling time on digital and analog clocks.

Math Boxes 10 5 

Math Journal 2, p. 204 Children practice and maintain skills through Math Box problems.

Key Activities

Home Link 10 5

Children review characteristics of polygons and defining and non-defining attributes of shapes. They construct polygons out of straws and twist-ties. Children identify and model 3-dimensional shapes.

Math Masters, p. 289 Children practice and maintain skills through Home Link activities.



Ongoing Assessment: Recognizing Student Achievement

Curriculum Focal Points

Interactive Teacher’s Lesson Guide

Differentiation Options READINESS

Reviewing Polygons and 3-Dimensional Shapes Children play I Spy to review characteristics of 2- and 3-dimensional shapes. ENRICHMENT

Constructing Regular Polyhedrons Math Journal 2, p. 203 models of regular polyhedrons  straws  twist-ties Children construct regular polyhedrons out of straws and twist-ties. ELL SUPPORT

Comparing 2- and 3-Dimensional Shapes Children compare and contrast 2- and 3-dimensional shapes.

Use Mental Math and Reflexes.  [Operations and Computation Goal 3]

Materials Math Journal 2, pp. 201–203 Math Masters, pp. 212A, 212B, 288A, and 288B Home Link 104 per child: 10 long straws, 10 short straws, and 20 twist-ties  scissors  tape  stickers  markers  glue  craft supplies

Advance Preparation For Part 1, display some 2- and 3-dimensional items from the Shapes Museum. Place straws and twist-ties in containers near the Math Message. Using heavy construction paper or another firm paper (the firmer, the better), copy one set of Math Masters, pages 212A, 212B, 288A, and 288B for each partnership. Gather stickers, markers, glue, and other craft supplies, so that children may decorate their solids. You may wish to locate the book Color Zoo by Lois Ehlert (J.B. Lippincott, 1989) as it relates to lesson content.

Teacher’s Reference Manual, Grades 1– 3 p. 153

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Unit 10

Year-End Review and Assessment

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Getting Started Mental Math and Reflexes



Math Message

Write two amounts of money on the board. Children show “thumbs-up” if they estimate that the sum is more than $1, “thumbs-down” if they estimate that the sum is less than $1, and a “fist” if they estimate that the sum is equal to $1. Suggestions:

Take 10 long straws, 10 short straws, and 20 twist-ties. Find some triangles and other polygons in the room.

Home Link 10 4 Follow-Up 

10¢ and 50¢; 25¢ and 75¢; 90¢ and 35¢ 45¢ and 45¢; 70¢ and 30¢; 5¢ and 80¢ 31¢ and 65¢; 47¢ and 47¢; 89¢ and 29¢

Ongoing Assessment: Recognizing Student Achievement

Have volunteers share their strategies for solving the problems. Expect a variety of solution strategies.

Mental Math and Reflexes



Use Mental Math and Reflexes to assess children’s ability to estimate sums. Children are making adequate progress if they are able to correctly estimate whether sums in the first set are greater than, less than, or equal to $1. Some children may be able to correctly estimate the sums in the second and third sets. [Operations and Computation Goal 3]

Examples of constructions from straws and twist-ties

1 Teaching the Lesson

 Math Message Follow-Up

WHOLE-CLASS DISCUSSION

Children identify triangles and other polygons they found. Review the key characteristics of polygons that are given in the following activity.

Student Page Date LESSON

10 5 

 Constructing Polygons out of Straws and Twist-Ties

PARTNER ACTIVITY

Some Polygons

Triangles

PROBLEM PR PRO P RO R OBL BLE B L LE LEM EM SOLVING SO S OL O LV VIN ING

(Math Journal 2, pp. 201 and 202) Quadrangles (Quadrilaterals)

Direct children’s attention to journal page 201. Review the characteristics of polygons:

trapezoid

rhombus square

 Polygons are made up of straight sides.  The corner of a polygon is where two sides meet.  Sides meet only at their ends.

kite

rectangle

Other Polygons

 The sides are connnected—there aren’t any gaps. Bring out the chart paper with Defining and Non-Defining Attributes of Triangles and Squares from Lesson 7-4. Have children look at the Triangles section of journal page 201. Triangles are polygons so they must have all the attributes of polygons. Ask children if any of the attributes of polygons are

hexagon

pentagon

octagon

heptagon

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Student Page Date LESSON

10 5 

Reviewing Polygons

Use straws and twist-ties to make the following polygons. Draw the polygons. Record the number of corners and sides for each polygon. Sample drawings are

given for Exercises 1–3.

1. Make a square.

4

Number of sides



Is the kite a square? Why or why not? Sample answer: No. Its sides aren’t the same lengths and the corners look different.



Is the rectangle on this page a square? Sample answer: No. Even though the corners all look the same, there is one set of long sides and one set of short sides so the sides aren’t all the same length.



How is the hexagon on this page like triangles and squares? How is it different? Sample answer: Triangles have 3 sides, squares have 4 sides each, and the hexagon has 6 sides, but they are all polygons with the traits of polygons.

4

Number of corners 2. Make a triangle.

3

Number of sides

missing from their list of triangle attributes and put those on the chart. Next, direct their attention to the Quadrangles section of journal page 201 and the Defining Attributes of Squares list on the chart paper. Ask:

3

Number of corners 3. Make a hexagon.

6

Number of sides Number of corners

6

4. Make a polygon of your choice.

Answers vary.

Write its name. Number of sides Number of corners 5. Make another polygon of your choice.

Answers vary.

Write its name.

Explain that even though the hexagon on their journal page has corners that all look the same and sides that are the same length, the defining attribute of a hexagon is that it is a polygon with 6 sides. The sides and corners do not have to be the same.

Number of sides Number of corners

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Working with a partner, children construct polygons and answer questions on journal page 202. Each partnership should construct a square, a triangle, a hexagon, and 2 or more other polygons. Remind children that when they construct the hexagon, it does not have to look exactly like the hexagon on journal page 201. While children work on their polygons, you may wish to ask them to construct a quadrangle that is NOT a square for one of their choice polygons and indicate which defining attributes it is missing.

 Reviewing the Names of

INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY

3-Dimensional Shapes

Student Page

(Math Journal 2, p. 203)

Date LESSON

10 5 

Reviewing 3-Dimensional Shapes

Children write the names of six 3-dimensional shapes.

Word Bank sphere

rectangular prism

pyramid

cube

cone

cylinder

Write the name of each 3-dimensional shape. 1.

2.

cone 4.

3.

cube 5.

sphere

rectangular prism 6.

pyramid

Review the names after children have completed journal page 203. Discuss the characteristics of each shape: flat versus curved surfaces, number of faces, and number of corners. Then discuss the polyhedrons at the bottom of the page. Explain that all of the faces on each shape are the same. Ask questions such as: What shape makes up the octahedron? triangles This portion of the page will be used for the optional Enrichment activity in Part 3.

cylinder

 Constructing Solids

Five Regular Polyhedrons The faces that make each shape are identical.

SMALL-GROUP ACTIVITY

(Math Masters, pp. 212A, 212B, 288A, 288B)

tetrahedron 4 faces

cube 6 faces

octahedron 8 faces

dodecahedron 12 faces

Tell children that they will be working in pairs to make cubes, rectangular prisms, cylinders, and cones. They will then work in small groups using these shapes to create larger figures. Begin by demonstrating how to cut and fold each template to construct the solids (see directions on pages 647 and 651 for constructing the

icosahedron 20 faces

Math Journal 2, p. 203 194-209_EMCS_S_G1_SMJ_U10_576396.indd 203

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Unit 10 Year-End Review and Assessment

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Student Page cylinder and the cone, respectively). Provide each partnership with scissors, tape, and templates for each solid from Math Masters, pages 212A, 212B, 288A, and 288B. After children have made the solids, have them work in small groups to combine their solids into new, composite figures. For instance, children may tape their solids together to make a figure that looks like a castle. Small groups may divide the work by having pairs of children work together to make a composite figure and then combining the pairs’ composite figures into a new shape. Provide children with stickers, markers, glue, and craft supplies (such as felt and buttons) to decorate their figures, and model for children how to decorate the hollow figures gently. Add completed figures to the Shapes Museum.

Date LESSON

Math Boxes

10 5 

1. Solve.

2. Which are you more likely

25

1 _ 2 of 50¢ =

to grab?

¢

1 _ 2 of $1.00 =

50

1 _ 2 of $2.00 = $

1 . 00

¢ black or white? or

white

?

47–48

4. Shade the thermometer

3. Record the time.

to show 78° F. 12

11 10

ⴗF 90

1 2

9

3

8

80

4 7

6

5

:

5. Label each

part. 2 Shade _ 6 of the hexagon.

5

70 60

15

80–81

1 6

1 6 1 6

1 6

87

50 6. These are pictures of

1 6 1 6

3-dimensional shapes. Put an X on shapes that have all flat faces.

2 Write another name for _ 6.

1 _ 3

pyramid

sphere

cylinder

cube

13

58

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NOTE Decorating the hollow figures may

2 Ongoing Learning & Practice

 Playing Time Match

be difficult for some children. Have them use firm paper to construct the solids and decorate them with stickers and craft materials that may be gently glued onto the figures.

PARTNER ACTIVITY

(Math Masters, pp. 354, 355, and 359; My Reference Book, pp. 152 and 153)

Children play Time Match to practice telling time using digital and analog clocks. For detailed instructions, see Lesson 4-4.

 Math Boxes 10 5 

Home Link Master Name HOME LINK

10 5 

Family Note

INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY

Date

Geometry Review

Today we reviewed several ideas about polygons and 3-dimensional shapes. Ask your child to point out objects of various shapes around the house or outside. Please return this Home Link to school tomorrow.

Use the Word List for Exercises 1–6.

(Math Journal 2, p. 204)

Word List

Mixed Practice Math Boxes in this lesson are paired with Math Boxes in Lesson 10-7.

hexagon

octagon

pentagon

rectangle

square

triangle

Write the name under each shape. 1.

 Home Link 10 5 

54–55

INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY

(Math Masters, p. 289)

2.

pentagon

3.

rectangle

4. I have 6 sides and 6 corners. What am I?

octagon hexagon

5. I am a special rectangle. All of my sides are the same length.

Home Connection Children identify polygons with names from a Word List and solve polygon riddles.

What am I?

square

6. I have the smallest number of corners of all of the shapes.

What am I?

triangle

Practice 7. Write 4 odd numbers with 7 in the hundreds place.

Answers vary.

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3 Differentiation Options READINESS

 Reviewing Polygons and

SMALL-GROUP ACTIVITY 5–15 Min

3-Dimensional Shapes To provide experience with attributes of 2- and 3-dimensional shapes, have children play the game I Spy. Begin by generating and recording a list of vocabulary words used to describe shapes. Include words such as sides, corners, faces, points, edges, length, and size. Also, generate and record a list of different 2- and 3-dimensional shapes that children know. Have children give each other clues about shapes they “spy” in the room. For example, one child says, “I spy with my little eye a shape with 4 sides the same length.” Children in the group guess which shape the child “spies.” ENRICHMENT

 Constructing Regular

INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY 15–30 Min

Polyhedrons (Math Journal 2, p. 203)

To further explore the properties of 3-dimensional figures using a concrete model, have children build polyhedrons with straws and connectors. Display labeled models of polyhedrons and have children look at the five regular polyhedrons shown on journal page 203. Tell children that polyhedrons are 3-dimensional shapes that have all flat faces. Prisms and pyramids are examples of polyhedrons. Regular polyhedrons are special because all of the faces are the same. There are only five kinds of regular polyhedrons. Invite each child to build his or her own regular polyhedron out of straws and twist-ties. Children should be able to build a tetrahedron or cube, but don’t be surprised if someone tries to build an octahedron. ELL SUPPORT

Planning Ahead For Lesson 10-6, you may want to find a recent national weather map from a newspaper, a large classroom map of the United States, and a local forecast from a current newspaper.

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 Comparing 2- and

SMALL-GROUP ACTIVITY 5–15 Min

3-Dimensional Shapes To provide language support for shapes, ask children to create lists of 2- and 3-dimensional shapes, using words and pictures. Have them explain how 2- and 3-dimensional shapes are alike and how they differ.

Unit 10 Year-End Review and Assessment

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Name LESSON

7 5 

Date

Cylinder Template

TAB

TAB

Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill

TAB

TAB

TAB

TAB

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Name LESSON

7 6 

Date

Cone Template

TA

B

TA

B

B TA T

AB

Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill

T A B

212B 196-220_EMCS_B_MM_G1_U07_576930_NEW_PAGES.indd 212B

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Name LESSON

10 5 

Date

Cube Template

TAB

TAB

TAB

TAB

TAB TAB

Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill

TAB

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Name LESSON

10 5 

Date

Rectangular Prism Template

TAB

TAB

TAB

TAB

TAB

Copyright © Wright Group/McGraw-Hill

TAB TAB

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