We look forward to working with you during this important time. Sincerely, ADMINISTRATION

Dear Parents and Students: This Jeffersonville High School Course Description Guide is an extremely valuable tool for assisting students with appropri...
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Dear Parents and Students: This Jeffersonville High School Course Description Guide is an extremely valuable tool for assisting students with appropriate course selections for the 2016-2017 school year. It is important that you are aware of the requirements a student must have for graduation from Jeffersonville High School. Every student must earn a Core 40 diploma and pass the required State Graduation Exams. We encourage students to earn a Technical Honors or the Academic Honors Diploma with their Core 40 diploma. These students must be sure to take the correct courses for those diplomas and make certain the courses are selected in the appropriate sequence. Our guidance staff will work with all students to ensure proper course selections. Students should select courses that are of interest and meet their educational goals. It is important to select courses carefully because schedule changes will be held to an absolute minimum once the school’s master schedule is finalized. We encourage parents and students to work together in choosing their career pathway and to discuss aspirations and goals. Collaboration among parents, students, teachers, and counselors will help provide the support students need in their journey to reach personal potential. We look forward to working with you during this important time. Sincerely, Jeffersonville High School Administration ADMINISTRATION JULIE STRAIGHT, PRINCIPAL MARIANE FISHER, ASST PRINCIPAL TIM LAGRANGE, ASST. PRINCIPAL CHARLES MARSHALL, ASST. PRINCIPAL GINGER WHITIS, ASST. PRINCIPAL JOE LUCE, DEAN OF STUDENTS GUIDANCE JAN MYERS, GUIDANCE DIRECTOR TYLER COLYER, COUNSELOR ANGEL GOLD, COUNSELOR SHELBY MCCORKLE, COUNSELOR WHITNEY ROBERTS, COUNSELOR

Table of Contents

GCCS College and Career Initiative PRIDE Program Work Ethics Certificate, Naviance Internships, PLTW, HIRE Technology GCCS Career Pathways Vision, Mission Statement, Beliefs Graduation Requirements Graduation Testing Requirement Testing, Advanced Placement Associates Degree Dual Credit Courses Grade Information, Student Athlete Eligibility Alternative PE Credit, Schedule Change Information Early Graduation Honors Diplomas, Additional Information, Core 40 Credit Checklist 4-Year Planning Organizer Diploma Types Guidance Counseling Info Notes Courses of Study: Aerospace Science (JROTC) Business/Technology Education Pathways Business Technology / Manufacturing Education Engineering & Technology Education, Project Lead the Way Engineering HIRE Technology Work Based Learning (Internship), Career and Technical Programs Family and Consumer Science Education Fine Arts Band, Chorus, Theatre

Health and Wellness English Math Multidisciplinary Science Project Lead the Way – STEM Biomedical and Engineering Social Studies World Languages Prosser Career Education Center

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Page 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24 25-27 28 29-30 31-32 33-34 35-38 39-46 47 48-52 53-56 57 58-60 61-62 63-66 67-69 70-73

GCCS COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS INITIATIVE Greater Clark County Schools, college and career readiness began with our strategic plan that was developed by a committee of over seventy (70) stakeholders. Inside the Student Achievement and Instruction area, stakeholders identified college and career readiness as a goal: “By 2018, Greater Clark County Schools’ graduation rate will meet or exceed the state goal and ensure all graduates are accepted to post-secondary education or employment opportunities.” This initiative has helped to connect students to a variety of post- secondary opportunities. Our graduation rate in Greater Clark Schools in the 2014-2015 school year was 94 percent.

The College and Career Initiative began with awareness and a vision, but required the need for an established action plan that all stakeholders can support. The action plan includes the following types of partnerships: • Pathway-specific Job Shadow: A student spends two to four hours, on a one-time basis, with an employee or series of employees, observing the various aspects of their job. The intent is for students to see what the job really involves as well as to observe how their schoolwork applies. • Student Out-of-School Internship: An unpaid, supervised work-based learning experience which links an 11th or 12th grade student with an employer for a planned set of activities often designed to give the student a broad overview of a business or occupational career pathway. (May be short-term: 18 weeks) • Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education Student (ICE - Co-op Work Experience): A school-supervised and structured 15 hour/week paid work experience during their 12th grade year arranged by the school and the employer to lead to an occupational goal. This experience is for the entire school year and includes a training agreement and a training plan, which couples the classroom learning with the workplace experience. • Field Trips and Worksite Tours: Students visit the workplace as a group to see the business operations in action and tie this to their career pathway. • Classroom/Career Fair Presentation: Present to a class about your job, its requirements or educational level, employer expectations, or tie directly into that classroom curriculum. • Mentorship: A mentor is described as a trusted and experienced advisor who has personal and direct interest in the development and/or education of younger and less experienced individuals. Mentorships are usually formed as the result of a job shadow or an out-of-school internship. Internal to Greater Clark, several components of our College and Career Readiness Initiative have already been implemented. First of all, we used a committee of administrators and counselors to determine four career pathways based upon labor market research. The group primarily used the Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s “Hoosier Hot 50 Jobs” to determine the pathways. In Greater Clark, those pathways are: 1. Business, Information Technology and Logistics 2. Health Care and Related Sciences 3. Human Services, Education, Law and the Arts 4. Engineering, Manufacturing, Technology and Skilled Trades Students selected their career pathway. This determination was made through mandatory careers’ classes for 6th and 9th graders and through large group presentations to 7th, 8th, 10th, and 11th grade students. It is important all students have a career pathway focus. This focus can change at any time, but it is critical all students have a career pathway focus that helps to make their education more relevant. The full-scale implementation of a College and Career Readiness Initiative will take several years. But the effort is worth it in terms of increasing relevancy, maintaining rigor of content, and establishing essential relationships with community partners. The ultimate goal is for students to be connected to area employers while in high school for the purpose of assuring they develop the knowledge and skills necessary to have successful careers. Again, this effort focuses on all career possibilities that will encompass all forms of post-secondary opportunities. The key is to match a student’s interest

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and skills to a career and the type of post-secondary education required to be qualified to pursue that career. Through the College and Career Readiness Initiative, GCCS has begun full implementation of Career Development Centers in each of our three high schools: Jeffersonville, Charlestown, and New Washington. The centers are staffed by a certified coordinator who will, among other responsibilities, coordinate internships for juniors and seniors with area organizations. Internships are an important component in exposing students to potential career opportunities and are vital in helping student’s verify just how committed they are to their chosen career pathway. A fully integrated College and Career Readiness Initiative encompasses all aspects of our educational process ranging from standards integration, literacy and mathematical skill enhancement, computer technology integration, and student 21st century skill acquisition. Full implementation takes time and patience; however, making a commitment to the initiative will pay dividends for students, parents, and all community stakeholders.

GCCS P-R-I-D-E PROGRAM

Greater Clark County Schools is developing and implementing a program of systems which promotes positive behavior as well as an intervention system to aid and assist students in developing those positive behaviors. Positive Behaviors are taught and recognized through school PRIDE. Pride is an acronym to help students demonstrate:

Persistence Respectfulness Initiative Dependability Efficiency Students, who display these characteristics show improvement in academics, create a safe environment and provide a space worthy of learning. Students are rewarded with a token economy and earn their rewards. Our students are then provided with opportunities to redeem or spend those earnings for school supplies and privileges. The second portion of the process is identifying students and creating interventions for these students to develop PRIDE through lessons, check-in/check-outs, one-on-one time, buddy systems, and constant reinforcement for appropriate and positive behaviors. Students who have interventions and individual student plans are rewarded using the same token system as all other students. The PRIDE program is evidence-based and driven by the need of the students. Data identifies areas of improvement for the buildings as well as individual areas of improvement for our students. It is a cycle that provides feedback and allows for constant improvements. Our communities and businesses are joining the program by committing resources and identifying the characteristics needed to keep our communities family friendly and to develop and grow our industry. We thank our partners, parents, students and staff for making this program successful in Greater Clark County School.

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WORK ETHIC CERTIFICATE The mission of Greater Clark County Schools’ College & Career Readiness (CCR) initiative, developed by the College and Career Advisory: “By 2018, Greater Clark County Schools’ graduation rate will meet or exceed the state goal and ensure all graduates are accepted to post-secondary education or employment opportunities.” One aspect of the College and Career Readiness initiative is the Work Ethic Certification program. With the help of our College and Career Advisory, Greater Clark has developed a Work Ethic Certificate that will provide confirmation of a student’s soft skills (responsibility, punctuality, teamwork, etc.) to post-secondary educational institutions and employers. During each school year, high school seniors elected to participate in the Work Ethic Certification program. As a participant, students will be measured in nine areas of academic and work ethic competency. Students must meet criteria and gain points within each area to earn the certification. The district’s P.R.I.D.E. initiative will require students to meet various requirements. PRIDE stands for: Persistence – persevere through challenges, problem solve; Respectfulness – access and serve others, possess a positive attitude, communicate clearly; Initiative – ability to self start and to think critically, Dependability – academically ready, reliable, demonstrate responsibility and teamwork, Efficiency – organized, punctual, self -managed. Visit Greater Clark County Schools’ website at www.gcs.k12.in.us for more information about the Work Ethic Certification!

NAVIANCE COLLEGE AND CAREER PLANNING TOOL Naviance is a college and career readiness platform that helps connect academic achievement to post-secondary goals. We are pleased to introduce Naviance Family Connection to you and your family. Family Connection is a comprehensive website that you can use to help in making plans about courses, college, scholarships and careers. Family Connection is linked with Naviance, a service that we use in our district to track and analyze data about college and career plans, so it provides up-to-date information that's specific to our district. Family Connection will allow you to: • • • • •

Get involved in the planning and advising process - Build a resume, complete online surveys, manage timelines, task and deadlines assign by your counselor and yourself. Stay Connected! - Communicate with your counselor anytime, anywhere using the notes and email sections of the site. Research colleges - Compare GPA, standardized test scores and college cost, size and other important information that helps you make your college choice. Research Careers - Research hundreds of careers and career clusters, and take career assessments like the Do What You Are test. Create plans for the future - Create goals, add to-do items for yourself, and complete task assigned to you by your counselor to better prepare you for your future college and career goals.

Family Connection will also let us share IMPORTANT information with you about upcoming college visits, critical meeting and events, local and national scholarship opportunities and other resources for college and career planning.

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INTERNSHIPS Internships are work-based learning activities in which students engage in learning through practical and relevant experiences at various internship sites to prepare students for college and career. This strategy builds students’ skills and knowledge in their chosen career path or furthers their study within the area of interest. Internships are targeted to the students’ meaningful future plans and allow students to explore careers that require additional degrees, certification, or on-the-job training following high school. Model internships are planned, structured, and evaluated by the intern, college and career coordinator, workplace mentor, and parents/guardians. Effective internships provide interns with the opportunities to develop an understanding of the career area duties and responsibilities, terminology, climate, protocol, and other information that will enable interns to analyze and revise their meaningful future plans.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY PLTW PATHWAY TO ENGINEERING Project Lead The Way (PLTW) offers a dynamic high school program that provides students with real-world learning and hands-on experience. Students interested in engineering, biomechanics, aeronautics, and other applied math and science arenas will discover that PLTW is an exciting portal into these industries. Pathway To Engineering™ courses engage high school students through a combination of activities-based, project-based, and problem-based (APPB) learning. APPB learning creates an environment for applying engineering concepts to real problems.

PLTW PATHWAY TO BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES Through activities, like dissecting a heart, students examine the processes, structures and interactions of the human body – often playing the role of biomedical professionals to solve mysteries. Think CSI meets ER. They also explore the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, working collaboratively to investigate and design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century such as fighting cancer with nanotechnology. See section 2 for course descriptions

HIRE TECHNOLOGY GCCS students have access to advanced manufacturing and logistics education. The Hire Technology Curriculum is designed to increase student engagement and interest in Indiana's largest industry. Students will gain problem-solving skills, communication, and industry-specific training. Upon completion of the 2 year Hire Technology program students will have the skills to be able to enter directly into the workforce. Hire students have an interest in working with their hands and exploring how the products we use every day are made. Students will have opportunities to visit industry leading facilities and speak with professionals in the workplace to better understand the potential they have after high school.

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Greater Clark County Schools Career Pathways Career pathways help students to identify their career goals and design their middle school and high school course plan to meet their career goals. GCCS has identified 4 Career Pathways. Each Pathway represents a common set of skills and knowledge, both academic and technical, necessary to pursue a career within that pathway. These skills can range from entry level to management and will include technical and professional career specialties. Counselors will be working with students to help identify courses that support their choice of pathway.

Pathway Business, Information Technology and Logistics Careers: Banker, Accountant, Insurance, Real Estate, Web Designer, Marketing, Entrepreneur, System Analyst, Database, Programmer, Computer Technician, Systems’ Engineer, Network Administrator

Healthcare and Related Services Careers: Dentists, Occupational Therapists, Surgeons, and Internists, Nurses, EMT, Home Health Aide, Cardio-Vascular Technologist, Dental Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, Medical Transcriptionist, Healthcare Administrative Assistants, Healthcare Administrators, Health Services Manager

Description Business- careers incorporate planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations. Career opportunities in business are available in every area of the economy and require specific skills in organization, time management, customer service and communication. IT- Information technology is the use of computers and software to manage information. The IT department of a large company would be responsible for storing, protecting, processing, and transmitting and retrieving information as necessary. Logistics is one of the most important career fields in the world. Logistics is the management of the flow of resources between two points. The resources managed in logistics can include physical items, such as food or materials, as well as abstract items, such as time or information. Health Care Practitioners are technical, hands-on careers that involve intense schooling and lots of patient contact. These individuals tend to make the most money, and have letters like M.D. and D.D.S after their names. Health professionals assist healthcare professionals in day-to-day business, as well as heading up patient care. This field involves less school, but gives you a solid basis for job growth to further your career. Related Services such as Supportive and Managerial Careers offer healthcare supportive careers are those aides and assistants who work alongside their more experienced counterparts. A healthcare managerial career is best for someone who does not want to work directly with patients, but still wants to work in the healthcare system.

Human Services, Education, Law and the Arts

This pathway encompasses many of the jobs that are typically thought of as the “helping professions.’

Careers: Counselor, Therapist, Social Worker, Teacher, Lawyer, Paralegal, Investigator, Law Enforcement, Public Safety, Administrator, Human Resources, musician, actor Engineering, Manufacturing, Technology and Skilled Trades Careers:

Human Services careers prepare individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as counseling and mental health services, family and community services, personal care, and consumer services. Jobs in hospitality and tourism are also included in this pathway as well as the careers in the field of education and law.

Computer Technician, Systems’ Engineer, Network Administrator, Carpet Layer, Machinist, Repairman, Plumber, Electrician, Pipefitter, Roofer, Construction, Chemical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Environmental Engineer, Genetic Engineer, Civil Engineer

Engineering is the application of scientific, economic, social and practical knowledge in order to design, build and maintain structures, machines, devices, systems, materials, and processes. It may encompass using insights to conceive, model and scale an appropriate solution to a problem or objective. Manufacturing is the production of goods for use or sale using labor and machines, tools, chemical and biological processing or formulation. Technology is the making, modification, usage and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques and methods of organization in order to solve a problem, achieve a goal, or perform a specific function. Skilled Trades includes specialized careers specific to a particular craft.

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JEFFERSONVILLE HIGH SCHOOL VISION STATEMENT Jeffersonville High School will be a school of academic excellence where all students are inspired and supported to achieve success.

MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Jeffersonville High School is to provide all students with a diverse education in a safe, supportive environment that promotes self-discipline, motivation, and excellence in learning.

BELIEF STATEMENTS Jeffersonville High School is producing learners for life. All Jeffersonville High School students will have the opportunity to learn and achieve at high levels. Diversity at Jeffersonville High School strengthens individuals and the community. Teacher collaboration will improve instruction and educational opportunities for all students. All students, parents (guardians), and school personnel will partner with, share responsibility, and encourage academic success of all students at Jeffersonville High School. Notice: It is the policy of Greater Clark County Schools to maintain and operate a learning environment free from discrimination and harassment on the basis of gender, age, race, disability, family status, national origin, or religion. No person is excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or otherwise subjected to unlawful discrimination on such basis under any educational or student activity.

Jeffersonville High School offers a wide selection of courses so students may choose the subjects that best fit their individual needs and interests. By studying the course offerings described in this guide, the student may arrange his/her program of subjects in an organized, progressive fashion. Students should realize that when they register for their courses in the spring, they are signing up for those subjects for the entire year, not for a single semester. Therefore, extreme care should be exercised in selecting courses.

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR CLASSES OF 2016 – 2018 Each student must pass certain required courses in order to graduate. These are minimum requirements. After consultation with his/her counselor and parents/guardians, a student should select other courses (electives) that are needed for career education or preparation for advanced schooling. Students must earn the appropriate number of credits AND pass the End-of-Course Assessments in Algebra I and English 10. Students enrolled in high school for two (2) semesters must take the ECAs regardless of the number of credits earned. PLEASE SEE THE DIPLOMA CHARTS FOR SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS BEGINNING ON PAGE 21 OF THIS GUIDE.

Graduation Requirements for the Freshman Class of 2019 Department of Education has released new school accountability assessment information in the 2015-2016 school year. The following chart is a brief summary of the proposed implementation plan. Graduation Examination and Accountability Assessment Implementation



(Phasing-Out ECAs; Implementing New Graduation Examination)

Year

2014-15

ECA

ECA

(IAS 2000 Algebra I, 2006 English 10)

(CCR IAS 2014 Algebra I, English 10)

Grade 10

Graduation Examination

Accountability Assessment

Grade 11

Retest

Grade 12

Retest

Grade

Adults

2015-16

2017-18

2018-19

Grade 10 Grade 11

Retest

Grade 12

Retest

Adults

Retest

Graduation Examination

Accountability Assessment

Begin test for Accountability

Begin test as Graduation Exam

Accountability Assessment

Grade 10

Graduation Examination

Accountability Assessment

Grade 11

Retest

Grade 11

Retest

Grade 12

Retest

Adults

Retest

Grade 12

Retest

Adults

Retest

Grade 10

Graduation Examination

Grade 11

Retest

Grade 12

Retest

Adults

2019-20

(1 test; 2 purposes)

Retest Graduation Examination

Grade 10 2016-17

ISTEP+ Grade 10 Assessment

Accountability Assessment

Retest

Grade 10

Graduation Examination

Grade 11

Retest

Grade 12

Retest

Adults

Retest

9

Accountability Assessment

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GRADUATION TESTING REQUIREMENTS for CLASSES of 2016 - 2018 The State of Indiana requires that students pass the End-of-Course Assessments (ECAs) in Algebra I and English 10 to satisfy the graduation test requirement. These assessments are given when students complete Algebra I and English 10. Students who do not pass these tests will have opportunities to retake the Algebra I and English 10 ECAs, once each semester while they are in high school. Students who fail the course but pass the ECA will receive a D in Algebra I, Biology I, and/or English 10. Note: New language has been proposed by the Indiana Department of Education that may allow a passing score on the new Grade 10 Graduation Qualifying Exam to replace the ECA requirement. More information will be shared as it is received. ECA “Evidence-based” Waiver: A student who does not achieve a passing score on Algebra I or English 10 ECA may be eligible to graduate if the student does all of the following: (1) Takes the End-of-Course Assessment (ECA) in each subject area in which the student did not achieve a passing score at least one (1) time every school year ; (2) Completes remediation opportunities provided to the student by the student's school; (3) Maintains a school attendance rate of at least ninety-five percent (95%) with excused absences not counting against the student's attendance; (4) Maintains at least a "C" average (2.0) or the equivalent in the courses comprising the credits specifically required for graduation by rule of the state board; (5) Otherwise satisfies all state and local graduation requirements; and (6) Obtain a written recommendation from a teacher of the student in each subject area in which the student has not achieved a passing score on the graduation examination. The written recommendation must be concurred by the principal of the student's school and be supported by documentation that the student has attained the academic standard in the subject area based on: (A) Tests other than the graduation examination; or (B) Classroom work. ECA “Work-readiness” Waiver: A student who does not achieve a passing score on the Algebra I or English 10 ECA may be eligible to graduate if the student does all of the following: (1) Takes the End-of-Course Assessment (ECA) in each subject area in which the student did not achieve a passing score at least one (1) time every school year; (2) Completes remediation opportunities provided to the student by the student's school; (3) Maintains a school attendance rate of at least ninety-five percent (95%) with excused absences not counting against the student's attendance; (4) Maintains at least a "C" average (2.0) or the equivalent in the courses comprising the credits specifically required for graduation by rule of the state board; (5) Otherwise satisfies all state and local graduation requirements; and (6) Complete the course and credit requirements for a general diploma, including the career academic sequence; a workforce readiness assessment; and, at least one (1) career exploration internship, or cooperative education, or workforce credential recommended by the student's school.

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Students enrolled in Biology I (regardless of grade level) must take the Biology I ECA when they complete the course. Participation in this assessment is a state requirement. Parents and students are encouraged to contact their counselors for more information regarding these requirements

State and National Testing All tenth grade students will participate in the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) and all eleventh grade students will participate in the American College Test (ACT) as well as have the option to take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). The ACT and SAT will also be offered at other locations for a fee. Students will need to see their counselor for more information regarding testing.

Advanced Placement / ACP Students who choose to participate in the Advanced Placement courses must take the AP examination in order to earn transcripted AP credit. If students do not take the AP examinations, the transcript will reflect Honors credit. College Board Testing offers these examinations. If students score well on these tests, universities may offer them advanced placement in upper-class courses and/or grant them semester hours (credits) for those tests passed with specified scores. Jeffersonville High School’s Advanced Placement (AP) Courses AP Language and Composition (English)

AP Calculus AB

AP Literature and Composition (English)

AP Calculus BC

AP Chemistry II

AP Statistics

AP Biology II

AP Economics

AP Environmental Science

AP United States Government

AP Computer Science A

AP United States History

AP Studio Art

AP European History

AP Music Theory

AP Psychology

AP Physics I

AP Human Geography

AP Physics II

AP World History ACP Advanced Speech ACP German

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College Certificate/Associate’s Degree JHS has entered into a Dual Credit agreement with Ivy Tech to provide the opportunity for our students to earn college credits in specified disciplines to qualify for a either a Transfer General Education Certificate and/or an Associate’s Degree from Ivy Tech. There is minimal cost to the student who is granted the opportunity to earn of 60 college credits at an estimated value of over $7,000.

Transfer General Education Certificate 30 Minimum Credits Required

Written Communication (Need 3 credits) _____ English 12 Honors/Eng. Lang AP: Eng111 (3cr) Quantitative Reasoning (Need 3 – 9 credits) _____ Pre-Cal Honors/Adv. Math College Credit: Mth136 (3cr) & Mth137 (3cr) _____ Calculus AP: Mth211 (4cr) Scientific Ways of Knowing (Need 3-10 credits) _____ Chem. II AP Chem105 (5cr) _____ Physics 1 AP Phys101 (4cr) ______ Biology AP Bio L 105, 107 (10cr) ______ Physics II AP Phys 102 (4cr) Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing (Need 3-9 credits) _____ US History Honors: Hist101 (3cr) _____US History AP: Hist101 (3cr) & 102 (3cr) _____ MacroEcon Honors: Econ201 (3cr) _____ POL Psychology: Psyc101 (3cr) Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing (Need 3-9 credits) _____ English Lit AP (3cr) _____ French IV: Fren201 (3cr) & Fren202 (3cr) _____ Spanish IV: Span201 (3cr) & Span202 (3cr) Speaking and Listening (Need 3 credits) _____ POL Speech: Comm101 (3cr) Total Credits (min 30): _____ Additional Associate Degree Requirements 60 Minimum Credits Required

General Studies Requirements _____ Adv. Eng. College Credit: Eng112 (3cr) _____ Digital Applications and Technology: Cins101 (3cr) _____ Prep for Careers: Ivyt111CareerExplor (1cr) _____ Capstone HS: Gens279 (1cr) Additional Statewide Electives _____ Educ. Prof: Educ101 (3cr)

_____French III: Fren101 (4cr) & 102 (4cr)

_____ Intro to Culinary: Hosp101 (2cr) & 102 (3cr) _____ Span III: Span101 (4cr) & 102 (4cr) _____ CIM: PLTWCimg102 (3cr)

_____ IED: PLTWDesn102 (3cr)

_____ POE: PLTWDesn104 (3cr)

_____ DE: PLTWEect112 (3cr) Total Credits (min 60): _____ 12

Jeffersonville High School’s Dual Credit Courses Jeffersonville High School Course Titles Eligible for Ivy Tech Dual Credit Advanced Business Management Biology II AP Building Trades Technology I Business Law & Ethics Calculus AP Early Child Education I Early Childhood Education II Economics Honors Education Professions I English 12 Honors English Language & Composition AP English Literature and Composition AP French III French IV Information Communications & Technology Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics Norton Health System (includes Medical Terminology) Physics I AP Physics II AP Pre-Calculus and Trigonometry Honors Preparing for College and Careers Psychology AP Spanish III Spanish IV U. S. History AP Welding Technology Welding Technology II

Jeffersonville High School Course Titles Eligible for Indiana University Dual Credit AP Chemistry Advanced Speech German III, IV

Jeffersonville High School Course Titles Eligible for Dual Credit PLTW Engineering – Introduction to Engineering Design Engineering Design – Principles of Engineering Engineering – Civil Engineering and Architecture Engineering – Design and Development Biomedical – Principles of Biomedical Science Biomedical – Human Body Systems Biomedical – Medical Interventions Biomedical – Biomedical Innovation

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GRADING SCALE A = 90-100; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69; F = 0-59

GPA & WEIGHTED GRADES Advanced Placement and Honors courses are considered “weighted” courses. The weight is not scaled to a grade for the course but is simply added to the final grade provided the student has earned credit for the course. If a student is in a combined Honors and Advanced Placement course, the weight will be applied to the course title under which the student enrolled. Advanced Placement credit will be awarded only if the student sits for the AP test in the applicable course. Weighted factor: All Honors courses---1.0

All AP/ACP courses---2.0

Calculation: At the end of the semester, the final grade calculation will be made by the student management system.

RE-TAKING A COURSE Jeffersonville High School recognizes that there may be times when it is in the best interest of a student to retake a specific course. The guidelines for re-taking a course are as follows: • • •

Only a course with a grade below a “C” can be repeated. Additional credit for re-taking the class will not be given. Both grades will be counted when calculating the student’s grade point average.

STUDENT ATHLETE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS NCAA For students entering a NCAA Division I school the number of required full-year core courses is 16 (32 credits). The 16 units (32 credits) must include 4 years of English, 3 years of math (Algebra l or higher), 2 years of natural/physical science, 1 year of additional English, math or science, 2 years of social science, and 4 years of additional courses from any of the above areas or from foreign language, philosophy or comparative religion. Other requirements include minimum SAT Reasoning and ACT test scores that are determined by the student's cumulative GPA in core classes. For students entering an NCAA Division 1 college or university on or after August 1, 2016 will need to meet new academic rules in order to receive athletics aid (scholarship), practice or compete their first year. This includes 10 of the 16 core courses must be complete before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school. 7 of those 10 courses must be in English, Math or Science. Minimum course GPA is 2.30. Prospective student-athletes should register with the eligibility center by their junior year of high school. Specific information about eligibility for all NCAA divisions can be found on the NCAA Eligibility Center website at www.ncaaeligibiltycenter.org. Information on recruiting and eligibility can also be found on the NCAA website. Athletes must be aware that PLATO online courses for core areas will not be accepted through the NCAA Eligibility Center to participate at the collegiate level.

NAIA For students entering an NAIA school they must meet two of the three following requirements. 1. Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT. 2. Achieve a minimum overall high school GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. 3. Graduate in the top half of your high school classes. Register with the NAIA Eligibility Center at www.PlayNAIA.org.

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ALTERNATIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION CREDIT (ASPE) Greater Clark County Schools’ students may earn physical education credit through an alternative supervised program (ASPE) during the fall, winter or spring sessions. ASPE does not count toward minimum course load requirements and IHSAA eligibility. 1. ASPE has been approved only for the following activities: a. All IHSAA School Sponsored sports b. Cheerleading c. Marching Band*, Winter Guard, Dance Team, STEP Team 2. The application for ASPE is available from counselors or on the GCCS website. The application must be completed and signed by the student, parent, counselor, and coach/instructor. 3. Students may earn a maximum of TWO (2) credits for ASPE (Physical Education II) 4. Students must apply for each credit. Students will be limited to one (1) credit per sport season. Credit will be issued at the end of the semester. 5. To receive one (1) credit, the student must participate in sixty (60) hours of direct instruction and complete the entire sports season and finish the season in good standing. 6. The total sixty (60) hours and application must be completed and submitted to the guidance counselor by the due dates established at the school. 7. All students who complete the sixty (60) hours of direct instruction and complete the application process will receive an A for the physical education course and the grade will be issued by a licensed Physical Education teacher. 8. Failure to provide the proper documentation, failure to meet the indicated deadlines, or participation in an activity/sport different from what was approved will result in no credit being issued.

ALTERNATES Students must select an alternate (substitute) course for each elective. Students should exercise much care in choosing alternates since students could be scheduled into alternates if first choices cannot be scheduled without conflict.

SCHEDULE CHANGE/COURSE WITHDRAWAL POLICY A request for a student schedule change MUST occur within the first two (2) weeks of the course. After that time, any changes, other than programmatic changes, will result in the grade of F in the dropped course. Programmatic changes result when a teacher recommends that a student be moved to another level or class. In general, schedule change requests will only be granted for valid educational reasons (i.e., senior needing course for graduation, scheduled into a course for which credit has already been granted, etc.). A “Withdrawn Failure (WF)” grade will be used for any student whose program is changed by a teacher or administrator from a traditional course of study to an alternative course of study.

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EARLY GRADUATION PROCEDURE It is the belief of Greater Clark County Schools that the majority of students benefit by completing eight semesters of high school. However, a student may graduate in fewer than eight semesters under the following guidelines: Students may graduate after 7 semesters if: • They are unlikely to graduate if forced to complete an 8th semester, or • They demonstrate financial need, or • They would be adversely impacted in their socio-emotional growth by the completion of an 8th semester, or • They are developmentally ready to move beyond high school, or • They have been accepted into an accredited postsecondary education institution, or • They are furthering their education through military enlistment and they have an enlistment contract that contains an education component. Students may graduate earlier than 7 semesters if: • They are unlikely to graduate if forced to complete additional semesters, or • They have been accepted into an accredited postsecondary education institution, or • They are furthering their education through military enlistment and they have an enlistment contract that contains an education component • They meet any one of the following criteria: o They receive a proficiency score on a standardized assessment of academic or subject area competence that is accepted by accredited postsecondary educational institutions, o They receive a high proficiency level score on an end-of-course assessment for a course without taking the course, o Successfully completing a similar course at an eligible institution under the postsecondary enrollment program o They receive a score of 3, 4, or 5 on an AP examination without taking the course Students requesting graduation in less than 8 semesters should do so when registering for their senior year classes. Students requesting accelerated graduation later than this will not be denied solely on the basis of the timing of request. Students may utilize the 8 transfer credit policy to assist them in meeting accelerated graduation requirements. Students graduating in less than 8 semesters will not be included in class rank when computed. Student selecting to graduate in less than 8 semesters will not be included in consideration for honor recognition based on class GPA or class rank. Official diplomas will not be awarded until the end of the school year. Students seeking accelerated graduation must petition their guidance counselor who will assist them in completing the GCCS Accelerated Graduation Application. Once the application is complete the counselor will gain approval from the principal or their designee.

The Mitch Daniels Early Graduation Scholarship There is a new scholarship for students who graduate from a publicly supported high school at least one year early, after December 31, 2010. For more information go to: http://www.in.gov/ssaci/2504.htm

16

INDIANA ACADEMIC/TECHNICAL HONORS DIPLOMAS The purpose of the Honors Diplomas is to encourage and reward students who pursue a rigorous course of study during the high school years. It is established as part of Indiana’s education plan for academic excellence and is available to any and all students who wish to pursue the challenge expected of them. These do not have to be honor level courses. A student must have earned a minimum of (47) credits with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or better. No grade lower than a “C” (2.0) may count toward the diplomas.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION – CORE 40 Core 40 classes will provide students with challenging learning experiences. These opportunities will prepare students for the demands of both work and college. Students must be successful (“C” (2.0) or better grades) in the Core 40 curriculum to be considered for admission to Indiana’s four-year colleges. The completion of Core 40 is an Indiana graduation requirement. To graduate with less than Core 40, the following formal opt-out process must be completed: • • • •

The student, the student’s parent or guardian, and the student’s counselor (or another staff member who assists students in course selection) meet to discuss the student’s progress. The student’s career and course plan is reviewed. The student’s parent or guardian determines if the student will achieve greater educational benefits by completing the general curriculum or the Core 40 curriculum. If the decision is made to opt-out of Core 40, the student is required to complete the course and credit requirements for a general diploma and the career-academic sequence found in this guide.

The opt-out process involves a conference between the student’s parent or guardian and the student’s counselor (or another staff member who assists students in course selection). The opt-out process is initiated: • • •

Upon the request of a student’s parent/guardian; If the student does not pass at least three (3) courses required under the Core 40 curriculum; student’s progress; or If a student received a score on the graduation examination that is in the twenty-fifth percentile or lower when the student takes the graduation examination for the first time.

A decision with regard to whether a student who is a child with a disability (as defined in IC 20-35-1-2) is subject to the Core 40 graduation requirement shall be made in accordance with the student’s individualized education program and federal law.

17

CREDIT CHECK LIST Name _______________________________

Career Pathway _______________________ Core 40 with

Core 40 with

Core 40 Diploma

Academic Honors

Technical Honors

English - 8 Crs.

World Language

Career Tech Prog. – 6 Crs.

Eng 9 ____ ____

3 yrs. of 1 or 4 yrs. of 2

______ ______ ______ ______

Eng 10 ____ ____

Sp/Fr/Gr ____ ____

______ ______ ______ ______

Eng 11 ____ ____

Sp/Fr/Gr ____ ____

Eng 12 ____ ____

Sp/Fr/Gr ____ ____ Sp/Fr/Gr ____ ____

Math - 6 Crs. Alg. I

_____

_____

Geom.

_____

_____

Alg. II Prob/Mod

_____ _____ _____ _____

GPAs

Credits

1-12 _________

________

8-12 _________

________

Add Math 2 Crs.

1-13 _________

________

Pre Cal. _____ _____

8-13 _________

________

AP Cal.

_____ _____

1-14 _________

________

AP Stat.

_____ _____

8-14 _________

________

Prob/Dis. _____ _____ Science - 6 Crs. Biology ____ ____

Fine Arts - 2 Crs. Art

_____ _____

______

____ ____

Media

______

____ ____

Chorus _____ _____ Band

_____ _____

_____ _____

T. Arts _____ _____ Soc. Studies – 6 Crs. World Hist. _____ _____ U.S. Hist.

_____

_____

News/ _____ _____ Yrbk Minimum GPA 3.0 Minimum Grades “C”

Minimum GPA 3.0 Minimum Grades “C”

Gov./Econ _____ _____ PE/Health PE

_____ _____

Health ____ or FACS (3)

One of the following:

Two of the following:

2 AP Classes /Exams

(a or b required)

6 Dual Credits

a. Work Keys M6 R6 L5

1 AP/3 Dual Credits

b. 6 Dual Credits

Grade 11 or 12

1200 SAT M/E _____

c. Prof. Career Internship

Math or Physics

26 ACT _____

d. Industry Work Exp. 140 hrs. e. State Certification

40 Credits

47 Credits

18

47 credits

The time to start planning is now! Every class and every year are important! It is so very important to make wise decisions as you prepare for your life’s work. This special edition is designed to provide information about the many opportunities high school has to offer you. You must plan carefully to take advantage of the courses available to you. .You and your parents should review and discuss the choices that are available and then make decisions that will best prepare you for the opportunities that await you. You are encouraged to become involved in this part of school life at JHS. We, along with your parents, are here to help you make wise decisions. Good luck!

FOUR YEAR PLAN 9th Grade

10th Grade

1. English:

English:

1. 1. English:

2. Math:

Math:

2. Math:

Math:

3. Science:

Science:

3. Science:

Science:

4. Careers/Elective

Careers/Elective

4. World History:

World History:

5. PE

5. PE

6.

6.

7.

7.

11th Grade

English:

12th Grade

1. English:

English:

1.English:

English:

2. Math:

Math:

2.Econ/Gov’t.

Econ/Gov’t.

3.

Science:

3.Math or Quantitative Reasoning

Math or Quantitative Reasoning

U.S. History:

4.

Science:

4. U.S. History: 5.

5.

6.

6.

7.

7.

19

DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS Class of 2016 and beyond CORE 40

CORE 40 TECHNICAL HONORS

CORE 40 ACADEMIC HONORS

The recommended course of study by the IDOE. This diploma is for students who are seeking admission to any of Indiana’s two or four year colleges and universities.

An extension of the CORE 40 diploma. A student must complete a career technical program and earn a state-recognized certification.

The most rigorous diploma offered, is a curriculum of specific courses, which will prepare students for the rigor of college coursework.

40 Credits No minimum GPA

47 Credits 3.0 minimum GPA C or above in all 47 credits

47 Credits 3.0 minimum GPA C or above in all 47 credits

English………………8 credits

English…………..…..8 credits

English……………….8 credits

Math……………….6-8 credits

Math…………….…6-8 credits

Math………………6-8 credits

(Algebra Two required)Math or Quantitative Reasoning course required all 4 years.

(Algebra Two required) Math or Quantitative Reasoning course required all 4 years.

Social Studies……..…6 credits

Social Studies….…….6 credits

(US History, Gov., Econ. and World History or Geography History of the World required)

(US History, Gov., Econ and World History or Geography History of the World required)

Science………….…..6 credits

Science…………..…..6 credits

(Algebra Two required) Math or Quantitative Reasoning course required all 4 years. 8 credits earned in high school ,

Social Studies….…….6 credits (US History, Gov., Econ and World History or Geography History of the World required)

Science…………..…..6 credits

(Biology required, Chemistry or Physics required)

(Biology required, Chemistry or Physics required)

(Biology required, 2 more credits from Biology, Chemistry Earth Space or Advanced Science)

Physical Educ………2 credits

Physical Educ………..2 credits

Physical Educ……….2 credits

(2 semesters)

(2 semesters)

Health & Wellness….1 credit

Health & Wellness……1 credit

Directed Electives…11 credits

Career Tech…...…8-10 credits

● Fine Arts ● World Language ● Career/Technical

(2 semesters)

Health & Wellness…….1 credit Fine Arts……………2 credits (Art, Band, Choir, Drama, Orchestra, Music Theory, Music Keyboard, Theatre Tech, Student Pubs)

Directed Electives…10 credits ● Fine Arts ● World Language ● Career/Technical

World Language……6-8 Credits (6 credits in one language or 4 credits in two different languages)

CCR Pathway…6 credits Complete 1of the following:

Directed Electives……....10 credits

1. 6 DC’s in Technical Area/Pathway 2. State approved industry certification

Complete One of the following:

AND Complete one of the following: 1.Any one of the options (A-E) of the Core 40 with Academic Honors 2. Earn Designated Scores on Work Keys or Accuplacer

20

● ● ● ●

2 AP Courses 6 college dual credits 1 AP Course and 3 dual credits 1750 on SAT reading/math/writing with minimum 530 on each section ● 26 on ACT must take written portion

Guidance Counseling - “Working for the whole student.” Academic

Emo-onal

Social

• One-on-one meetings with each student takes place at least twice a year to discuss topics such as: o course selection o graduation plan design o college and career planning • Personal counseling for social and emotional growth, as needed Jeffersonville High School

Tyler Colyer– Last Names A-En [email protected] ext. 15120 Shelby McCorkle - Last Names Lf-Ro [email protected] ext. 15123 Jan Myers – Counseling Director Student support programs grades 9-11 [email protected] ext. 50399

a plan a path a career

Angel Gold - Last Names Eo-Le [email protected] ext. 15122 Whitney Roberts - Last Names Rp-Z [email protected] ext. 15124

College & Career Readiness Visit your College & Career Center at Jeffersonville High School Cheryl Martin – College & Career Coordinator [email protected] ext 50401 21

NOTES

22

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

AEROSPACE SCIENCE Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) The JROTC program strives to develop the positive characteristics in the students who participate in this organization. These characteristics are citizenship, patriotism, self-discipline, physical fitness, and leadership, plus the skills necessary for decision making, communication, and problem solving. The activities and experience the students participate in expose them to basic military knowledge, gender equity issues, and the benefits and requirements of today’s military. In addition, students are given the opportunity to discover the traits of courage, self-sacrifice, and integrity. Students are required to wear the Air Force uniform once each week. An integral part of the program is the requirement to meet Air Force grooming standards and to wear the uniform a minimum of one day every week. The course content and experiences enable the students to become familiar with basic military knowledge, benefits, and requirements while understanding the role of the military in support of national objectives. Topics to be included in the courses are: (1) military history (2) global cultural awareness (3) exploring space (4) military drill (5) team building and (6) leadership. Opportunities are provided to explore the qualities and traits of courage, self-sacrifice, and integrity. To enhance classroom learning, students may participate in extracurricular and social activities such as field trips, community service, drill teams, color guard teams, sabre team, military balls, and awards ceremonies. The Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program is approved by and meets the requirements of the United States Air Force. ROTC851611** AEROSPACE I (JROTC) (9,10,11,12) Academics consist of studying aerospace history, aviation pioneers and the aerospace environment. Leadership consists of introduction to drill, customs and courtesies, principles of leadership and curriculum-in-action trips. The wellness portion is an exercise program used to motivate students to lead healthy and active lifestyles. Prerequisite: None ROTC851621** AEROSPACE II (JROTC) (10,11,12) Academics are concentrated on the world’s cultures through the study of world affairs, regional studies and cultural awareness. Leadership consists of drill, how to communicate, effective writing, knowledge of customs and courtesies. The wellness portion is an exercise program used to motivate students to lead healthy and active lifestyles. Prerequisite: Aerospace I, or consent of Senior Aerospace Science Instructor ROTC851631** AEROSPACE III (JROTC) (11,12) Academics consist of exploring and using space, space technology, international space programs, human requirements of space flight, defense of the United States, and career opportunities in aerospace. Leadership consists of drill, life skills, career opportunities and problem solving. The wellness portion is an exercise program used to motivate students to lead healthy and active lifestyles. Prerequisite: Aerospace II, or consent of Senior Aerospace Science Instructor ROTC851641** AEROSPACE IV (JROTC) (12) Academics consist of putting theories of previous leadership into practice to further develop leadership and management skills. Additionally, academics will cover survival and first aid. Students have operational control of the cadet squadron and staff positions. The wellness portion is an exercise program used to motivate students to lead healthy and active lifestyles. Prerequisite: Aerospace III, or consent of Senior Aerospace Science Instructor

23 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

*=ONE SEMESTER

**=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION COURSE PATHWAYS Business 9th 10th 11th 12th Pathway Marketing

Accounting/ Finance

Business Mgmt./ Administration

Preparing for College and Careers

Preparing for College and Careers

Preparing for College and Careers

Technology Pathway

Computer Applications

Principles of Marketing

Intro to Accounting

Introduction to Business

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Advanced Accounting

Principles of Business Management

Professional Internship

Business Law and Ethics or Professional Internship

Advanced Business Management

Professional Internship or Entrepreneurship and New Ventures Capstone

11th

12th

9th

10th

Preparing for College and Careers

Digital Applications and Responsibility

Introduction to Computer Science

(Can earn MOS Certification)

Interactive Media

Computer Science

Computer Science II: Programming

Digital Applications and Responsibility

Web Design

(Can earn MOS Certification)

Interactive Media

Digital Applications and Responsibility

Web Design

Web Design

Professional Internship or Computer Tech Support

Preparing for College and Careers Computer Science

Computer Support Service, Repair

Introduction to Computer Science Preparing for College and Careers Introduction to Computer Science Preparing for College and Careers

Web Design

Introduction to Computer Science

(Can earn MOS Certification)

AP Computer Science

Computer Tech Support or AP Computer Science Computer Tech Support

Interactive Media

24 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

*=ONE SEMESTER

**=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY and MANUFACTURING EDUCATION BUS539401* PREPARING FOR COLLEGE AND CAREERS (9) DC Preparing for College and Careers addresses the knowledge, skills and behaviors all students need to be prepared for success in college, career and life. The focus of the course is the impact of today’s choices on tomorrow’s possibilities. Topics to be addressed include twenty-first century life and career skills; higher order thinking, communication, leadership and management processes; exploration of personal aptitudes, interests, values and goals; examining multiple life roles and responsibilities as individuals and family members; planning and building employability skills; transferring school skills to life and work; and managing personal resources. This course includes reviewing the 16 national career clusters and Indiana’s College and Career pathways, in-depth investigation of one or more pathways, reviewing graduation plans, developing career plans, and developing personal and career portfolios. A project based approach, including computer and technology applications, cooperative ventures between school and community. Prerequisites: Required for incoming 9th grade students BUS451801* INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (9,10) Business, Marketing and Entrepreneurship introduces students to the world of business, including the concepts, functions and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in the twenty-first century on a local, national and/or international scale. Prerequisite: None BUS456201* PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (9,10,11,12) Principles of Business Management focuses on the roles and responsibilities of management as well as opportunities and challenges of ethically managing a business in the free enterprise system. Prerequisites: None BUS526801* ADVANCED BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (12) Advanced Business management prepares students to plan, organize, direct and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization and to perform business-related functions. Prerequisite: Principles of Business Management BUS452401** INTRO TO ACCOUNTING (10,11,12) Accounting is a business course that introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Prerequisite: Algebra I grade of “C” or better or teacher approval BUS5452201** ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (11 ,12) DC Accounting is the language of business, and the Advanced Accounting specialization will sharpen accounting skills as students further develop their ability to scrutinize accounting data and understand how it applies to the overall financial condition of an organization. Required Prerequisite: Intro to Accounting BUS456001* BUSINESS LAW AND ETHICS (11,12) DC This Ivy Tech dual credit course is part of the Indiana Core Transfer Library This is a course that provides an overview of the legal system. Topics covered include: Basics of the Law, Contract Law, Employment Law, Personal Law, and Property Law. Both criminal and civil trial procedures are presented. Prerequisite: Students must meet Ivy Tech criteria BUS454001* PERSONAL FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (10,11,12) This course addresses the identification and management of personal financial resources to meet the financial needs and wants of individuals and families, and considers a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors. This course helps students build skills in financial responsibility and decision making; analyze personal standards, needs, wants, and goals; identify sources of income, saving and investing; and understand banking, budgeting, record-keeping and managing risk, insurance and credit card debt. A project based approach and applications through authentic settings such as work based observations and service learning experiences are appropriate. Direct, concrete applications of mathematics proficiencies in projects are encouraged. Prerequisite: None

25 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

*=ONE SEMESTER

**=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 BUS591401** PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (10,11,12) This class provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global economy. Prerequisite: None BUS598401* SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING (11,12) Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a specialized marketing course that develops student understanding of the sport/event industries, their economic impact and products; distribution systems and strategies; pricing considerations; product/service management, and promotion. Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing BUS596701* INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP (9,10) Introduction to Entrepreneurship provides an overview of what it means to be an Entrepreneur. Student will learn about starting and operating a business, marketing products and services, and how to find resources to help. This course is ideal for students interested in starting their own art gallery, salon, restaurant, etc. Prerequisites: None BUS596601** ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURES CAPSTONE (12) Entrepreneurship and New Ventures introduces entrepreneurship and develops skills and tools critical for starting and succeeding in a new business venture. Prerequisites: Principles of Business Management or Principles of Marketing

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY COURSES TECH452801** DIGITAL APPLICATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITY (10,11,12) DC This class introduces students to the physical components and operation of computers. Technology is used to build students decision-making and problem-solving skills. Students will can MOS Certification. Prerequisite: None TECH457401* WEB DESIGN (10,11,12) This is a course that provides instruction in the principles of web design using HTML/XHTML and current /emerging software programs. Prerequisites: None TECH451601* COMPUTER ILLUSTRATION AND GRAPHICS (11,12) Introduces students to the computer’s use in visual communication. The focus of the course is on basic computer terminology and use, mastering fundamental skills, and developing efficient working styles. These skills are then developed by creating work with imaging, drawing, interactive, and page layout software. The course includes organized learning experiences that incorporate a variety of visual art techniques as they relate to the design and execution of layouts and illustrations for advertising, displays, promotional materials, and instructional manuals. Instruction also covers advertising, displays, promotional materials, and instructional manuals. Instruction also covers advertising theory and preparation of copy, lettering, posters, produce vector illustrations, graphics and logos, and artwork in addition to incorporation of photographic images. Communication skills will be emphasized through the study of effective methods used to design products that impart information and ideas. Advanced instruction might also include experiences in silk screening and airbrush techniques as well as activities in designing product packaging and commercial displays or exhibits. Prerequisites: Digital Applications and Responsibility (Info Com Tech) TECH523201* INTERACTIVE MEDIA (11,12) Interactive Media prepares students for careers in business and industry working with interactive media products and services, which include the entertainment industries. Prerequisites: Web Design TECH523001** COMPUTER TECH SUPPORT (11,12) Computer Tech Support allows students to explore how computers work. Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. Prerequisites: Digital Applications and Responsibility (Info Com Tech) 26 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

*=ONE SEMESTER

**=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 TECH480301* INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE (9,10) Introduction to Computer Science allows students to explore the world of Computer Science. Students will gain a broad understanding of the areas composing Computer Science. Prerequisites: None TECH480101** COMPUTER SCIENCE I (10,11,12) ® Using Python as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. While this course can be a student's first in computer science, students without prior computing experience are encouraged to start with Introduction to Computer Science. CSE helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cyber security, and simulation. The course curriculum is a College Board-approved implementation of AP CS Principles. (PLTW) Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science, Intro to Engineering and Design, Digital Applications and Responsibility TECH523601** COMPUTER SCIENCE II: Programming (11,12) Explores and builds skills in programming and a basic understanding of the fundamentals of procedural program development using structured, modular concepts. Coursework emphasizes logical program design involving user--defined functions and standard structure elements. Discussions will include the role of data types, variables, structures, addressable memory locations, arrays and pointers and data file access methods. An emphasis on logical program design using a modular approach, which involves task oriented program functions. Prerequisite: Computer Science I. TECH457004** COMPUTER SCIENCE A, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) This is a business mathematics course that provides students with the content established by the College Board. The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development, and also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction. The course provides students an alternative to taking pre-calculus or calculus to fulfill the four-year math requirement for graduation. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course web page. Prerequisites: Algebra I& II, Computer Science and teacher recommendation.

27 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

*=ONE SEMESTER

**=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROJECT LEAD THE WAY ENGINEERING PATHWAY

Introduc)on to Engineering Design (9-12)

Principles of Engineering (10-12)

Civil Engineering & Architecture (11-12)

Engineering Design & Development (12)

PLTW481201** PLTW INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING AND DESIGN (9,10,11,12) DC This course is aligned with the following Post-Secondary courses for Dual Credit. Introduction to Engineering Design is an introductory course which develops student problem solving skills using the design process. Students document their progress of solutions as they move through the design process. Students develop solutions using elements of design and manufacturability concepts as well as develop hand sketches using 2D and 3D drawing techniques. Computer Aided Design (CAD). Recommended Prerequisites: None PLTW481401** PLTW PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (10,11,12) DC This course is aligned with the following Post-Secondary courses for Dual Credit. Principles of Engineering is a course that focuses on the process of applying engineering, technological, scientific and mathematical principles in the design, production, and operation of products, structures, and systems. This is a hands-on course is designed to provide students interested in engineering careers an opportunity to explore experiences related to specialized fields such as civil, mechanical, and materials engineering. Students will engage in research, development, planning, design, production, and project management to simulate a career in engineering. The topics of ethics and the impacts of engineering decisions are also addressed. Classroom activities are organized to allow students to work in teams and use modern technological processes, computers, CAD software, and production systems in developing and presenting solutions to engineering problems. Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW) PLTW482001** PLTW CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (STEM Honors) (10,11,12) DC Engineering and Architecture introduces students to the fundamental design and development aspects of civil engineering and architectural planning activities. Application and design principles will be used in conjunction with mathematical and scientific knowledge. Computer software programs allow students opportunities to design, simulate, and evaluate the construction of buildings and communities. During the planning and design phases, instructional emphasis will be placed on related transportation, water resource, and environmental issues. Activities will include the preparation of cost estimates as well as a review of regulatory procedures that would affect the project design. Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW), Principles of Engineering (PLTW) PLTW482801** PLTW ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (STEM Honors)

(12)

DC

The knowledge and skills students acquire throughout PLTW Engineering come together in EDD as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing EDD ready to take on any post-secondary program or career. Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering Design, and one specialty course.

28 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

*=ONE SEMESTER

**=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

HIRE TECHNOLOGY - MANUFACTURING & LOGISTICS Course Pathways

HIRE

INTRODUCTION TO MANUFACTURING & LOGISTICS

10-12

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING I

11-12

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING II

12

Industry Certifications offered: APICS- Logistics, APICS- Operations, MSSCLogistics Associate, MSSC-Safety, MSSC-Production, SolidWorks Associate All courses are offered as Dual Credit Technical Honors requirements can be met by taking 2 HIRE Courses*

TECH479601** INTRODUCTION TO ADVANCED MANUFACTURING AND LOGISTICS (10,11,12) DC Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics is a course that specializes in how people use modern manufacturing systems with an introduction to advanced manufacturing and logistics and their relationship to society, individuals, and the environment. Students apply the skills and knowledge of using modern manufacturing processes to obtain resources and change them into industrial materials, industrial products and consumer products Students investigate the properties of engineered materials such as: metallic, polymers, ceramics, and composites. Students study six major types of material processes: casting and molding; forming; separating; conditioning; finishing; and assembling. After gaining a working knowledge of these materials, Students are introduce to advanced manufacturing, logistics, and business principles that are utilized in today’s advanced manufacturing industry. Students gain a basic understanding of tooling, electrical skills, operation skills, inventory principles, MSDS’s, chart and graph reading and MSSC concepts. There is also an emphasis placed on the flow process principles, material movement, safety, and related business operations. Students have the opportunity to develop the characteristics employers seek as well as skills that will help them in future endeavors. Prerequisite: None

29 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 TECH560801** ADVANCED MANUFACTURING I (11,12) DC Advanced Manufacturing I, is a course that includes classroom and laboratory experiences in two broad areas: Industrial Technology/Software Controls and Manufacturing Trends. Industrial Technology and Software Controls covers wiring and schematic diagrams used to design, install, and repair electrical/electronic equipment such as wireless communication devices, and programmable controllers. Course content will include basic theories of electricity, electronics, digital technology, and basic circuit analysis. Activities include experiences in: soldering; use of an oscilloscope, meters, signal generators and tracers; breadboarding; circuit simulation software; and troubleshooting. Understanding and using the underlying scientific principles related to electricity, electronics, circuits, sine waves, and Ohm’s Law are integral to this course. Manufacturing Trends covers basic concepts in manufacturing operations and plant floor layout in the production environment. Applications of Computer Numerical Control (CNC), and lathe and turning operations are developed as a foundation for machining operations. Coordinate system concepts are introduced as relevant to machining processes, as well as fluid and mechanical power, welding, and lean manufacturing. Fluid power concepts will include hydraulic components and circuits, laws and principles, fluid power controllers, and the construction of systems. In the mechanical power portion of the course, students will learn about machine specifications, basic forces, friction, simple machines, motors, and motor controls. Students will also be introduced to lean manufacturing where they will study concepts including: lean goals, product quality, eliminating waste, cost effectiveness, lean concepts, resource planning, continuous improvement, and the various advantages of lean manufacturing. This course includes MSSC concepts required to earn MSSC certification. Prerequisite: Introduction to Advanced Manufacturing & Logistics TECH560601** ADVANCED MANUFACTURING II offered 2017-18 (11,12) Introduces basic blueprint reading, Computer Numerical Control (CNC) operation and the skills commonly used in the manufacturing industry. Areas of study will include: interpretation of drawing dimensions and notes to ANSI standards for machining including; Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GDT), welding, fabrication applications and inspection techniques. Students will be able to use Computer Aided Design software (CAD) to create 3D models and working drawings. Skills in the setup and operation of a CNC mill and lathe will also be acquired using multiple machine tool controllers. Other more general topics will include coordinate systems, dimensioning, line precedence, multiview drawings, safe dress, tool paths, speed and feed calculations, and tool selection. The course also introduces robotics, automation, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology (CIMT). Common types of factory automation will be identified. The course will focus on three main types of manufacturing automation including; Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), Computer Numerically Controlled Machines (CNC), and Robotics. Topics cover robotic principles including basic theory, robot safety, robotic classifications, applications, socioeconomic impact, work cell design, robot programming (Pendant and Software Language), and sensor and actuator interfacing. Students will be required to design, program and troubleshoot computer controlled machine logic and production processes in a project oriented learning environment. High School Approved Course Titles & Descriptions Indiana Department of Education 48 Prerequisite: Advanced Manufacturing I

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

COLLEGE AND CAREER WORK EXPERIENCE OPPORTUNITIES MISC597401** WORK BASED LEARNNG; Multiple Pathway (12) This Course builds students’ skills and knowledge in their chosen career path or furthers their study within the area of interest. A standards based training plan is developed by the student, teacher, and workplace mentor to guide the student’s work based learning experiences and assist in evaluating achievement and performance. Students have the

opportunity to apply the concepts, skills, and dispositions learned in previous coursework in their pathways in real world business and industry settings. Students are monitored in their experiences by the content-related CTE teacher. Three credits per semester. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance into the Internship program

CAREER AND TECHNICAL PROGRAMS HEALTHCARE CTE58221** NORTON HEALTHCARE (11,12) DC Students can take their first steps toward a career in nursing or nursing support services by participating in the Norton Healthcare Academy, an initiative of the Norton Healthcare Institute for Nursing and Workforce Development. The initiative will allow junior and senior students the opportunity to receive instruction specific to the field of nursing. The students will receive both classroom instruction and onsite facility and simulation exposure to the healthcare environment. Prerequisite: 3.0 G.P.A with application and interview process

EDUCATION CTE540801** EDUCATION PROFESSIONS I (12) DC This provides the foundation for employment in education and related careers and provides the foundation for study in higher education in these career areas. The course of study includes, but is not limited to: the teaching profession, the learner and the learning process, planning instruction, learning environment, and instructional and assessment strategies. Field experiences in classroom settings, and career portfolios are required components. A standards-based plan guides the students’ field experiences. Students are monitored in their field experiences by the Education Professions teacher. *Students must provide transportation to practicum experience. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor; 2.5 GPA

AUTOMOTIVE CTE551011** AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES TECHNOLOGY I (11,12) DC This includes classroom and laboratory experiences that incorporate training in service and repair work on all types of automotive vehicles. Included in the course is training in the use of service/repair information and a variety of hand and power tools. Instruction and practice provides opportunities for students to diagnose malfunctions, disassemble units, perform parts inspections, and repair and replace parts. Course content will address NATEF/ ASE standards leading to certification in one or more of the following areas: steering and suspension; brakes; engine performance; manual transmissions and differential; automatic transmissions; electrical systems; air conditioning; and, engine repair. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities and cost estimation/calculation activities. Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions. Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors. Course taught at Charlestown High School. Prerequisite: None CTE551021* AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES TECHNOLOGY II (12) DC Includes classroom and laboratory experiences that incorporate training in service and repair work on all types of automotive vehicles. Included in the course is training in the use of service/repair information and a variety of hand and power tools. Instruction and practice provides opportunities for students to diagnose malfunctions, disassemble units, perform parts inspections, and repair and replace parts. Course content will address NATEF/ ASE standards leading to certification in one or more of the following areas: steering and suspension; brakes; engine performance; manual transmissions and differential; automatic transmissions; electrical systems; air conditioning; and, engine repair. Mathematical skills will be reinforced through precision measuring activities and cost estimation/calculation activities. Scientific principles taught and reinforced in this course include the study of viscosity, friction, thermal expansion, and compound solutions. Written and oral skills will also be emphasized to help students communicate with customers, colleagues, and supervisors. Course taught at Greater Clark County Auto Shop in Charlestown, Indiana Prerequisite: Auto Services Technology I. Application and interview required. 31 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

BUILDING TRADES CTE558011** CONSTRUCTION TRADES I (11,12) DC This includes classroom, laboratory and site work experience with structures using assorted materials such as wood, metal and concrete. Instruction covers a variety of activities such as accurate measurement, cutting, fitting, and fastening various materials as well as the safe use of both hand and power tools and material estimation. Students are exposed to the following areas of construction: Foundations, framing, roofing, plumbing, electrical, HVAC, insulation, roofing, window and door installation, drywall, interior trim and painting, vinyl siding and other exterior coverings. Prerequisite: None CTE558021** CONSTRUCTION TRADES II (12) DC This includes classroom, laboratory and site work experience with structures using assorted materials such as wood, metal and concrete. Instruction covers a variety of activities such as accurate measurement, cutting, fitting, and fastening various materials as well as the safe use of both hand and power tools and material estimation. Students are exposed to the following areas of construction: Foundations, framing, roofing, plumbing, electrical, HVAC, insulation, roofing, window and door installation, drywall, interior trim and painting, vinyl siding and other exterior coverings. Prerequisite: Construction Trades I

WELDING CTE577611** WELDING TECHNOLOGY I (11,12) CTE577621** WELDING TECHNOLOGY II The Welding Technology Program at Jeffersonville High School includes classroom and laboratory experiences that develop a variety of skills detailed in the American Welding Society Entry Level Guidelines and Certifications curriculum. Lab areas of study include Gas Metal Arc Welding, Flux Core Arc Welding, Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Oxy-acetylene cutting, plasma arc cutting and gouging are processes also learned in our program. Instructional activities include properties of metals, lab safety, electrical principles, welding symbols, precision measurement, decimals and fractions. Students have the ability to earn up to 15 dual college credit hours (with the purchase of new welding equipment) after completion of the two year program. Welding I: WELD 103 ARC WELDING, WELD 115 SHOP PRACTICES l. Welding II: WELD 108 SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING, WELD 274 FLUX CORE ARC WELDING, WELD 207 GAS METAL ARC WELDING, WELD 208 GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING. Prerequisite: None

RADIO/TV CTE598611** RADIO AND TELEVISION I (10,11,12) Students will be exposed to the basics of the radio, TV, and media industries. This is a complete script-to-screen course. Content will cover items from broadcast laws to scriptwriting. Students will be working in a new, state-of-the-art, digital studio. The TV portion of the class consists of practical studio production techniques, while the Radio portion of the class offers students the opportunity to learn how to use and operate an actual FCC licensed radio station. Students will be required to participate in after-school productions, advertising, and sports casting as part of the real world education that this program offers. Students will be subject to FCC rules and regulations and will be expected to follow a professional dress code. Prerequisite: Students that sign up for the course will be selected based upon auditions, recommendations, and application form. Students will participate in the selling of educational grants as a course requirement. CTE599210** RADIO AND TELEVISION II (11-12) The TV/Video portion of this course will consist of practical studio production techniques and projects to aid the student in assimilating the many facets of television and video production. Shows and projects will be created for broadcast purposes. The Radio portion consists of learning to use and operated the most up-to-date radio broadcast equipment available. Student will write and produce programs for broadcast purposes. WJHI is an actual FCC licensed FM station. Students will be required to participate in both during and after school productions, advertising, public relations and sports casting, as part of the real world education that WJHI Radio/TV offers. Students will be subject to FCC rules and regulations, and will be expected to follow a professional dress code. Students will participate in selling of educational grants as a course requirement. Students are selected for WJHI Radio/TV following and audition, personal interview and teacher recommendation. Prerequisite: Radio/TV I, application and audition. CTE599211** RADIO AND TELEVISION II: SPORTS CASTING (11-12) Shows and projects will be created for broadcast purposes. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of sports, topics, activities, and production techniques, for both radio and TV. Students will be required to participate in both, during and after school productions, advertising, public relations and sports casting, as part of the real world education that WJHI Radio/TV offers. WJHI is an actual FCC licensed FM station. As a result, students will be subject to FCC rules and regulations. And will be expected to follow a professional dress code. Students will participate in the selling of educational grants as a course requirement. Prerequisite: Radio/TV I, application and audition 32 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES Note: Students may elect to take 3 semester classes in the Family and Consumer Sciences Department to fulfill Health credit. Students may choose from these classes: Interpersonal Relations, Nutrition and Wellness, Child Development, Adult Roles and Responsibilities, Human Development and Wellness. FACS533001* ADULT ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES (10,11,12) Adult Roles and Responsibilities is recommended for all students as life foundations and academic enrichment. It is a career sequence course for students with interest in family and community services, personal and family finance, and similar areas. This course builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors that students will need as they complete high school. It will prepare them to take the next steps toward adulthood in today’s society. Included is the study of interpersonal standards, lifespan roles and responsibilities, individual and family resource management, and financial responsibility and resources. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to individual and family life. Prerequisite: None FACS536201* CHILD DEVELOPMENT (9,10,11,12) Child Development is an introductory course for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. It is especially relevant for students interested in careers that draw on knowledge of children, child development, and nurturing of children. This course addresses issues of child development from conception/prenatal through age 3. It includes the study of prenatal development and birth; growth and development of children; child care giving and nurturing; and support systems for parents and caregivers. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to children, child development, and nurturing of children. Prerequisite: None FACS536601* HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND WELLNESS (10,11,12) Human Development and Wellness is valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers impacted by individuals’ physical, social, emotional, and moral development and wellness across the lifespan. Major topics include principles of human development and wellness; impacts of family on human development and wellness; factors that affect human development and wellness; practices that promote human development and wellness; managing resources and services related to human development and wellness; and career exploration in human development and wellness. Life events and contemporary issues addressed in this course include (but are not limited to) change; stress; abuse; personal safety; and relationships among lifestyle choices, health and wellness conditions, and diseases. This course provides the foundation for continuing and postsecondary education in all career area. Prerequisite: None FACS536401* INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS (9,10,11,12) Interpersonal Relationships is an introductory course that is especially relevant for students interested in careers that involve interacting with people. It is also valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment. This course addresses knowledge and skills needed for positive and productive relationships in career, community, and family settings. Major course topics include communication skills; leadership, teamwork, and collaboration; conflict prevention, resolution, and management; building and maintaining relationships; and individual needs and characteristics and their impacts on relationships. This course provides a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education for all career areas that involve interacting with people both inside and outside of a business/organization, including team members, clients, patients, customers, and the general public. Prerequisite: None FACS534211* NUTRITION AND WELLNESS (9,10,11,12) Nutrition and Wellness is an introductory course valuable for all students as a life foundation and academic enrichment; it is especially relevant for students interested in careers related to nutrition, food, and wellness. This is a nutrition class that introduces students to only the basics of food preparation so they can become self-sufficient in accessing healthy and nutritious foods. Major course topics include nutrition principles and applications; influences on nutrition and wellness; food preparation, safety, and sanitation; and science, technology, and careers in nutrition and wellness. Food preparation experiences are a required component. This course is the first in a sequence of courses that provide a foundation for continuing and post-secondary education in all career areas related to nutrition, food, and wellness. Prerequisite: None 33 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 FACS53801* INTRODUCTION TO FASHION AND TEXTILES (9,10,11,12) This is an introductory course for those students interested in academic enrichment or a career in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry. This course addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the fashion, textile, and apparel arena. The course includes the study of personal, academic, and career success; careers in the fashion, textile, and apparel industry; factors influencing the merchandising and selection of fashion, textile, and apparel goods and their properties, design, and production; and consumer skills. A project--based approach integrates instruction and laboratory experiences including application of the elements and principles of design; selection, production, alteration, repair, and maintenance of apparel and textile products; product research, development, and testing; and application of technical tools and equipment utilized in the industry. Visual arts concepts will be addressed. Direct, concrete mathematics proficiencies will be applied. This course provides the foundation for continuing and post--secondary education in fashion, textile, and apparel--related careers. Prerequisites: None

CAREER EDUCATION

FACS541211** EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION I (11,12) DC Early Childhood Education prepares students for employment in early childhood education and related careers that involve working with children from birth to 8 years (3rd grade) and provides the foundations for study in higher education that leads to early childhood education and other child-related careers. A project-based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate the study of suggested topics. Major course topics include: career paths in early childhood education; promoting child development and learning; building family and community relationships; observing, documenting, and assessing to support young children and families; using developmentally effective approaches; using content knowledge to build meaningful curriculum, and becoming an early childhood education professional. The course provides an overview of the history, theory, and foundations of early childhood education as well as exposure to types of programs, curricula, and services available to young children. Students examine basic principles of child development, importance of family, licensing, and elements of quality care of young children. The course addresses planning and guiding developmentally appropriate activities for young children in various childcare settings; developmentally appropriate practices of guidance and discipline; application of basic health, safety, and nutrition principles when working with children; overview of management and operation of licensed child care facilities or educational settings; child care regulations and licensing requirements; and employability skills. Intensive experiences in one or more early childhood settings, resumes, and career portfolios are required components. A standards-based plan for each student guides the laboratory/field experiences. Students are monitored in their laboratory/field experiences by the Early Childhood Education teacher. Student laboratory/field experiences may be either school-based or "on-the-job" in community-based early childhood education centers or in a combination of the two. Dual credit agreements with postsecondary institutions are in place. Prerequisite: Application and Instructor Approval

FACS541241** EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION II (12) DC FACS541251** Early Childhood Education II prepares students for employment in early childhood education and related careers that involve working with children from birth to 8 years (3rd grade) and provides the foundations for study in higher education that leads to early childhood education and other child-related careers. ECE II is a sequential course that builds on the foundational knowledge and skills of Early Childhood Education I, which is a required prerequisite. In ECE II students further refine, develop, and document the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors gained in the foundational course. Major topics of ECE II include: overview of the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential, safe and healthy learning environment, physical and intellectual competence, social and emotional development, relationships with families, program management, and professionalism. Extensive experiences in one or more early childhood education settings are required: and may be either school-based or "on-the-job" in community-based early childhood education centers, or in a combination of the two. A standards-based plan for each student guides the early childhood education experiences. Prerequisite: Early Childhood Education I: Application and Instructor Approval

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

FINE ARTS ART400001* INTRO TO TWO DIMENSIONAL ART (9,10,11,12) It is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art. They create two-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios, and community resources. Prerequisite: None ART400201* INTRO TO THREE DIMENSIONAL ART (9,10,11,12) It is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking this course engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production, and integrated studies and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Student ;explore historical and cultural background and connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; create three-dimensional works of art, reflect upon the outcomes and revise their work; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. They identify ways to utilize and support art museums, galleries, studios and community resources. Prerequisite: None

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 ART404401* SCULPTURE I (10,11,12) It is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in sculpture engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. Using materials such as plaster, clay, metal, paper, wax, and plastic, students create portfolio quality works. Students at this level produce works for their portfolios that demonstrate a sincere desire to explore a variety of ideas and problems. They create realistic and abstract sculptures utilizing subtractive and additive processes of carving, modeling, construction, and assembling. They reflect upon and refine their work, explore cultural and historical connections, analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art. Relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries and studios and identify art-related careers. Prerequisite: Intro to Three Dimensional Art ART404402* SCULPTURE II Prerequisites: Sculpture I See description above.

(10,11,12)

ART404403* SCULPTURE III Prerequisites: Sculpture II

(11,12)

ART404404* SCULPTURE IV Prerequisites: Sculpture III

(11,12)

ART404011* CERAMICS I (10,11,12) This is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in ceramics engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production which leads to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create works of art in clay utilizing the processes of hand building, press-molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques and the firing processes. They reflect upon and refine their work, explore cultural and historical connections, analyze, interpret, theorize and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries and studios, and identify art-related careers. Prerequisite: Intro to Three Dimensional Art ART404021* CERAMICS II Prerequisite: Intro to 3-D & Ceramics I

(10,11,12)

ART404031* CERAMICS III Prerequisite: Intro to 3-D, Ceramics I & II

(11,12)

ART404041* CERAMICS IV (11,12) Prerequisite: Intro to 3-D, Ceramics I, II, III and permission from the instructor ART406011* DRAWING I (10,11,12) This is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in drawing engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create drawings utilizing processes such as sketching, rendering, contour, gesture, and perspective drawing and use a variety of media such as pencil, chalk, pastels, charcoal, and pen and ink. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers. Prerequisite: Intro Two Dimensional Art ART406021* DRAWING II Prerequisite: Intro Two Dimensional Art and Drawing I

(10,11,12) 36

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 ART406031* DRAWING III Prerequisite: Intro Two Dimensional Art and Drawing l and II

(11,12)

ART406041* DRAWING IV (11,12) Prerequisites: Intro to 2D, Drawing I, II, III and permission from the instructor ART406411* PAINTING I (11,12) Painting is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students taking painting engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production that lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create abstract and realistic paintings, using a variety of materials such as mixed media, watercolor, oil, and acrylics as well as techniques such as stippling, gouache, wash, and impasto. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers. Prerequisites: Intro to 2D, Drawing I ART406421* PAINTING II Prerequisites: Intro to 2D, Drawing I, Painting

(11,12)

ART406431* PAINTING III Prerequisite: Intro Two Dimensional Art; Painting I and II

(12)

ART406441* PAINTING IV (12) Prerequisites: Intro to 2D, Drawing I, Painting I, II & III and Permission from the instructor ART404201* JEWELRY I (10,11,12) Jewelry is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in Jewelry engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works. Students create works of jewelry design and fabrication techniques including, sawing, piercing, filing, and soldering. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers. Prerequisites: Intro to 2D or 3D Art, and application required. ART406202* JEWELRY II See description above Prerequisite: Jewelry I

(10,11,12)

ART406203* JEWELRY III Prerequisite: Jewelry II

(11, 12)

ART4046204* JEWELRY IV Prerequisite: Jewelry III and instructor permission

(11, 12)

ART405201** STUDIO ART (3D DESIGN PORTFOLIO), ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) Studio Art, Advanced Placement 3D is designed to address a very broad interpretation of sculptural issues and media. Students will create a portfolio to be submitted to the AP Board for scoring. For this portfolio students are asked to demonstrate mastery of 3D design through any three-dimensional approach, including, but not limited to, figurative or nonfigurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, glass work, installation, assemblage and 3D fabric/fiber arts. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page. Prerequisite: Intro to 3D, Ceramics I, Sculpture I and permission from the instructor

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 ART405001** STUDIO ART 2D DESIGN , ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) This portfolio is intended to address two-dimensional (2D) design issues. Design involves purposeful decision making about how to use the elements are principles of art in an integrative way. The principles of design articulated through the visual elements help guide artists in making decisions about how to organize the elements on a picture plane in order to communicate content. For this portfolio, students are asked to demonstrate proficiency in 2D design through any 2D medium or process, including, but not limited to, graphic design, digital imagery, photography, collage, fabric design, wearing, illustration, painting and printmaking. This class meets after school once a week. Student portfolio will be submitted to the College Board for scoring for the possibility of college credit. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central web page. Prerequisites: Intro to 2D, Drawing I, II, and permission from instructor based on submitted portfolio. ART4048** STUDIO ART: DRAWING (11,12) This class is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. This course is based on students creating a body of work that demonstrates quality, concentration and breadth and shows mastery of line quality, light and shade, rendering of form, composition and mark-making. Drawing can be addressed through a variety of means which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media etc. Student portfolio will be submitted to the College Board for scoring for the possibility of college credit. As in any college level course students will be expected to spend a considerable amount of time outside of class in order to complete assignments and doing homework and sketchbook assignments. This class meets after school once a week. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central web page. Prerequisites: Intro to 2D, Drawing I, Drawing II, and permission from the instructor based on submitted portfolio. ART406211* PHOTOGRAPHY I (9,10,11,12) Photography is a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Art. Students in photography engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production and lead to the creation of portfolio quality works, creating photographs, films, and videos utilizing a variety of digital tools and dark room processes. They reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret, theorize, and make informed judgments about artwork and the nature of art; relate art to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students utilize the resources of art museums, galleries, and studios, and identify art-related careers. Prerequisite: Students must purchase a digital camera with 10 or more megapixels and removable media storage. ART406221* Prerequisite:

Photography II Photography I

(9,10,11,12)

ART406231* Photography III Prerequisite: Photography I and II

(10,11,12)

ART406241* Photography IV Prerequisite: Photography III

(10,11,12)

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

Intermediate Concert Band Woodwind or Bass 9-12 Grade

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

BAND The Jeffersonville High School Band Program is a highly visible contributor to the Jeffersonville community. The JHS Band Program focuses on exemplary musical performance with the concert band programs as the foundation for all other aspects of the program. The JHS Band prides itself on instilling skills outside of those that are purely musical in our students; great focus is given to student leadership training, intrinsic motivation, and collaboration in our organization. The JHS Band is the proud recipient of many recent awards and performance opportunities, including; GRAMMY Signature award, Carnegie Hall National Band and Orchestra Festival, Percussive Arts Society International Convention, 5 Tri-State Championships, 2 top-ten ISSMA State MB finishes, 8 years as a top 25 concert program, and multiple competitive grant awards. This rich history of excellence promotes a great deal of student pride in their shared success as Red Devil Band members. MUS416001** BEGINNING BAND WOODWINDS (9,10,11,12) MUS416002** BEGINNING BAND BRASS (9,10,11,12) MUS416003** BEGINNING BAND PERCUSSION (9,10,11,12) Beginning Band is an opportunity for students new to instrumental music to learn the fundamentals of an instrument and integrate into the band program. Beginning Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including one production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciples. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A number of public performances will serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: None MUS416801** INTERMEDIATE CONCERT BAND WOODWINDS (9,10,11,12) MUS416802** INTERMEDIATE CONCERT BAND BRASS (9,10,11,12) Symphonic Band at Jeffersonville is taught in two sections, one brass and one woodwind class. Students need to be sur e to enroll in the correct section based on their instrument. Intermediate Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course includes a balanced comprehensive study of music that devel ops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop ele ments of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Students study a varied repertoire of developmentally appropriate concert band literature and develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A number of public performances will serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: Previous school band experience MUS417001** ADVANCED CONCERT BAND (Wind Symphony) (10,11,12) Wind Symphony is the most advanced instrumental ensemble offered at JHS. Private lessons and a strong commitment to your instrument are highly recommended. Instructor approval and an audition are required for inclusion in the ensemble. Advanced Concert Band is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. This course provides students with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Ensemble and solo activities are designed to develop elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required toparticipate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and exten d learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: Audition and Instructor Approval

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 MUS416011** MARCHING BAND (9,10,11,12) (summer enrollment) not included on course selection sheet Marching band consists of the marching band, percussion ensemble, and color guard. Summer band meets during the summer months to study the fundamentals of marching and music performance. Due to the physical nature of the marching band activity, this course satisfies one semester of a Physical Education credit. All Freshmen band members and any student new to the band program are also members of the marching band. All first year members are required to participate in the marching band their first year. After the oneseason commitment has been met, students are strongly encouraged to remain members. Members who elect not to participate in marching band after their first year commitment will be dealt with on a case by case basis. The director should be notified immediately of any conflicts. Prerequisite: Previous school band experience/audition MUS416201** INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE I (Concert Percussion) (9,10,11,12) Concert Percussion Ensemble will focus on all aspects of percussion performance, students will prepare percussion ensemble literature as well as be assigned parts in the concert bands. A percussion ensemble class is required for all percussionists involved in any ensemble at JHS. Instrumental Ensemble is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of chamber ensemble and solo literature, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains. Students develop and refine elements of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music, studying historically significant styles of literature as pertaining to chamber ensemble and solo literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight-reading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: Previous school band experience. MUS416202** INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE II (Chamber Percussion) (10,11,12) Chamber Percussion Ensemble will focus on all aspects of percussion performance,students will prepare percussion ensemble literature as well as be assigned parts in the concert bands. Chamber Percussion is the most advanced PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE offered at JHS. Private lessons and a strong commitment to your instrument are highly recommended for those involved in this course. Instructor approval and an audition are required for inclusion in the Chamber Percussion Ensemble. A percussion ensemble class is required for all percussionists involved in any ensemble at JHS. Instrumental Ensemble is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrument al Music. Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of chamber ensemble and solo literature, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive and affective domains. Students develop and refine element s of musicianship including tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music,studying historically significant styles of literature aspertaining to chamber ensemble and solo literature, and integration of other applicable disciplines. Experiences include improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sightreading. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A number of public performances will serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: Audition and Instructor approval MUS416401** JAZZ ENSEMBLE (9,10,11,12) Students must also be performing in another PRIMARY band class, Jazz Ensemble is a course that supplements other curricular music experiences and based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Students taking this course develop musicianship and specific performance skills through group and individual settings for the study and performance of varied styles of instrumental jazz. Instruction includes the study of the history, formative, and stylistic elements of jazz. Students develop their creative skills through improvisation, composition, arranging, performing, listening, and analyzing. A limited amount of time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. In addition, a limited number of public performances will serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Studentsmust participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend the learning in the classroom. Student participants must also be receiving instruction in another band or orchestra class offering at the discretion of the director. Prerequisite: Instructor approval

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 MUS420001* APPLIED MUSIC (INSTRUMENTAL) (10,11,12) Applied Music Instrumental is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. It offers high school students the opportunity to receive small group or private instruction designed to develop and refine performance skills. A variety of music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine students’ abilities in performing, creating, and responding to music. Prerequisite: Instructor approval MUS420801** MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION I (9,10,11,12) Music Theory and composition is based on Indiana Academic Standards for Music and standards for the specific course. Students develop skills in the analysis of music and theoretical concepts. They develop ear training and dictation skills, compose works that illustrate mastered concepts, understand harmonic structures and analysis, understand modes and scales, study a wide variety of musical styles, study traditional and nontraditional music notation and sound sources as tools for musical composition, and receive detailed instruction in other basic elements of music. Prerequisite: None MUS421004** MUSIC THEORY II ADVANCED PLACEMENT (10,11,12) Music Theory, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. Music Theory is intended for secondary school students who have completed music studies comparable to a first-year college course in music theory. The guidelines for the course that are published by The College Board may not match any particular college program, but they do reflect the coverage of content and level of skills typical of most first-year college courses. This course should integrate aspects of melody, harmony, texture, rhythm, form, musical analysis, elementary composition, and history, and style. The student’s ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to this course, and it is also assumed that the student has acquired at least basic performance skills in voice or on an instrument. A comprehensive description of this course can be found on the College Board AP Central Course Description web page. Prerequisite: Instructor Approval or Music Theory l MUS420401* PIANO AND ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD I (9,10,11,12) MUS420421* PIANO AND ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD II (9,10,11,12) MUS420431* PIANO AND ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD III (10,11,12) MUS420441* PIANO AND ELECTRONIC KEYBOARD IV (10,11,12) Piano and Electronic Keyboard is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Music Technology and Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are offered keyboard classes in order to develop music proficiency and musicianship. Students perform with proper posture, hand position, fingering, rhythm, and articulation; compose and improvise melodic and harmonic material; create and perform simple accompaniments; listen to, analyze, sight-read, and study a variety of keyboard literature; study the elements of music as exemplified in a variety of styles; and make interpretive decisions. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Previous level course or instructor approval by audition. Courses must be taken in sequential order

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

CHORUS MUS418211** BEGINNING CHORUS (GIRLS) (9) MUS418221** BEGINNING CHORUS (BOYS) (9) This is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Women’s Chorus develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: None – Previous Vocal Experience Preferred MUS418801** ADVANCED WOMEN’S CONCERT CHOIR (10,11,12) Women’s Concert Choir is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Students taking Women’s Concert choir develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ensemble and solo singing. This class includes the study of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Chorus classes provide opportunities for performing, creating, and responding to music. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: Freshman Women’s Chorus/Instructor approval MUS418011* CHORAL CHAMBER CHOIR (10,11,12) The most advanced vocal ensemble at JHS, Chamber Choir, is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Student musicianship and specific performance skills in this course are enhanced through specialized small group instruction. The activities expand the repertoire of a specific genre. Chamber ensemble classes provide instruction in creating, performing, listening to, and analyzing music in addition to focusing on specific subject matter. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s intent in performance of music. Time outside of the school day may be scheduled for rehearsals and performances. A number of public performances will serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the classroom. Prerequisite: Audition/Instructor approval MUS420002* APPLIED MUSIC – (Voice) (10,11,12) Applied Music for Voice is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral Music. Applied Music for Voice offers high school students the opportunity to receive small group or private instruction designed to develop and refine performance skills. A variety of music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine students’ abilities in p erforming, creating, and responding to music. Prerequisite: Instructor approval

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

THEATRE Jeffersonville High School Theatre is dedicated to providing enriching opportunities for student participation in the creative, educational, and team-building environment. Students are instructed and involved in every aspect of theatre, including but not limited to, performance, technical production, and business management. THE424211* Theatre Arts I (9,10,11,12) Theatre Arts is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Theatre Arts read and analyze plays, create scripts and theatre pieces, conceive scenic designs, and develop acting skills. These activities incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, attend and critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community. Prerequisite: None THE424221* Theatre Arts II Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I

(9,10,11,12)

THE424011* Advanced Theatre Arts I (10,11,12) Advanced Theatre Arts is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Advanced Theatre Arts read and analyze plays and apply criteria to make informed judgments. They draw on events and experiences to create scripted monologues and scenes, create scenic designs for existing plays, and build characters through observation, improvisation and script analysis. These activities will incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore careers in theatre arts and begin to develop a portfolio of their work. They also attend and critique theatre productions and identify ways to support the theatre in their community. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I, II and Instructor approval THE424021* Advanced Theatre Arts II Prerequisite: Advanced Theatre Arts I and Instructor approval

(10,11,12)

THE425011* Advanced Acting I (11,12) Students will deepen their knowledge of performance skills and refine acting skills by analyzing cause and effect, using collaboration, and incorporating improvisation to create finished performances. They will express an understanding of classical theatre (i.e., Shakespeare) and the lasting quality of timeless themes through articulation and performance, followed by comparing and contrasting the treatment of similar themes in contemporary plays. Students will read, analyze, select, and perform plays for specific audiences. Students will continue to build a portfolio and create a dramatic arts resume. Students are required to attend or participate in theatre productions and provide analysis of their experience. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I & II, Advanced Theatre I & II and Instructor approval THE425021* Advanced Acting II (11,12) Advanced Acting is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Advanced Acting research, create, and perform characters through script analysis, observation, collaboration and rehearsal. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre by attending plays, meeting actors and discussing their work, and becoming theatre patrons in their community. Prerequisite: Advanced Acting I, Instructor approval THE424811* Theatre Production I (12) Theatre Production is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Theatre Production take on responsibilities associated with rehearsing and presenting a fully mounted theatre production including all technical aspects. They read and analyze plays to prepare for production; conceive and realize a design for a production, including set, lighting, sound and costumes; rehearse and perform roles in a production; and direct or serve as assistant director for a production. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students investigate a theatre arts career then develop a plan for potential employment or further education through audition, interview, or presentation of a portfolio. Students also attend and critique theatrical productions and volunteer to support theatre in their community. Prerequisite: Students must audition and/or present a portfolio of their theatre work 45 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 THE424821* Theatre Production II Prerequisite: Theatre Production I and Instructor Approval

(12)

THE557840* Musical Theatre (10,11,12) Musical Theatre is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students in this course study the history of musical theatre and its place in today’s society. They participate in staging, choreographing, rehearsing, and performing an original or existing musical work. This class may be taught collaboratively among music, theatre, dance, and visual arts faculty. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, attend and critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community Prerequisite: Instructor Approval THE424411* Technical Theatre I (10,11,12) Technical Theatre is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students will be responsible for the build, set up and strike of all theatrical events. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, attend and critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community. Prerequisite: Theatre I THE424421* Technical Theatre II See description above. Prerequisite: Theatre Il

(10,11,12)

THE425211* Advanced Technical Theatre I (11,12) This is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Advanced Technical Theatre actively lead and supervise in the process of designing, building, managing, programming, drafting, and implementing the technical aspects of a production. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students investigate technical theatre careers then develop a plan for potential employment or further education through audition, interview or presentation of a portfolio. Students also attend and critique theatrical productions and volunteer to support theatre in their community. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I & II, Technical Theatre I & II, Portfolio of Theatre Work and Instructor Approval THE425221* Advanced Technical Theatre II (11,12) See description above. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I & II, Technical Theatre I & II, Portfolio of Theatre Work and Instructor Approval.

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

HEALTH AND WELLNESS Note: Students may elect to take 3 semester classes in the Family and Consumer Sciences Department to fulfill Health credit. Students may choose from these classes: Interpersonal Relations, Nutrition and Wellness, Child Development, Adult Roles and Responsibilities, Human Development and Wellness.

PEH350601* Health and Wellness (9,10) This is an on-line course in Greater Clark which meets the State of Indiana’s Health & Wellness requirement for graduation. All sophomores should complete this on-line course work by the end of the second semester of their sophomore year. * Students will receive further information during freshmen and sophomore year. Course may be started th in 9 grade, but students are required to complete by the end of 10 grade year. Prerequisite: None

PEH354211* Physical Education I (9) PEH354411* Physical Education II (10) A co-educational physical education class that convenes for one semester, this course satisfies the grades 9 and 10 graduation requirements in physical education. Students will be involved with sports in the fullest sense as they gain an allegiance to a team using the sport education teaching model. Students will develop leadership, sportsmanship, cardiovascular wellness, teamwork, assertive communication, conflict resolution skills, decision-making skills, and a respect for authority and self-discipline all the while fulfilling needs in the affective, cognitive, psychomotor and social domains of learning. Prerequisite: None

Elective Physical Education courses*

(10,11,12)

Students may only take 1 elective PE per course per semester. Prerequisite: PE I and any additional requirements specific to the course. Courses include: PEH356040* Lifeguard Certification (9,10,11,12) Students in this coed course will have the opportunity to become certified as an American Red Cross Lifeguard. This includes CPR for the Professional Rescuer, Basic First Aid, and learning to use an Automated External Defibrillator. Students will be charged fees for American Red Cross cards. Prerequisite: Written permission from instructor and ability to swim 300 yards required. PEH356050* Sports Performance I,II,III,IV (9,10,11,12) This course is designed for athletes to systematically train during the school year. The objective is to improve the various components of fitness necessary to improve athletic performance. Activities include advanced weight training programs, speed and power development, and stretching activities. The students will be expected to possess a level of conditioning which will allow them to actively participate with a high degree of intensity and be motivated to improve. This is recommended for student athletes only. Students may only earn up to 6 credit hours in elective PE. Prerequisite: PE I PEH356090* Team Sports/ (Advanced Sport Ed.) (10, 11, 12) A mastery level physical education class designed specifically for sophomores, juniors, and seniors will utilize the sport education curriculum and convene for one semester. Participants will master the development of a more holistic self by fully exploring the affective, cognitive, psychomotor and social domains of learning. A more in-depth analysis of competition, strategy and kinesiology will also be revealed. Prerequisite: Students must have earned an A or B in Physical Education I

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT CORRELATIONS WITH COLLEGE CAREER READINESS PATHWAYS

Business, Info, Tech & LogisBcs

Health Careers Related Science



English 9-12 Honors English

English 9-12 Honors English

Speech/ Adv. Speech

Speech/ Adv. Speech

Newspaper

Yearbook

Human Service, EducaBon, Law & the Arts

English 9-12 Honors English

Journalism

Engineering, Manufacturing, Technology & Skilled Trades

English 9-12 Honors English

Speech/ Adv. Speech

§ § § § § § § § §

Science Fiction Lit. Biblical Lit. AP Lit. AP Lang. Sports Lit. Holocaust Lit. Mythology Speech Adv. Speech § Newspaper § Yearbook

§ Photography

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ENGLISH ENG100201** ENGLISH 9 This is an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Prerequisite: None ENG100203** ENGLISH 9 HONORS This class is an in-depth program that encourages individual progress, investigation, and accomplishment. Students will be instructed in a firm foundation of skill mastery. The study of literature involves such skills as determining author’s purpose, understanding context clues, and the story structure. Reading is enhanced with the study of work parts such as prefixes, suffixes, and roots. Correct usage, punctuation, spelling, and grammar comprise the basics of the composition program. Using the writing process, students are instructed in considering their audiences as they write narrative, expository, persuasive, and descriptive essays. The student will learn to form logical, coherent judgments while researching and making narrative, descriptive, expository, or persuasive arguments. Prerequisite: Grade of A or B in previous English class and teacher recommendation. ENG100401** ENGLISH 10 This is an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. ENG100403** ENGLISH 10 HONORS This study of language, literature, composition and oral communication is designed for accelerated students who are academically advanced and highly self-motivated. The literature component requires students to read and understand other grade level appropriate and advanced material. Students read and respond both reflectively and critically to a variety of genres and styles. Some areas explored are literary devices such as allegory, irony and symbol; unique structures of various genre; analysis of theme; study of how language reveals tone, perspective and author’s purpose; and vocabulary development. Writing is approached as an ongoing process and students practice all steps in the writing process from pre-writing to publishing. Specific forms addressed include biographical narrative, literary response, business letter, expository writing, research report, persuasive composition and creative writing. Grammar usage and language mechanics are integrated into the composition instruction. A research report, extensive independent reading and a final project are requirements of the course. Prerequisite: Grade of A or B in previous English class and teacher recommendation. ENG100601** ENGLISH 11 This is an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 11 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring characterization across universal themes and a wide variety of genres. ENG100603** ENGLISH 11 HONORS This course is the advanced study of literature along with composition, language, and oral communication. Designed for the accelerated student who is academically advanced and self-motivated, emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the relationship between literature and culture as well as increasing academic writing skills. Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation, test scores will also be taken into consideration

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 ENG105604** ENGLISH LANGUAGE COMPOSITION, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11) DC English Language and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Prerequisite: Grade of A or B in previous English class, teacher recommendation. ENG100801** ENGLISH 12 English 12, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts for Grade 12 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication focusing on an exploration of point of view or perspective across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance for Grade 12 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. ENG112401** ADV ENGLISH COLLEGE CREDIT: ENG 12 HONORS DC This course is designed to develop students’ abilities to think, organize, and express their ideas clearly and effectively in writing. This course incorporates reading, research, and critical thinking. Emphasis is placed on the various forms of expository writing such as process, description, narration, comparison, analysis, persuasion, and argumentation. A research paper is required. Numerous in-class writing activities are required in addition to extended essays written outside of class. Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation ENG105804** ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (12) DC This course is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP English course in Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Prerequisite: Grade of A or B in previous English class, teacher recommendation.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES ENG1022201* BIBLICAL LITERATURE (9,10,11,12) Biblical Literature is a study of the Bible, viewed from a literary standpoint, as a source of a wide variety of literary patterns, themes, and conventions. Students examine the different books in relation to the various historical time frames of the books and in relation to related literature as it pertains to Biblical themes. Students read, discuss, and write about Biblical references (allusions) in both classical and modern literature, formation of a canonical Bible, inclusion of apocryphal and heretical writings, oral versus literate transmission of sacred history and doctrine, and questions and problems of interpretation. Prerequisite: None ENG105401* CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE: THE WORLD OF SPORTS (9,10,11,12) Contemporary Literature, is a study of how post-1950s literature from around the world. In particular this course is focused on the contemporary issues concerning sports. Students examine multiple genres to develop a sense of how particular genres are used today to represent ideas and events. Students analyze different theories and methods of textual criticism especially theories currently popular. Students analyze how the interpretations and themes of contemporary literature read in this course relate to the time period and to historical issues in regards to sports. Prerequisite: None ENG104201* NOVELS: SCIENCE FICTION/FANTASY LITERATURE (9,10,11,12) Novels, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of the distinct features of the novel, such as narrative and fictional elements of setting, conflict, climax, and resolution. Students analyze science fiction novels by various important authors in the past and present or in a given time period or across time periods or covering a particular theme. Prerequisite: None 50 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 ENG109201* CREATIVE WRITING (11,12) Composition is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies for prose and poetry. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purposes for writing, and the style of their own writing. Creative Writing Project: Students complete a project, such as a short story, a narrative or epic poem, a persuasive speech or letter, a book review, a script or short play, or other creative compositions, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and writing progress in the Creative Writing course content. Prerequisite: English 9 & 10 ENG108000** JOURNALISM (9,10,11,12) Journalism, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of communications history including the legal boundaries and the ethical principles that guide journalistic writing. It includes a comparison study of journalistic writing to other types of writing. Students prepare for a career path in journalism by working on high school publications or media staffs. JOURNALISM PROJECT for the second credit: Students complete a project, such as a special feature magazine or mini-documentary on a topic of interest or concern. The project demonstrates knowledge, application, and progress in Journalism course content. Prerequisite: None ENG107611* SPEECH (9,10,11,12) Speech, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts Standards, is the study and application of the basic principles and techniques of effective oral communication. Students deliver focused and coherent speeches that convey clear messages, using gestures, tone, and vocabulary appropriate to the audience and purpose. Students deliver different types of oral and multi-media presentations, including viewpoint, instructional, demonstration, informative, persuasive, and impromptu. Students use the same Standard English conventions for oral speech that they use in their writing. Prerequisite: None ENG107801* ACP ADVANCED SPEECH/COMMUNICATION (11,12) DC Advanced Speech and Communication, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and emphasizing the High School Speech and Communication Standards, is the study and application of skills in listening, oral interpretation, media communications, research methods, and oral debate. Students deliver different types of oral and multi-media presentations, including speeches to inform, to motivate, to entertain, and to persuade through the use of impromptu, extemporaneous, memorized, or manuscript delivery. ADVANCED SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION PROJECT: Students complete a project, such as multi-media presentations that are reflective, reports or historical investigations, responses to literature, or persuasive arguments, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and speaking progress in the Advanced Speech and Communication course content. Prerequisite: Speech I and 3.0 G.P.A. requirement for Dual Credit 1–ENG108610** STUDENT PUBLICATIONS/ NEWSPAPER I & II (10,11,12) 2–ENG108620** Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school publications, including school newspapers and yearbooks, and a variety of media formats. Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism. Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading. Students work on high school publications or media staffs so that they may prepare themselves for career paths in journalism, communications, writing, or related fields. Students will participate in selling of educational grants as a course requirement. Prerequisite: Journalism or Photography. Application is required. This class fulfills the fine arts requirement for the AHD. 1–ENG108630** STUDENT PUBLICATIONS – YEARBOOK I & II (10,11,12) 2–ENG108640** Student Publications, a course based on the High School Journalism Standards and the Student Publications Standards, is the continuation of the study of journalism. Students demonstrate their ability to do journalistic writing and design for high school publications, including school newspapers and yearbooks, and a variety of media formats. Students follow the ethical principles and legal boundaries that guide scholastic journalism. Students express themselves publicly with meaning and clarity for the purpose of informing, entertaining, or persuading. Students work on high school publications or media staffs so that they may prepare themselves for career paths in journalism, communications, writing, or related fields. Prerequisite: Journalism or Photography. Application required 51 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 ENG104811* THEMES IN LIT: MYTHOLOGY (11,12) Themes in Literature, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of universal themes in mythology, such as the journey of the hero, the trials of youth, the search for identity, and other themes appropriate to the level and interests of students. The course may be limited to a few important related themes. Students examine representative works in various genres by authors of diverse eras and nationalities and the way themes may be treated differently in the works because of the cultural context. Students analyze how themes illuminate humanity's struggle to understand the human condition. Prerequisite: English Teacher recommendation ENG104821* THEMES IN LIT: HOLOCAUST (11,12) Themes in Literature, a course based on Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of universal themes in holocaust literature, the trials of youth, the search for identity, and other themes appropriate to the level and interests of students. The course may be limited to a few important related themes. Students examine representative works in various genres by authors of diverse eras and nationalities and the way themes may be treated differently in the works because of the cultural context. Students analyze how themes illuminate humanity's struggle to understand the human condition. Prerequisite: Night by Elie Wiesel

ENGLISH/READING INTERVENTION ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE Level I,II,III,IV,V ENG101201** ENG101211** ENG101221** ENG101231** ENG101241** English as a New Language, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards, is the study of language, literature, composition and oral communication for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students so that they improve their proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension of standard English. Students study English vocabulary used in fictional texts and content-area texts, speak and write English so that they can function within the regular school setting and an English-speaking society, and deliver oral presentations appropriate to their respective levels of English proficiency. English/Language Arts credit: If ENL course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, up to four (4) credits accrued can be counted as part of the eight (8) required E/LA credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors or Core 40 with Technical Honors. World Language Credit: If ENL course work addresses Indiana’s Academic Standards for World Languages and is taken concurrently with another E/LA course, up to four (4) credits accrued may count as World Language credits for the General, Core 40, Core 40 with Academic Honors, or Core 40 with Technical Honors

LANGUAGE ARTS LABS ENG101010** Language Arts Lab I (9) ENG101020** Language Arts Lab II (10) ENG101030** Language Arts Lab III (11,12) Language Arts Lab is a supplemental course that provides students with individualized or small group instruction designed to support success in completing language arts course work aligned with Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-12 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, with an emphasis on Literacy skills and competencies. Prerequisite: Reading scores/Teacher recommendation required. ENG112000** DEVELOPMENTAL READING (9) Developmental Reading is a supplemental course that provides students with individualized instruction designed to support success in completing language arts course work aligned with Indiana's Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grades 9-12 and the Common Core State Standards for English/Language Arts, focusing on the Reading Standards (Standards 1, 2, and 3). Prerequisite: Reading score/ Teacher recommendation required.

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

Course Pathways for MathemaBcs Department 8th Grade Failed Pre-Algebra or ISTEP+

8th Grade Passed Pre-Algebra

8th Grade Passed Honors Algebra I

8th Grade Geometry

9th grade Algebra I & Alg 1 Lab

9th grade Algebra I

9th grade Honors Geometry

9th grade Algebra II Honors

10th grade Honors Algebra II

10th grade Honors PreCalculus AP StaBsBcs

10th grade Geometry Algebra II

10th grade Geometry

11th grade Geometry or Algebra II

11 grade Algebra II

11th Grade Honors PreCalculus and /or AP StaBsBcs

11th grade AP Calculus AP StaBsBcs

12 grade Math Lab II (if needed)

12 grade Advanced Modeling/ Probability or Precalculus

12th grade AP Calculus (AB) and/or AP StaBsBcs

12th grade AP Calculus (BC) AP StaBsBcs

Additional Notes: Math Lab II is offered as an additional math course for those students needing extra support in order to pass the math graduation exam. Honors Pre-calculus is offered as a dual credit course through IVY Tech for 6 credit hours.AP Calculus (AB & BC) is offered as a dual credit course through IVY Tech for 3 credit hours. 53 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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MATHEMATICS Students taking a mathematics course will be expected to have an appropriate SCIENTIFIC calculator. Instruction will be geared toward the use of the Texas Instrument TI-30 (any model). MT251600** ALGEBRA LAB (9) Algebra Enrichment is a mathematics support course for Algebra I. The course provides students with additional time to build the foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade-level appropriate courses. The five critical areas of Algebra Enrichment align with the critical areas of Algebra I: Relationships between Quantities and Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadratic Functions and Modeling. However, whereas Algebra I contains exclusively grade-level content, Algebra Enrichment combines standards from high school courses with foundational standards from the middle grades. Student must also be enrolled in Algebra I while enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: Teacher/counselor recommendation. MTH252001** ALGEBRA I (9) Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Nonlinear Equations; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; and Polynomial Expressions. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Prerequisite: NONE MTH253201** GEOMETRY (10,11,12) Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Congruency and Similarity; Measurement; Analytic Geometry; Circles; and Polyhedra. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school CCSS. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Prerequisite: Algebra I and successful completion of the Algebra I ECA required. MTH253203** GEOMETRY HONORS (9,10) Geometry students examine the properties of two- and three-dimensional objects. Proof and logic, as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions, are stressed. Properties and relationships of geometric objects include the study of: (1) points, lines, angles and planes; (2) polygons, with a special focus on quadrilaterals, triangles, right triangles; (3) circles; and (4) polyhedra and other solids. The Honors course provides a study of additional topics and includes more challenging problems. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and successful completion of the Algebra 1 ECA required. Teacher recommendation required. MTH252201** ALGEBRA II (10,11,12) Algebra II builds on work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and allows for students to extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Prerequisite: Algebra I (both semesters)

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 MTH252203** ALGEBRA II HONORS (10,11,12) Algebra II is a course that extends the content of Algebra I and provides further development of the concept of a function. Topics include: (1) relations, functions, equations and inequalities; (2) conic sections; (3) polynomials; (4) algebraic fractions; (5) logarithmic and exponential functions; (6) sequences and series; and (7) counting principles and probability. The Honors course provides a study of additional topics and includes more challenging problems. Prerequisites: Algebra I + Geometry (with A or B for both Semesters) and Math Teacher recommendation. Successful completion of the Algebra 1 ECA required. MTH256402** PRE-CALCULUS/TRIGONOMETRY (11,12) Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry combines the material from Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus into one course. The foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses will be extended to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. The course provides students with the skills and understandings that are necessary for advanced manipulation of angles and measurement. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. The course is designed for students who expect math to be a major component of their future college and career experiences, and as such it is designed to provide students with strong foundations for calculus and other higher-level math courses. Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II and successful completion of the Algebra 1 ECA required. MTH256803** PRE-CALCULUS HONORS (11,12) Pre-Calculus extends the course of study in algebraic reasoning past Algebra II (or Integrated Math III). The foundations of algebra and functions developed in previous courses will be extended to new functions, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and to higher-level sequences and series. This course will allow students to more accurately model real-life phenomena that are regular topics of discussion in college-level STEM courses. Students pursuing non-STEM careers will benefit from an increased understanding of mathematical modeling and data analysis, both of which are increasingly used in nearly all career fields. Many students need four years of high school mathematics to prepare for college mathematics courses. Pre-Calculus is offered as an Honors course for students who intend to take calculus in college. Success in this course will require an appropriate amount of after-school work in the form of homework and/or study sessions with other students or the instructor. Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II with A or B for both semesters and teacher recommendation. MTH256204** CALCULUS AB, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (12) Calculus AB, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Calculus AB is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important. Topics include: (1) functions, graphs, and limits; (2) derivatives; and (3) integrals. Technology should be used regularly by students and teachers to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. Students are required to have a graphing calculator, TI 83 or TI 84 for this course. Success in this course will require an appropriate amount of after-school work in the form of homework and/or study sessions with other students or the instructor. Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation. MTH257204** CALCULUS BC, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) Calculus BC, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Calculus BC is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections among these representations also are important. Topics include: (1) functions, graphs, and limits; (2) derivatives; (3) integrals; and (4) polynomial approximations and series. Technology should be used regularly by students and teachers to reinforce the relationships among the multiple representations of functions, to confirm written work, to implement experimentation, and to assist in interpreting results. The content of Calculus BC is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for Calculus AB. Prerequisites: Honors Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation. 55 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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MTH253001* FINITE MATHEMATICS (11,12) Finite Mathematics is an umbrella of mathematical topics. It is a course designed for students who will undertake higherlevel mathematics in college that may not include calculus. Finite Math is made up of five strands: Sets, Matrices, Networks, Optimization, and Probability. The skills listed in these strands indicate what students should know and be able to do in Finite Math. The eight Process Standards for Mathematics apply throughout the course. Together with the content standards, the Process Standards prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situation. Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II and successful completion of the Algebra 1 ECA required. MTH254601* PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (11,12) Probability and Statistics includes the concepts and skills needed to apply statistical techniques in the decision-making process. Topics include: (1) descriptive statistics, (2) probability, and (3) statistical inference. Practical examples based on real experimental data are used throughout. Students plan and conduct experiments or surveys and analyze the resulting data. The use of graphing calculators and computer programs is encouraged. Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II and successful completion of the Algebra 1 ECA required. MTH257004** STATISTICS, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (10,11,12) Statistics, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Topics include: (1) exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns (2) sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study, (3) anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and (4) statistical inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses. The use of graphing calculators and computer software is required. Students are required to have a graphing calculator, TI 83 or TI 84 for this course. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 /Teacher Recommendation

MATH LABS/ INTERVENTION MTH256010** MTH256020** MTH256030** MTH256040**

Math Lab I Math Lab II Math Lab III Math Lab IV

(9) (10) (11) (12)

Mathematics Lab provides students with individualized instruction designed to support success in completing mathematics coursework aligned with Indiana’s Academic Standards for Mathematics. Math labs do not count toward graduation requirements.

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

MULTIDISCIPLINARY MISC850010** BASIC SKILLS DEVELOPMENT (9) Basic Skills Development is a multidisciplinary course which provides students continuing opportunities to develop basic skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, (5) mathematical computation, (6) note taking, (7) study and organizational skills, and (8) problem-solving skills that are essential for high school course work achievement. Determination of the skills to be emphasized in this course is based on Indiana’s standards, individual school corporation general curriculum plans, and student Individualized Education Programs (IEP) or other individualized plans. Skills selected for developmental work provide students with the ability to continue to learn in a range of different life situations. Prerequisite: Counselor recommendation. MISC852010* PEER TUTORING I (11,12) MISC852020* PEER TUTORING II (11,12) Peer Tutoring provides high school students with an organized exploratory experience to assist students in grades 9-12 through a helping relationship with their studies and personal growth and development. The course provides opportunities for the students taking the course to develop a basic understanding of individual differences and to explore career options in related fields. Peer Tutoring experiences are preplanned by the teacher trainer and any cooperating teacher under whom the tutoring is to be provided. It must be conducted under the supervision of a licensed teacher. The course provides a balance of class work relating to the development of and use of: (1) listening skills, (2) communication skills, (3) facilitation skills, (4) decision-making skills, and (5) teaching strategies. Student may earn a maximum of 2 credits. Prerequisite: None

STUDENT ASSISTANTS Students must have exemplary academic and discipline records in order to serve as assistants. Permission from the Assistant Principal and/or Counselor is required. Students are limited to ONE of these courses per semester. MISC903030 Counseling Center (11,12) 1 Semester No Credit Students will show new students around the building, act as runners and help out with various errands in the counseling center. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA MISC903040 Attendance Office (11,12) 1 Semester No Credit Students will pick up attendance from classrooms, file, run copier and address envelopes Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA MISC903060 Nurse’s Office (11,12) 1 Semester No Credit Students will log in visitors to the nurse’s office, answer the telephone and greet the public. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA

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Science Department Course Pathways

Freshman Year Honors Biology

Biology

Integrated Chemistry/Physics

Earth Space

**PLTW: Biomedical

Sophomore Year

Junior Year

Honors Chemistry, *AP Bio, *AP Enviro Science AP Physics I

Chemistry

Biology

Senior Year

Honors Anatomy, Physics AP Bio, *AP Chem, *AP Enviro Science, Physics *AP Physics 1, *AP Physics 2

Honors Anatomy, Physics AP Bio, *AP Chem, *AP Enviro Science *AP Physics 1, *AP Physics 2

Honors Anatomy, Physics AP Bio, *AP Chem, *AP Enviro Science, Physics *AP Physics 1, *AP Physics 2

Honors Anatomy, Physics AP Bio, *AP Chem, *AP Enviro Science *AP Physics 1, *AP Physics 2

Earth/Space, Chemistry

Earth/Space, Chemistry, Honors Anatomy, Physics

Biology

Integrated Chem/ Phys Advanced Science/ Astronomy

**PLTW: Human Systems

**PLTW: Medical

IntervenBon

Chemistry

**PLTW: Biomedical InnovaBons

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SCIENCE SCI304401** EARTH/SPACE SCIENCE (9,10,11,12) This course focused on the following core topics: study of the earth’s layers; atmosphere and hydrosphere; structure and scale of the universe; the solar system and earth processes. Students analyze and describe earth’s interconnected systems and examine how earth’s materials, landforms, and continents are modified across geological time. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Prerequisite: None SCI302401** BIOLOGY I (10,11,12) This course is based on the following core topics: cellular chemistry, structure and reproduction; matter cycles and energy transfer; interdependence of organisms; molecular basis of heredity, and genetics and evolution. Instruction will focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Prerequisites: Integrated Chemistry/Physics or Earth/Space SCI302403** BIOLOGY I HONORS (9,10,11,12) This advanced course provides a study of the structures and functions of living organisms and their interactions with their environment. Students will explore the functions and processes of cells, tissues, organs, and systems within various species of living organisms. This course will follow a pre-advanced placement curriculum; activities will include labs, lectures, demonstrations, dissections, and career explorations. Both homework assignments and lab activities will involve higher level thinking skills. Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation, standardized test scores SCI302004** BIOLOGY II ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) Biology, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The major themes of the course include: The process of evolution drives the diversity and unity of life; Biological systems utilize free energy and molecular building blocks to grow; to reproduce and to maintain dynamic homeostasis, Living systems store, retrieve, transmit and respond to information essential to life processes, Biological systems interact, and these systems and their interactions possess complex properties. Students must take Adv. Science, Special Topics Lab concurrently with this course. Prerequisites: Biology I and/or Chemistry I with Teacher Recommendation and have a passed both GQE exams SCI309201** ADV SCIENCE, SPECIAL TOPICS LAB Biology II, Advanced Placement, must be taken concurrently.

(11,12)

SCI309203** ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY HONORS (11,12) Anatomy & Physiology is a course in which students investigate and apply concepts associated with human anatomy and physiology. Concepts covered include the process of homeostasis and the essentials of human function at the level of genes, cells, tissues, and organ systems. Students will understand the structure, organization, and function of the various components of the healthy human body in order to apply this knowledge. The course should include ample laboratory experiences that illustrate the application of the standards to the appropriate cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. Dissection is both appropriate and necessary. Students should be able to use basic laboratory equipment such as microscopes, balances, and pipettes. Prerequisites: Biology I, Chemistry I Honors (grade of A or B), Teacher Recommendation SCI306401** CHEMISTRY I (10,11,12) Chemistry I is a course based on the following core topics: properties and states of matter; atomic structure; bonding; chemical reactions; solution chemistry; behavior of gases, and organic chemistry. Students enrolled in Chemistry I compare, contrast, and synthesize useful models of the structure and properties of matter and the mechanisms of its interactions. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Prerequisites: Biology I and Algebra I with at least a C average in each required. Students must have passed the GQE Exams. 59 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 SCI306403** CHEMISTRY I HONORS (10,11,12) This advanced course provides students the opportunity to study a more challenging approach to Chemistry I curriculum. The use of a first year college chemistry text book allows students to gain an understanding of the history of chemistry, its uses in various careers, and its applications to the real world. Both homework and lab work will involve higher level thinking skills. Prerequisites: Honors Biology I and Honors Algebra I with at least a B average in each required. Students must have passed the GQE exams, and teacher recommendation SCI306004** CHEMISTRY II ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) Chemistry, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The content includes: (1) structure of matter: atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, molecular models, nuclear chemistry; (2) states of matter: gases, liquids and solids, solutions; and (3) reactions: reaction types, stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Chemistry I and/or Honors Biology I with teacher recommendation only SCI309202** ADVANCED SCIENCE, SPECIAL TOPICS (11,12) Students must take this class concurrently with Chemistry II Advanced Placement. SCI310801** INTEGRATED CHEMISTRY/PHYSICS (9,10,11,12) This course is focused on the following core topics: motion and energy of macroscopic objects; chemical, electrical, mechanical and nuclear energy; properties of matter; transport of energy; magnetism; energy production and its relationship to the environment and economy. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures Prerequisite: 8th Grade Teacher recommendation SCI309210** ADVANCED SCIENCE, SPECIAL TOPICS: ASTRONOMY (11,12) This science course is grounded in extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations into astronomy. Students engage in an in--depth study of the application of science concepts, principles, and unifying themes that are unique to that to astronomy. Students will complete an end of course project. Prerequisite: Biology SCI308401** PHYSICS I (11,12) Physics I is a course focused on the following core topics: motion and forces; energy and momentum; temperature and thermal energy transfer; electricity and magnetism; vibrations and waves; light and optics. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures. Co-requisite: Algebra II SCI308001** PHYSICS I: ALGEBRA-BASED, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (10,11,12) This is equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Co-requisite: Pre-Cal/Trig SCI308101** PHYSICS II: ALGEBRA-BASED, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) This is equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisite: AP Physics 1: Algebrabased prior or concurrent and have passed graduation exams. SCI301204** ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) This course based on content established by the College Board. Students enrolled in AP Environmental Science investigate the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Prerequisites: Bio I Honors and teacher recommendation, passed both GQE exams. Students must take Adv. Science, Special Topics Lab concurrently with this course. SCI309204** ADVANCED SCIENCE SPECIAL TOPICS LAB (11,12) Students must take this class concurrently with Environmental Advanced Placement. 60 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

PLTW STEM (SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING) PLTW Biomedical Course Pathway

Principles of Biomedical Science (PBS)

PLTW

Human Body Systems (HBS) Medical Interventions (MI) Biomedical Innovation (BI)

9-12

10-12

11-12

12

All PLTW courses are offered as Dual Credit thru IUPUI, Students must pass the end of course assessment to qualify for dual credit.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY STEM BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE PATHWAY SCI521801** PLTW PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (9,10,11,12) PLTW Principles of the Biomedical Sciences provides an introduction to this field through “hands-on” projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. Key biological concepts included in the curriculum are: homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defense against disease. Engineering principles such as the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to function will be included where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of all courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses. Prerequisites: Biology I or Concurrent Enrollment in Biology I, passing with a grade of B or better SCI521601** PLTW HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS (10,11,12) This course is aligned with postsecondary courses for Dual Credit PLTW Human Body Systems is a course designed to engage students in the study of basic human physiology and the care and maintenance required to support the complex systems. Using a focus on human health, students will employ a variety of monitors to examine body systems (respiratory, circulatory, and nervous) at rest and under stress, and observe the interactions between the various body systems. Students will use appropriate software to design and build systems to monitor body functions. Prerequisite: Principles of 61 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 Biomedical Sciences or teacher recommendation with Anatomy or Chemistry grade of B or better SCI521701** PLTW MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS (Honors) (11,12) This course is aligned with postsecondary courses for Dual Credit. PLTW Medical Interventions is a course that studies medical practices including interventions to support humans in treating disease and maintaining health. Using a project-based learning approach, students will investigate various medical interventions that extend and improve quality of life, including gene therapy, pharmacology, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation, and supportive care. Students will also study the design and development of various interventions including vascular stents, cochlear implants, and prosthetic limbs. Lessons will cover the history of organ transplants and gene therapy with additional readings from current scientific literature addressing cutting edge developments. Using 3-D imaging software, students will design and build a model of a therapeutic protein. Prerequisites: Principles of Biomedical Sciences and Human Body Systems or concurrent Human Body Systems, teacher recommendation SCI521901** PLTW BIOMEDICAL INNOVATION (Honors) (12) This course is aligned with postsecondary courses for Dual Credit. PLTW Biomedical Innovation is a capstone course designed to give students the opportunity to design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century as they work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They have the opportunity to work on an independent project and may work with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, physician’s office, or industry. Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an adult audience that may include representatives from the local business and healthcare community. Prerequisites: Principles of Biomedical Sciences, Human Body Systems, and Medical Interventions

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY STEM ENGINEERING COURSES

PLTW482001** PLTW CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE (STEM Honors) (10,11,12) DC Engineering and Architecture introduces students to the fundamental design and development aspects of civil engineering and architectural planning activities. Application and design principles will be used in conjunction with mathematical and scientific knowledge. Computer software programs allow students opportunities to design, simulate, and evaluate the construction of buildings and communities. During the planning and design phases, instructional emphasis will be placed on related transportation, water resource, and environmental issues. Activities will include the preparation of cost estimates as well as a review of regulatory procedures that would affect the project design. Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW), Principles of Engineering (PLTW) PLTW482801** PLTW ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (STEM Honors)

(12)

DC

The knowledge and skills students acquire throughout PLTW Engineering come together in EDD as they identify an issue and then research, design, and test a solution, ultimately presenting their solution to a panel of engineers. Students apply the professional skills they have developed to document a design process to standards, completing EDD ready to take on any post-secondary program or career. Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design, Principles of Engineering Design, and one specialty course.

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

Social Studies Department Course Pathways

Geography

World History Required

US History Required

Government Economics -Required

AP Geography (9th-12)

AP World History

AP US History

AP European History

AP European History

AP Government (11th or 12th)

Psychology (11th or 12th)

AP Microeconomics (11th or 12th)

AP Psychology (11th or 12th)

Honors Economics

AP Government (11th or 12th)

Psychology (11th or 12th)

AP Microeconomics (11th or 12th)

AP Psychology (11th or 12th)

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

SOCIAL STUDIES SS154601* WORLD GEOGRAPHY (9,10) World Geography allows students to study the interaction of humans and their environments in a world setting. Students study global patterns of physical and cultural characteristics, including the Earth/sun relationship, atmospheric and oceanic circulation, landforms, climate, vegetation, population, economic and political structures, culture, cultural diffusion, and international and interregional connections. Using maps, geographic representations and technology such as geographic information systems (GIS) students will examine spatial relationships, the interaction of physical and cultural characteristics of designated places, areas, or regions. Students are expected to apply knowledge of geographic concepts and uses of geography to inquiry, research, and participatory processes. Guiding course content are the themes of location, characteristic of place, human/environmental interaction, movement between places, and regions. Emphasized are elements of the National Geography Standards: The World in Spatial Terms, Places and Regions, Physical Systems, Human Systems and Environment and Society. Prerequisite: None SS157201** HUMAN GEOGRAPHY ADVANCED PLACEMENT (9,10,11,12) Human Geography, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Topics include: 1) Geography: its nature and perspectives; 2) Population; 3) Cultural patterns and processes; 4) Political Organization of space; 5) Agriculture and rural land use; 6) Industrialization and economic development; and 7) Cities and urban land uses. Prerequisite: Honors/Advanced teacher recommendation SS154801** WORLD HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION (10) World History emphasizes events and developments in the past that greatly affected large numbers of people across broad areas and that significantly influenced peoples and places in subsequent eras. Key events related to people and places as well as trans-cultural interaction and exchanges are examined in this course. Students are expected to compare and contrast events and developments involving diverse peoples and civilizations in different regions of the world. They will examine examples of continuity and change, universality and particularity, and unity and diversity among various peoples and cultures from the past to the present. Students are also expected to practice skills and process of historical thinking and research and apply content knowledge to the practice of thinking and inquiry skills and processes. There will be continuous and pervasive interactions of processes and content, skills and substance, in the teaching and learning of history. Prerequisite: None. SS157604** WORLD HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION ADVANCED PLACEMENT (10,11,12) World History, Advanced Placement is a course that provides students with the content established by the College Board. The course will have a chronological frame from the periods 800 B.C.E to the present. AP World History focuses on five overarching themes: Interaction between humans and environment; Development and interaction of cultures; Statebuilding, expansion, and conflict; Creation expansion and interaction of economic systems; Development and transformation of social structures. Prerequisite: Recommendation of English teacher. SS154201** U. S. HISTORY (11) United States History builds upon concepts developed in previous studies of U.S. History. Students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U,S. History. They will develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time. Prerequisite: None SS156204** U. S. HISTORY ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) DC United States History, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. The course has a chronological frame from 1492 to the present and focuses on multiple causation and change in United 64 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 States history over time. A variety of historical themes are examined in order to place the history of the United States into larger analytical contexts. Students are expected to analyze and interpret primary sources and develop awareness of multiple interpretations of historical issues in secondary sources. Historical events and issues in U.S. history are to be th examined from multiple perspectives. Prerequisite: Recommendation of 10 grade history teacher. SS155604** EUROPEAN HISTORY ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) European History, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Topics include: (1) intellectual and cultural history, (2) political and diplomatic history, and (3) social and economic history. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European History are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. Prerequisite: World History and Civilization SS154001* U. S. GOVERNMENT (11,12) United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed. Students will understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local, state, and national government. Students will examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. How the United States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs will be examined. Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues. As a result, they will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government, politic, and civic activities and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States. Prerequisite: None SS156004** U. S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) This course is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government. This is to interpret United States politics and government. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret US politics and an examination of the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up American politics. The course is taught with college-level texts. Preparation for the A.P test will be an integral part of the course. Government and Politic, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Topics include: (1) constitutional underpinnings of United States government, (2) political beliefs and behaviors, (3) political parties, interest groups, and mass media, (4) institutions of national government, (5) public policy, and (6) civil rights and civil liberties. Prerequisite: Honors English 10 or Honors English 11 SS151403* ECONOMICS HONORS (11,12) DC Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course analyzes economic reasoning and behaviors of consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, institutions, governments, and societies in making decisions. Students will explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. Key elements of the course include the study of scarcity and economic reasoning, supply and demand, market structures, the role of the government, national economic performance, the role of the financial institutions, economic stabilization and trade. Prerequisite: None SS156604** ECONOMICS ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) This course will follow the guidelines set by the College Board for AP Economics (Macroeconomics). The purpose of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of micro-economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of governments in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. The study of national income and price-level determination, and also developing student’ familiarity with economic performance measure, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economies will be included. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam. Students will be required to do independent reading and research throughout the course. In addition to the AP requirement, this course will also satisfy the Jeffersonville High School Economics credit requirement for seniors. th Prerequisite: Placement will be based upon recommendation of 11 grade History teacher. SS151401* ECONOMICS (12) Economics examines the allocation of resources and their uses for satisfying human needs and wants. The course 65 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 analyzes economic reasoning used by consumers, producers, savers, investors, workers, voters, and government in making decisions. Key elements of the course include study of scarcity and economic reasoning, supply and demand, market structures, role of government, national income determination, the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade. Students will explain that because resources are limited, people must make choices and understand the role that supply, demand, prices, and profits play in a market economy. The functions of government in a market economy and market structures will be examined. Students will understand economic performance, money, stabilization policies, and trade of the United States. The behavior of people, societies and institutions and economic thinking is integral to this course. Prerequisite: None SS153201** PSYCHOLOGY (11,12) Psychology is the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. The course is divided into six content areas and uses the scientific methods to explore research methods and ethical consideration. Developmental psychology takes a life span approach to physical, cognitive, language, emotional, social, and moral development. Cognitive aspects of the course focus on learning, memory, information processing, and language. Personality, Assessment, and Mental Health topics include psychological disorders, treatment, personality, and assessment. Socio-cultural dimensions of behavior deal with topics such as conformity, obedience, perceptions, attitudes, and influence of the group on the individual. The Biological Basis focuses on the way the brain and nervous system function, including sensation, perception, motivation, and emotion. Prerequisite: None SS155814** PSYCHOLOGY ADVANCED PLACEMENT (11,12) DC Psychology, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes. Topics include: (1) history and approaches, (2) research methods, (3) biological bases of behavior, (4) sensation and perception, (5) states of consciousness, (6) learning, (7) cognition, (8) motivation and emotion, (9) developmental psychology, (10) personality, (11) testing and individual differences, (12) abnormal psychology, (13) treatment of psychological disorders, and (14) social psychology. Prerequisite: 3.0 G.P.A. and recommendation of previous History teacher.

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017

World Language Course Pathways Click here to enter text.

Freshman Year •  French I •  German I •  Spanish I

Sophomore Year

Junior Year

•  French II •  German II •  Spanish II

Senior Year

•  French III Dual Credit

•  French IV Dual Credit

•  German III Dual Credit

•  German IV Dual Credit

•  Spanish III Dual Credit

•  Spanish IV Dual Credit









WORLD LANGUAGE Level I (All Languages)**

(9,10,11,12)

WL202001** FRENCH I French 1 presents the basics of the French language. Students learn greetings, basic verb conjugations, basic vocabulary, pronunciation rules and basic grammatical structures. They develop basic reading, listening and conversational abilities. Francophone customs, culture, and everyday life are also highlighted. th Prerequisite: Must have a C in 8 grade English or written parental permission WL204001** GERMAN I WL212001** SPANISH I This course provides students with opportunities to: respond to and give oral directions and commands and to make routine requests in the classroom and in public areas; understand and use appropriate forms of address in courtesy expressions and be able to tell about daily routines and events; ask and answer simple questions and participate in brief guided conversations related to their needs and interests; read isolated words and phrases in a situational context, such as menus, signs, and schedules; comprehend brief written directions and information; read short narrative texts on simple topics; and write familiar words and phrases in appropriate contexts and respond in writing to various stimuli. Additionally, students learn nonverbal communication such as body language and gestures. They learn how some of the major holidays are celebrated as well as where the countries are located that speak the targeted language. Students learn how to greet and say goodbye and the behaviors accompanying them in a variety of social situations. They learn to respond appropriately and use courtesy behaviors when introducing/being introduced. Students learn the appropriate etiquette in a th variety of social settings. Prerequisite: Must have a C in 8 grade English or written parental permission

Level II (All Languages)**

(10,11,12) 67

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 WL202201** FRENCH II French 2 strengthens students' comprehension of the spoken and written language. Students learn how to respond in real-life situations while expanding their vocabulary and improving their reading skills. The grammar focuses on more complex verbs and structures (in the present, past and future tenses). Students learn about the many French-speaking areas around the world. Prerequisite: Must have a C or better in French I class or teacher recommendation WL204201** GERMAN II WL212201** SPANISH II Students are able to ask questions regarding routine activities; participate in conversations on a variety of topics; relate simple narrative about a personal experience or event; interact in a variety of situations to meet personal needs, such as asking permission, asking for or responding to an offer of help, and expressing preferences pertaining to everyday life; understand main ideas and facts from simple texts over read aloud with appropriate intonation and pronunciation; and write briefly in response to given situations, for example postcards, personal notes, phone messages, and directions, as well as write letters using culturally appropriate format and style. Additionally, students become familiar with major geographical features and historical events of the country/countries being studied. They are introduced to different aspects of the culture such as the visual arts, architecture, literature, and music. They are able to extend and respond to hospitality as a host or a guest. They know when it is acceptable to be late and when one must be on time. Prerequisite: Must have a C or better in Spanish I class or teacher recommendation

Level III (All Languages)**

(11,12)

WL202401** FRENCH III HONORS French 3 reviews and builds on the grammar and vocabulary taught in French 1 and 2 to enhance conversational, reading, listening, and writing skills. Students study complex structures (compound verb tenses and the subjunctive and passive moods). Students read authentic material (literary excerpts and newspaper articles) and watch authentic videos/podcasts (movies clips, news reports, radio programs…) Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C– in French I

and II required. WL204401**

GERMAN III

ACP

This course is an introduction to present-day German and to selected aspects of the cultures of Germanspeaking countries; to German grammatical forms and their functions. Students development listening comprehension, simple speaking proficiency, controlled reading skills and simple written compositions. Active oral participation in German expected throughout. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C– in German 1 and II required. WL212401** SPANISH III HONORS Students are able to: respond to factual and interpretive questions and interact in a variety of social situations, such as expressing regret condolences, and complaints, and using more than rote memory formula phrases; read for comprehension from a variety of authentic materials, such as advertisements in newspapers and magazines, and cartoons and personal correspondence; read short literary selections; write paraphrases, summaries, and brief compositions. Students learn about major historical events and some of the persons who played key roles. They discuss how the political structures can affect a country’s history and future. They study the value systems and appropriate participation at special occasions such as birthdays, weddings, funerals and anniversaries. Students make presentations on the visual arts, literature and music. Upon successful completion students may earn up to 8 credit hours. Consult Dual Credit chart for explanation. Prerequisite: Must have a C or better in previous Spanish II class or teacher recommendation

Level IV (All Languages) (12) WL202604**

DC

FRENCH IV 68

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 French 4 expands students’ speaking, reading, writing, listening and cultural skills. Students expand their mastery of structures of the language to include past, present, future expression and subjunctive mood. Students speak French with increasing fluency on a variety of topics as they build on their foundation of vocabulary, structure and culture. They develop comprehension of increasingly more complex speech and conversation by native speakers. Students read extended texts such as short stories, magazine or newspaper articles. Prerequisite: Must have a C or better in French III class or teacher recommendation WL204604** GERMAN IV ACP This is an actual college course which can either be one semester (G200) or both first and second semester (G200/250). Each semester gives students the opportunity to receive 3 college credits to obtain an official Indiana University transcript. There is a fee required for this course, to be determined by Indiana University. It is currently $25.00 per credit hour. The course aims to teach students to communicate in German and at the same time develop a structural awareness of the German language. Since the goals of communicative and grammatical competence are ultimately inseparable, the students are guided towards using German as accurately as possible. A large emphasis is placed on students becoming autonomous learners. Regular discussion and practice of grammatical structures will help students monitor their own spoken and written output, as well as further develop useful language learning strategies. Students are learning the exact same material as students in any Indiana University course of the same title. German IV—Advance College Project (ACP)—G200/G250—WL204604. There are 3 credits for the first semester course and 3 credits for the second semester course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP German Language and Culture or its equivalent and Teacher Recommendation plus a current GPA of 2.7 or higher, according to Indiana University requirements.

WL212604** SPANISH IV Students respond to factual and interpretive questions, interact in complex social situations, and express opinions and make judgments; give presentations on cultural topics; paraphrase or restate what someone else has said; read for comprehension from a variety of longer authentic materials, as well as make judgments about what is read; and write wellorganized compositions on a given topic. The students are aware of the relationship between various art forms in at least one major historical period. They can adjust speech appropriate to the situation and the audience. Students are aware of the major literary, musical, and artistic periods of at least one of the target cultures. Upon successful completion students may earn up to 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: Must have a C or better in Spanish III or teacher recommendation

PROSSER Indiana’s Largest Career Center 69 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 Prosser Career Education Center provides high -quality career and technical education (CTE) programs for high school students throughout southern Indiana. With an average enrollment of 1,350 students enrolled in 24 different career preparation programs, Prosser is the largest career center in the state of Indiana. Prosser students have opportunity to earn multiple college credits and nationally recognized certifications for successfully completing the CTE program. With proper planning, can earn the Technical and/or Academic Honor’s diploma. Junior and senior students will attend Prosser for half of the instructional school day, while the other half of the instructional day will be utilized to complete academic requirements at the home school. Most programs offer two years of career preparation training, but many students will choose to attend for only one year. Students complete Intent-to-Enroll forms in early spring the year before they will attend. Students wanting to attend Prosser need to meet with their home school counselor to ensure the Prosser career program matches future goals as well as desired diploma type. For more information about each program, including dual college credit and certification opportunities, go to www.prossercareers.com Course Offerings *=1 year program **=1 year program/seniors only

Agriculture Programs *Horticulture Science (DOE 5132) Horticulture students study the biology and technology involved in the production, processing and marketing of horticultural plants and products. Students study plant propagation and growth, growth media, floriculture, greenhouse management, nursery stock and landscaping. While participating in a variety of activities, including extensive laboratory work in the school’s five greenhouses, students grow plants to sell to the community during winter and spring plant and flower sales events. Related Careers: Landscaper, Horticulture Sales, SportsTurf Specialist *Landscape Management I (DOE 5136) Landscape Management students experience an overview of the many career opportunities in the diverse field of landscape management. Students are introduced to the procedures used in the planning and design of a landscape using current technology practices, the principles and procedures of landscape construction, the determination of maintenance schedules, communications and management skills necessary in landscape operations and the care and use of equipment utilized by landscapers. Related Careers: Landscaper, Horticulture Sales, Sports Turf Specialist

Architecture and Construction Programs Architectural Drafting and Design I & II (DOE 5640/5652) Drafting students will learn the theory and skills of architectural drafting and design. Curriculum will focus on all aspects of fundamental drafting, geometric constructions, orthographic (multi-view) drawings, ANSI standards, and residential design and site work. Students will learn to transition from 2 dimensional drafting to 3 dimensional modeling. This course will utilize the most current computer-aided design (CAD) and 3D modeling software available. Related Careers: Architect, Engineer, Interior Designer Construction Trades I & II (DOE 5580/5578) Construction students gain familiarity with all aspects of building of a single-family residence. Through classroom instruction and laboratory experience, students acquire hands-on training in estimating, layout, footing and foundation, platform construction, framing, roofing, sidings, insulation, exterior finish, window and door installation, and stair building. Students learn safe ways to construct brick and block walls; identify and mix mortar; mix and finish concrete. During each school year, students construct one home in Prosser’s Builders’ Ridge subdivision to be sold on the open real estate market. Related Careers: Frame/Trim Carpenter, Mason/Bricklayer, Construction Cost Estimator Construction and Earthmoving Equipment Operator I & II (DOE 5497/5499) Construction and Earthmoving Equipment students are trained to operate and/or maintain heavy equipment. Students learn how to maneuver and operate heavy equipment on computerized simulators as well as on actual backhoes, skid-steers, excavators and bulldozers. In addition, students learn to operate rollers, tractors, earthmovers, extended-hoes, graders, dump trucks, and rubber-tired loaders. Curriculum includes knowledge of safety and preventative maintenance, surveying, road construction, and basic earthwork construction. Related Careers: Heavy Equipment Operator, Excavation Specialist, Home-site Specialist Electrical I & II (DOE 4830/4832) Electricity students learn basic electrical theory, residential, commercial and industrial wiring. An in-depth study of the National Electrical Code is a primary focus as students wire the residential homes in Builders’ Ridge, Prosser’s subdivision. Industrial automation, including robotics, programmable logic controllers, and mecha-tronics provide students with the high-demand training for factory maintenance, installation and repair work. Included in the second year of study, motors, rotating machines, electrical motor controls and basic aspects of green 70 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT *=ONE SEMESTER **=TWO SEMESTERS

Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 energy, including photo-voltaics (solar) and wind turbines. Related Careers: Residential/Commercial/Industrial Electrician, Electro-Mechanical Technician, Electrical Engineer Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration I & II (DOE 5496/5498) HVACR students learn all aspects of the fundamentals of residential and commercial HVACR. Curriculum will focus on the skills and knowledge required for trouble-shooting, repairing and maintaining heating and air-conditioning units. In addition, students identify and interpret health, safety, and welfare standards and codes as designated by local, state, or federal agencies. Students will install the HVAC units and ductwork in the residential homes in Builders’ Ridge, Prosser’s subdivision. Related Careers: Residential/Commercial Technician, HVAC Sales and Service, HVAC Installation

Arts/AV Technology & Communications Programs **Interactive Media (DOE 5232) Interactive Media students will utilize computer software to manipulate text, photos, graphics, sound and moving images into creative projects. Interactive media emphasizes the development of digitally generated or computer enhanced products using multiple technologies. Graphic design, animation, full audio and video production and photography are also included. Related Careers: Graphic Designer, Audio Engineer, Web Content Designer

Business and Marketing Programs Entrepreneurship and New Ventures (DOE 5966) Entrepreneurship students will study curriculum that focuses on the roles and responsibilities of managers as well as opportunities and challenges of ethically managing a business in the free enterprise system. A special focus will be placed upon the entrepreneurship skills and tools critical for starting and succeeding in a new business venture. Topics of government and legal restrictions, franchising, sales and revenue forecasting, business accounting, start-up funding, and business plan development will also be covered. Related Careers: Accountant, Sales Representative, Business Manager **Advanced Business Management (DOE 5268) Advanced Business Management will prepare students to plan, organize, direct and control the functions and processes of a firm or organization and be successful in a work environment. Students are provided opportunities to develop attitudes and apply skills and knowledge in the areas of business administration, management, and finance. Students will spend a great deal of the time in on-the-job training opportunities in real world business and industry settings. Related Careers: Sales Representative, Business Manager, Business owner, Human Resources

Health and Human Services Cosmetology I & II (DOE 5802/5806) Cosmetology students study curriculum related to bacteriology, anatomy, hygiene, and sanitation, as well as, small business (salon) management, record keeping, and customer relations. Students’ practical experiences will be conducted in a lab setting as well as in the Prosser School of Cosmetology full-service salon. Cosmetology students accumulate the required 1500 clinical hours over the two-year period to be eligible to test for the Indiana Cosmetology License. Related Careers: Cosmetologist, Nail Technician, Make-up Artist Culinary Arts and Hospitality/Advanced Culinary Arts (DOE 5440/5346) Culinary Arts students will successfully complete three the basic disciplines of baking, food and beverage, and culinary. Instruction includes sanitation and safety requirements for food preparation; maintenance and operation of culinary tools and equipment; recipe reading and measurement. In addition to classroom instruction, students’ practical experiences will be conducted in a lab setting as well as in the Prosser Café and through participation in Prosser’s Culinary catering service. Related Careers: Chef, Caterer, Restaurant Manager Health Science Education I & II (DOE 5282/5284) Health Science students study the skills common to specific healthcareer topics and study medical terminology, basic anatomy/physiology, disease processes, infection control, and components for wellness and healthy lifestyle. Students learn and demonstrate technical skills in Prosser’s mock clinical laboratories. In addition, students study the role of the healthcare worker, effective communication skills, and the legal and ethical standards within the health care industry. Second-year students focus on career specialists and are placed in an actual clinical setting where they are prepared for the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) certification. Students participate in a variety of other experiences such as nursing, lab testing, obstetrics, imaging, physical therapy, surgery, medical offices or extended care. Related Careers: Nurse, Medical Assistant, X-Ray Technician **Introduction to Pharmacy (DOE 5214) Pharmacy students will attend their home school for a full schedule of classes and attend Prosser’s pharmacy class two days a week from 3:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Students study an introduction to health care systems, basic medical and pharmaceutical terminology, body systems, pharmaceutical dispensation, drug conversions, legal and ethical responsibilities, the role of the pharmacist/technician, pharmaceutical industry trends. In 71 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 st addition, students participate in a required internship within an actual pharmacy. Students must be 18 by November 1 to participate in this experience. Related Careers: Pharmacist, Pharmacy Technician, Pre-Med

Information Technology Programs Computer Tech Support I/Infrastructure to the Internet II (DOE 5230/4588) Networking students will learn how to assemble and configure computers, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. Students will also learn all aspects of network support including the fundamental concepts of local, wide area, and home networks. The Network Systems curriculum is aligned with Comptia A+, Comptia Network+, and Cisco CCNA. Related Careers: Information Systems Management, Computer Installation & Maintenance, Computer Systems Analysis Computer Programming I & II (DOE 4534/5236) Computer Programming students design, develop, test, document, implement and maintain computer systems and software. Programming introduces the structured techniques necessary for efficient solution of business-related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into the high-level languages. Students learn computer languages, including Visual Basic and C++, JAVA, PHP, XHTML, Javascript, XML, AJAX, Oracle and SQL . Related Careers: Computer Programmer, Computer Software Engineer, Database Manager

Public Safety Programs Criminal Justice I & II (DOE 5822/5824) Criminal Justice students will study the basic fundamentals of law enforcement and the criminal justice system. The Criminal Justice curriculum is based on the standards and content provided by official law enforcement academies. Students will learn criminal law, traffic control, and how to conduct effective criminal investigations. Students will also learn personal safety and defense tactics and participate in weekly physical training. Related Careers: Police Officer, Probation Officer, Conservation Officer Fire and Rescue I/ Fire Rescue II (5820/5826) Fire and Rescue students will focus on all aspects of Fire Science in the first year curriculum. This will include Firefighter safety and health, fire control and behavior, rescue equipment, and hazardous materials. Second year curriculum will include pre-hospital care, medication identification, and ambulance operations. Students completing the second year curriculum will be prepared to test for a Basic Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) certification. Related Careers: Firefighter, EMT, Paramedic

Manufacturing Programs Precision Machining Technology I & II (DOE 5782/5784) Precision Machine students learn a basic understanding of the precision machining processes used in industry, manufacturing, maintenance and repair. Students experience hands-on training on some of the most technologically advanced equipment found in industry, including CNC(computer numerical control) lathes, CNC mills, EDM (electrical discharge machining) wire machines, CMM (coordinate measuring machine), CAD/CAM (computer-aided design/computer-aided machining) computers, robots, lathes, mills, surface grinders, drill presses, and saws. Related Careers: Machinist, Tool & Die Maker, CNC Programmer Welding Technology I & II (DOE 5776/5778) Welding Technology students learn to fabricate and weld metal, using shielded metal arc, oxy fuel, MIG, TIG, and plasma arc techniques and procedures. In addition, students study the properties of metals, safety, blueprint reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and mechanical drawings. The principles of metallurgy, gases, and material science are integral to this course. Related Careers: Pipe Fitter, Iron Worker, Steel Fabricator

Transportation Programs Aviation Operations I/Aviation Flight I (DOE 5528/5524) Aviation students will receive a broad-based introduction to the field of aviation. Course activities include: familiarization with aviation technology; a historic overview of the field of aviation; exploration of the current aviation environment and careers and employment opportunities in the field. Topics are focused on aircraft manufacturing, airline operations, general aviation, air-freight, airport management, and government service. Additional topics covered include: aviation safety, human factors, regulations, and certification. This course also prepares new student pilots for the maneuvers that are required to be performed during the Practical Test portion of the Private Check Ride. In addition to these maneuvers, basic aerodynamics, aircraft systems, instrument construction and operation, weight and balance, aviation flight physiology as well as a basic working knowledge of aircraft power plants and their construction will be covered. Related Careers: Pilot, Air-Traffic Controller, Grounds Crew Automotive Collision Repair Technology I & II (DOE 5514/5544) Auto Collision students train in many phases of the collision repair process: cost estimating, frame and body damage analysis, structural and uni-body three-dimensional measuring, metal straightening, MIG welding, computerized frame diagnosis, computerized color mixing, computerized estimating of repair costs, panel and parts replacement. Students also learn auto-electrical systems, air-conditioning and 72 KEY DC=DUAL CREDIT

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Jeffersonville High School – Course Description Guide 2016-2017 air-bag systems. In addition to completing classroom instruction, students’ practical experiences will be conducted in Prosser’s fully-operational auto collision business. Related Careers: Collision Repair Technician, Insurance Estimator/Appraiser, Automotive Refinish Tech Automotive Services Technology I & II (DOE 5510/5546) Automotive Services Technology students learn industry theory and experience hands-on instruction in repairing vehicles using the latest diagnostic and repair equipment in the automotive industry. Topics covered include steering and suspension, braking systems, manual transmissions, differentials, automatic transmissions, air conditioning, engine repair, electrical systems and engine performance. In addition to completing classroom instruction, students’ practical experiences will be conducted in Prosser’s fullyoperational automotive services business. Related Careers: Auto Service Technician, Service Writer, Insurance Adjuster Diesel Service Technology I & II (DOE 5620/5624) Diesel Service Technology students experience all phases of repair work on diesel engines and heavy equipment. Classroom and lab activities utilize state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment and tools to repair and troubleshoot all aspects of diesel operation, service and maintenance. Students also practice with the use of technical manuals, hand and power tools, and testing and diagnostic equipment. Related Careers: Diesel Maintenance Technician, Hydraulics Repair Technician, Service Writer

Visit our website for more information: www.prossercareers.com

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