Washington County Employment Policies Training

Washington County Employment Policies Training Instructions Thank you for taking the time to complete this component of your RQERDUGLQJSURJUDP. • T...
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Washington County Employment Policies Training

Instructions Thank you for taking the time to complete this component of your RQERDUGLQJSURJUDP. • This training provides Washington County employees an overview

of Washington County Employment Policies. • There are two components to this training: – Read WKURXJKWKHIROORZLQJVOLGHV – 6XEPLW\RXUVLJQHG3ROLF\$FNQRZOHGJHPHQW)RUP

once you have read and understand the Employment Policies. • Email your signed form to [email protected] • Print and return your signed form to Human Resources Mailstop 11, Attn: Debbie Meyer.

If you have technical questions, email us at [email protected]

County Employment Policies • Harassment-Free Workplace • Violence in the Workplace • Prohibition of Carrying Firearms • Drug-Free Workplace • Reporting of Improper Governmental

Conduct (“Whistleblowing”)

• Family Medical Leave

www.co.washington.or.us/HRPolicies

Harassment-Free Workplace Purpose of Policy: To provide a productive work environment for all employees which is fair, civil, positive, and respectful of each person’s dignity and is free from all forms of discrimination or harassment.

HARASSMENT-FREE WORKPLACE POLICY POLICY Washington County is committed to providing a productive work environment for all employees which is fair, civil, positive, and respectful of each person’s dignity and is free from all forms of discrimination or harassment. Our goal is to provide an environment that supports employees so that they may realize their full potential. Washington County recognizes the value of diverse backgrounds, experiences, special abilities and characteristics that employees bring to the organization. It may be unlawful and/or violate the policies of the County for any employee to engage in harassment or discrimination of another employee on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, disability, age, gender, marital status, sexual orientation or any other factors addressed by state or federal law. Behaviors which inappropriately assert race, religion, color, national origin, gender, etc. as relevant to employee performance, damage the core of the public services work environment and are in direct conflict with this policy and our organizational values. “Harassment” includes unwelcome, intimidating, hostile or threatening behavior, derogatory statements, jokes, and depiction’s that are made because of a person's gender, race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, or sexual orientation. A complaint of harassment or discrimination may be made to anyone in the employee’s supervisory/management hierarchy, to Human Resources or to the County Administrator. The policy includes that once a complaint is filed; the County shall take prompt and appropriate action including investigation and take effective remedial action if warranted. To the extent possible complaints and investigations will be kept confidential. There shall be no retaliation against the complaining party, witnesses or any other person participating in the investigative process. Anyone found to have violated this policy against harassment; discrimination or retaliation shall be disciplined up to and including termination. Washington County’s harassment-free workplace policy confirms our belief in the value of all employees and a respect for the differences among people. PROCEDURES Employees with a complaint involving harassment or discrimination that is unlawful and/or violates County policy based on their protected class status (i.e. age, gender, race, etc.) may make their complaint with one of several resources including the Department of Support Services/Human Resources Division. Because of the diverse perspectives they bring to problem solving, the Human Resources Division staff is particularly skilled and experienced in hearing, advising, mediating and resolving these complaints. Additionally, employees may choose, if applicable, to use the grievance procedures outlined in Article 10 of the Washington County Personnel Rules and Regulations to file complaints including those which are not specifically related to their protected class status but which may violate County policy.

Employees are also encouraged to bring these issues to any manager or supervisor in their department’s “chain of command” if practicable. It is important that employees at all levels know and understand that they have several options available to them if they believe that they have been harassed. These include: 1. The assistance of the Human Resources Division in providing information and resources, training and direct problem solving; 2. Access, through the Human Resources Division, to the services of a third-party mediator or problem-solver, such as a manager from another area, or an outside consultant or advisor; 3. Article 10, Personnel Rules and Regulations grievance procedure; 4. Article 12.4.2 Personnel Rules & Regulations grievance procedure; 5. A full and formal investigatory process, generally filed under this Plan. Complainants are encouraged to use the County’s internal procedures to resolve issues regarding harassment or discrimination. A report of harassment must be made within one year of the disputed action, but is most effective when made as close to the time of the incident as possible. An employee is not required to complain to the alleged harasser, but may make his/her complaint, either orally or in writing, to the: 1. Department Head, Manager, or Supervisor. 2. Department of Support Services/Human Resources Division; 3. Civil Service Commission if the complaint is regarding appointments under Article 10.2 or if the complaint is regarding a violation of civil rights under Article 12.4.2 of the Personnel Rules and Regulations; 4. Employee’s Union if the position is represented by a bargaining unit or; 5. County Administrative Office. Employees may also make a complaint outside of the County through either: 1. The Civil Rights Division of the Bureau of Labor and Industries or; 2. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. When a complaint is received within a Department, documentation of the complaint (formal and informal) must be communicated to the Department of Support Services, Human Resources Division immediately. Upon receipt of the complaint, the Human Resources Division will assist the Department in determining the appropriate course of action. In some cases the Human Resources Division (and if appropriate, with assistance from outside of the organization) may be called upon to advise or conduct an investigation. Generally, the goal is to complete the inquiry within 30 days. However, factors such as the complexity of the matter, the availability of persons with information to contribute, and the need to consult with legal counsel, may affect how long the investigation process will take. Generally, a department may be responsible for any investigation activities for complaints, which represent a single offense, and constitute an apparent less serious violation (e.g., offensive remark). If the behavior indicates a pattern of offense and/or is of a more serious nature, the Human Resources Division or other resources outside of the department may be called upon to participate in or conduct an investigation.

There are several criteria for deciding who should assist with the investigation or resolution. Department Heads and the Human Resources Division will generally recommend a person(s) who meets the following criteria: 1. Is knowledgeable about what constitutes unlawful harassment 2. and/or violations of County policy; 3. Understands how allegations of harassment/discrimination can be tied legally to other causes of action; 4. Has credibility and the ability to provide decisions and recommendations that are wellgrounded and legally defensible; 5. Is perceived by those involved as objective, sensitive and open-minded; 6. Is able to put people at ease, and get them to openly discuss the situation; 7. Is someone who will be a credible witness, if the case proceeds as far as a formal charge of discrimination or legal action. The intent is for any investigation procedure to be as confidential and prompt as the complaint, the law and the investigation allow, and to provide effective remedies and protection of complainants and witnesses against retaliation. Complete confidentiality may not always be possible, since discussion of allegations and positions may be necessary during the investigatory process and these matters may become subject to some possible future legal action. Complainants, accused, and witnesses will be treated with courtesy and respect during any period of investigation or inquiry. Anyone accused of harassment or discrimination will be considered innocent until a final determination can be made regarding the allegations. The County may decide to use a third party fact finder or mediator to help resolve these issues or complaints. Depending on the specific situation, these persons may be managers from other County departments, or outside resources with expertise in the type of problem that is being alleged. The Department of Support Services/Human Resources Division will work with the County Administrator’s Office to see that: 1. Complaints are investigated in accordance with Washington County’s policies, and/or work with County departments to conduct investigations; 2. Attempts are made to resolve the complaint informally with all parties; 3. The investigation and resolution efforts are documented and maintained within the Human Resources Division; 4. Advisors and legal counsel are consulted; 5. A final determination is made. Final resolution, including avenues of appeal, if any, by an employee or the person accused of harassment, can depend upon several factors, including: 1. 2. 3. 4.

The severity of the alleged behavior; The nature of any disciplinary action recommended or taken; Whether either party is a member of a bargaining unit; Whether a candidate for appointment has appeal rights to the Civil Service Commission.

The Human Resources Division will serve as a resource in determining what appeal rights apply in each individual situation. Charles Cameron, County Administrator Date: 8-19-98

Violence in the Workplace Purpose of Policy: To provide a safe work environment for all employees and all citizens who conduct business with County employees or on County property, and to establish a process for reporting and responding to events or threats of violence.

VIOLENCE IN THE WORKPLACE POLICY PURPOSE Washington County’s Violence in the Workplace Policy is designed to provide a safe work environment for all employees and all citizens who conduct business with County employees or on County property, and to establish a process for reporting and responding to events or threats of violence. POLICY STATEMENT It is the policy of Washington County to provide a working environment that is free from violent acts or threats against a person’s life, health, well-being, family or property. Violence in the workplace may occur between one employee and another, or between any member of the public and a County employee. Such acts or threats of violence by physical acts, words, gestures or symbols are entirely unacceptable and violate the County’s policy. Every covered individual is required to report acts or threats of violence of which he/she is aware. WHO THE POLICY COVERS This policy applies to all persons involved in the County’s operation, including but not limited to County personnel, contract and temporary workers, and anyone else on County property. DEFINITION "Threats or acts of violence" include, but are not limited to, statements or conduct against persons or property that is sufficiently severe, offensive, or intimidating to alter the employment conditions at Washington County, or to create a hostile, abusive, or intimidating work environment for one or more Washington County employees, its volunteers, or any person conducting business with the County. EXAMPLES OF PROHIBITED CONDUCT Specific examples of conduct that may be considered "threats or acts of violence" and prohibited under this policy include, but are not limited to, the following:

• • • • •

Hitting, shoving or throwing an object at an individual. Acts of intimidation including threatening to harm an individual or his/her family, friends, associates, or their property. The intentional destruction or threat of destruction of property owned, operated, or controlled by Washington County. Making harassing or threatening telephone calls, letters or other form of written or electronic communications. Intimidating or attempting to coerce an employee to do wrongful acts that would affect the business interests of the County.

• • •

Harassing surveillance, also know as "stalking", the willful, malicious and acts of intimidation repeated following of another person and making a credible threat with intent to place the other person in reasonable fear of his or her safety. Making a suggestion or otherwise intimating that an act to injure persons or property is "appropriate". Unauthorized possession or inappropriate use of firearms, weapons, or any other dangerous devices on County property. While some employees of the County may be required as a condition of their work assignment to possess firearms, weapons or other dangerous devices, or permitted to carry them as authorized by law, it is the County’s policy that employees use them only in accordance with departmental operating procedures and all applicable State and Federal laws.

REPORTING PROCEDURE AND RESPONSIBILITIES All employees should follow the following procedures; however, in critical incidents in which serious threat or injury occurs, emergency responders such as Police, Fire and/or Ambulance personnel must be immediately notified. Any employee who believes that he or she has been the target of violence or threats of violence, or has witnessed or otherwise learned of violent conduct by or directed to another employee or other individual must report such incidents to his or her immediate supervisor, a management level supervisory employee if the immediate supervisor is not available, or to the County’s Human Resources Division. It is incumbent upon all employees to immediately report such conditions in order for the County to effectively deal with such situations. Supervisory personnel shall take prompt action when they become aware of any aspect of violence in the workplace. Supervisory personnel shall also contact management level supervisors to pursue the appropriate personnel action. As necessitated by the seriousness of the incident, County management staff may assemble a Crisis Management Team to respond to the incident. Employees shall refer any questions regarding his/her rights and obligations under this policy to their department management. VIOLATIONS Violation by a County employee of a provision of this policy, or false reporting under this policy, may lead to legal action and disciplinary action up to and including termination, as provided in County Personnel Rules and any other County policies and agreements. This policy and any related sanctions are to be deemed supplemental to the County’s Personnel Rules and applicable State and Federal laws.

This policy was approved by the Board of County Commissioners on June 15, 1999.

Prohibition of Carrying Firearms Purpose of Policy: This Policy is designed to complement the County’s ‘Violence in the Workplace Policy.’ The intent is to minimize the risk that use of a firearm may result in accidental or intentional harm and minimize the potential for intimidation caused by the presence of firearms.

FIREARMS IN THE WORKPLACE POLICY PURPOSE This Policy is designed to compliment the County’s ‘Violence in the Workplace Policy’. The intent is to minimize the risk that use of a firearm may result in accidental or intentional harm and minimize the potential for intimidation caused by the presence of firearms. POLICY Except as provided in this policy, employees are prohibited from carrying any firearms while on-duty and are prohibited from carrying firearms on County property at any time. This includes employees who have obtained a concealed weapons permit. For purposes of this policy: 1. On-duty means any time the employee is performing work for or on behalf of Washington County. This includes, but is not limited to any travel on County business, attending community meetings, classes or conferences. On-duty does not include "on-call" or "standby" status, except that the employee shall be subject to the policy upon commencing regular duty. It does not include the employee’s commute between the employee’s residence and his or her regular work site, but the firearm shall not be stored on County property. 2. County property means any County owned or leased property, facilities, equipment or vehicles. It includes, but is not limited to parking lots, common areas and private vehicles while in use on County business. EXCEPTIONS 1. Sworn law enforcement officers and assistant deputy district attorneys shall be subject to the policies, procedures and decisions of the Sheriff and District Attorney, respectively. 2. The County Administrator, or his designee, may issue written authorization for an employee to carry a firearm if, in his sole discretion, the employee’s job responsibilities or personal circumstances warrant an exception. This shall be subject to such limitations as are specified in the authorization. This authorization is not a substitute for compliance with all federal, state or local laws and the employee shall be responsible for such compliance. VIOLATIONS Violation of this policy shall be a basis for discipline up to and including termination. Discipline is in addition to, and not in lieu of, any criminal or other action provided by law. Violation of this policy may be deemed malfeasance or willful or wanton neglect of duty, in which case the County may decline to indemnify and defend an employee in a civil suit relating to the employee violating this policy.

Drug-Free Workplace Purpose of Policy: The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of or being under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance on County premises or while conducting business off County premises is prohibited.

DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE POLICY The policy of Washington County regarding the work-related effects of drug use and the unlawful possession of controlled substances on County premises is as follows: Employees are expected and required to report to work on time and in appropriate mental and physical condition for work. It is our intent and obligation to provide a drug free, healthful, safe and secure work environment. The unlawful manufacture distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance on County premises or while conducting business off County premises is absolutely prohibited. Violations of this policy will result in disciplinary action, up to and including termination, and may have legal consequences. The County recognizes drug dependency as an illness and a major health problem. The County also recognizes drug abuse as a potential health, safety and security problem. Employees needing help in dealing with such problems are encouraged to use our employee assistance program and health insurance plans, as appropriate. Conscientious efforts to seek such help will not jeopardize any employee's job, and will not be noted in any personnel file. Employees must, as a condition of employment, abide by the terms of the above policy and report any occurrences on or off County premises while conducting County business. A report of a conviction must be made within five (5) days after the conviction. This requirement is mandated by the Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988.

Reporting of Improper Governmental Conduct Purpose of Policy: To create an environment that provides opportunities to report known or suspected improper governmental conduct to a responsible County representative and that those reports will be fairly and timely investigated and appropriate action with be taken.

WASHINGTON COUNTY POLICY REPORTING OF IMPROPER GOVERNMENTAL CONDUCT I. PURPOSE It is the purpose of this policy to create an environment that provides the following: A. County employees are clearly informed of the opportunities to report concerns and/or complaints of improper governmental conduct; B. Reports of improper governmental conduct are fairly and timely investigated and appropriate action taken; C. Reporting employees and members of the public are free from retaliation; and D. Where appropriate, the reporting employee or members of the public are provided confidentiality. Pursuant to ORS 659A.221(2), Washington County has authority to provide the below procedures and provisions outlined in this policy. II. SCOPE This policy applies to all regular, temporary, classified, unclassified and contract employees, applicants for employment, and specified volunteer positions. III. POLICY STATEMENT A guiding principle for Washington County is for all county employees to commit themselves to the highest standards of ethical conduct and to accept full accountability for their actions. In keeping with this guiding principle, Washington County encourages its employees and members of the public to report any known or suspected improper governmental conduct to a responsible County representative. IV. DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this policy and procedures the following definitions shall apply: A. "Abuse of Authority"1 means to deliberately exceed or make improper use of delegated or inherent authority or to employ it in an illegal manner. B. "Disciplinary action"1 means any adverse action, including dismissal, demotion, transfer, reassignment, supervisory reprimand, warning of possible dismissal or withholding of work, whether or not the action affects or will affect employee compensation.

C. "Gross waste of funds"1 means an expenditure that is significantly out of proportion to the benefit expected to accrue to the County and is more than a debatable expenditure. D. "Improper governmental conduct" includes conduct or actions of County employees, officials or agents that constitute violations of any federal or state law, rule, or regulation; or mismanagement, gross waste of funds, or abuse of authority or substantial and specific danger to public health and safety resulting from action of the County. E. “Investigating employee or official” means that employee or official who is in a position of authority, pursuant to this policy and procedure, to investigate a complaint or concern of alleged improper governmental conduct. F. "Mismanagement"1 means serious County misconduct having the effect of actually or potentially undermining the County’s ability to fulfill its public mission. G. "Reasonably believes is evidence" means, in addition to other circumstances bearing on the reasonableness of the belief, that the employee has personal knowledge of facts tending to establish the violation of law, rule or regulation, or the existence of mismanagement, abuse of authority, gross waste of funds, or substantial and specific danger to public health or safety. H. "Receiving employee or official" means, that employee or official who receives through the County’s ethics hotline or by any other method, a report, complaint or concern of improper governmental conduct. I. "Reckless disregard for its truth or falsity" means a conscious disregard of a substantial and justifiable risk that the information disclosed is false. J. "Reporting Employee" means, an employee who reasonably believes they have evidence of improper governmental conduct. K. "Substantial and specific danger"1 means a specified risk of serious injury, illness, peril or loss, to which the exposure of the public is a gross deviation from the standard of care or competence which a reasonable person would observe in the same situation. V. GENERAL PROVISIONS A. EMPLOYEE REPORTING PROCEDURES 1. Any County employee who discloses information that the employee reasonably believes is evidence of improper governmental conduct shall not be subjected to or threatened with disciplinary action for the disclosure. 2. In addition to or in lieu of the following reporting procedures, a reporting employee may disclose any allegation, concern, or complaint of improper governmental conduct to the County Auditor, in accordance with the Auditor's responsibilities set forth in the County Charter (Section 46); and/or a reporting employee may report an allegation, concern, or complaint of improper

governmental conduct that may also be a violation of the State Code of Ethics (ORS Chapter 244) to the Oregon Government Ethics Commission. 3. An employee who reasonably believes he or she has evidence of improper governmental conduct shall report it in the following manner: a. First to the employee's supervisor. Where the reporting employee reasonably believes that the improper governmental conduct involves the supervisor or there may not be a fair and impartial investigation or there could be retaliation for reporting, the reporting employee shall report the alleged improper governmental conduct directly to his or her department head; if the reporting employee reasonably believes the alleged improper governmental conduct should not be reported to his or her department head for any of the reasons set forth above, the reporting employee shall report the conduct to the County Administrator; and if the reporting employee reasonably believes the improper governmental conduct should not be reported to the County Administrator for any of the reasons set forth above, the reporting employee shall report the conduct to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners. b. Where the reporting employee reasonably believes there is an imminent likelihood of substantial and specific danger if action is not taken immediately, the reporting employee may report the alleged improper governmental conduct directly to that County employee or official having authority over the matter and not personally involved in the alleged improper governmental conduct. c. Where the alleged improper governmental conduct is believed to have been committed by a county official appointed by the Board of Commissioners, the reporting employee shall report the conduct to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners. d. Where the alleged improper governmental conduct is believed to have been committed by an elected county official, the reporting employee shall report the conduct to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners or a non-culpable Board member. e. Where the reporting employee reasonably believes the County Commission has culpability in the alleged improper governmental conduct, the reporting employee may report the conduct to the County Auditor for investigation. B. INVESTIGATION PROCEDURES 1. The County employee or official receiving the report of improper governmental conduct shall be responsible for creating a log documenting the date, time, and subject matter of any report of improper conduct that is received. A copy of the log shall be provided to the Human Resources Division Manager within five (5) days of receipt of the report. The County employee or official receiving the report shall be responsible for determining, pursuant to this policy and procedure, the manner in which the allegations of

improper governmental conduct will be investigated. Except as otherwise required pursuant to sections V.B.1b. and V.B.1c., the investigation shall remain confidential until such time as the written report required under subsection V.B.4 is completed. a. The receiving employee or official may elect to investigate the allegations by him or herself; assign the investigation to a subordinate employee or request that the investigation be conducted by the receiving employee's supervisor; request the investigation be conducted by another office, agency, or department in the County; or, as provided in section V.B.le, below, utilize the services of an outside agency. Where appropriate, the receiving employee or official may consult with his or her supervisor, the County Auditor, County Administrative Office, the Human Resources Division Manager, or the Office of County Counsel in electing how to proceed with an investigation. b. When an investigating employee or official determines during an investigation that fraud or other criminal activity may be occurring or may have occurred, the investigating employee or official shall notify the appropriate law enforcement agency of the potential fraud or other criminal activity. c. When an investigating employee or official determines during an investigation that a violation of any provision of ORS chapter 244 may be occurring or may have occurred, the investigating employee or official shall notify the Oregon Government Ethics Commission of the potential violation. d. Upon providing notice pursuant to sections V.B.1b or V.B.1c herein, the investigating employee or official may elect to suspend the investigation, pending completion of the referral agency’s review of the matter. e. If the receiving employee or official reasonably believes that an investigation of a non-criminal matter cannot be conducted in an impartial, fair or complete manner by him/herself or any office, employee or official in the County, upon approval of the County Administrator, County Counsel or County Board Chairman, the matter may be referred to an outside public agency willing to accept responsibility for the investigation (such as another county's Administrative Office or Office of County Counsel). f. If the County Auditor is the receiving official of a report of improper governmental conduct, the County Auditor may refer the matter to an outside public agency upon his or her own discretion and without prior approval of any County employee or official. 2. Any investigation conducted pursuant to this policy shall be done in a timely, impartial, and fair manner. An employee who is the subject of an investigation of improper governmental conduct (and therefore may be subject to discipline) may have certain rights afforded pursuant to County Personnel

Rules, a collective bargaining agreement and/or state or federal law. The investigating employee or official shall confer with the Office of County Counsel pertaining to such rights. 3. The investigation shall be done in a manner that will not result in any unreasonable embarrassment to the subject(s) of the investigation or any witnesses. All County employees and officials shall cooperate in any investigation performed pursuant to this policy and procedure. 4. The investigating employee or official, upon conclusion of the investigation, shall prepare a written report setting forth the allegations and findings. The investigating employee or official shall present his or her report to the Human Resources Division Manager and the non-culpable County department head having authority over the affairs being investigated; or, in the event the allegations involve a department head, the report shall be presented to the County Administrator; or, in the event the allegations involve the County Administrator, the report shall be presented to the Chairman of the County Board of County Commissioners. C. RESPONSE TO FINDINGS OF IMPROPER GOVERNMENTAL CONDUCT 1. The non-culpable County authority receiving the investigation findings shall take necessary and appropriate action. Such action may include, but is not limited to, initiating the implementation of discipline, modifying department procedures, and/or presenting the report to the appropriate County employee or official. 2. Should an investigation find that improper governmental conduct has occurred, the reporting employee, upon request, shall be provided with a copy of the written report, except that any personnel action(s) taken as a result of the investigation may be kept confidential. Any information provided to the reporting employee, that may be considered confidential, shall not be publicly disclosed by the employee. 3. Upon completion of the investigation, the written report shall be subject to disclosure as a public record under ORS 192.410 to 192.505 unless an exemption from disclosure set forth in a provision state or federal law applies to the records, except that the identity of the reporting individual or employee shall remain confidential. D. RESPONSIBILITY OF REPORTING EMPLOYEE / PROTECTION AGAINST RETALIATION / CONFIDENTIALITY 1. County officials and employees are prohibited from retaliating, including the imposition of disciplinary action, against a member of the public or any Washington County employee because he or she has, in good faith, reported improper governmental conduct in accordance with these policies and procedures. However, employees may be subjected to discipline if the

information disclosed by the employee is known by the employee to be false, if the employee discloses the information with reckless disregard for its truth or falsity, or if the information disclosed relates to the employee's own violations, mismanagement, gross waste of funds, abuse of authority or endangerment of the public health or safety. 2. An employee who believes he or she has been retaliated against for reporting improper governmental conduct should advise their supervisor, the Human Resources Manager or County Administrator. The County official receiving a report of retaliation shall take appropriate action to investigate and address complaints of retaliation. A County employee who has been found to have retaliated against an employee for reporting, in good faith, improper governmental conduct shall be subject to discipline. 3. Notwithstanding the above, any employee who believes he/she has been retaliated against for the reporting of improper government conduct may bring a civil action as provided by ORS 659A.215. 4. The names of employees or other individuals reporting allegations of improper governmental conduct shall be kept confidential unless waived by the subject employee or reporting individual. The County employee receiving the report shall take reasonable steps to maintain confidentiality of the reporting employee. Unless, otherwise required by law: a. The identity of the reporting employee or other reporting individual described in this policy, shall not be disclosed, during the investigation, without the written consent of the reporting employee; and b. No supervisory or management employee of the County shall reveal to an employee accused of improper governmental conduct the identity of the reporting employee or other reporting individual. E. OTHER OPPORTUNITIES FOR REPORTING The policy and procedures identified herein are for the purpose of reporting allegations of improper governmental conduct. These procedures are not intended to replace other opportunities for employees to bring complaints or grievances pertaining to their employment. Specifically, County employees maintain their rights pursuant to personnel rules (Article 5) and/or a collective bargaining agreement to appeal imposition of discipline; their right pursuant to personnel rules to appeal County policies or actions (Article 10); and any rights they/may have pursuant to federal and state law to present civil complaints. -------------------------------------------1

These terms are defined as provided by OAR 839-010-0010. In the event the OAR definitions are changed or modified, the definitions herein shall be considered to likewise change to conform to the OAR unless expressly stated otherwise by the Board. Adopted 8/23/2011

Family Medical Leave Policy Policy: The Family Medical Leave (FML) Policy provides protected leave for family and medical reasons in accordance with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) and the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA).

WASHINGTON COUNTY FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE (FML) POLICY I.

PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to define the provisions and processes for eligible employees to take protected leave for qualifying medical and family circumstances. This policy is intended to comply with federal and state laws regulating these leaves of absence. II. SCOPE This policy applies to all Washington County employees. III. POLICY STATEMENT The Washington County Family Medical Leave (FML) Policy provides protected leave for family and medical reasons in accordance with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) and the Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA). The purpose of these laws is to secure the right of eligible employees to respond to their own serious health needs and those of their qualified family members. Federal and state laws protect an employee against loss of employment for reasons related to the leave, and in some cases, against loss of insurance coverage in the event an employee must be absent from the workplace due to a qualifying event. The laws also provide for reinstatement to the employee's former or an equivalent position. Washington County's FML Policy has been designed to consolidate provisions of both State and Federal laws in such a way as to allow employees the maximum advantage. IV. ELIGIBILITY For purposes of this policy, employees include probationary, regular status, seasonal and/or temporary employees. Employees who are absent from work due to service in the National Guard or the Reserves shall have their time spent in military service count toward the eligibility requirements for FML. The following table lists employee eligibility requirements under both FMLA and OFLA. Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA)

 Employee must have worked for Washington County for at least 180 days immediately preceding commencement of the leave in order to be eligible, and  Employee must have worked an average of at least 25 hours per week during the 180-day period.  For purposes of ‘Parental leave’, an employee does not need to meet the average weekly hour requirement, but is required to have worked for Washington County for at least 180 days immediately preceding the commencement of the leave.

1

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

 Employee must have worked for Washington County for at least 12 months, which need not be consecutive, and  Employee must have worked for at least 1,250 hours for Washington County during the 12 months preceding the leave.

For employee medical leaves that are not qualified under either the Family and Medical Leave Act or the Oregon Family Leave Act, more information is provided at the end of this policy. V. QUALIFYING EVENT The following table lists reasons that an employee may qualify for Family Medical Leave under federal and/or state law: Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA)

 For a parent to provide care for a newborn, newly adopted, or newly placed foster child under 18 years of age; or for an adopted or foster child older than 18 years of age if the child is incapable of self-care (‘parental leave’)  For the employee to provide immediate and necessary care for a qualified family member with a serious health condition because of a mental or physical disability  For the employee’s own serious health condition  To provide immediate and necessary care for the employee’s child who is suffering from an illness, injury, or condition that is not a serious health condition, but requires home care (‘sick child leave’). Sick child leave may only be taken provided another family member is not willing and able to care for the child.  A female employee may take a total of 12 weeks of additional leave within any 12 month period for an illness, injury or condition related to pregnancy or childbirth that disables the employee.  An employee who takes 12 weeks of ‘parental leave’ may take an additional 12 weeks to care for a child of the employee who is suffering from an illness, injury, or condition that is not a serious health condition, but that requires home care (‘sick child leave’).

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)  For the birth and care of the newborn child of the employee.  For the placement of a child for adoption or foster care with the employee.  To provide immediate and necessary care for the employee’s own parent (including individuals who exercise parental responsibility under state law), child, or spouse with a serious health condition.  For the employee’s own serious health condition.

VI. QUALIFYING FAMILY MEMBER The following table lists family members that are qualified under FMLA and OFLA. Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA) Qualified family member includes:    

    

Spouse Parent Parent-in-Law Biological, adopted or foster child Same-sex domestic partner Parent of a same-sex domestic partner Child of same-sex domestic partner Person standing in loco parentis Grandparent or grandchild of the employee

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) Qualified family member includes:

 Spouse  Parent  Person standing in loco parentis  Biological, adopted or foster child under age 18

2

  

An "In Loco Parentis" relationship exists when one party in the place of a parent has been responsible for day-to-day care and financial support of the other. A legal or biological relationship is not necessary. For the serious health condition of a child, FMLA restricts the leave for children under age eighteen (18) years of age, except when the child is incapable of self-care due to a physical or mental impairment. An OFLA-eligible employee may take leave even for an adult child who has a serious health condition. However, under OFLA, children must be under the age of eighteen (18) to qualify for "sick child leave".

VII. SERIOUS HEALTH CONDITION The following table lists definitions of serious health condition under the Family and Medical Leave Act and the Oregon Family Medical Leave Act: Oregon Family Leave Act (OFLA)

 Illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that requires inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility; or  Illness, disease, or condition that in the medical judgment of the treating health care provider poses an imminent danger of death, is terminal in prognosis with a reasonable possibility of death in the near future; or  requires constant care or continuing care such as home care administered by a health care professional; or  A period of incapacity where the employee is unable to perform an essential job function and any subsequent treatment of recovery period. The incapacity must involve (1) two or more treatments by a health care provider or (2) one treatment plus a regimen of continuing care; or  A period of incapacity or treatment for a chronic serious health condition that requires periodic visits for treatment from a health care provider, continues over an extended period of time, and may cause episodic rather than a continuing period of incapacity; or  Involves permanent or long term incapacity due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective; or  Involves multiple treatments for restorative surgery or for a condition such as chemotherapy for cancer, physical therapy for arthritis, or dialysis for kidney disease that if not treated would likely result in incapacity of more than three days; or  Any period of disability due to pregnancy or childbirth or period of absence for prenatal care.

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

 Illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition involving incapacity or treatment connected with inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility; or  Continuing treatment by a health care provider involving a period of incapacity: (1) requiring absence of more than three (3) consecutive calendar days from work which involves (a) treatment two or more times from a health care provider, a nurse or physician under the supervision of a health care provider, or under orders of or referral by a health care provider or (b) treatment by a health care provider on a least one occasion which results in a regimen of treatment under the supervision of the health care provider; or (2) due to a chronic serious health condition; or (3) requiring absences to receive multiple treatments (including recovery periods) for restorative surgery or a condition that if left untreated would likely result in incapacity for more than three (3) days; or (4) due to pregnancy or for prenatal care. (5) which is permanent or long-term due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective

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VIII. DURATION OF LEAVE A. All Qualifying Events under FMLA and OFLA 1. Employees are permitted to take a total of twelve (12) weeks of leave in a 12month period for any qualifying event. In most cases, FMLA leave and OFLA leave will run concurrently. Employees using qualified OFLA leave for circumstances not covered by FMLA may take additional protected leave for FMLA-qualifying conditions. 2. One week of FML is based on the employee's regular work schedule prior to the start of the leave. 3. Leave for the birth of the employee’s child, or the placement of a child for adoption or foster care with the employee (‘parental leave’) must be taken within twelve (12) months of the birth or adoption. Parental leave must be taken in one continuous block and may not be taken intermittently. 4. Two family members that are both employees of Washington County may take FML concurrently only under the following circumstances: a. under FMLA for parental leave or leave to care for an employee’s parent with a serious health condition, but limited to a combined total of 12 weeks between the eligible employees in either circumstance, or b. under OFLA where one employee needs to care for the other employee who is suffering from a serious health condition, or c. under OFLA where both employees are suffering from a serious health condition, or d. under OFLA where one employee needs to care for a child who has a serious health condition while the other employee is also suffering a serious health condition, or e. under certain circumstances, subject to business needs, and subject to review and approval by appointing authorities of each employee in coordination with the Human Resources Manager. 5. Disability leave for the birth of a child and for an employee’s own serious health condition will be designated as qualified under both FMLA and OFLA and will run concurrently. 6. Disability leave due to a compensable on-the-job injury will be designated as qualified under FMLA only. However, if the employee refuses a bona-fide offer of modified duties prior to becoming medically stationary, the leave shall be designated as qualified under both FMLA and OFLA and shall run concurrently. B. Additional Leave under OFLA A female who takes leave for a pregnancy related disability (including routine prenatal care) may take up to an additional twelve (12) weeks of leave for any other OFLA-qualifying purpose. Male or female employees who use a full twelve (12) weeks of parental leave may use up to twelve (12) additional weeks in the same leave year for sick child leave. If an employee does not take a full twelve (12) weeks of parental leave, he or she is only 4

entitled to take sick child leave up to his/her twelve (12) week entitlement. Sick child leave is allowed only under OFLA. C. Leave Year Designated as Calendar Year It is the policy of Washington County to use a calendar year (January to December) when calculating available leave for the employee. Generally, eligible employees will be allowed up to twelve (12) weeks of qualifying leave between January 1st and December 31st of each year. IX. MEDICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS The County requires completion of the Certification of Health Care Provider by the attending health care provider(s) for leave to care for an employee's family member with a serious health condition, or the employee's own serious health condition, including disability for pregnancy and following childbirth. The written certification must include satisfactory evidence that confirms the illness of the employee or their immediate family member, provide an estimate of when the employee will be able to return to work, state whether the employee’s incapacity will require intermittent treatments, state the estimated frequency and duration of such treatments and provide the estimated period for recovery, if known. If leave is foreseeable, this Certification of Health Care Provider must accompany the employee’s request for FML. If the leave is unforeseeable, the employee must submit a Certification of Health Care Provider within fifteen (15) days of the County’s written request. Failure to provide the required certification may result in denial of the rights and protections of FMLA and OFLA. If the serious health condition is related to a family member, the attending health care provider must indicate on the Certification of Health Care Provider form that the employee is needed to provide care (which may include psychological comfort). When the medical certification is unclear, or its validity is in doubt, the County may require the employee or family member to obtain a second or third opinion at the County's expense. For leave requests based on pregnancy, chronic, or long term conditions, the County may request a new Certification of Health Care Provider not more than every thirty (30) days unless: (1) an employee requests an extension of leave; (2) the duration or nature of the condition has changed significantly; or (3) the County receives information casting doubt on the employee’s reason for the absence. When the leave extends beyond a period of one (1) year, such as with intermittent leave, the County may also require a re-certification by a health care provider that there is a continuing need for leave. The County may require medical verification for leave taken for the non-serious health condition of a child requiring home care (sick child leave) after the third incident, day, or occurrence of sick child leave and every subsequent occasion during the leave year. HEALTH CARE PROVIDER: Practitioners in the following disciplines are considered health care providers for purposes of 5

FMLA and OFLA. All of the following must be authorized to provide health care by the State in which they practice:  Doctors of Medicine or Osteopathy  Podiatrists  Dentists  Clinical Psychologists  Optometrists  Chiropractors (limited to treatment consisting of manual manipulation of the spine to correct a subluxation as demonstrated by x-ray to exist)  Nurse Practitioners  Midwives  Clinical Social Workers  Naturopathic Physicians  Christian Science practitioners listed with the First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, Massachusetts.  A health care provider as defined above who practices and is licensed in a country other than the United States. X.

INTERMITTENT OR REDUCED WORK SCHEDULE LEAVE

A. Employees may take their FMLA/OFLA leave consecutively or intermittently. Under certain circumstances, employees may use their leave to reduce the work week or work day, resulting in a reduced hour schedule. B. Intermittent leave or reduced work schedule leave may be requested by the employee to provide immediate and necessary care for the employee’s own serious medical condition, or for a serious health condition of a qualified family member. C. Parental leave must be taken in one continuous block of time and may not be taken intermittently or through a reduced schedule. D. Employees requesting intermittent leave or reduced schedule leave that is foreseeable must notify their supervisor as soon as possible. E. Employees may be asked to schedule leave periods so as not to unduly interfere with county operations. The county reserves the right to temporarily place an employee in an available, alternative position with equivalent pay and benefits if the alternative position would better accommodate the intermittent or reduced schedule. If leave is also OFLA qualifying, the County will seek the employee’s permission to do this. F. In the case of an intermittent or a reduced work schedule leave, the employee’s position retains its designated FTE status (full-time or part-time). The difference between hours usually scheduled and actual hours worked must be covered by use of accrued leaves if available. XI.

SENIORITY, LEAVE BALANCES, ACCRUALS AND OTHER BENEFITS

A. Employees on qualified leave will retain accrued balances for sick leave, compensatory time, administrative leave, floating holiday and vacation leave earned prior to leave, except for the amount of leave accruals used during the leave. B. Employees will be eligible for holiday pay as provided for in the County’s Personnel Rules and Regulations or applicable collective bargaining agreement. C. Payroll periods will be considered qualified, provided an employee is in paid status for no less than 90% of their regularly scheduled hours for the Payroll Period 6

D. An employee will accrue sick and vacation leaves only when qualified payroll periods are completed or are otherwise eligible for prorated accruals as provided in the Personnel Rules and Regulations. E. Step increase and review dates will be adjusted for unqualified payroll periods according to the provisions of the Personnel Rules and Regulations. XII.

USE OF ACCRUED PAID LEAVE

A. Use of accrued paid leaves will run concurrently with Family Medical Leave and Oregon Family Leave. B. The employee must use all accrued paid leave, including any paid leave accrued during the employee’s qualified leave, prior to commencing any period of unpaid leave. Paid leaves include, but are not limited to, vacation, administrative leave, floating holiday and, when applicable, sick leave. C. An employee who is taking qualified leave for the employee’s own serious health condition or the serious health condition of a qualified family member must first use all accrued sick leave prior to using any other accrued leaves. D. An employee who is taking qualified ‘parental leave’ may elect to use up to the equivalent of six (6) weeks of accrued sick leave prior to using other accrued paid leaves. Once six weeks of accrued sick leave has been used, the employee will be required to use all other accrued paid leave (includes vacation, administrative leave, and floating holiday) for the duration of their qualified ‘parental leave’ prior to beginning unpaid leave. Upon exhaustion of all other accrued paid leave, an employee may elect to use any remaining accrued sick leave, or may begin unpaid leave for the duration of their qualified ‘parental leave’. E. Eligible employees may elect to use accrued compensatory time during a qualified family medical leave. If compensatory time is used, it will not count against the leave allowed under FMLA or OFLA. F. Employees who are on unpaid leave will not be eligible to accrue vacation, sick leave or seniority if they incur unqualified pay periods as defined by Washington County’s Personnel Rules and Regulations. G. Under no circumstances will an employee be permitted to go back and forth between paid and unpaid leaves for the purpose of extending eligibility for County paid benefits or earning service accruals. XIII. FMLA EXPANDED FOR MILITARY FAMILIES The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (NDAA) and Oregon House Bill 2744 (2009) include provisions amending the Family and Medical Leave Act and the Oregon Family Leave Act for military families. Specifically, the amendments expand the leaves available under the FMLA and OFLA by adding qualifying events related to an eligible employee who is a spouse or family member of a member of the Armed Forces. A. FMLA Caregiver Leave for an Injured Service Member 1) An eligible employee who is the spouse, son, daughter, parent, or next of kin (defined as the closest blood relative) of a covered service member shall be entitled to a total of twentysix (26) workweeks of leave during a 12-month period to care for the service member. 2) A covered service member is a member of the Armed Forces, including a member of the National Guard or Reserves, who is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation or therapy, is otherwise in outpatient status, or is otherwise on the temporary disability list for a serious injury or illness that occurred while on active duty. 7

B. FMLA/OFLA Family Leave Due to a Qualifying Exigency or Call to Active Duty 1) An eligible employee may use up to twelve (12) weeks of FMLA leave for any qualifying exigency (pressing or urgent matter) as defined by the Department of Labor arising from a spouse, son, daughter, or parent who is either on active duty in the Armed Forces, or who has been notified of an impending call or order to active duty in the Armed Forces. 2) FMLA leave for a qualifying exigency is not in addition to the standard FMLA 12-week entitlement; rather, it constitutes an additional qualifying basis for seeking FMLA leave. 3) An eligible employee who is a spouse or registered domestic partner of a member of the Armed Forces, the National Guard, or the military reserve forces of the United States may use up to fourteen (14) days of OFLA leave per deployment or leave from deployment. The employee must notify the County of their intention to take such leave within five (5) business days of receiving notice of an impending call or order to active duty or of a leave from deployment. 4) OFLA leave taken for deployment or leave from deployment of an employee’s spouse or registered domestic partner is not in addition to the standard OFLA 12-week entitlement; rather, it constitutes an additional qualifying basis for seeking OFLA leave. 5) Employees utilizing OFLA leave pursuant to this subsection may use any accrued leave they may have earned for any part of the qualified leave. 6) The use of OFLA leave by an employee pursuant to this subsection shall run concurrently with their FMLA leave entitlement under this subsection which may not be taken separately or consecutively. XIV. ADDITIONAL LEAVE AT THE END OF FML Once an employee's FML entitlement due to serious health condition of employee or qualified family member is exhausted, he or she may request an additional leave of absence with or without pay, subject to approval by the appointing authority. Unless otherwise specified in the applicable collective bargaining agreement, the appointing authority may approve a leave of absence, with or without pay, for a reasonable period of time based on the business needs of the department. Leaves in excess of ninety (90) days may be granted at the discretion of the County Administrator. XV. RETURN TO WORK A. If an employee has been on leave due to his or her own serious health condition, the employee must provide the supervisor with a release to return to work form completed by their health care provider. B. Except under specified or limited circumstances, employees who take qualified leave under FMLA and OFLA will be able to return to the same position or a position with equivalent status, pay, benefits and other employment terms. C. The County retains the right to deny restoration in the following situations: 1) the employee would have lost the job due to layoff if he/she had not been on leave; 2) the employee fraudulently obtains FML; 3) the employee violates the County's policy governing outside employment during the leave; or 4) the employee fails to provide a release to return to work from their health care provider upon return. 8

XVI. MEDICAL LEAVE (not eligible under FMLA or OFLA) Washington County will allow employees all leaves required to be provided under FMLA and OFLA. Individual circumstances may exist which would allow for leave beyond what this policy provides under FMLA and OFLA. In circumstances where additional interpretation of this policy is required the Human Resources Manager shall make the final determination. A. The County will consider requests for unpaid medical leave from employees that are not eligible for leave under FMLA or OFLA for their own serious health conditions. Employees must submit the request in writing to their Appointing Authority and it will be forwarded to the Human Resources Division. B. Employees may be allowed to take unpaid medical leave (not qualified under FMLA or OFLA) for a reasonable period of time subject to the business needs of the department with appointing authority approval. C. If the leave is foreseeable, the employee must provide a written medical verification issued by a licensed physician or practitioner, or other satisfactory evidence that confirms the illness of the employee or their qualified family member, provides an estimate of when the employee will be able to return to work, states whether the employee’s incapacity will require intermittent treatments, states the estimated frequency and duration of such treatments, and provides the estimated period of recovery. D. If the reason for the leave is unforeseeable, the employee must give verbal notice within 24 hours of the beginning of the leave or as soon thereafter as practicable. The employee must provide medical verification described above as soon as practicable. E. While the County will make a reasonable attempt to return the employee to the same position or a position with equivalent status, pay benefits or other employment terms, this may not always occur if no suitable position is available when the employee seeks to return to work.

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XVII. HEALTH BENEFIT CONTINUATION The following table describes the impact on the benefits that are provided to Washington County employees based on the leave taken.

Benefit

Paid Leave

Medical Dental Vision EAP Life Insurance (County paid) Long-term Disability

FMLA or FMLA/OFLA

Medical leaves not qualifying as FMLA

The County will continue its contribution to The County will continue its contribution these benefits during the leave period at the to these benefits while the employee is in same level and under the same conditions as paid status. if the employee had continued to work.

The County will continue its contribution to these benefits during the qualified leave period at the same level and under the same conditions as if the employee had continued to work. The employee is responsible for their share of premiums. If premiums are not paid during the leave, the County can take additional deductions when the employee returns from leave.

Unpaid Leave

If the employee chooses not to return to work for reasons other than (1) a continued serious health condition of the employee or the employee’s family member, or (2) a circumstance beyond the employee’s control, the County will require the employee to reimburse the County the amount that it paid for the employee’s health and life insurance premiums during the leave period.

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The County will terminate coverage under the medical, dental, vision, and EAP plans when the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to replace the 20 hours/week that is required for plan eligibility. COBRA continuation coverage will be extended at the employee’s cost upon termination of County coverage. The County will terminate coverage under the life and long-term disability plans when the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to replace 100% of his/her regular, pre-leave earnings. Continuation of life insurance coverage through a conversion policy will be extended at the employee’s cost upon termination of County coverage. Upon return from leave the employee has 31 days to request reenrollment in any plan under which they terminated or lost coverage during the leave. Reenrollment is subject to the eligibility and reenrollment rules of the plan.

Benefit

FMLA or FMLA/OFLA

Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA)

Medical leaves not qualifying as FMLA

Paid Leave

If no employee action is taken, deductions will continue to be taken from the employee’s check.

If no employee action is taken, deductions will continue to be taken from the employee’s check.

Within 31 days following the beginning of the leave, the employee may request to terminate or reduce their participation in the plan.

Within 31 days following the beginning of the leave, the employee may request to terminate or reduce their participation in the dependent care FSA plan if there is a reduction in the need for child/adult care.

COBRA continuation coverage will be extended at the employee’s cost upon termination of County coverage. Upon return from leave the employee has 31 days to request reenrollment in any plan under which they terminated or lost coverage during the leave. Reenrollment is subject to the eligibility and reenrollment rules of the plan. If the employee takes no action, participation under the plan will continue during the qualified leave. The employee is responsible for their share of contributions. If contributions are not paid during the leave, the County can take additional deductions when the employee returns from leave.

Unpaid Leave

Within 31 days following the beginning of the leave, the employee may request to terminate or reduce their participation in the plan. COBRA continuation coverage will be extended at the employee’s cost upon termination of County coverage. Upon return from leave the employee has 31 days to request reenrollment in any plan under which they terminated or lost coverage during the leave. Reenrollment is subject to the eligibility and reenrollment rules of the plan.

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Employees may not terminate or reduce their contribution to the health FSA during a paid non-FMLA leave. Upon return from leave the employee has 31 days to request reenrollment in any plan under which they terminated or lost coverage during the leave. Reenrollment is subject to the eligibility and reenrollment rules of the plan. The County will terminate coverage under the FSA plans when the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to replace the 20 hours/week that is required for plan eligibility. COBRA continuation coverage will be extended at the employee’s cost upon termination of County coverage. Upon return from leave the employee has 31 days to request reenrollment in any plan under which they terminated or lost coverage during the leave. Reenrollment is subject to the eligibility and reenrollment rules of the plan.

Benefit

FMLA or FMLA/OFLA

Voluntary Life Insurance

Paid Leave

Coverage and the required premium deduction will continue during the leave unless the employee requests a termination of coverage.

Coverage and the required premium deduction will continue during the leave unless the employee requests a termination of coverage.

The employee may request to terminate or reduce coverage under the plan at any time.

Employees may request to terminate or reduce coverage under the plan at any time.

The employee may request to begin or increase coverage under the plan at any time. However, this request will require a health statement which is subject to underwriting and may be denied. Coverage will continue during the leave unless the employee requests otherwise. The employee is responsible for their share of premiums. If premiums are not paid during the leave, the County can take additional deductions when the employee returns from leave.

Unpaid Leave Paid Leave

Deferred Compensation 457(b)

Medical leaves not qualifying as FMLA

The employee may request to begin or increase coverage under the plan upon their return from leave. However, this request will require a health statement which is subject to underwriting and may be denied.

The employee may request to begin or increase coverage under the plan at any time. However, this request will require a health statement which is subject to underwriting and may be denied. The County will terminate coverage under the voluntary life plans when the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to replace 100% of his/her regular, preleave earnings. The employee may request to begin or increase coverage under the plan upon their return from leave. However, this request will require a health statement which is subject to underwriting and may be denied

If the employee chooses not to return to work for reasons other than (1) a continued serious health condition of the employee or the employee’s family member, or (2) a circumstance beyond the employee’s control, the County will require the employee to reimburse the County the amount that it paid for the employee’s health and life insurance premiums during the leave period. Deductions will continue during the leave unless the employee requests that they be terminated.

Deductions will continue during the leave unless the employee requests that they be terminated.

The employee may request to begin or increase deductions into the plan at any time.

The employee may request to begin or increase deductions into the plan at any time.

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FMLA or FMLA/OFLA

Deferred Compensation 457(b)

Contributions to the plan will be terminated when the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to satisfy the elected contribution amount.

Contributions to the plan will be terminated when the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to satisfy the elected contribution amount.

The employee may request to restart contributions to the plan once the employee returns from leave. County and employee contributions will continue during the leave.

The employee may request to restart contributions to the plan once the employee returns from leave. County and employee contributions will continue during the leave.

County and employee contributions will terminate once the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to make the required contribution.

County and employee contributions will terminate once the employee’s leave banks are not sufficient to make the required contribution.

PERS participation is suspended when an employee has 11 or more consecutive days without pay. This time is not counted toward PERS service time.

PERS participation is suspended when an employee has 11 or more consecutive days without pay. This time is not counted toward PERS service time.

Paid Leave

PERS

Unpaid Leave

Benefit

Unpaid Leave January, 2011

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Medical leaves not qualifying as FMLA

Questions Contact your HR Liaison with policy or other HR related inquires.

Family Medical Leave inquiries, contact Stacey Siemiller at x8328.

For a complete list of HR Contacts visit our website at: www.co.washington.or.us/Support_Services/HR/contact

REMEMBER: To print, sign and return the Washington County Employment Policy Acknowledgement form on the next page.

Washington County Employment Policy Acknowledgement My signature below acknowledges that I have been informed that complete copies of these policies can be found online at: www.co.washington.or.us/HRPolicies. I understand that I am responsible for understanding and following these policies: • Drug Free Workplace Policy • Family Medical Leave (FML) Policy • Harassment-Free Policy • Prohibition on Carrying Firearms Policy • Reporting of Improper Governmental Conduct Policy • Violence in the Workplace Policy

Employee Signature

Date

Print Name

Return form to Human Resources (select one): Email: [email protected] Interoffice mail: Debbie Meyer, MS 11 In-person: PSB 270 (155 N. First Ave. Hillsboro)

Revised