Washington State NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

Washington State OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION Child Nutrition Services Old Capitol Building 600 Washington Street SE PO BOX 47200 Ol...
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Washington State OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION Child Nutrition Services Old Capitol Building 600 Washington Street SE PO BOX 47200 Olympia, WA 98504-7200

CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS

Phone: (360) 725-6200 TTY: (360) 664-3631

2012 OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

The Child Nutrition Programs PART OF THE TOTAL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM PROMOTING HEALTH AND NUTRITION The Child Nutrition Programs administered in the state of Washington by Child Nutrition Services, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction are:  National School Lunch Program  School Breakfast Program  Child and Adult Care Food Program  Simplified Summer Food Program  Seamless Summer Feeding Program  Special Milk Program/Summer Special Milk Program  USDA Food Distribution Program  Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program Child Nutrition Services Mission Statement Assist school districts and other institutions in providing quality nutrition programs that promote life-long, healthful living while providing nutritious meals each day that prepare children for learning.

 

Goals To provide leadership for the child nutrition meal programs through advocacy, assistance, and administration. To manage program resources for the benefit of recipients. To incorporate nutrition education in all phases of services.

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Objectives Assist Child Nutrition Program sponsors. Advocate for good nutrition. Administer the Child Nutrition Programs. Support section staff. Promote strong agency cooperation, interaction, and communication.



Randy I. Dorn State Superintendent of Public Instruction Martin T. Mueller Assistant Superintendent, Student Support Donna R. Parsons Director, Child Nutrition Services Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction Old Capitol Building PO Box 47200 Olympia, WA 98504-7200 To order more copies of this document, please call toll free 1-877-204-6486, or visit our Web site at http://www.k12.wa.us/ChildNutrition.

CONTENTS NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAMS ................. 1 HISTORY.............................................................................................................. 1 HIGHLIGHTS ......................................................................................................... 1 WASHINGTON STATE PUBLIC SCHOOL SBP/NSLP STATISTICS FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2011–12 ....................2 NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM EXPENDITURES ............... 3 SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM AVERAGE BREAKFAST SELLING PRICE .............................. 3 NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM AVERAGE LUNCH SELLING PRICE........................... 3 OCTOBER PUBLIC SCHOOL FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE LUNCH APPLICATIONS SUMMARY BY SCHOOL YEAR ...................................................................................................... 4 NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM STUDENT ELIGIBILITY SUMMARY FOR OCTOBER 2011.................4 SCHOOL DISTRICTS OPERATING FEDERAL BREAKFAST AND LUNCH PROGRAMS BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 .... 5 PUBLIC SCHOOL BREAKFAST PARTICIPATION TOTAL BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 ................................................................................................... 5 PUBLIC SCHOOL NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PARTICIPATION TOTAL BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 ........................................................................... 5 2010–11 PUBLIC SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM PARTICIPATION ................................. 6 2010–11 PUBLIC SCHOOL NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM PARTICIPATION ............ 7 STATE SUPPORT FOR REDUCED-PRICE MEALS ................................................. 8 STATUS OF SCHOOL MEAL PROGRAMS ........................................................... 9 TOTAL CHANGES FROM SCHOOL YEAR 2009–10 TO SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 ................. 9 CHANGES IN ELIGIBILITY STATUS .............................................................................. 9 EFFECTS OF DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES ....................................................................... 9 POSSIBLE CAUSES FOR CHANGES ............................................................................ 10 WASHINGTON STATE USDA FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAMS...................... 10 HISTORY............................................................................................................ 10 HIGHLIGHTS ....................................................................................................... 10 SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM/SIMPLIFIED SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM ............11 HISTORY............................................................................................................ 11 HIGHLIGHTS ....................................................................................................... 12 2011 SIMPLIFIED SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM PARTICIPATION...................................... 12 SEAMLESS SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM...................................................... 13

HISTORY............................................................................................................ 13 HIGHLIGHTS ....................................................................................................... 13 SPECIAL MILK PROGRAM/SUMMER SPECIAL MILK PROGRAM ...................... 13 FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROGRAM ..................................................... 14 HISTORY............................................................................................................ 14 HIGHLIGHTS ....................................................................................................... 14 2011-12 FRESH FRUIT & VEGETABLE PROGRAM RECIPIENTS ...................................... 16 CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM .................................................... 19 HISTORY............................................................................................................ 19 HIGHLIGHTS ....................................................................................................... 19 CACFP PARTICIPATION FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011........................................................ 21 CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS AVERAGE DAILY PARTICIPATION AND PERCENT OF CHANGE BY FISCAL YEAR .......................................................................... 22 CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM ............................................................... 22 Family Day Care Homes ............................................................................. 22 Child Care Centers and Adult Care Centers ................................................ 22 NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAMS ................................. 23 Breakfast .................................................................................................... 23 Lunch .......................................................................................................... 23 Snacks ........................................................................................................ 23 SIMPLIFIED SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM ................................................................ 24 SEAMLESS SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM ................................................................. 24

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAMS HISTORY The National School Lunch Act, signed by President Harry S. Truman, permanently authorized the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in 1946. Three reasons prompted this legislation: (1) there were many young men found to be malnourished during physical examinations for the military service; (2) there was a need for an outlet for agricultural commodities produced by flourishing farms after World War II; and (3) lunch was needed at school for learning to take place. In 1962, funds for free and reduced-price lunches were first authorized for schools and in 1970 uniform national income eligibility guidelines for free and reduced-price meals were authorized. The School Breakfast Program (SBP) was first established under the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 as a pilot project. First consideration was to have the program for schools in poor areas and in areas where children had to travel a long distance to school. In 1971, eligibility for free and reduced-price breakfasts was established using the same income eligibility guidelines as the school lunch program. In 1975, the School Breakfast Program became a permanent program. The Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-336) was signed and allowed snacks to be claimed for reimbursement by schools operating afterschool care programs for children up to 18 years and children with disabilities. To be eligible for the afterschool snack program, children must be in care for education or enrichment purposes. Afterschool care programs that operate in areas served by a school in which at least 50 percent of the children enrolled in school are eligible for free and reduced-price meals may claim snacks for reimbursement at the free rate. Schools in other areas may also participate in the afterschool snack program; however, reimbursement depends on the eligibility category for each child who participates in the afterschool program and receives a snack.

HIGHLIGHTS The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) are designed to promote the health and well-being of children by providing nutritious meals to children in public and private schools and residential child care institutions (RCCIs). The income eligibility guidelines for school meals are intended to direct benefits to those children most in need. These guidelines are based on the federal income poverty guidelines and are revised annually. The eligibility 1

criterion is 130 percent of the income poverty guidelines for free and 185 percent for reduced-price meals. There are currently 373 local education agencies (LEAs) in Washington State that participate in the NSLP/SBP which includes 281 public school districts, 45 private schools, and 47 RCCIs. LEAs participating in the NSLP are required to provide meals that contain onethird of the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for protein, calcium, iron, vitamin A, vitamin C, and with no more than 30 percent of calories from fat and less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fat. LEAs participating in the SBP are required to offer one-fourth of the RDAs for the same nutrients.

WASHINGTON STATE PUBLIC SCHOOL SBP/NSLP STATISTICS FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2011–12 SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM Districts on School Breakfast Program Districts not on School Breakfast Program

271 24

Schools/sites on School Breakfast Program Schools/sites not on School Breakfast Program Average Daily Participation, October 2011

1,851 144 174,468

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM Districts on National School Lunch Program Districts not on National School Lunch Program

281 14

Schools/sites on National School Lunch Program Schools/sites not on National School Lunch Program Average Daily Participation, October 2011 Enrollment of Districts on NSLP/SBP Enrollment of Districts not on NSLP/SBP

1,977 18 509,919 *1,025,959 692

*Based on October 2011 enrollment figures reported to Child Nutrition Services

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NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM EXPENDITURES School Average Food Labor Supplies Other Indirect Year Cost/Meal 2004–05 $117,908,682 $131,020,671 $14,385,007 $10,000,123 $37,367,283 $2.69 2005–06 $120,076,450 $137,725,732 $14,772,879

$9,328,905

$39,159,192

$2.79

2006–07 $126,459,676 $146,880,347 $14,887,228 $10,256,588 $26,130,413

$2.79

2007–08 $138,164,523 $153,698,489 $15,830,101 $10,306,778 $32,349,306

$2.99

2008–09 $139,402,536 $161,421,748 $15,409,893 $11,034,023 $33,276,706

$3.07

2009–10 $137,961,293 $158,661,873 $16,644,736 $15,733,295 $30,076,006

$3.00

2010–11 $144,230,847 $164,411,809 $16,634,382 $12,545,645 $29,150,045

$3.06

SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM AVERAGE BREAKFAST SELLING PRICE School Year Elementary Middle/Junior High High School 2005–06 $0.99 $1.08 $1.09 2006–07 $1.08 $1.18 $1.21 2007–08 $0.97 $1.02 $1.13 2008–09 $1.10 $1.17 $1.12 2009–10 $1.13 $1.20 $1.14 2010–11 $1.13 $1.20 $1.16 2011–12 $1.35 $1.49 $1.50

Reduced-price $0.27 $0.00** $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

Adult $1.69 $1.73 $1.67 $1.81 $1.86 $1.87 $2.08

* Some sponsors do not charge reduced-price eligible students for their meals, resulting in the average selling price becoming less than the maximum allowed. ** Beginning school year 2006–07, the Washington State Legislature appropriated funds to subsidize the charge for reduced-price breakfast.

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM AVERAGE LUNCH SELLING PRICE School Year Elementary Middle/Junior High High School 2005–06 $1.65 $1.89 $1.90 2006–07 $1.77 $2.04 $2.11 2007–08 $1.84 $2.11 $2.17 2008–09 $1.92 $2.10 $2.00 2009–10 $1.95 $2.14 $2.03 2010–11 $1.93 $2.13 $2.03 2011–12 $2.21 $2.50 $2.57

Reduced-price $0.38 $0.40 $0.39** $0.37 $0.37 $0.36 $0.36

Adult $2.83 $2.94 $3.03 $3.23 $3.29 $3.33 $3.46

* Some sponsors do not charge reduced-price eligible students for their meals, resulting in the average selling price becoming less than the maximum allowed. ** Beginning school year 2007–08, Washington State Legislature appropriated funds to subsidize the charge for reduced-price lunch for students in K–3.

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OCTOBER PUBLIC SCHOOL FREE AND REDUCED-PRICE LUNCH APPLICATIONS SUMMARY BY SCHOOL YEAR School Year 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12

October K-12 Number of Free and Enrollment Reduced-Price Students 1,012,765 1,013,361 1,016,509 1,012,864 1,024,722 1,027,338 1,025,959

384,088 380,129 388,227 400,760 433,017 452,076 467,279

% of Students Eligible For Free and Reduced-Price Meals Applications 37.9% 37.5% 38.2% 39.5% 42.3% 44.0% 45.0%

NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM STUDENT ELIGIBILITY SUMMARY FOR OCTOBER 2011 Free ≤ 130% of poverty guidelines Reduced-price ≤ 185% of poverty guidelines Above-scale (paid) > 185%

Reducedprice 73,888 7%

Free 393,391 38%

Paid 558,680 55%

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SCHOOL DISTRICTS OPERATING FEDERAL BREAKFAST AND LUNCH PROGRAMS BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 Congressional District 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TOTAL

Total Revenue

Total Expenditure

$25,861,174 $44,953,333 $40,988,001 $61,621,944 $39,681,296 $42,499,974 $13,414,121 $32,405,957 $47,294,626 $348,720,427

$27,177,047 $48,469,148 $43,399,363 $64,379,203 $45,266,501 $45,273,207 $13,524,627 $32,676,431 $46,782,140 $366,947,666

Revenue Less Expenditure $(1,315,873) $(3,515,815) $(2,411,362) $(2,757,259) $(5,585,204) $(2,773,232) $(110,506) $(270,474) $512,486 $(18,227,240)

PUBLIC SCHOOL BREAKFAST PARTICIPATION TOTAL BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 Congressional District

Enrollment

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TOTAL

93,100 145,023 126,874 150,989 109,491 110,137 48,581 105,422 137,721 1,027,338

Total Meals - Free, Reduced-Price & Paid 1,278,808 3,406,247 3,451,139 6,024,963 3,684,916 4,665,334 1,283,645 1,447,361 3,761,403 29,003,816

Average Daily Participation (ADP) 7,104 18,924 19,173 33,472 20,472 25,919 7,131 8,041 20,897 161,132

PUBLIC SCHOOL NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PARTICIPATION TOTAL BY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 Congressional District

Enrollment

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TOTAL

93,100 145,023 126,874 150,989 109,491 110,137 48,581 105,422 137,721 1,027,338

Total Meals—Free, Reduced-price & Paid 6,296,332 11,205,789 10,890,903 16,191,218 10,481,931 10,544,397 3,433,226 7,590,985 11,957,522 88,592,303

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Average Daily Participation (ADP) 34,980 62,254 60,505 89,951 58,233 58,580 19,073 42,172 66,431 492,179

2010–11 PUBLIC SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM PARTICIPATION County Adams Asotin Benton Chelan Clallam Clark Columbia Cowlitz Douglas Ferry Franklin Garfield Grant Grays Harbor Island Jefferson King Kitsap Kittitas Klickitat Lewis Lincoln Mason Okanogan Pacific Pend Oreille Pierce San Juan Skagit Skamania Snohomish Spokane Stevens Thurston Wahkiakum Walla Walla Whatcom Whitman Yakima Totals

Enrollment 4,435 3,139 32,896 12,908 8,539 75,397 481 17,207 6,837 939 17,504 321 18,888 11,074 8,779 2,753 258,074 37,014 5,105 2,956 11,915 2,150 8,448 6,654 2,807 1,700 127,275 1,600 19,304 1,125 108,880 73,656 5,479 38,979 468 8,938 26,582 4,614 51,518 1,027,338

* Average Daily Participation

Free 207,973 85,356 697,475 340,444 290,389 1,226,093 11,362 452,981 223,842 40,772 633,850 4,007 656,043 357,907 84,852 59,421 3,935,636 577,267 94,832 71,113 370,161 37,589 230,771 205,319 98,263 68,319 2,972,011 24,572 495,030 35,782 1,598,403 1,578,235 211,520 613,852 14,302 287,417 565,664 73,562 2,036,434 21,568,821

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Reduced-price 34,845 13,620 88,221 45,233 56,837 213,545 541 51,233 31,843 6,356 65,255 2,019 88,213 43,204 33,606 13,585 682,557 147,461 13,686 10,508 52,337 8,619 34,408 27,981 17,857 9,417 521,830 8,389 69,480 6,880 302,968 278,180 32,468 123,360 1,726 45,539 102,106 16,929 204,867 3,507,709

Paid 24,108 14,061 99,206 32,984 130,436 323,417 681 76,127 36,364 11,065 54,552 1,804 88,212 55,059 23,574 13,702 646,094 180,314 17,258 15,691 56,104 14,020 42,384 32,543 20,544 16,805 514,572 12,763 84,774 13,217 315,889 346,676 36,198 195,455 2,428 34,595 82,979 31,231 229,400 3,927,286

ADP* 1,483 628 4,916 2,326 2,654 9,795 70 3,224 1,622 323 4,187 44 4,625 2,534 789 482 29,246 5,028 699 541 2,659 335 1,709 1,477 759 525 22,269 254 3,607 310 12,318 12,239 1,557 5,181 103 2,042 4,171 676 13,726 161,132

2010–11 PUBLIC SCHOOL NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM PARTICIPATION County Adams Asotin Benton Chelan Clallam Clark Columbia Cowlitz Douglas Ferry Franklin Garfield Grant Grays Harbor Island Jefferson King Kitsap Kittitas Klickitat Lewis Lincoln Mason Okanogan Pacific Pend Oreille Pierce San Juan Skagit Skamania Snohomish Spokane Stevens Thurston Wahkiakum Walla Walla Whatcom Whitman Yakima Totals

Enrollment 4,435 3,139 32,896 12,908 8,539 75,397 481 17,207 6,837 939 17,504 321 18,888 11,074 8,779 2,753 258,074 37,014 5,105 2,956 11,915 2,150 8,448 6,654 2,807 1,700 127,275 1,600 19,304 1,125 108,880 73,656 5,479 38,979 468 8,938 26,582 4,614 51,518 1,027,338

Free Reduced-price 386,936 78,888 173,060 33,695 1,595,580 264,765 870,498 120,149 450,769 90,182 3,278,150 637,665 24,328 2,194 950,716 123,636 483,728 79,385 66,079 9,887 1,374,938 169,720 14,735 5,823 1,534,153 222,379 753,191 109,481 271,396 107,470 119,396 26,839 9,851,728 2,165,090 1,286,704 344,731 202,429 30,130 167,010 29,085 734,606 111,594 93,558 27,167 473,884 77,998 439,037 81,841 188,054 36,778 103,755 16,413 6,154,036 1,243,522 48,141 15,323 1,112,071 165,790 62,948 13,072 3,960,495 852,573 3,608,427 791,852 362,680 64,092 1,460,350 337,889 26,923 3,434 581,171 93,720 1,184,694 239,727 149,239 39,894 4,556,193 569,997 49,155,786 9,433,870

* Average Daily Participation

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Paid 107,108 94,870 929,798 336,845 239,136 2,347,023 14,918 479,141 186,656 29,970 322,721 18,187 443,744 321,682 278,990 67,330 8,026,114 1,345,646 126,583 85,708 288,916 98,300 172,301 150,808 90,292 47,293 3,386,642 50,398 451,948 49,502 2,992,430 2,472,738 121,573 1,527,921 11,747 219,421 656,691 240,846 1,170,710 30,002,647

ADP* 3,183 1,676 15,501 7,375 4,334 34,794 230 8,631 4,165 589 10,374 215 12,224 6,580 3,655 1,186 111,350 16,539 1,995 1,566 6,306 1,217 4,023 3,732 1,751 930 59,912 633 9,610 697 43,364 38,183 3,046 18,479 234 4,968 11,562 2,389 34,983 492,179

STATE SUPPORT FOR REDUCED-PRICE MEALS For school year 2010–11, Washington State funded the 30 cent co-pay for reduced-price breakfasts served in public schools. The number of breakfasts and funding spent was: Number of Breakfasts: Dollar Amount:

3,507,709 $1,052,313

For school year 2010–11, Washington State funded the 40 cent co-pay for reduced-price lunches served in public schools for children in kindergarten through third grade. The number of lunches and funding spent was: Number of Lunches: Dollar Amount:

3,083,899 $1,233,560

Public School Food Service Revenue for School Year 2010–11 Federal 62.5% Local Sales 30.6% Federal Local Sales State State 1.9% Local Levy 5.0%

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Local Levy

STATUS OF SCHOOL MEAL PROGRAMS TOTAL CHANGES FROM SCHOOL YEAR 2009–10 TO SCHOOL YEAR 2010–11 Paid Lunch Meals

Free Lunch Meals

Reduced by 1,662,050

Increased by 2,552,064

Reduced-price Lunch Meals Decreased by 457,171

Total Additional Lunches Served 442,843

Changes in Eligibility Status from October 2010 to October 2011 2010

700,000

2011 575,777 558,680

600,000 500,000 400,000

373,015 393,391

300,000 200,000 78,546 73,888

100,000 0 FREE

REDUCED-PRICE

PAID

CHANGES IN ELIGIBILITY STATUS Category FREE REDUCED-PRICE PAID TOTAL

October 10 373,015 78,546 575,777 1,027,338

October 11 Change 393,391 20,376 73,888 -4,658 558,680 -17,097 1,025,959 -1,379

% Increase/Decrease 5.5% -5.9% -3.0% -0.1%

EFFECTS OF DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES •



The number of students eligible for reduced-price meal benefits has decreased from 78,546 in school year 2010–11 to 73,888 in school year 2011–12. The number of students eligible for free meal benefits has increased from 373,015 in school year 2010–11 to 393,391 in school year 2011–12. 9

POSSIBLE CAUSES FOR CHANGES •

• •

The state increased eligibility for Basic Food benefits from 130% of poverty to 200% of poverty in October 2008. This allows previously reduced-price eligible students to be categorically eligible for free meal benefits if the families applied for and were approved for Basic Food benefits; thus numbers of eligible students in the free category continue to increase while the numbers of students in the reduced-price category decrease. The state’s unemployment rate has increased dramatically over the two years, which leads to more households becoming eligible for USDA Child Nutrition Program’s free and reduced-price meal benefits. Layoffs have led to a number of wage earners turning to lower paying jobs, which increases the number of students eligible for USDA Child Nutrition Program’s free and reduced-price meal benefits.

WASHINGTON STATE USDA FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAMS HISTORY The Food Distribution Program began in the early 1930s as an outgrowth of federal agriculture policies designed to shore up farm prices and help American farmers suffering from the economic upheaval of the Great Depression. Many individual farmers lost their farms, while the total amount of farmland increased. Farmers planted more acreage to try to make up for poor prices – thus further depressing prices by increasing surpluses in a time of falling demand. At the same time, millions of people in the cities lost their jobs and were without means of support for themselves and their families. The danger of malnutrition among children became a national concern. For the full legislative history of food distribution programs visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/fdd/aboutfd/fd_history.pdf.

HIGHLIGHTS Public and private schools, residential child care institutions, and approved state agencies that participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are eligible to receive food purchased by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In 2011, USDA foods valued at over $24 million and totaling over 21 million pounds were allocated. Each month schools are in session, approximately two million pounds of USDA foods are distributed by the USDA Food Distribution section of Child Nutrition Services. In 2011–12, 348 agencies were allocated USDA foods at the rate of 22.25 cents for each lunch served. They are able to select from a variety of dry, canned, frozen, and fresh foods up to nine times during the year. These USDA foods 10

represent 20–25 percent of the value of all foods purchased for the school lunch program. In cooperation with the Department of Defense, 47 agencies were allocated $1.35 million of USDA entitlement funds for the purchase of fresh fruit and vegetables. Food Distribution is funded through USDA State Administrative Expense (SAE) funds and a state-administered revolving fund. Agencies are charged a fee to cover storage, handling, and shipping of USDA foods. They also reimburse the state account for processing costs paid to USDA processors who manufacture over 40 specific food items for the NSLP. Effective July 1, 2009, OSPI Child Nutrition Services was given the authority to establish a statewide purchasing cooperative for all public and private schools and eligible agencies in Washington. The Child Nutrition Purchasing Co-op (CNPC) bids, orders, and delivers food and supplies to preapproved storage, distribution, or school district locations. As of November 2011 there were 33 member districts representing nearly 30 million total lunches served per year. CNPC Purpose: •

Eliminate the administrative burden on the school districts and agencies by writing specifications and advertising for formal invitations for bids (IFB). This will include formal quotes (RFQ) or informal quotes with all procurement following federal and state requirements.



Ensure that product specifications are written in order to guarantee nutritional integrity, maximum competition, and provide a variety of food and supply products utilized in Child Nutrition Programs.



Reduce the cost of food and other supplies through volume purchasing directly from manufacturers to improve the financial health of all school districts, agencies, and distributors.

Simplified Summer Food Program (SSFP) sponsors also receive USDA foods based on 1.5 cents for each eligible meal served. Some Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) institutions receive cash-inlieu for USDA foods.

SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM/SIMPLIFIED SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM HISTORY The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) was established in 1968 as part of the pilot program along with the Child Care Food Program. The intention was to provide meals to children in areas where poor economic conditions existed 11

or where there were high concentrations of working mothers. In 1975, the SFSP was formally established as a separate program. In 1981, the Omnibus Reconciliation Bill set the eligibility requirements at higher levels than in previous years. Area eligibility required 50 percent or more of the children in the area to be from families at or below 185 percent of the poverty level. The SFSP is one of the most needed, yet underutilized federal child nutrition programs. Although 20.6 million eligible children received free or reducedprice school meals during the 2009–2010 school year, only 2.3 million children received meals through the SFSP. There are many hungry children that we still need to reach with this program. Sponsors must apply to operate a SFSP. Once approved, sponsors operate sites in low-income areas and may feed children age 18 and younger. Sponsors may serve a maximum of two meals per day, which includes snacks as a meal choice. In the summer of 2006, Washington State began operating the Simplified Summer Food Program (SSFP), formally known as the Lugar Pilot. This program reduced the paperwork burden placed on sponsors and ensured them the maximum reimbursement (meals served multiplied by rates).

HIGHLIGHTS The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction assumed the administration of the SFSP in Washington State in 1989. The first year, 22 organizations and one school district sponsored the program. During the last 22 years, the number of sponsors, feeding sites and children participating has fluctuated— especially since 2002 when school districts received the option of operating the Seamless Summer Feeding Program instead of the SFSP. Participation fluctuated again in 2006 when Washington State switched from offering the SFSP to the Simplified Summer Food Program. For the summer of 2011, meals were served to children in 29 of the 39 counties, with a total of 736 sites. A daily average of 39,587children was served.

2011 SIMPLIFIED SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM PARTICIPATION School Districts/Private Schools Private Nonprofit Organizations Indian Tribes City and County Governments Colleges/Universities and Upward Bound Programs Residential Camps TOTAL

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72 32 3 8 3 4 122

SEAMLESS SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM HISTORY The Seamless Summer Feeding Program (SP) began as a pilot program in California and Florida. The SP was expanded to all states in 2002 and was set to terminate following the summer of 2004. However, in early 2004, the program became a permanent option for local education agencies (LEAs) to use in operation of a summer feeding program. The SP combines features of the NSLP, SBP, and the SSFP. The purpose of the SP is to reduce the administrative burden and paperwork requirements placed on schools to operate a summer food program. LEAs must apply to operate the program. Once approved, sponsors operate feeding sites in low-income areas and may feed children 18 years and younger. Meals are reimbursed at the free NSLP/SBP rates. Meal sites may be in school and non-school settings such as community centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, and YMCAs. It is important to note that schools operating an academic summer school and feeding only those children enrolled in the summer school program must extend their NSLP/SBP agreement instead of operating under the SP. A maximum of two meals per day may be served, which includes snacks as a meal choice. Sponsorship of the SP decreased in 2007, as Washington State was approved to operate under the “simplified” rules of the SSFP. LEAs were encouraged to switch from the SP back to the SSFP, as the SSFP decreased the administrative burdens associated with the program and reimbursement rates are higher under the SSFP than the SP.

HIGHLIGHTS The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction administers the program at the state level. For the summer of 2011, there were 31 school districts/private schools participating with 56 meal service sites throughout the state. Meal service averaged 2,673 children each day in 22 of the 39 counties. Training is offered annually to school personnel in March/April. Although training is not mandatory, attendance is highly recommended to help sponsors plan, operate, and monitor a successful program.

SPECIAL MILK PROGRAM/SUMMER SPECIAL MILK PROGRAM The Special Milk Program (SMP) was established in 1955 to increase the consumption of fluid milk for children in nonprofit schools. In 1966, the SMP was incorporated into the Child Nutrition Act. In 1981, legislation was enacted 13

that limited participation in the milk program to schools and institutions not participating in other child nutrition programs. Participation was restored to schools on the NSLP/SBP with split session kindergarten in which children do not have access to meal service. The SMP provides reimbursement for milk served to children in schools, child care institutions, afterschool programs, or summer camps that do not participate in other Child Nutrition Programs. Children from families that qualify for free milk may receive milk at no cost if this program option is chosen by the sponsor. There are currently 59 SMP sponsors. This includes 2 public school districts, 38 private schools, and 5 nonresidential child care institutions, and 14 summer camps.

FRESH FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PROGRAM HISTORY The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program initially began as a pilot project authorized by Congress in 2002. The pilot provided funds to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables in four states and an Indian Tribal Organization (ITO) for school year 2002–03. The success of the pilot led to the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 to expand the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) to four additional states and to make it a permanent program under the National School Lunch Act. The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 expanded the FFVP nationwide and provided approximately $9.9 million to begin program operations for school year 2008–09. The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (also known as the Farm Bill) amended the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act by adding section 19, the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program. Section 19 permanently authorized the program nationwide, consolidated all prior operations under section 19, and provided a significant funding increase, beginning with $40 million in FY 2009.

HIGHLIGHTS The FFVP is intended to provide all students in participating schools with a variety of free fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the school day. It is an effective and creative way of introducing fresh fruit and vegetables as healthy snack options. The FFVP also encourages community partnerships to support schools when they offer free fruit and vegetables to students during the school day.

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The goals of the FFVP are to: • • • •

Create healthier school environments by providing healthier food choices. Expand the variety of fruit and vegetables children experience. Increase student’s fruit and vegetable consumption. Make a difference in student’s diets to impact their present and future health.

This program is seen as an important catalyst for change in the efforts to combat childhood obesity by helping students learn more healthful eating habits. The FFVP introduces students to a variety of produce that they might not otherwise have the opportunity to sample. Not all schools are eligible to participate in the FFVP. Elementary schools participating on the NSLP with a free and reduced-price eligibility percentage of 50 percent and greater based on October building data are encouraged to apply for participation. Outreach is conducted annually in March/April to encourage eligible schools to submit applications. Schools with the highest free and reduced-price percentages are then awarded the FFVP for the following school year. Awards are determined based on total enrollment and can be no less than $50 per student and no more than $75 per student. Single school LEAs with 200 or less students have historically received the maximum per student allocation while all other schools have received a per student allocation based on enrollment vs. remaining funding. Participation from year to year is not guaranteed as participation depends upon the number of schools that apply, their total enrollment, and the funding provided by USDA. Many schools that would receive funding had chosen not to apply for the FFVP for a variety of reasons, allowing schools with a lower free and reduced-price percentage to participate. The OSPI administers the FFVP at the state level. Historical data is shown in the following table. Note that until school year 2009-10, a maximum of 25 schools were allowed per state. School Year 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12

# of Schools 25 25 25 25 60 81 121

Enrollment 8,570 9,304 8,605 12,285 22,295 35,126 54,468

Total Funding Amount $708,754 $1,028,273 $935,205 $938,647 $1,389,532 $2,123,256 $3,129,843

A detailed historical funding history of the FFVP in Washington State can be found at http://www.k12.wa.us/ChildNutrition/programs/FFVP/Awards.aspx.

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2011-12 FRESH FRUIT & VEGETABLE PROGRAM RECIPIENTS Local Education Agency (LEA) Aberdeen Auburn Bellingham Bremerton Brewster Bridgeport Clarkston East Valley (Spokane) Everett

School(s) within LEA Stevens Elementary Gildo Rey Elementary Pioneer Elementary Alderwood Elementary West Hills Elementary Brewster Elementary Bridgeport Elementary Grantham Elementary Highland Elementary Trent Elementary

Garfield Elementary Hawthorne Elementary Ferndale Central Elementary First Place First Place Franklin Christensen Elementary Pierce Harvard Elementary James Sales Elementary Grandview Harriet Thompson Primary McClure School Smith Elementary Granger Roosevelt Elementary Greater Trinity Greater Trinity Christian Learning Academy Highland Marcus Whitman Elementary Tieton Middle Highline Beverly Park Elementary Hilltop Elementary Madrona Elementary Midway Intermediate Mount View Elementary Seahurst Elementary Southern Heights Elementary White Center Heights Bow Lake Elementary Kelso Wallace Elementary Kent Daniel Elementary Scenic Hill Elementary Longview Kessler Elementary St. Helens Elementary Loon Lake Loon Lake Elementary Mabton Artz-Fox Elementary

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Enrollment

FFVP Funding

497 447 507 373 339 537 392 258 366 560

$28,388.64 $25,532.64 $28,959.84 $21,305.76 $19,363.68 $30,673.44 $22,391.04 $14,736.96 $20,905.92 $31,987.20

367 573 344 48 413 412 398 624 658 629 609 32

$20,963.04 $32,729.76 $19,649.28 $3,600.00 $23,590.56 $23,533.44 $22,733.76 $35,642.88 $37,584.96 $35,928.48 $34,786.08 $2,400.00

356 260 523 601 590 539 589 530 321 543 644 351 438 582 316 369 138 552

$20,334.72 $14,851.20 $29,873.76 $34,329.12 $33,700.80 $30,787.68 $33,643.68 $30,273.60 $18,335.52 $31,016.16 $36,785.28 $20,049.12 $25,018.56 $33,243.84 $18,049.92 $21,077.28 $10,350.00 $31,530.24

Local Education Agency (LEA) Manson Mary Walker Moses Lake Mt. Vernon Northport Oakville Ocean Beach Onion Creek Othello Pasco

Prescott Queets Clearwater Quincy

Seattle

Shelton Spokane

School(s) within LEA

Enrollment

FFVP Funding

Manson Elementary Springdale Elementary Larson Heights Elementary North Elementary Centennial Elementary Northport Elementary/Junior High Oakville Elementary Ocean Park Elementary Onion Creek School Hiawatha Elementary Lutacaga Elementary Scootney Elementary Captain Gray Elementary Emerson Elementary Longfellow Elementary Robert Frost Elementary Rowena Chess Elementary Virgie Robinson Elementary Whittier Elementary Prescott Elementary Queets Clearwater Elementary

378 157 379 373 621 94 135 227 52 612 636 671 557 540 525 556 599 765 691 106 24

$21,591.36 $11,775.00 $21,648.48 $21,305.76 $35,471.52 $7,050.00 $7,711.20 $17,025.00 $3,900.00 $34,957.44 $36,328.32 $38,327.52 $31,815.84 $30,844.80 $29,988.00 $31,758.72 $34,214.88 $43,696.80 $39,469.92 $7,950.00 $1,370.88

George Elementary Monument Elementary Mountain View Elementary Pioneer Elementary Bailey Gatzert Elementary Concord Elementary Dearborn Park Elementary Dunlap Elementary Emerson Elementary Hawthorne Elementary Highland Park Elementary Madrona School Martin Luther King Jr. Northgate Elementary Roxhill Elementary Van Asselt Elementary West Seattle Elementary Wing Luke Elementary Evergreen Elementary Bemiss Elementary Grant Elementary Holmes Elementary Ligerwood Elementary

130 619 345 355 364 372 356 444 380 294 423 357 371 262 352 550 384 359 539 511 407 388 372

$7,425.60 $35,357.28 $19,706.40 $20,277.60 $20,791.68 $21,248.64 $20,334.72 $25,361.28 $21,705.60 $16,793.28 $24,161.76 $20,391.84 $21,191.52 $14,965.44 $20,106.24 $31,416.00 $21,934.08 $20,506.08 $30,787.68 $29,188.32 $23,247.84 $22,162.56 $21,248.64

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Local Education Agency (LEA) Spokane (continued)

Sunnyside

Toppenish

Tukwila Union Gap Vancouver

Wapato Warden Wellpinit Yakima

School(s) within LEA Logan Elementary Longfellow Elementary Regal Elementary Sheridan Elementary Stevens Elementary Whitman Elementary Chief Kamiakin Elementary Outlook Elementary Pioneer Elementary Sun Valley Elementary Washington Elementary Garfield Elementary Kirkwood Elementary Lincoln Elementary Valley View Elementary Cascade Elementary Thorndyke Elementary Union Gap School Fruit Valley Elementary Martin Luther King Elementary Peter S. Ogden Elementary Washington Elementary Adams Elementary Camas Elementary Satus Elementary Warden Elementary Wellpinit Elementary Adams Elementary Barge-Lincoln Elementary Garfield Elementary Hoover Elementary M.L. King Elementary McClure Elementary McKinley Elementary Ridgeview Elementary Robertson Elementary Roosevelt Elementary

TOTALS

Enrollment

FFVP Funding

502 $28,674.24 520 $29,702.40 $27,874.56 488 496 $28,331.52 $30,673.44 537 551 $31,473.12 663 $37,870.56 549 $31,358.88 689 $39,355.68 579 $33,072.48 630 $35,985.60 399 $22,790.88 504 $28,788.48 427 $24,390.24 433 $24,732.96 474 $27,074.88 446 $25,475.52 586 $33,472.32 248 $14,165.76 487 $27,817.44 498 $28,445.76 370 $21,134.40 418 $23,876.16 655 $37,413.60 662 $37,813.44 462 $26,389.44 188 $14,100.00 699 $39,926.88 652 $37,242.24 573 $32,729.76 626 $35,757.12 567 $32,387.04 593 $33,872.16 455 $25,989.60 529 $30,216.48 523 $29,873.76 533 $30,444.96 54,468 $3,129,843.12

All LEAs with only one school participating with 200 students or less received $75 per student for the year. All other schools received $57.12 per student.

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CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM HISTORY In 1968, the Special Food Service Program for Children (SFPFC), the predecessor to the Child Care Food Program and the Summer Food Service Program, was established. This pilot program was operated by day care centers where poor economic conditions existed or where there were high concentrations of working mothers. In 1975, the Child Care and Summer Food Service components of the SFPFC were separated. The Child Care Food Program was permanently established in 1978. Eligibility was expanded to include before and after-school care and any licensed public or private nonprofit organization providing nonresidential child care. It specifically included family day care homes and the Head Start Program. In 1989, adult day care centers providing meals to eligible enrolled individuals began participating and the program’s name was changed to the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-193) mandated several changes to the CACFP, including the reimbursement structure for family day care homes and a reduction in the number of meals that child care centers could claim for reimbursement. The Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998 allowed emergency shelters that serve homeless children and their families to participate and authorized reimbursement for snacks served in at-risk centers. The Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 2004 expanded for-profit (proprietary) centers’ eligibility if at least 25 percent of the children in care (enrolled or license capacity, whichever is less) are eligible for free or reducedprice meals. They may also participate if they receive compensation under Title XX for at least 25 percent of their licensed or enrolled capacity, whichever is less. Eligible participants include infants and children through the age of 12, children of migrant workers 15 years and under, children 18 years and under in emergency shelters or in at-risk programs, mentally or physically disabled persons as defined by the state, and adults 60 years and older.

HIGHLIGHTS The CACFP provides federal funds to nonresidential child and adult care facilities to serve nutritious meals and snacks. The goal of the CACFP is to improve and maintain the health and nutritional status of children and adults in care while promoting the development of good eating habits. 19

Eligible programs include nonresidential, licensed public or private, nonprofit child care centers or family day care homes. Head Start, Early Childhood Educational Assistance Program (ECEAP), outside-school-hours programs, homeless shelters, and at-risk centers meeting the CACFP requirements are also eligible. Proprietary child care and adult care centers may participate if at least 25 percent of the participants in care (enrolled or license capacity, whichever is less) are eligible for free or reduced-price meals. Eligibility based on compensation under Title XX is not an option in Washington. Certain adult care centers providing services to persons 60 years or older, or persons 18 years or older that are chronically-impaired or disabled, are also eligible. Reimbursement rates for child and adult care centers are based on family income eligibility. Homeless shelters and at-risk centers are reimbursed at the free rate. Reimbursement rates for family day care home providers are offered on a twotiered structure determined by economic need based on the location of the day care home, the income of the day care provider, or the income of an individual child’s household. The CACFP reaches children and adults in 39 counties. The number of child care center sites, as well as the number of children participating in the CACFP continues to increase, especially among the for-profit centers. The number of family day care homes has steadily decreased since 1997.

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CACFP PARTICIPATION FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011 Independent centers have only one site. Sponsors have two or more sites. CACFP institutions are further divided according to the population they serve. Some institutions serve multiple populations. The following chart shows the number of sites approved to serve each program type. The following is a breakdown of the types of institutions in fiscal year 2011 that participated in the CACFP.

PROGRAM TYPES Institution Type Independent Centers Adult Care Sponsors Center Sponsors

Number of Institutions 410 12 164

Sites Sponsored 410 17 838

Subtotals Family Day Care Home Sponsors

586 12

1,265 3,158

Grand Totals

598

4,423

Institution Type

Number of Sites

Adult Care Centers Child Care Centers Head Starts Outside School Hours Care ECEAP At-Risk Afterschool Care Centers Emergency Shelters

17 884 298 165 175 169 7

Family day care home sponsors provided services to more than 3,100 day care home providers. Some centers serve multiple programs. For example, a child care center might also have a Head Start program and an at-risk snack program. The at-risk afterschool care center provides non-residential care to children afterschool through an approved afterschool program located in an eligible area. An emergency shelter provides temporary shelter and food services to homeless children.

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CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS AVERAGE DAILY PARTICIPATION AND PERCENT OF CHANGE BY FISCAL YEAR CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM FAMILY DAY CARE HOMES # of Meals Sites Operating Year Served Number % of Change Sept. 2005 Sept. 2006 Sept. 2007 Sept. 2008 Sept. 2009 Sept. 2010 Sept. 2011

1,350,325 1,224,917 1,110,850 1,183,126 1,090,438 1,034,466 889,229

3,709 3,455 3,221 3,211 3,109 2,929 2,598

-9% -7% -7% 0% -3% -6% -13%

Number

ADP* % of Change

27,308 24,910 24,700 20,622 19,019 18,277 15,783

-2% -10% -1% -20% -8% -4% -16%

CHILD CARE CENTERS AND ADULT CARE CENTERS # of Meals Sites Operating ADP* Year Served Number % of Change Number % of Change Sept. 2005 Sept. 2006 Sept. 2007 Sept. 2008 Sept. 2009 Sept. 2010 Sept. 2011

1,748,947 1,734,922 1,728,169 1,983,543 1,964,841 2,055,708 1,951,691

1,096 1,099 1,117 1,152 1,222 1,228 1,313

7% 0% 2% 3% -6% 0% 6%

45,415 49,446 51,394 52,746 49,515 51,629 52,842

-9% 8% 4% 3% -7% 4% 2%

* Average Daily Participation % of Change: Current year ADP data for the month of September compared to September ADP data from the previous year.

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CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS AVERAGE DAILY PARTICIPATION AND PERCENT OF CHANGE BY FISCAL YEAR NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAMS Public Schools, Private Schools, and Residential Child Care Institutions

BREAKFAST Year

Oct. 2005 Oct. 2006 Oct. 2007 Oct. 2008 Oct. 2009 Oct. 2010 Oct. 2011

LUNCH

Meals

2,734,284 3,125,231 3,314,491 3,483,567 3,379,699 3,406,760 3,556,336

Year

Meals

Oct. 2005 Oct. 2006 Oct. 2007 Oct. 2008 Oct. 2009 Oct. 2010 Oct. 2011

9,745,458 10,410,842 10,866,308 10,875,724 10,419,183 10,255,823 10,339,808

SNACKS Year

Oct. 2005 Oct. 2006 Oct. 2007 Oct. 2008 Oct. 2009 Oct. 2010 Oct. 2011

Meals 182,881 197,856 194,296 179,713 164,786 225,086 227,066

ADP*

Average Days of Service

136,735 148,143 151,668 160,026 161,998 169,253 174,468 ADP*

20.00 21.10 21.85 21.77 20.86 20.13 20.38 Average Days of Service

488,214 495,417 498,470 500,921 497,189 510,152 509,919 ADP*

19.96 21.01 21.80 21.71 20.96 20.10 20.28 Average Days of Service

9,791 10,187 9,766 9,139 8,805 12,080 12,233

18.68 19.42 19.90 19.66 18.72 18.63 18.56

% of Change 4% 14% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% % of Change 2% 1% 1% 1% -1% 1% 1% % of Change 6% -2% -1% -1% -1% 25% 1%

* Average Daily Participation % of Change: Current year ADP data for the month of October compared to October ADP data from the previous year.

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CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS AVERAGE DAILY PARTICIPATION AND PERCENT OF CHANGE BY FISCAL YEAR SIMPLIFIED SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM Year July 2005 July 2006 July 2007 July 2008 July 2009 July 2010 July 2011

Total Meals 660,550 811,588 847,933 924,779 864,724 761,923 797,430

Lunch Sites Number % of Change 407 584 558 562 598 596 647

-5% 43% -4% 1% 6% 0% 9%

Lunch ADP* Number % of Change 22,102 30,435 39,558 37,636 41,455 36,744 39,587

-4% 38% 30% -5% 10% -11% 8%

SEAMLESS SUMMER FEEDING PROGRAM Year July 2005 July 2006 July 2007 July 2008 July 2009 July 2010 July 2011

Total Meals 318,179 102,673 98,615 109,917 94,949 38,140 42,629

Lunch Sites Number % of Change 204 70 68 60 45 30 40

30% -66% -3% -12% -25% -33% 33%

Lunch ADP* Number % of Change 13,034 4,042 5,627 3,955 3,920 2,711 2,673

6% -69% 39% -30% -1% -31% -1%

* Average Daily Participation % of Change: Current year site and ADP data for the month of July compared to July site and ADP data from the previous year.

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In accordance with Federal Law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. If you believe you have been treated unfairly, you may file a complaint of discrimination by writing, USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll free (866) 632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Washington State OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION Child Nutrition Services Old Capitol Building 600 Washington Street SE PO BOX 47200 Olympia, WA 98504-7200

CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS

Phone: (360) 725-6200 TTY: (360) 664-3631

2012 OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

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