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Val Verde Unified School District Division of Education Services English Learner Support Services Program TK-12 Revised: 2015-2016 Val Verde Unified ...
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Val Verde Unified School District Division of Education Services English Learner Support Services Program TK-12

Revised: 2015-2016 Val Verde Unified School District 975 West Morgan Street Perris, Ca 92571 Telephone: (951) 940-6100 Fax: (951) 960-6120 www.valverde.edu

Approved by the Board of Education Date: June 14, 2011 Revision: June 8th, 2012 Revision: July 23rd, 2013 Revision: September 29th, 2014 Revision: October 28th, 2015

Table of Contents Acknowledgements Introduction

3 5

Dimension I: Parent Outreach and Involvement EL 01: Parent Outreach and Involvement EL 02: Translation of Information for Parents EL 03: Private School Consultation and Participation EL 04: English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) EL 05: District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC)

7 8 9 13 15

Dimension II: Governance and Administration EL 06: English Learner Identification and Assessment EL 07: Parent Guardian Notifications EL 08: Implementation, Monitoring, & Revision of LEA Plans EL 09: Program Inclusion in Development of the SPSA EL 10: Inventory

17 22 27 31 32

Dimension III: Funding EL 11: Supplement, Not Supplant, with Title III & EIA-LEP EL 12: Time Accounting Requirements

33 34

Dimension IV: Standards, Assessments, and Accountability EL 13: Evaluation of English Learner Program Effectiveness EL 14: Reclassification

35 38

Dimension V: Staffing and Professional Development EL 15: Teacher EL Authorization EL 16: Professional Development Specific to English Learners Supplement A: Role of Bilingual & Reclassification Facilitators

50 53 57

Dimension VI: Opportunity and Equal Educational Access EL 17: Appropriate Student Placement EL 18: Parental Exception Waiver for Alternative Program

58 63

Dimension VII: Teaching and Learning EL 19: English Language Development (ELD) EL 20: Access to the Core Subject Matter Supplement B: English Learners & G.A.T.E. Supplement C: English Learners & Special Education

69 80 82 84

Appendix CELDT English Proficiency Levels Overall CELDT Test Performance Levels CELDT Scale Score Ranges Relevant Online Sources for English Learners CELDT Questions and Answers Glossary of Terms & Acronyms

93 94 95 99 100 102

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Val Verde Unified School District Board of Education Marla Kirkland, President Shelly Yarbrough, Vice President Suzanne Stotlar, Clerk Michael M. Vargas, Member Julio Gonzalez, Member District Office Administration Michael R. McCormick, Superintendent, Val Verde Unified School District Darrin Watters, Assistant Superintendent, Business Services Mark LeNoir, Assistant Superintendent, Education Services Christi Barrett, Assistant Superintendent, Human Resources Deborah J. Bryant, Director, Assessment and Accountability, Education Services Garrick Owen, Coordinator, State and Federal Programs, Education Services Jennifer Doskocil, Coordinator, Elementary Education, Education Services Rae Dunn, Coordinator, Secondary Education, Education Services Carla de la Torre, Ed.D., Coordinator, English Learner Support Services TK-12 Lou Randall, Coordinator, STEAM

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Acknowledgements The Division of Education Services English Learner Program Office wishes to express its appreciation to the following people for their assistance and contributions to the update of the Val Verde Unified School District’s Master Plan for English Learners. Principals:

Bilingual Facilitators

Julie Singletary, Pre-School Tammy Roughton, Avalon Elementary School Thelma Almuena, Columbia Elementary School Tom Gronotte, Lasselle Elementary School Fernando Betanzos , Manuel L. Real Elementary School Katrina Bermudez, Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School Aimee Garcia, May Ranch Elementary School Nickey Smith, Mead Valley Elementary School Laura Pulido, Rainbow Ridge Elementary School Korby Warren, Sierra Vista Elementary School Deni Seagrave, Triple Crown Elementary School Timothy Tanner, Val Verde Elementary School Molly Large, Victoriano Elementary School John Parker, Lakeside Middle School Jim Owen, March Middle School Esteban Lizarraga, Tomás Rivera Middle School Esperanza Arce, Vista Verde Middle School Nereyda Gonzalez, Citrus Hill High School Ross Godfrey, Rancho Verde High School Steve Coelho, Val Verde High School David McPhee, Val Verde/Student Success Academy

Corrina Alvarez, Avalon Elementary School Leslie Aguayo and Vera Sanchez, Columbia Elementary School Rosa Rosas, Lasselle Elementary School Catalina Valdez-Taylor, Manuel L. Real Elementary School Alejandra Avila, Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School Catalina González, May Ranch Elementary School Mario Sagastume, Mead Valley Elementary School Liseth Wendy Maravilla, Rainbow Ridge Elementary School Adriana Hauser, Sierra Vista Elementary School Adriana Vázquez, Triple Crown Elementary School Alejandro Alcazar, Val Verde Elementary School Jose Saldana, Victoriano Elementary School Hannah De Lacy, Lakeside Middle School Elsa Canales, March Middle School Katie Ruiz, Tomás Rivera Middle School Laura Schoenfelder, Vista Verde Middle School Kristal Cullivan, Citrus Hill High School Gary López, Rancho Verde High School Elizabeth Pepe, Val Verde High School Refugio Santa Cruz, Val Verde/Student Success Academy

DELAC Members Maria Castillo, Avalon Elementary School Perla Rodriguez, Columbia Elementary School Zugey Olea & Carmen Soto, Lasselle Elementary School Guadalupe Caridad, Manuel L. Real Elementary School Stella Corbalan, Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary School Maria Ordones, May Ranch Elementary School Ana Andrade & Susana Morales, Mead Valley Elementary School Rosalba Navarro, Rainbow Ridge Elementary School Susana Villanueva, Sierra Vista Elementary School Ana Ruiz, Triple Crown Elementary School Zoila Cruz, Val Verde Elementary School Veronica Negrete & Sharon Ramirez, Victoriano Elementary School

Brenda Cardona, Lakeside Middle School Ruben Ruiz, March Middle School Maria Buenrostro, Tomás Rivera Middle School Celia Ruelas, Vista Verde Middle School Ana Muñoz, Citrus Hill High School Juana Acosta, Rancho Verde High School N/A, Val Verde High School N/A, Val Verde/Student Success Academy

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Acknowledgements (continued)

Carla de la Torre, Ed.D., Coordinator, English Learner Support Services TK-12 Language Assessment Center: Ivonne Fuentes-Ortega, Language Assessment Center Supervisor Aurora Del Real, Bilingual Assessment Technician Fernandina Palomera, Bilingual Assessment Technician Laura Rodas, Bilingual Assessment Technician Yolanda Villa, Bilingual Assessment Technician Bilingual Clerk Team: Erika Velasco, Educational Interpreter/Translator Supervisor Judith Alvarado, Bilingual Clerk Angélica Flores, Bilingual Clerk Karena López, Bilingual Clerk Family Engagement Center: Iliana Dodge, Family Engagement Specialist Maria González, Community Liaison Christina López, Community Liaison Porscha Morris, Community Liaison

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Introduction Val Verde Unified School District serves a diverse population in Riverside County. District enrollment of English Learners has increased from 850 in 1993 to over 4544 in 2014. In accordance with the state and federal guidelines, the district has implemented programs in order to meet the needs of the English Learner population, including both immigrant and heritage language students. The English Learner Master Plan (EL Master Plan) addresses the needs of all children of diverse language backgrounds. All students are expected to achieve academic success through varied methods of instruction, qualified teaching staff, and high expectations. This plan will address the components necessary to ensure that all English Learners are provided the opportunity to be successful: identification of English Learners, program design and evaluation, curriculum, staffing, instructional materials, and parent involvement. The purpose of this plan is to provide a framework of instruction for English Learners and to acquaint their teachers, administrators, and parents with federal, state, and district policies as well as programs, resources and staff/parent development opportunities. VVUSD personnel at the district and school level: teachers, counselors, instructional assistants, and administrators, are expected to follow the procedures specified in the English Learner Master Plan. With this in mind, the following goals have been established: ● Develop English proficiency as quickly and efficiently as possible ● Provide English Learners with a smooth transition into the core, standards-based curriculum and ensure academic success by continuing to develop academic English ● Provide equal access to the core, standards-based curriculum ● Develop a positive self-concept among English Learners ● Establish standards-based instruction and evaluation procedures by aligning district programs with the California English Language Development standards and benchmarks ● Provide staff and parents with a comprehensive overview of instructional practices and program options for English Learners ● Achieve standardization of instructional programs for English Learners district-wide ● Provide staff and parents with standards-based professional development opportunities ● Provide district personnel and parents with an accessible and usable master plan ● Develop awareness of student biculturalism, bilingualism, and bi-literacy through the Dual Language Immersion Program (parent choice) To better serve our English Learner program, our district has organized the following components in order to meet the needs of our English Learners: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Department of English Learners, with an administrator English Learner Language Assessment Center (LAC) Team English Learner/Bilingual & Reclassification Facilitators at each school site Interpreter-Translator Procedures and documents to organize and control our English Learner Program English Learner Green Folder which contains: CELDT assessments, reclassification/monitoring documentation 5|Page

Introduction (continued) Val Verde Unified School District remains strong in its belief that all appropriate learning opportunities for each English Learner enrolled in grade TK-12 must reflect the highest possible expectation for academic achievement. The development of the Val Verde English Learner Master Plan is based on instructional principles supported by research as well as implementation of current state and federal guidelines. The student's’ primary language will be utilized to support and reinforce the acquisition of oral, reading, and writing skills in English that lead to academic success. Consistent application of a well-designed, sequential, and exemplary English Language Development program will lead English Learners to linguistic competence in their second language. Specifically, the Val Verde Unified School District holds the following beliefs: ● High expectations and aspirations apply to every student in the district ● All students are entitled to equal access to the core, standards-based curriculum ● The goals of the English Learner programs are: o English proficiency o Academic achievement o Positive self-concept o Equal access to the core o Bilingualism and bi-literacy (per parent choice through the DLI program) ● Effective English Language Development (ELD) programs are guided by the same principles that direct all effective language arts programs. An exemplary ELD program is meaning-centered and communicative-based, which places an emphasis on language development in English appropriate to the evolving linguistic competence of the learner ● Primary language support assists in building literacy, academic vocabulary and cognitive skills for academic success in the core, standards-based curriculum ● Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) methodologies are used to provide equal access to the core, standards-based curriculum and these classes are aligned with the California Common Core State Standards in each discipline ● Awareness, understanding, and appreciation of cultural diversity are the cornerstones of a positive self-concept ● Building the capacity of professional staff is integral to an English Learner program. This can be accomplished through various methods including college coursework, in-service training, and workshops and conferences ● Successful implementation of any program requires careful planning, appropriate training, and consistent monitoring ● Parent and community involvement is a critical component in the educational process which helps overcome barriers and support the students’ academic success.

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Dimension I – Parent Outreach and Involvement EL 01 – Parent Outreach and Involvement The LEA sends notices of and holds regular meetings for the purpose of formulating and responding to the parents’ recommendations. Parents, staff, students, and community members participate in developing, implementing, and evaluating core and categorical programs. VVUSD sends notice off and holds regular meetings for the purpose of formulating and responding to the parents’ recommendations. For parents of English Learners, this is accomplished primarily through our English Learner Advisory Committees and our District English Learner Committee. VVUSD informs the parents how they can be involved in the education of their children and be active participants in assisting their children to: ● Attain English proficiency ● Achieve at high levels in core academic subjects ● Meet challenging state academic Common Core standards expected of all students VVUSD will inform parents/guardians of English Learners if the district has failed to make progress on the annual measureable achievement objectives (AMAO) within 30 days after such failure occurs. Val Verde Unified School District recognizes the importance of parental involvement and the positive effects it has in relation to a student’s academic performance. Educators must engage parents as partners in the educational process and help them develop a sense of efficacy, which translates into higher academic performance for their children. The district offers a wide range of opportunities for parental and community involvement, including: ● School Site Council (SSC) ● English Learner Task Force (ELTF) ● Family Math Night ● Family Reading Night ● Parent Teacher Organization (PTO) membership ● English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) membership ● Classroom involvement ● Parent training ● CABE and other conference attendance ● English as a Second Language (ESL) classes for parents ● Family Engagement Center Educators and other school staff have a crucial responsibility to communicate directly with parents on a regular basis: ● In the parents’ primary language ● To listen and respond to their concerns ● For positive home-school connection 7|Page

● ● ● ●

To communicate student expectations To value parents as a source of support, information, and assistance To assist parents in understanding school policies and procedures To demonstrate value of the student’s home language and culture

Every effort must be made to include parents in the educational process. A successful school program develops strong relationships between the school staff and parents and helps overcome barriers, such as language and cultural differences. For this reason, Val Verde Unified School District seeks to build more effective parent/school relationships through: ● Providing communications in the home language whenever possible ● Encouraging parents and community members to act as volunteers and aides ● Offering training programs, meetings, and workshops for parents to develop their leadership and parenting skills ● Providing classes to help the non-English speaking and/or unschooled parents (such as English as a Second Language) ● Organization of school visitations so parents become familiar and comfortable with the school environment ● Principal working closely with the ELAC President and Bilingual Facilitator to plan trainings and develop Agendas for ELAC meetings EL 02 – Translation of Information for Parents The LEA must provide parents and guardians with information on school and parent activities in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand. Notices in Primary Language Val Verde is committed to follow state guidelines in regards to parent communication: When 15 percent or more of students enrolled in a public school speak a single primary language other than English, as determined by language census data from the preceding year, all notices, reports, statements and records sent to parents of such students are written in English and the primary language.

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EL 03 – Private School Consultation and Participation The LEA must contact private school officials in the LEA enrollment areas to provide an opportunity to receive equitable Title III educational services and benefits to address the needs of eligible LEP and immigrant students, their teaches, and their families. What consultation is required under the equitable participation provision? The Uniform Provisions contain requirements for timely and meaningful consultation between appropriate public and private school officials. The goal of the consultation process is to design and implement a program that will provide equitable services and meet the needs of eligible private school students and/or teachers and other education personnel. Consultation between the entity receiving federal financial assistance and private school officials must occur before any decision is made that could affect the ability of private school students, teachers and other education personnel to receive benefits under ESEA and must continue throughout the implementation and assessment of activities. Consultation generally must include discussion on such issues as: how children's needs will be identified; what services will be offered; how and where the services will be provided; who will provide the services; how the services will be assessed and how the results of assessment will be used to improve those services; the amount of funds available for services; the size and scope of the services to be provided; and how and when decisions about the delivery of services will be made. In addition, a thorough consideration of the views of private school officials on the provision of contract services through potential third-party providers must take place, and, where the entity receiving assistance disagrees with the views of the private school officials on the provision of services through a contract, the entity must provide a written explanation of the reasons why the entity has chosen not to use a contractor. Title I—Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged Title I, Part A—Improving Basic Programs Operated by LEAs Title I, Part A, provides supplementary instruction by public school teachers or through a thirdparty contractor to students who are educationally disadvantaged and failing or most at risk of failing to meet high academic standards, and who live in areas of high poverty. Instruction may take place during the school day, before or after school, or in the summer. Title I services may be provided on site at the private school, including religiously affiliated schools, or at other locations. Funds are generated on the basis of the number of children from low-income families who reside in participating public school attendance areas and attend private schools. Private school students who reside within a Title I attendance area and who are failing or most at risk of failing to meet high academic standards are eligible for services. Services may include a targeted, assisted pullout model, supplementary instruction, direct instruction, computer-assisted instruction, tutoring, counseling, family literacy and early childhood programs. In addition, the law requires equitable participation of private school teachers of Title I students in professional development activities and of parents of Title I students in parent involvement activities. Title I is not governed by the Uniform Provisions; it has its own requirements. Under Title I, LEAs are required to maintain a written affirmation signed by an official for each participating private school that the required consultation has occurred. 9|Page

Title I, Part B—Reading First Reading First provides funding to implement comprehensive reading instruction for children in kindergarten through third grade. Funds must be used for reading programs; instructional materials; professional development; administering screening, diagnostic and classroombased reading assessments; collecting and reporting data; and promoting reading and library programs. Reading First is governed by the Uniform Provisions, and private school children in the areas served by public schools receiving Reading First funds are eligible for services. Title I, Part B, Subpart 3—Even Start Family Literacy Even Start Family Literacy provides funding to partnerships of LEAs and other public and private entities to support family literacy programs that integrate early childhood education, adult education, parenting education, and literacy activities for low-income families and their children from birth through age seven. The Even Start Family Literacy program is governed by the Uniform Provisions, and grant applicants are required to consult in a timely and meaningful manner with private schools in designing and implementing a program for school-aged students. Title I, Part C—Migrant Education Migrant Education provides financial assistance to improve education for migrant children. State education agencies (SEAs) provide services and activities either directly or through subgrants to local operating agencies (LOAs), which can be either an LEA or a public or nonprofit private agency. The Migrant Education program is governed by the Uniform Provisions and requires the equitable participation of private school migrant students and their teachers, and other education personnel in schools located in targeted areas. Title II—Preparing, Training and Recruiting High-Quality Teachers and Principals Title II, Part A—Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund

The Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund provides assistance for preparing, training, recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers. This program is governed by the Uniform Provisions, but the amount of funding available for services to private school personnel is governed by Section 9501 (b) (3), which requires equitable participation of private school teachers and other education personnel to the extent that the LEA uses its funds for professional development. For the purposes of determining the amount of program funds to be made available for services to private school teachers, the law “imputes” a minimum amount of program funds devoted to professional development as the total amount spent in fiscal year 2001 for professional development under the predecessor Eisenhower Professional Development Program and the Class Size Reduction Program. Activities may include improving teachers’ knowledge in the core academic subjects and effective instructional teaching strategies; technology integration training; teaching students with different learning styles; using assessments to improve instruction and student outcomes; involving parents more effectively; and education leadership development.

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Title II, Part B—Mathematics and Science Partnerships The Mathematics and Science Partnerships program provides funds to improve mathematics and science teaching through a variety of activities. At the current appropriations level, partnerships must include an SEA; engineering, math or science department of an institution of higher education (IHE); and a high-need LEA. Private schools may be members of these partnerships. Activities include professional development; stipends and scholarships for advanced coursework in mathematics, science or engineering; and programs to bring math and science teachers into contact with working scientists, mathematicians and engineers. This program is administered jointly with the National Science Foundation. The Mathematics and Science Partnerships program is governed by the Uniform Provisions and requires the equitable participation of teachers who teach in private schools located in school districts where grants are awarded. Title II, Part D—Enhancing Education Through Technology The Enhancing Education Through Technology program provides funds for innovative initiatives to support the integration of education technology into classrooms to improve teaching and learning. Activities include professional development in technology integration and the use of the Internet; distance learning initiatives; acquiring education technology; and using technology to enhance parental involvement. This program is governed by the Uniform Provisions and requires the equitable participation of students and teachers in private schools located in school districts where grants are awarded. Title III—Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students Title III, Part A—English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement

The English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement and Academic Achievement program provides funds for helping limited English proficient (LEP) children attain English proficiency and meet the same challenging state academic standards as all children are expected to meet. Funds must be used for increasing the English proficiency of LEP children by providing high-quality language instruction and high-quality professional development. Private school students and teachers whose schools are located within an LEA that receives a sub-grant from the state are eligible to participate in this program, as required by the Uniform Provisions. Title IV—21st Century Schools Title IV, Part A—Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities The Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act supports programs that foster a safe and drug-free learning environment. Authorized activities include drug, violence and suicide prevention programs; professional development and training; developing school security plans; conflict resolution, community service and character education programs; family involvement activities; counseling; mentoring; and emergency intervention services. The Uniform Provisions for the equitable participation of private school students apply to the Safe and Drug-Free Schools program, including the competitive grant programs awarded directly by the Department (National Coordinator program, Community Service Grant, Grants to Reduce Alcohol Abuse, and Mentoring programs). 11 | P a g e

Title IV, Part B—21st Century Community Learning Centers The 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program provides before-and after-school (including summer) services to children and their families that include academic enrichment activities, particularly for students who attend low-performing schools, to help them meet state and local student performance standards in core academic subjects. Activities may include remedial education, academic enrichment, art, music, tutoring, mentoring, recreation, technology, drug and violence prevention, counseling, character education and family literacy. The Uniform Provisions apply to the 21st CCLC program and require the equitable participation of private school students, teachers and other education personnel who are part of the target population. Title V—Promoting Informed Parental Choice and Innovative Programs Title V, Part A—Innovative Programs Innovative Programs support education reform and innovative school improvement programs to improve school, student and teacher performance. Private school students, teachers and other education personnel may receive professional development, library materials, educational equipment, and repair and minor remodeling or construction of school facilities. Other activities may include community service programs; consumer education; purchase of computer hardware and software; programs to hire and support school nurses; school-based mental health services; programs for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in schools; and parent and community involvement. The program has its own provisions for the equitable participation of private school students, teachers and other education personnel (section 5142). Title V, Part D, Subpart 6—Gifted and Talented Students The Gifted and Talented Students program provides funding for demonstration projects in activities designed to enhance the ability of schools to meet the special education needs of gifted and talented students (including economically disadvantaged individuals, individuals with limited English proficiency, and individuals with disabilities). Activities include training of personnel in the education of gifted and talented students and, where appropriate, in the use of gifted and talented services, materials and methods for all students. The program has its own provisions for the equitable participation of private school students, teachers and other education personnel. They require the secretary to ensure, where appropriate, that provision is made for the equitable participation of students and teachers in private schools, including the participation of teachers and other personnel in professional development programs serving such students.

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EL 04 – English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) A school site with 21 or more English Learners must have a functioning English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) that meets the following requirements: English Learners Advisory Committee (ELAC) State law requires that each public school, grades TK-12, with 21 or more English Learners form an English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) that meets the following requirements: 1. Parent members are elected by parents or guardians of English Learners. 2. Parents of English Learners constitute at least the same percentage of the committee membership as their children represent of the student body. 3. The ELAC has advised the School Site Council (SSC) on the development of the Single School Plan for Student Achievement. 4. The ELAC has advised the principal and staff on the school’s program for English Learners. 5. The ELAC assists in the development of the school’s: ● Needs Assessment ● Language Census Report ● Efforts to make parents aware of the importance of regular school attendance 6. The ELAC has received training materials and training, planned in full consultation with committee members, to assist members in carrying out their legal responsibilities. 7. The ELAC has the opportunity to elect at least one member to the DELAC or has participated in a proportionate regional representation scheme when there are 31 or more English Learner Parent Advisory Committees in the district. 8. Recognition of English Learner Program student achievements. Legal Requirements – Parent Advisory Committees Schools with 21 or more English Learners are required to establish a functioning English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) on programs and services for English Learners. The ELAC meets the following requirements: Formation: The school sends out written invitations (in English and Spanish) to all parents and often makes telephone calls to the parents of English Learners inviting them to the ELAC meeting. Typically, on the first ELAC meeting of the school year, there is an election in which all parents/guardians of English Learners have an opportunity to vote and elect the parent members of the committee. The school principal is responsible for establishing the ELAC. In addition, the school site principal works collectively with the ELAC president to create the agenda. Elections: Legal requirements for ELAC elections include: a. Parent/guardian members of English Learners elect parent members of the school committee or subcommittee. b. The parents/guardians are provided the opportunity to vote for committee members. c. Each school’s ELAC shall have the opportunity to elect at least one member to the District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC). 13 | P a g e

Composition Requirements: Parents of English Learners constitute at least the same percentage of the committee membership as their children represent of the student body. The principal and staff work diligently to ensure that parents of English Learners attend ELAC meetings. Major Function: The purpose of the ELAC is to advise the principal and school staff on programs and services for ELs and the School Site Council on the development of the Single School Plan for Student Achievement. ELAC also assists the school on other tasks listed below. Tasks: The committee advises and assists the school as follows: ● The ELAC advises the school principal and staff on: o The school’s program for English Learners. ● The ELAC advises the School Site Council (SSC) on: o The development of the Single School Plan for Student Achievement. ● The ELAC assists in the following: o The school’s needs assessment o The school’s annual language census (Language Census). o Efforts to make parents aware of the importance of regular school attendance. Training: The District and Site Administrator shall provide training for all ELAC members: o Appropriate training and materials to assist each member to carry out his or her legally-required advisory responsibilities. School Site Council: The ELAC advises the School Site Council (SSC) on the development of the Single School Plan for Student Achievement. This activity is documented in the minutes of the School Site Council meeting at which this involvement occurred. DELAC: ELAC Parents/guardians elect one or two members to the District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC) or have participated in a proportionate regional representation scheme when there are 31 or more parent advisory committees in the district. Monitoring: The Administrator for English Learner Program, Bilingual Facilitator, and principal continually review the implementation of the ELAC to ensure that all requirements are met. Documentation: All site ELAC documentation of ELAC sign-in sheets, agendas, and minutes are kept at the site. A copy of all documentation is sent to the Administrator for EL Programs for review and to be filed at district level.

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EL 05 – District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC) A LEA with 51 or more English Learners must have a functioning DELAC or a subcommittee of an existing district committee in which at least 51 of the members are parents (not employed by the district of English Learners. District English Learners Advisory Committee (DELAC) A district with 51 or more English Learners has a functioning DELAC or a subcommittee of an existing district committee in which at least 51% of the members are parents (not employed by the district) of English Learners. Annually, our DELAC members are trained on these topics and subsequently advise our Board of Education on at least the following tasks: 1. Development of a district master plan for educational programs and services for English Learners that takes into consideration the Single Plan for Student Achievement. 2. Conducting of a district-wide needs assessment on a school-by-school basis. 3. Establishment of district program, goals, and objectives for the program and services for English Learners. 4. Development of a plan to ensure compliance with any applicable teacher and instructional aide requirements. 5. Administration of the Annual Language Census report. 6. Review of and comment on the school district’s reclassification procedures. 7. Review of and comment on the written notifications required to be sent to parents and guardians. DELAC members receive training and materials, developed in consultation with the committee, that are appropriate to assist parents in carrying out their DELAC responsibilities. DELAC - Legal Requirements When a school district has 51 or more English Learners, the school district is required to establish a functioning District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC) for programs and services for English Learners. Composition Requirements: Parents or guardians of English Learners not employed by the district must constitute a majority membership (51% or more) of the committee. Elections: Each school English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC) must have the opportunity to elect at least one member to the DELAC. Major Function: The purpose of the DELAC, or subcommittee on English Learner education, is to become trained in and advise the Board of Education (e.g. in person, by letters and/or reports) on programs and services for English Learners listed below. Annually, our DELAC members are trained on these topics and subsequently advise our Board of Education on at least the following tasks:

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1. Development or revision of a district master plan for educational programs and services for English Learners that takes into consideration the Single School Plan for Student Achievement. 2. Conducting of a district wide needs assessment on a school-by-school basis. 3. Establishment of district program, goals, and objectives for programs and services for English Learners. 4. Development of a plan to ensure compliance with any applicable teacher and instructional aide requirements. 5. Administration of the Annual Language Census. 6. Review of and comment on the school district’s reclassification procedures. 7. Review of and comment on the written notifications required to be sent to parents and guardians. Training and Materials The district has provided training and training materials, planned in full consultation with committee members, appropriate to assist parent members in carrying out their DELAC responsibilities.

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Dimension II – Governance and Administration EL 06 – English Learner Identification and Assessment The LEA must properly identify and assess all students who have a primary language other than English. The district has properly identified, assessed, and reported all students who have a primary language other than English. At the time of enrollment, California public schools are required to determine the language(s) spoken in the home by each student. In order to gather this information, all parents/legal guardians are required to complete, sign and date a Home Language Survey. When a parent or legal guardian enrolls his/her child in our district for the first time, the parent/legal guardian completes the HLS as part of the District’s enrollment procedure at Centralized Registration. The HLS remains on file for each of the district’s students (including Migrant, Special Education, and Alternative Education enrollees). This information will assist schools in providing appropriate instruction for all students. The HLS is a state mandated survey used to determine the primary language of the student. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and California Education Code Section mandates the testing of all students identified initially on information that parents fill out on the Home Language Survey as other than English. If the responses to the questions on the HLS are all “English,” the student does not require assessment for language proficiency. Rather, the student is identified as English Only (EO) and placed in an English Language Mainstream (ELM) classroom. However, all students whose HLS indicates a language other than English on questions 1, 2, or 3 or if it is believed through observation that the student speaks another language in addition to English, the student must be assessed in English language skills on the California English Language Development Test (CELDT) within 30 calendar days of initial enrollment. Language Assessment Center (LAC) CELDT testing will be accomplished at the VVUSD Language Assessment Center (LAC) by trained testers when the parent comes to the LAC with student(s). The CELDT assessment is conducted by trained Assessment Technicians at our centralized Language Assessment Center. The Assessment Center will call the student’s previous district to determine prior placement, testing dates, and scores. If CELDT scores are less than one year old, the student may be placed according to the previous program placement and CELDT scores. After entering the scores in the VVUSD student information database system, the Language Assessment Center will forward scores to the school as part of the Green EL master folder CELDT – Annual Assessment for English Learners A state-approved assessment instrument, the California English Language Development Test (CELDT), is currently administered to determine English language proficiency skills. The CELDT is a criterion-referenced test based on the ELD Standards which assesses students’ English language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This test yields scores in 5 levels: 1 = Beginning, 2 = Early Intermediate, 3 = Intermediate, 4 = Early Advanced and 5 = Advanced. The child receives a score on each part of the test taken (Listening, Speaking, 17 | P a g e

Reading, and Writing) as well as an overall score. The score types used include raw score, scale score and proficiency level. A preliminary unofficial score is calculated at the Language Assessment Center for the purposes of placement and program options. These preliminary results and program options are communicated to the school site and the parent via the Parent/School Notification. Additionally, parents are provided with the English Learner Parent which provides an overview of the English Learner program, placement options, CELDT, and reclassification procedures. The tests are also forwarded for official scoring by the test publisher. Official test results are recorded in the student information system. In addition, these official results override the informal scoring in those cases where the scores differ. CELDT results and Parent/School Notification are stored at the Language Assessment Center and in the Green EL folder inside the student’s cumulative folder. The results are used to monitor student progress and program evaluation. The Administrator of the Language Assessment Center and Assessment Technicians attend a yearly training to remain current on test administration procedures. The assessment is conducted by abiding to all of the publisher’s instructions. Student Online ELD Matrix (TK-5) This informal assessment is administered to all English Learners by the classroom teacher based on observation. The score acquired by the ELD Matrix should be used as part of the student’s ELD grade. Sample of Online ELD Matrix (TK-5)

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Clarification of Practice Who Goes to the Language Assessment Center? All students whose parents have indicated a language other than English on lines 1, 2 or 3 of the Home Language Survey (HLS) must visit our Language Assessment Center (LAC) to be properly serviced our district. This includes students who have already been identified as: 1. Special Education students 2. Re-entering VVUSD students 3. Students possessing a CELDT bar graph 4. All entering Kindergarten students; including Ks from VVUSD preschools or TK classrooms 5. English Learners/IFEP/RFEP ***Send students with transcripts/withdrawal paperwork We must take each student through this process even if the student has an IEP or current CELDT scores in his/her possession, the student still needs to go to the LAC.

Why?

In order to be compliant with CDE and NCLB regulations and to guarantee that each student receives the appropriate services and instructional setting. 1. Initial language assessment; 2. Parent notification of assessment results 3. Placement options *****Please provide LAC with a copy of the HLS for EACH student enrolled****** Thank you for your support in helping parents understands that a visit to the LAC is part of the process of enrollment for students who may not have full English proficiency. If you have any questions regarding whether or not a student should be sent to the LAC, please contact the LAC @ (951) 940-6105.

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Home Language Survey – Sample Registration Form

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Identification, Assessment, & Program Placement Flow Chart HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY

English Only

Home Language other than English

(EO) Assess English language proficiency using CELDT

Place in the mainstream program

Grades TK-12 Assessed in Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing Initially Fluent English Proficient (IFEP

English Learner (EL) *Requires Parental Exception Waive Place in the appropriate EL program

*Alternative Instruction Place in English Mainstream

SEI

English Mainstream

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EL 07 – Parent/Guardian Notifications The LEA must provide notification to parents and guardians of their child’s initial English language proficiency assessment results. Notification of Results of Initial Assessment Parents whose children speak a language other than English must be notified within 30 calendar days of the completion and results of their child’s initial assessments. In VVUSD, results of initial assessments are shared with the parent(s) in a conference with a bilingual LAC staff member at the LAC immediately after the testing. The purpose of the conference is to explain the English proficiency and primary language assessment results, program options, student recommended placement, exit criteria, and the waiver process for an alternative program. This information is also provided in written form by means of the English Learner Parent Guide. Parents are asked to sign and date all documents and then given copies of the documents. Assessment results are entered for each student in the Student Information System by the LAC personnel. In addition, the results are provided to the child’s school and teacher(s). A copy of the Home Language Survey and a copy of the School/Parent Notification are placed in the students’ Green EL Folder. The LAC staff sends folders to the respective sites, where the EL Green Folder becomes a part of the student’s cumulative record file. Bilingual Facilitator, Reclassification Facilitator, and/or other district and site personnel maintains the student’s Green EL folder. Student Placement Using this assessment information and program placement recommendations, the principal and/or designated trained staff place the student in the most appropriate instructional setting. The principal, teacher, or Bilingual Facilitator can clarify any questions or review any concerns the parent(s)/legal guardian may have regarding testing results or program placement recommendations. Initial Notification of Program Placement Parents/guardians of English Learners are notified no later than 30 days after the beginning of the school year (or, during the school year, within two weeks of the child being placed in the program) of their child’s initial English Language and primary-language proficiency assessment results, their child’s language designation, English proficiency level, program placement, program options, exit criteria, and for English Learners on IEPs, and how the current program will meet objectives of IEP. All of this information is communicated by our Language Assessment Center staff in both oral and written form. Documents are translated into Spanish for Spanish-speaking parents of English Learners. Annual Official CELDT Result Notification Parents/guardians of English Learners are notified annually of their child’s English Language proficiency assessment results within thirty calendar days following receipt of official results of testing from the test contractor. The district notifies parents of official tests results within thirty calendar days from receipt of test scores from publisher. Additionally, the district notifies parents of placement options by means of the Parent Notification. 22 | P a g e

Title III Annual Placement Notification VVUSD sends out the Annual Placement Notification to parents/guardians of English Learners, no later than 30 days after the completion of the test, of their student’s language designation, English proficiency level, program placement, program options, exit criteria, English Learner graduation rate, and for English Learners on IEPs, how the current program will meet objectives of IEP. Transfer of Students When students transfer between schools in the district, all relevant data regarding the student’s English Learner assessment history including current scores, current student placement, academic progress, and interventions are sent to the receiving school or are already available in the student information database. The new school site does not redo the English language identification process. Students newly entering the district will have the relevant assessment and placement information entered into the student information database within ten (10) days of enrollment by the LAC personnel. When the site receives the student cumulative record from the former school district/school, the record will be reviewed by site personnel to check for any relevant data pertaining to English Learner status and/or services provided in the former district. Site personnel will forward pertinent English Learner data to the LAC. Such information may impact initial assessment data and placement of the student; in that case, adjustments in the database and program will be made accordingly. If assessment data is incomplete or missing from the student’s cumulative record, the Bilingual Facilitator will arrange with the Language Assessment Center to have assessments done so that the student will be properly placed.

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CELDT Student Results Parent Notification Sample For

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Student Test Results and Classroom Placement Notification Sample Forms

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Student Program Options Parent Notification Sample Form

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EL 08 – Implementation, Monitoring, & Revision of LEA Plans A LEA operating Title III programs must annually update, implement, and monitor Goal 2 of the approved LEA Plan. Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs) from CELDT, California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), and local Benchmark assessment data. On the district level, English Learner (EL) data will be collected annually to determine: ● The percentage of students who gain one CELDT proficiency level annually until they reach the English Proficiency level and then maintain that level (AMAO 1) ● The percentage of students who gain a CELDT score of Early Advanced Overall, with all skill areas at the Intermediate level or above (AMAO 2) ● The percentage of students making adequate yearly progress (AYP - frozen as of 2014) on the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) in Language Arts and Mathematics (must meet academic targets for AMAO 3) ● The percentage of ELs and reclassified students meeting grade level standards in English/Language Arts ● The number of English Learners graduating from high school ● The number of English Learners retained each year ● The percentage of English Learners (grades 9 – 12) who enroll and complete eligible classes for California State University and University of California. 1. Montoring through CELDT data is used as an annual measurement of student progress in language proficiency. English Learners’ scale scores in listening, speaking, reading and writing are printed on all data reports to sites and individual teachers. Teachers and staff may access longitudinal and comparison of CELDT scores through Aeries Student Database and/or EADMS. 2. Analyzing Results of AMAOs: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives are distributed to all principals so that they are aware of their school’s performance on the AMAOs. Although the AMAOs reflect district outcomes and accountability, progress in AMAO 1, 2 and 3 is also disaggregated by school. The Department of English Learner Programs shares AMAO outcomes with each principal in late Spring. This information guides each school in setting goals for ELD programs and/or reclassification expectations. AMAO 1: Percent of English Learners Making Annual Progress in Learning English AMAO 1 requires annual increases in the percentage of pupils making progress in learning English on the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). Pupils are expected to meet the annual growth target of gaining one proficiency level or attaining and remaining at the Early Advanced or Advanced levels of English proficiency. AMAO 2: Percent of English Learners Attaining the English Proficient Level AMAO 2 requires annual increases in the percentage of children attaining English proficiency. English proficiency is defined as a score of Early Advanced or Advanced Overall on the CELDT, with all skill areas at the Intermediate Level or above.

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AMAO 3: Annual Yearly Progress for English Learner Subgroup AMAO 3 holds Title III districts accountable for meeting targets for the English Learner (EL) subgroup that are required of all schools and Local Education Agencies (LEA) under NCLB. The academic achievement targets specify the percent of ELs that must be proficient or above in English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics as measured by the state assessment (CAASPP). VVUSD informs parents/guardians of English Learners if the district has failed to make progress on the annual measureable achievement objectives (AMAO) within 30 days after such failure occurs.

Sample Notice to Parents of Failure to Meet AMAO 1, 2 and/or 3

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Monitoring Tools In addition to our local district monitoring tools, VVUSD uses two other data resources to evaluate AMAOs and student progress through the ELD Standards. EL Student Catch-Up Plan Assisting Students in Recouping Academic Deficits The district and schools monitor progress of English Learners to prevent any academic deficits from developing; however, if such deficits are discovered, appropriate actions to overcome them are taken before they become irreparable. Students who need to recoup academic deficits, students who do not qualify (DNQ) for reclassification, as well as students who have not made expected progress through CELDT levels are targeted for assistance in their area(s) of need. Catch-Up Plans (CUPs) are generated electronically based on specific criteria. CUPs are completed online using the student information database indicating interventions, goals, and results of interventions. At the elementary level, teachers meet with parents during Parent-Teacher conferences to explain the area(s) of student concern and goal(s). At the secondary level, teachers meet with parents to explain area(s) of student concern and goal(s). Teachers utilize the Catch-Up Plan for these students and document academic interventions as well as Bilingual Intervention Goals (BIG) for the student. Schools provide appropriate and additional educational services which include some of the following: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Placement in a supplemental program (Small Group Assistance provided by bilingual instructional aides) Cross-age or peer tutoring Cooperative learning techniques Individual or small group assistance/instruction by a teacher Extended day (before or after school ) tutoring programs * High School Saturday school * Remedial summer intervention programs * Summer English Learner Academy * Referral to the Language Assessment Team (LAT)

* If funding is available

CUP – Aeries.net Online Sample Form

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Sample of English Learner Monitoring Green Folder Record Sheet

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EL 09 – EL Program Inclusion in Development of the SPSA The EL program must be included in the development of the SPSA. In 2001, the California legislature amended the planning requirements for schools that participate in state and federal categorical programs funded through the Consolidated Application process, creating the Single Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA). Its stated purpose is to "improve the academic performance of all students to the level of the performance goals, as established by the Academic Performance Index." The Academic Performance Index (API) is a rating of schools based on their performance on state academic assessments. The requirements for monitoring these categorical programs are part of the same legislation. The SPSA planning process and local compliance monitoring are directly related. Annually, Val Verde schools review student performance data from a variety of state and local assessments, then work in collaboration with their Site Councils and ELACs to develop their SPSA. SPSAs are approved by the site’s SSC in December or January, and by the Governing Board in January of each school year. For further information on SPSA, please contact your child’s school or Val Verde district office. This legislation established the following eight requirements for school plans: 1. School districts must assure "that school site councils have developed and approved a plan, to be known as the Single Plan for Student Achievement for schools participating in programs funded through the consolidated application process, and any other school program they choose to include…" 2. School plans must be developed "with the review, certification, and advice of any applicable school advisory committees…" 3. Any plans required by programs funded through the Consolidated Application, the School and Library Improvement Block Grant, the Pupil Retention Block Grant, and NCLB Program Improvement must be consolidated into a single plan. 4. The content of the plan must be aligned with school goals for improving student achievement. 5. School goals must be based upon "an analysis of verifiable state data, including the Academic Performance Index…and the English Language Development test…and may include any data voluntarily developed by districts to measure student achievement…" 6. The plan must address how Consolidated Application funds will be used to "improve the academic performance of all students to the level of the performance goals, as established by the Academic Performance Index…" 7. The plan must be "reviewed annually and updated, including proposed expenditures of funds allocated to the school through the Consolidated Application, by the school site council…" 8. Plans must be reviewed and approved by the governing board of the local educational agency "whenever there are material changes that affect the academic programs for students covered by programs" funded through the Consolidated Application.

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EL 10 – Inventory For all categorical programs, the LEA must maintain an inventory record of each piece of equipment with an acquisition cost of $500 or more per unit that is purchased with EIA-LEP and Title III. Val Verde Unified School District maintains inventory record of each piece of equipment purchased for all categorical programs. Record of such equipment includes type, model, serial number, funding source, acquisition date, cost, location, and current condition. Additionally, should transfer, replacement, and/or disposition of the item becomes obsolete or unusable, Val Verde conducts a physical inventory check. Record of purchases and/transfer is kept for a minimum of two years.

Sample of Inventory Record Sheet

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Dimension III – Funding EL 11 – Supplement, Not Supplant, with Title III & EIA-LEP General fund resources must be used to provide services and program for English Learners, including English language development and access to the core curriculum. The provision of such services and programs must not be contingent on the receipt of state or federal supplementary funds. ELD Materials and Instructional Time English Learners in Grades TK-12 access state-approved, standards-based ELD materials for their ELD instruction. These supplementary instructional materials are used “to accelerate pupils as rapidly as possible” towards grade level proficiency in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Materials have been verified by the California Department of Education as being substantially correlated to identified state standards. A full selection of ELD materials is used at each of our schools. In accordance with district guidelines, daily ELD instructional time has been allocated for each English Learner: 30 minutes for Kindergarten through fifth grade and double block (2 class periods) for all English Learners in grades 6th through 12th. For English Learners in mainstream settings (generally, CELDT Levels 3, 4, and 5), ELD instruction is focused on the EL’s identified need and delivered and monitored by the classroom teacher. Val Verde Unified School District ELD Instructional Resources Grades TK – 5 Medallion (Houghton Mifflin) Core Adoption Intensive Intervention Grades 4-5 Inside (National Geographic/Hampton-Brown) Supplemental Materials HM-ELD (Houghton Mifflin) o

Val Verde is currently undergoing through a “piloting phase” composed by an Adoption Curriculum Committee and teachers from every elementary site to choose the most effective program for our students.*

Grades 6 – 8 Supplemental/Intervention Materials Inside (Hampton-Brown) Inside the USA (Hampton-Brown) for EL Newcomers and Special Education Grades 9 - 12 Supplemental/Intervention Materials Edge (Hampton-Brown) Inside the USA (Hampton-Brown) for EL Newcomers and Special Education

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EL 12 – Time Accounting Requirements The LEA must properly assess charges for direct or indirect costs of Title III LEP and Immigrant funds for salaries and wages in proportion to the allowable and identified quantity and duties of employees.

All Val Verde employees paid in part from Title II and in part from other revenue is required to complete a Personnel Activity Report (PAR), each pay period. Val Verde employees funded solely under Title III must complete a semiannual certification of such employment. Additionally, stipends directly affecting English Learners are officially recorded, approved by cabinet and board, and updated on a yearly basis by.

Sample of Stipends Servicing English Leaners

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Dimension IV – Standards, Assessments, and Accountability EL 13 – Evaluation of English Learner Program Effectiveness A program evaluation shall be provided by the LEA and shall be used to determine: *Necessary Improvements to programs and activities for which Title III have been used for LEP and immigrant students. *The effectiveness of programs and activities in assisting EL students to attain proficiency and to meet academic achievement and content standards. The district implements a process and criteria to determine the effectiveness of programs for English Learners, including: A way to demonstrate that the programs for English learners produce within a reasonable period of time: 1. English language proficiency comparable to that of average native speakers of English in the district 2. Academic results indicating that English learners are achieving and sustaining parity of academic achievement with students who entered the district’s school system already proficient in English An ongoing mechanism to use the procedures described above to improve district-wide and school site EL program implementation, and to modify the program, as needed, to ensure that each English learner achieves full proficiency in English and academic achievement at grade level as rapidly as possible. Site Level Program Evaluation Principals are responsible for monitoring, evaluating, and revising the program for English Learners at their school based on the goals set in their SPSA. The site Bilingual Facilitator and Reclassification Facilitator provide staff guidance and in-service which includes CELDT proficiency levels, program placement, documentation for Federal Program Monitoring (FPM), ELD standards, SDAIE strategies, assessment of ELs, reclassification, intervention strategies and other pertinent program needs. Teachers use on-going assessment, multiple measures, ELD Benchmarks (CELDT Levels), ELD Standards and parent conferences to evaluate the effectiveness of their classroom program. Teachers have access to data to inform instruction and to monitor how effectively and efficiently English Learners are: ● Acquiring English and “closing the gap” academically ● Meeting grade level state standards If, after reviewing and analyzing various data, the Principal, Bilingual Facilitator, Reclassification Facilitator, staff and parents conclude that English Learners at their site are not achieving at expected levels as indicated in the SPSA, the Language Assessment Team (LAT) needs to meet to develop goals, objectives and activities which will remedy the situation. Fiscal resources may be required to accomplish these goals. This information must be disseminated to the various stakeholders on campus (ELAC, SSC, and Staff). Specific 35 | P a g e

plans for English Learners should be discussed with ELAC and the SSC. The SSC will then utilize current EL data and feedback from all stakeholders to readdress and, if necessary, revise the SPSA goals. Following SSC approval, the plan will be submitted to the Coordinator of State and Federal Programs for review and then submitted to the School Board for final approval. On an annual basis, the district distributes the English Learner Program Parent Survey to all parents of English Learners and Teacher Program Evaluation to teachers providing EL services at all sites. The questionnaire/survey provides parents and teachers an opportunity to make suggestions and recommendations for the EL program. Results are taken into consideration for modifying and improving the EL Program. Val Verde Unified School District has established high expectations for all students, including English Learners. We hold all students accountable for achieving high standards. We also recognize that English Learners face a challenge that is more difficult than that faced by their native-English speaking peers. Our English Learners must develop full proficiency in English as they work to achieve grade-level Common Core State Standards. In order to ensure this, the district has established a process and criteria to determine the effectiveness of the English Learner program. This multi-faceted process includes: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs) from CELDT, California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), and local Benchmark assessment data. On the district level, English Learner (EL) data is collected annually to determine: ● The percentage of students who gain one CELDT proficiency level annually until they reach the English Proficiency level and then maintain that level (AMAO 1) ● The percentage of students who gain a CELDT score of Early Advanced Overall, with all skill areas at the Intermediate level or above (AMAO 2) ● The percentage of students making adequate yearly progress (AYP - frozen as of 2014) on the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) in Language Arts and Mathematics (must meet academic targets for AMAO 3) ● The percentage of ELs and reclassified students meeting grade level standards in English/Language Arts ● The number of English Learners graduating from high school ● The number of English Learners retained each year ● The percentage of English Learners (grades 9 – 12) who enroll and complete eligible classes for California State University and University of California. Education Services staff will gather and compile annual assessment data to measure the effectiveness of the English Learner program. This information will be given to the Assistant Superintendent, Education Services, which will then provide the mechanism to alter and modify the program if needed.

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Methods for Collecting Data All of the information for the district reports can be collected from three existing databases: EADMS, AERIES and CALPADS. The Director of Assessment and Accountability and the Val Verde Unified School District Informational Technology Team oversee these databases and the dissemination of data. To determine the percentage of English Learners who are meeting grade level standards, the district takes into account the following factors: ● CELDT ● Teacher Recommendation ● District Writing Assessment Scores ● California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress results ● Report Card Grades ● Benchmark Assessments/JITTERS

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EL 14 – Reclassification The LEA must reclassify a pupil from EL to proficient in English by using a standard process and criteria. The Val Verde Unified School District has adopted a reclassification process to enable students initially identified as English Learners to exit specialized program services and participate without further language assistance as Fluent English Proficient students. English Learners shall be reclassified as Reclassified Fluent-English Proficient (R-FEP) when they have acquired the English language skills necessary to receive instruction and achieve academic progress in English only instructional setting at a level equivalent to students of the same age or grade whose primary language is English. The participation of teachers, support staff, school administrators, and parents is required in the reclassification process. The reclassification criteria includes multiple measures to ensure both proficiency in the English language and participation equal to that of average native speakers in the school’s regular instructional program. An English Learner is reclassified from English Learner to proficient in English by using a process and criteria that include, but are not limited to: 1. Assessment of English Language proficiency (CELDT) 2. Comparison of student performance in basic skills, such as the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) English Language Arts (ELA) and/or Local District Assessments. 3. Teacher evaluation that includes, but is not limited to, the pupil’s academic performance. “Teacher” refers to the classroom teacher and other certificated staff with direct responsibility for teaching or placement decisions of the pupil. 4. Opportunity for parent opinion and consultation during the reclassification process.

Reclassification Procedures Reclassifications are initiated throughout the year. The Language Assessment Center provides each site Facilitator with a list of English Learners who are candidates for reclassification (FEP-C) as determined by an overall CELDT proficiency level of Early Advanced or Advanced and each skill area proficiency level as Intermediate or higher. At grade TK-12 levels, the appropriate site Reclassification Facilitator initiates the reclassification process. The LAC collects reclassifications criteria, then places it on forms, and forwards the reclassification forms to the site Reclassification Facilitator. The Reclassification Facilitator forwards the information to the core teachers for their input. If the student meets the criteria, the Reclassification Facilitator schedules a meeting with the Language Assessment Team (LAT). A notice must be sent home in the parent’s primary language informing the parent of the meeting time and date at least two weeks in advance. An effort must be made to include parental input in the reclassification process.

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The Language Assessment Team (LAT) is comprised of members selected from the following: ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Parent (when possible) Classroom and/or ELD Teacher Counselor School Site Bilingual Facilitator as needed School Site Reclassification Facilitator Principal or Principal’s Designee Interpreter (when required) Student (when appropriate) Other school staff (e.g., Special Education Teacher)

When the Language Assessment Team meets, the student’s progress is discussed and concerns are noted on the reclassification form. If the LAT approves reclassification, the student is then designated as FEP-R/M. The team makes a recommendation for classroom placement for the next term or school year, as well as time frame for progress monitoring. All participating members of the LAT must sign the reclassification form, as well as the site principal, and then the form is sent to the VVUSD Language Assessment Center office for review and inputted into the student information database. After data input, the form is placed in the English Learner Green Master Folder in the student’s cumulative file. For grades 7-12, the counselor takes the EL student out of any ELD program(s) and places the RFEP student in the mainstream program. A letter is sent home in the parent’s home language explaining if the student reclassified or not. The Reclassification Criteria (see below) are aligned to and/or exceed State legal requirements and validate each student’s readiness to exit from specialized English Learner programs by demonstrating achievement and mastery of grade-appropriate standards in the following areas:

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2015-2016 EL Basic Skills Options for VVUSD Redesignation for RFEP

Redesignation Grade Level TK & K 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th

Option 1 Smarter Balanced ELA Summative Assessment

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Option 2 ELA Benchmark Assessments Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Option 3 Basic Skills Assessments Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Option Descriptions Option 1: A score on the most recent Summative Assessment at the Scaled Score midpoint of Level 2 or higher. Option 2: A score on the current or previous (always the most recent) aggregate (sum of all end-of-Trimester/Quarter ELA Benchmarks for the year) or comprehensive ELA Benchmark at the midpoint of Level 2 or higher (Proficient or higher for TK-2nd grade). For TK/K these assessments are titled “Multiple Measures/” Option 3: A score on the redesignation grade or previous grade level (always the most recent) 2013 ELA Basic Skills Assessments (BSAs) at the midpoint of the Basic projected performance level or higher (proficient for TK-2nd grade). Modified BSAs are available for administration to Special Education students where deemed appropriate. NOTE: Meeting any one of the indicated Options is evidence of ELA Basic Skills attainment. Meeting one or more of these options does not, however, automatically qualify a student for Redesignation. All other Redesignation criteria must be met.

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Reclassification Criteria Grades TK – 2 CATEGORY

CRITERIA

District Benchmark Assessments

Score of PROFICIENT or better OR

ELA Comprehensive Standards Assessment

Score of PROFICIENT or better (Grade 2 Only)

AND THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: CELDT Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing

Intermediate or higher

CELDT Overall

Early Advanced or Advanced

District Writing Prompt

Rubric score of 3 (out of 4 points) / B grade (or higher)

ELD/Reading/Language Arts Grade

B or better

Teacher Recommendation

Teacher writes a letter of recommendation

Parent Notification/Consultation

Parents are notified 2 weeks in advance/encouraged to attend the LAT meeting to discuss reclassification.

Reclassification Criteria Grades 3 – 12 CATEGORY

CRITERIA Grades 3-12 = Score of NEARLY MET (Mid. Level 2 or higher)

CAASSP-ELA

OR District Benchmark Assessments

Score of BASIC or better OR

ELA Comprehensive Standards Assessment

Score of BASIC or better AND THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

CELDT Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing

Intermediate or higher

CELDT Overall

Early Advanced or Advanced

District Writing Prompt ELD/Reading/Language Arts Grade Teacher Recommendation Parent Notification/Consultation

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Modified Reclassification Criteria Grades TK – 2 CATEGORY

CRITERIA

Modified District Benchmark Assessments

Score of PROFICIENT or better OR

Modified ELA Comprehensive Standards Assessment

Score of PROFICIENT or better (Grade 2 Only)

AND THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: CELDT Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing

Intermediate or higher

CELDT Overall

Early Advanced or Advanced

District Writing Prompt

Rubric score of 3 (out of 4 points) / B grade (or higher)

ELD/Reading/Language Arts Grade

B or better

Teacher Recommendation

Teacher writes a letter of recommendation

Parent Notification/Consultation

Parents are notified 2 weeks in advance/encouraged to attend the LAT meeting to discuss reclassification.

Modified Reclassification Criteria Grades TK – 2 CATEGORY

CRITERIA Grades 3-12 = Score of NEARLY MET (Mid. Level 2 or higher)

CAASSP-ELA

OR Modified District Benchmark Assessments

Score of BASIC or better OR

Modified ELA Comprehensive Standards Assessment

Score of BASIC or better

AND THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: CELDT Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing

Intermediate or higher

CELDT Overall

Early Advanced or Advanced

District Writing Prompt ELD/Reading/Language Arts Grade Teacher Recommendation Parent Notification/Consultation

Rubric score of 2 (out of 4 points) / C grade (or higher) C or better Teacher writes a letter of recommendation Parents are notified 2 weeks in advance/encouraged to attend the LAT meeting to discuss reclassification. 42 | P a g e

Reclassification: Decision Guide Comparison of Performance in Basic Skills

Student Remains an English Learner

 No 

Review results of latest English-Language Arts Content Standards Test. Does student meet the district’s cut point (a score within the range of Basic on the state standardized assessment) Yes

Assessment of English Proficiency

Student Remains an English Learner

No





Review CELDT results from annual assessment. Does student score at Early Advanced overall and score at Intermediate or higher in listening,

speaking, reading, and writing? Yes

Student Remains an English Learner

No

Teacher Evaluation of Student Academic Performance

 

Review the student’s academic performance. Does student meet academic performance indicators set by the district? Yes

Parent Option and Consultation 



Provide notice to parents/guardians of their right to participate in the reclassification process. Encourage them to participate in reclassification process and face-to-face

Reclassification    

Reclassify the student as FEP (Fluent English Proficient). Notify parents/guardians of reclassification. Update school/district records. Monitor the student’s progress for two years.

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Did Not Qualify for Reclassification For students who Did Not Qualify for reclassification, the DNQ box is checked at the top of the reclassification form. No attached documentation is required for DNQs. The form must be signed by the student’s teacher, Bilingual Facilitator, and Reclassification Facilitator. The Catch-up Plan for DNQ for Reclassification should be completed online, interventions noted and put into action, printed, and attached to the DNQ-Reclassification form. The original DNQ Reclassification form and Catch-Up Plan are sent to the Language Assessment Center to update student’s record. The LAC Team then sends the forms back to the site and will be placed in the student’s EL Green Master File.

Two Year Monitoring Follow-up Procedures for Reclassified Students Students who are reclassified to FEP-R/M must be monitored for a period of two years to ensure that they are making satisfactory academic progress without EL services. Monitoring takes place immediately upon a student being reclassified. The Bilingual Facilitator or Reclassification Facilitator at each school site is responsible for monitoring reclassified students. Reclassification Facilitators review student academic achievement data on the Follow-Up Monitoring provided by the LAC and determine if the student is maintaining satisfactory progress. The Reclassification Facilitator will return forms to LAC along with Catch-Up Plans when applicable. Once LAC has inputted the information into database, forms will be sent back to sites and are to be placed in the green English Learner Green Master File in the student’s cumulative file. Follow-up procedures include the following: ● Examination of student grades at each grading period for two years following reclassification ● Review progress of CAASPP ELA – score & level ● Review progress of District Benchmark Assessments ● Teacher input on student progress in core academic areas If a student’s progress is not acceptable, interventions shall be noted in a Catch-Up Plan. Interventions may include but are not limited to: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Student/teacher/parent conference Specialized academic assessment Specialized reading, writing or math instruction Additional English Language Development instruction Placement in reading, writing or math support class After school academic support programs Summer School (when funding available)

If a student’s performance is satisfactory for the full two years, the student is recommended for exit from English Learner Services. Exit from services is marked on the last monitoring form. Signatures from the site Bilingual Facilitator, Reclassification Facilitator, and site Administrator are needed on the form. The form is then to be sent to LAC to be inputted into the database. Once inputted, it shall be returned to the site and shall be placed in the Green English Learner folder in the student cumulative file. The student is then designated FEP-X and no longer requires monitoring. 44 | P a g e

Reclassification (Exit) Criteria The goal of the English learner program is for students to become fully proficient in English and to master the Common Core State Standards for academic achievement as rapidly as possible. This district’s reclassification Exit criteria are listed below: Category

LEA Criteria

Successful LAC and Site Monitoring Period

2 Year Monitoring Period

Comparison of Performance in Basic Skills: Local Benchmark Assessment - ELA

PROFICIENT or better (Grades TK-2)

Comparison of Performance in Basic Skills: Local Benchmark Assessment - ELA

BASIC or better (Grades 3-12)

Reading/Language Arts Grade

B or better (Grades TK – 2)

Reading/Language Arts Grade

C or better (Grades 3-12)

Parental Opinion and Consultation

Sign form provided by LAC

Teacher Approval

Sign form provided by LAC

Bilingual And Reclassification Approval

Sign form provided by LAC

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Sample Reclassification Form

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Sample Parent Notice for LAT/Reclassification Meeting

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Sample Reclassification Meeting Notice to Parents

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Sample Reclassified Student Monitoring Form

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Dimension V – Staffing and Professional Development EL 15 – Teacher EL Authorization Teachers assigned to provide English language development and instruction in subject courses for English Learners must be appropriately authorized or are actively in training for an appropriate EL authorization. In order to provide the highest quality program for English Learners, Val Verde Unified School District is committed to having an adequate number of appropriately credentialed teachers assigned to English Learner classrooms. These teachers must hold appropriate authorizations approved by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). Teachers that are assigned to the Structured English Immersion (SEI) classrooms must have a BCLAD certification or be in training for it, or have a CLAD certification and may be assigned a bilingual instructional aide. Teachers that are assigned to the English Language Mainstream Classroom must have a CLAD certification or be in training to achieve it. Newcomer Program

Structured English Immersion

English Language Mainstream

English

BCLAD or In Training or CLAD with a Bilingual Instructional Aide (if available)

BCLAD or In Training or CLAD with a Bilingual Instructional Aide (if available)

CLAD or In Training

No special authorization required

Only

Paraprofessional Staffing Due to the passage of “No Child Left Behind of 2001” (NCLB), now titled the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), paraprofessionals working in a program supported with Title I funds who assist in classroom instruction will have until January 8, 2006 to complete one of the following requirements: ● Obtain an associates or higher degree, or ● Complete two years of higher education study, or** ● Pass a formal state or local academic assessment that demonstrates knowledge of, and the ability to assist in teaching reading, writing, and mathematics or reading, writing, and mathematics readiness. Note: We would like to encourage all paraprofessionals working as a classroom instructional aide, regardless whether the aide’s position is funded through Title I or other funding sources, to take the four-part exam IF they have not met option one or two above. Human Resources administration has scheduled testing dates for “paraprofessionals” desiring option three. ** State Board of Education (SBE) has clarified that for the NCLB requirement “Two years of study” is defined as 48 semester units. 50 | P a g e

In order to provide English Learners with support in their primary language, Val Verde Unified School District utilizes bilingual instructional aides in the classroom. The role of the instructional aide is to aid the teacher in implementing an effective English Learner program through: ● ● ● ● ●

Helping students to develop language skills through one-on-one and small group work Assisting the teacher by reinforcing lessons in the primary language Assisting the teacher in the development and preparation of instructional materials Increasing home-school communication Acting as a community role model

The school site must provide adequate time for the teacher and aide to plan together. However, the teacher is responsible for the instruction and supervision of his/her students at all times. Qualifications and Competencies A bilingual instructional aide must have the following qualifications: ● ● ● ●

AA degree or passed a proficiency exam Possess a high school diploma Understand the culture(s) represented in the classroom Be fluent in English and the primary language of the students being served

In addition, he/she must demonstrate the following competencies: ● ● ● ●

Knowledge of vocabulary necessary for most academic and social topics Ability to translate and interpret between English and the student’s primary language Use and react appropriately to basic non-verbal communications within the target culture Be able to communicate effectively with parents and community members

Training Component All bilingual instructional aides will participate in on-going trainings throughout the course of the school year in order to improve the support and reinforcement needed for academic success of the English Learner. The training of instructional aides will be based on the following: ● ● ● ● ●

Language and literacy instructional support and development SDAIE methodologies Assessment procedures Classroom management Translation (only for students during instruction)

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The district uses Bilingual Instructional Aides to support classroom instruction in the following manner: ● Help with vocabulary development ● Help with sight words, grammar, language arts, writing, vocabulary, etc. ● Work with small groups, such as guided reading or any other subject ● Help with math vocabulary and math facts ● Monitor students ● Help with homework, especially when parents don’t know how to do it ● Preview/review approach ● Read content area material in Spanish ● Explain/clarify concepts in Spanish ● One-to-one testing ● Help with running records ● Listen to students read on a one to one basis ● Translate lesson objectives ● Translate parent letters ● Translate during parent conferences, open house, etc. ● Explain/teach reading strategies to parents, especially higher order thinking skills ● Explain procedures to parents and students such as homework policies, location of facilities, etc. ● Make phone calls to Spanish speaking parents ● Talk to parents during zero period (secondary sites) ● Talk to parents in the morning while the teacher is taking attendance, etc. *Community Liaison (Bilingual) *If funding is available Under general supervision, to provide a broad range of liaison duties between the school and community; assist parents in understanding school procedures in and out of ELAC, programs, and goals; and assist the school in maintaining contact and communication with the parents it serves; to do related work as may be required. Examples of duties: ● Contact parents at their homes, in person or by phone, obtaining information about students which will help teachers in providing information to the parents about the school and its policies and programs ● Inform parents of child’s progress and problems ● Promote a positive relationship between home, school, and community ● Make referrals to community agencies for needs relating to welfare, housing, family counseling, and employment ● Assist the school nurse in conducting home visits, health screening programs, immunization follow-ups ● Process and verify information required for various federal, State, and District surveys and reports ● Encourage parental school involvement ● Promote attendance and participation in workshops, meetings, and advisory committees ● Assist in verification of attendance records ● Assist parents with applications for services ● Maintain records Perform a variety of related clerical and typing duties such as answering phones, filing student information in cumulative records, maintaining ELAC documentation, and translating for meetings (Student Success Team [SST], teacher conferences, IEP for Special Education)

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EL 16 – Professional Development Specific to English Learners The LEA must provide professional development specific to the implementation of programs for English Learners. Believing that ongoing staff development at all levels is critical to the academic success of English Learners, Val Verde Unified School District will provide a full range of meaningful staff development opportunities at all levels. Refer to the Strategic Plan available through Education Services. Staff development for teachers shall include the following: Guidance in selecting training to achieve the full certification of Bilingual, Cross-cultural, Language and Academic Development (BCLAD), Cross-Cultural, Language and Academic Development (CLAD), or equivalent certification recognized by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing ● ● ● ●

Training in ELD instructional strategies and SDAIE methodologies Opportunities to attend workshops where teachers will experience critical thinking, meaning-centered activities Staff development sessions which include theory, modeling, and opportunities for feedback Capacity-building opportunities beyond workshops, which may include classroom observations, peer-coaching, and site-specified initiatives

Staff development for administrators shall include the following: ● Theory and philosophy of educating English Learners ● Supervision and evaluation of English Learners personnel (training to recognize effective ELD instruction, SDAIE instruction, and primary language lessons) ● State and federal requirements for English Learner programs ● Implementation of English Learner programs ● Meaningful ways in which parents of English Learners can be involved in the education of their children Staff development for Bilingual Instructional Aides shall include: ● Literacy training ● Classroom management ● Effective instructional strategies ● Teamwork ● Parent communication District opportunities to meet requirements of the Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Staff development for Counselors shall include: ● Theory and philosophy of educating English Learners ● State and federal requirements for English Learner programs

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Training opportunities for parents shall include: ● Ways in which parents of English Learners can be involved in their children’s education and encourage academic success ● The rights and responsibilities of parents and students ● Effective participation in site and district committees ● The importance of regular school attendance ● Information on the school’s language census ● Information on the English Learner section of the school’s plan including opportunities for parents to request information and/or training on specific parental needs District support for implementation: ● Coordinate the identification and allocation of Bilingual Instructional Aides ● Recruit, hire, and assign appropriate certified CLAD and BCLAD certificated personnel to English Learner classrooms ● Address the needs of Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) and Special Education English Learners by hiring personnel holding the appropriate authorizations for these classes and provide additional training to meet the needs of English Learners (ELs) ● Strengthen the articulation and coordination between the English Learner services department and Human Resources ● Centralize translation services of district publications ● Provide continuous review and monitoring of English Learner assessment practices o Identify improved measures of primary language ability for the purposes of initial assessment in languages other than Spanish o Investigate and identify a variety of formative assessments in reading and writing in English o Monitor adherence to existing criteria for reclassification ● Work jointly with the Language Assessment Center to oversee assessment, clarify recommendations for placement, and act as a direct link between parents and school counselors, administrators and teachers ● Continuously explore ways to increase identification of GATE students among English Learners ● Work jointly with Special Education to monitor the referral and placement of English Learners and assist Special Education personnel in ensuring that all English Learners have access to appropriate services within the Special Education setting ● Facilitate identification of appropriate primary language materials for alternate programs to ensure access to the core, standards-based curriculum ● Ask sites to designate an English Learner Facilitator and Reclassifier to meet regularly under the leadership of the District Education Services English Learner Program. The Role of School Leadership ● Actively support and encourage staff participation in training opportunities for teachers of English Learners ● Promote tenets of programs that ensure academic success of all English Learners ● Promote status and recognition of staff members working with English Learners ● Monitor site implementation of English Learner programs ● Provide on-going information on current practices as well as changes in state and federal laws and/or guidelines regarding English Learner programs 54 | P a g e

● ●

● ●

Notify parents of their rights and responsibilities and encourage parent and community involvement through site committees and parent education Training parents in carrying out their legal responsibilities in English Learner Advisory Committee (ELAC), selection of a District English Learner Advisory Committee (DELAC) representative, and School Site Council (SSC) Include members of ELAC on the SSC Notify parents/guardians of CELDT scores and placement

Staff Development Val Verde Unified School District strives to provide all English Learners with the highest quality education available. The primary resource for this education is qualified teachers. A concentrated effort has been made to train current teachers and to recruit appropriately credentialed teachers. The foci of staff development are: 1) emphasis on high expectations for all English Learners; and 2) ensure that each student is afforded equal access to a comprehensive, structured, and systematic curriculum aligned with the California English Language Development and Content-area Standards. Teacher Training To address the need for appropriately credentialed staff, the district may offer staff development opportunities for current staff through a variety of resources: ●







Bilingual Teacher Training Program (BTTP) o This program, provided through the Riverside County Office of Education, provides staff development in the areas of primary and secondary language development, culture and cultural awareness, ELD and SDAIE methodologies, and Spanish language. The purpose of this program is to prepare teachers to take the state CLAD test. District Staff Development o In-class modeling of appropriate ELD and SDAIE methodologies by qualified instructional leaders. o District personnel will offer school-site staff development in a variety of areas as deemed appropriate and necessary by school and district staff. Conferences and Workshops o California Association of Bilingual Education (CABE) Annual Conference offers over 400 individual workshops in all areas of English Learner education. o Guided Language Acquisition Design (GLAD) programs provide training for K-6 teachers in the areas of language acquisition and development. o Other available trainings recommended by school or district staff. o Bilingual Facilitators and Reclassification Facilitator can ask to go to professional development they see as necessary. College and University Classes

Areas of Concentration There are several areas of instruction that Val Verde Unified School District has identified as essential to a well-planned staff development program for teachers of English Learners: 55 | P a g e

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Primary Language Literacy Development Second Language Literacy Development Second Language Acquisition/Methodology Content Instruction through Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) Culture and cultural awareness Standards-Based Instruction Appropriate Assessments for English Learners Federal and State requirements for English Learner Programs

Site Support Staff to Support English Learners – Bilingual and Reclassification Facilitators: The principal at each site selects a Bilingual Facilitator and a Reclassification Facilitator to support the diverse needs of the English Learner population. The Bilingual Facilitator is the central person at the school site that supports and promotes effective English Learner instructional practices through the demonstration of lessons, collaborative on-going peer coaching, and site workshops on SDAIE methodology, ELD Standards and EL assessment. The Bilingual Facilitator follows the English Learner Timeline to complete tasks on a timely manner. The Facilitator and Reclassification Facilitator work together to ensure that services are given to EL students appropriately. Each position has its own stipend but one person can hold both positions and receive both stipends.

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Supplement A: Role of the Bilingual & Reclassification Facilitators Bilingual Facilitator Responsibilities ❖ Attend monthly information/training meetings ❖ Advise principal and teachers about EL student placement and groupings ❖ Compile documents for Federal Program Monitoring ( EL daily schedule, lesson plans, class records, intervention records, LAT meeting documents, ELAC meeting documents, student samples) ❖ Assist with determining the efficacy of programs for EL students at the school site through the ELP Surveys for teachers and parents. ❖ Suggest interventions for English Learners with unsatisfactory State Standard Test CELDT progress ❖ Provide staff training on EL topics ❖ Review EL instructional resources for new and returning teachers ❖ Model effective English Learner instructional practices ❖ Provide training on the VVUSD EL Master Plan ❖ Coordinate CELDT testing at site ❖ Monitor ELAC meeting requirements and documentation (agenda, sign-in sheet and minutes) ❖ Assist with providing staff training on completing Catch Up Plans and interventions ❖ Monitor completion of Green EL student record filing ❖ Provide input on assessment related issues, EL Master Plan revisions, and curriculum adoption committees ❖ Assist with EL data collection ❖ Oversee the reclassification process/collection of data/completion of forms ❖ Oversee the intervention of EL students ❖ Oversee monitoring of reclassified students ❖ Oversee ELD grade book implementation ❖ Monitor the implementation and update of the ELD Matrix ❖ Print monthly EL reports ❖ Attend LAT meetings as needed

Reclassification Facilitator Responsibilities ❖ Attend meetings for Reclassification Facilitators ❖ Consult with teachers, parents and students about EL progress ❖ Compile documents for Federal Program Monitoring (Reclassification paperwork, monitoring paperwork, class records of student progress, LAT meeting paperwork) ❖ Assist with determining the efficacy of programs for EL students at the school site through the ELP Surveys for teachers and parents ❖ Monitor EL student progress for reclassifications and academic success ❖ Suggest interventions for EL students who have been reclassified but are not meeting monitoring ❖ Assist with staff training on EL topics ❖ Assist with the review of EL instructional resources for new and returning teachers ❖ Provide input of assessment related issues, EL Master Plan revision, curriculum adoption committees ❖ Assist with EL data collection ❖ Facilitate the reclassification process/ collection of data/ completion of forms ❖ Provide staff training on completing Catch Up Plans and interventions ❖ Monitor Catch-up Plans of English Learners ❖ Assist teachers with the coordination of Catch Up Plan parent meetings ❖ Monitor progress of reclassified students ❖ Meet with students, parents, and teachers on a regular basis to discuss progress of EL students ❖ Coordinate and attend LAT meetings ❖ Assist with the monitoring of the implementation and update of the ELD Matrix

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Dimension VI – Opportunity and Equal Educational Access EL 17 – Appropriate Student Placement All pupils must be placed in English language classrooms unless a parental exception waiver has been granted for an alternative program in which some or all of the instruction is delivered in the pupil’s primary language. All pupils are placed in English language classrooms unless a parental exception waiver has been granted for an alternative program. Based on the district criteria of reasonable fluency, English Learners are placed in Structured English Immersion (SEI) or in English Language Mainstream (ELM) program settings. English Learners who do not meet the district’s criteria for participation in an ELM are placed in an ELM program if the parent or guardian so requests. VVUSD has designed and implemented an SEI English language acquisition process in which the curriculum and instruction are designed for children who are learning the language. Placement Recommendations At the end of the year, each school site compiles teachers’ recommendations for ELD instructional placement for the upcoming school year. This data assists the site in determining the potential number of ELD cluster groups for each proficiency level at each grade level or grade level span. Program Placement Based on Reasonable Fluency English Language Proficiency Levels Advanced Initial Fluent English

Early Advanced

Intermediate

Early Intermediate Beginning

Program Placement Options

Proficient Or Reclassified (R-FEP/FEP-C)

English Language Mainstream Class

Reasonable Fluency

English Language Mainstream Class If scored in the upper range of “Intermediate” ** OR Structured English Immersion Class If scored in the lower range of “Intermediate” **

Structured English Immersion Less than Reasonable OR Fluency Alternative Program with an approved Parental Exception Waiver Other Instructional Setting based on IEP

**Based on Flexible Grouping

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Options for Instructional Programs Upon initial enrollment, our Language Assessment Center makes recommendations for English Learner program placement based on CELDT results. The LAC works closely with the parents/guardians to explain the instructional options. Using this assessment information and program placement recommendations, the site principal and staff place the EL student in the most appropriate instructional setting. Written descriptions of actual program options specific to the site are available for parent review. The site principal or designee will meet with the parent(s)/legal guardians to clarify any questions as needed and/or to review any concerns parents may have regarding testing results or program placement recommendations. The program placement options are: I.

Structured English Immersion: This model provides instruction for all subjects in English for ELs with less than reasonable fluency in English. For students with an overall CELDT score at the Beginning Level (Level 1), Early Intermediate Level (Level 2), and flexible grouping of Lower Half of Intermediate (Level 3A) teachers will combine specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE) with primary language instructional support when needed and a strong, structured, sequential English Language Development (ELD) program.

II.

Mainstream English with Appropriate Support: This model is recommended for EL students with an overall CELDT score at the Intermediate Level (with flexible grouping of the higher half of Intermediate students-Level 3B), Early Advanced (Level 4) & Advanced (Level 5). This model is designed to provide all instruction in English with additional and appropriate services as needed. All instruction is in English with Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) strategies utilized to make curriculum understandable.

III.

Alternative Program (Bilingual Instruction): This option is designed for ELs entering VVUSD or for continuing students whose parents wish to waive into an alternative program. In this program, if a waiver is granted and acted upon, all students receive daily ELD instruction. Language Arts instruction is provided in the primary language (Spanish). Content areas are taught in the primary language in math, science and social studies. Spanish instruction is decreased as the student becomes fluent in English. Please Note: This would be a bilingual program for English language acquisition for pupils in which much or all of the instruction, textbooks, and teaching materials are in the child’s native language. If parents of 20 or more students in one grade level at the same school request the alternative program, the school is required to provide this program.

IV.

AVID Excel: This program is designed to interrupt the cycle that leads to long-term English Language Learner status. It has been implemented in the Val Verde Unified school district to accelerate students’ language acquisition and guide students on the path to college preparatory courses. AVID Excel is also effective in preparing 7th and 8th grade English Learners to enter 9th grade with the language skills that will enable them to succeed in rigorous coursework. During the summer of the English Learners’ 6th grade year, trained Val Verde administrators and staff work together to place ideal candidates in the AVID Excel program based on the years a student has remained in the EL program (usually more than 5 years) in conjunction with the students’ grades and overall academic performance. 59 | P a g e

V.

Dual Language Immersion Program: The Val Verde Unified School District has adopted the 90:10 Dual Language Immersion program model (see below for program progression through the elementary years), which develops bilingualism and biliteracy in English and Spanish. The Dual Language Immersion program is based on parent choice of both English Learners and English Only students who desire bilingualism and biliteracy in their children’s education. Additionally, it is an additive program offered to all students who qualify by commencing their Dual Language career in their kindergarten year.

Program Definitions: I.

Structured English Immersion (SEI)

The Structured English Immersion Program, for students with “less than reasonable fluency,” is described in CA Ed. Code Sections 300-340 (Proposition 227 that was passed by the voters of California in June 1998). It is described as an English language acquisition process for young children in which nearly all classroom instruction is in English, but the curriculum and presentation are specifically designed for children who are learning the language. Students are taught subjects “overwhelmingly,” but not exclusively, in English. Teachers and aides may use the student’s primary language in content instruction to motivate, clarify, direct, support, and explain. The goal of the SEI Program is for EL students to develop a reasonable level of proficiency in English. Any academic delays can be remedied through a number of interventions. Access to core content is accomplished through instructional strategies using Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) techniques to enable English Learners to gain access to grade level subject matter in mathematics, social studies, science, and other academic subjects as required. Program Requirements: ● Parents must be informed of the placement of their children in a Structured English Immersion Program and be notified of the opportunity to apply for a Parental Exception Waiver for an alternative program or may make a request to move to an English Language Mainstream classroom. ● All EL students receive at least 30 minutes of daily ELD instruction based on the districtadopted program and state standards. Instruction must include listening, speaking, reading, and writing. 60 | P a g e

● Core instruction in all subjects is taught overwhelmingly in English with primary language (L1) support as needed and extensive SDAIE (Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English) strategies to assist the EL in accessing the core. ● All students participate in activities that promote multicultural competency and positive self-esteem. Staffing: ● All teachers must be appropriately certificated (e.g., BCLAD, CLAD, CTEL). ● It is preferred that teachers in CELDT Level I and II settings hold a BCLAD or equivalent. However, non-BCLAD teachers can be paired with a bilingual instructional aide who, under the teacher’s direction, provides primary language support as needed in the content areas. SEI – Grouping: ELD Group ● Students will be grouped into their ELD classes based on their English proficiency level. The optimum placement is one ELD level per class. ● English Learners with CELDT level of 1 (Beginning), 2 (Early Intermediate), and 3A (Lower Half of Intermediate) students will be grouped by class. Primary Language (L1) Support ● The assignment of a BCLAD teacher is the best method for providing primary language instruction or support;

II.

English Language Mainstream (ELM)

English Learners whose CELDT overall level is Intermediate, Early Advanced, or Advanced, and who are not participating in an alternative program or whose parents requested to move from an SEI program are to be placed in an English Language Mainstream Program. Parents of English Learners can request that their students be placed in a mainstream program at any time by completing a Parental Request form. The term “Mainstream” refers to the fact that these students have an instructional program that is primarily in English with ELD instruction and an emphasis on reading and writing. The English Learner will receive ELD from the classroom teacher for grades TK-5 or be assigned to a section of ELD or “SDAIE English” for grades 6-12 until the student has acquired proficiency in English. Mainstream Program teachers of ELs are responsible for providing ELD instruction that continues the students’ English Language Development, prepares them for reclassification, and recoups any academic deficits that may have been incurred in the core curriculum as a result of language barriers. In addition, students will access core subjects from teachers using SDAIE strategies so that the content knowledge is comprehensible to the student. The program is designed to continue the development of English, while providing content instruction in English. Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) is a major feature of this program. Mainstreamed EL students require careful monitoring and attention to their progress towards reclassification.

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English Language Mainstream (ELM): ● EL student who are transitioning from SEI to mainstream are typically intermediate, early advanced, and advanced in CELDT levels ● EL students at any level, whose parents request a mainstream placement ● Elementary teachers will provide ELD to English Learners ● Secondary: English Learners will receive ELD/SDAIE English ● EL students at secondary level will be provided with one or more core subjects taught using SDAIE ● Special Day Class (SDC) will receive ELD services through their Special Day Class teacher; Individualized Education Plan will state appropriate goals and objectives in order to support the English Learner

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EL 18 – Parental Exception Waiver for Alternative Program Parents and guardians of ELs must be notified of the opportunity to apply for a parental exception waiver for their children to participate in an alternative program in which some or all of the instruction is deli9vered in the pupil’s primary language.

English Language Mainstream Class - Parental Request An English Language Mainstream setting with parental request is one in which ELs who have not met local district criteria for having achieved a "good working knowledge" (also defined as "reasonable fluency") of English are enrolled in an English Language Mainstream class and are provided with additional and appropriate services on the basis of a parental request. Note: CCR T5, Section 11301(b), permits a parent or guardian of an EL to request, at any time during the school year, that a child placed in Structured English Immersion be transferred to an English Language Mainstream class and be provided with additional and appropriate services (upon availability of classroom space). Under the English Language Education requirements of Ed. Code 305, parents of English Learners may request that their child be placed in an English Mainstream class in the regular educational program at any time by filing the Parental Request Form for Regular Educational Program. Parents understand that the student will receive English Language Development (ELD) as part of their daily academic schedule for 30 minutes at the elementary level, and one class period at the secondary level. ELD is part of the core, standards-based curriculum and parents cannot decline this service.

III.

Alternative Program (Parental Exception Waiver)

Parents and guardians of English Learners are informed of the placement of their children in an English language classroom and are notified of an opportunity to apply for a parental exception waiver for their children to participate in an alternative program. Parents and guardians are provided, on enrollment and annually, full written and, on request, spoken descriptions of the Structured English Immersion program, English Language Mainstream program, alternative programs, all educational opportunities available to the student, and the educational materials to be used in the different options. Upon initial enrollment at the district’s Language Assessment Center, all parents receive an orientation to VVUSD program options for English Learners and the parental exception waiver process. Language Assessment Center personnel explain the program options and give each parent the Parent EL Brochure which contains written descriptions of the three options: ● Structured English Immersion ● Mainstream ● Alternative program with approved exception waiver

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Procedures for Granting Parental Exception Waivers Parents and guardians of ELs are informed of the placement of their children in an English language classroom and are notified of an opportunity to apply for a parental waiver for their children to participate in an alternative program. VVUSD procedures for granting parental exception waivers include the following: Parents and guardians are provided, on enrollment and annually, full written, and upon request, spoken descriptions of the Structured English Immersion program, English Language Mainstream Classroom program, alternative program, and all educational opportunities available to the student. The descriptions of the programs shall include the educational materials to be used in the different options. Parents and guardians are informed that a pupil under age ten must be placed for no less than 30 calendar days in an English language classroom the first year of enrollment in a California school. Parents and guardians are informed of any recommendations by the school principal and educational staff for an alternative program and are given notice of their right to refuse the recommendation. Parental exception waivers are acted on within 20 instructional days of submission to the school principal. However, waivers submitted under EC Section 311(c) must be acted on either no later than ten calendar days after the expiration of the 30 day English language classroom placement or within 20 instructional days of submission of the waiver, whichever is later. Principal and Education Staff Recommendations Each application for a waiver will be considered on its individual merits. Approval of Parental exception waivers are granted unless the school principal and educational staff determines that an alternative program offered at the school would NOT be better suited for the overall educational development of the student. Denial of Waiver The principal in consultation with the educational staff, must consider relevant district and state assessments when denying a parental exception waiver request. If a waiver is denied, parents and guardians are informed in writing by the principal and other educational staff of the reason for denial and advised that they may appeal to the local board of education or to the court. Denial of Waiver Appeal Procedures School Site: a. The school site administrator holds a conference with the parent/guardian to explain the reason(s) for denial of waiver. b. During the conference, the parent/guardian is provided with the information of his/her child’s test results and other information that was used to make the decision to deny the 64 | P a g e

waiver request. The school site administrator must have substantial evidence that the alternative program requested would not be suited for the student. C. If the parent/guardian is not satisfied with the results of the conference, he/she may appeal the principal’s decision. The parent/guardian must receive information regarding the next step for the appeal process. In order to begin this process, the school site administrator must provide the parent/guardian with the name and telephone number of the local district English Language Learner Coordinator and advise him/her to call and schedule a conference with the local district English Language Learner Coordinator or designee. Local District: a. The local district English Language Learner Coordinator is provided with a copy of the Parental Denial Form and all relevant documentation discussed with the parent/guardian. b. Upon holding the parent conference, the local district English Language Learner Coordinator must notify the parent/guardian within 5 school days of his/her decision to grant or deny the parental exception waiver. c. The local district English Language Learner Coordinator may facilitate a transfer for the child to attend a school that offers the program the parent/guardian is requesting. d. If the parent/guardian is not satisfied with the results of the conference and wishes to appeal the local district English Language Learner Coordinator’s decision, the parent/guardian must receive information regarding the next step of the appeal process. The local district English Language Learner Coordinator must provide contact information of the district’s School Board of Education and/or the assistance of a legal system’s team. Granting Alternative Classes Each school in which 20 or more students of a given grade level have been granted a waiver provides such a class. If fewer than 20 waivers are granted, the school provides such a class or allows the students to transfer to a public school in which such a class is offered. Note: The IEP team determines placement of each special education student regardless of language proficiency. Section 311 of CA Ed. Code describes the three circumstances in which a Parental Exception Waiver may be granted: 1. Children who already know English: The child already possesses good English language skills as measured by norm-referenced tests of vocabulary, comprehension, reading, and writing, in which the child scores at or above the state average for his/her grade level or at or above the 5th grade average, whichever is lower; or 2. Older children: The child is age 10 years or older, and it is the informed belief of the school principal and educational staff that an alternate course of educational study would be better suited to the child’s rapid acquisition of basic English language skills; or 3. Children with special needs (children less than 10 years old): The child already has been placed for a period of no less than thirty calendar days in an English language classroom. It is 65 | P a g e

subsequently the informed belief of the school principal and educational staff that the child has such special physical, emotional, psychological, or educational needs that an alternate course of educational study would be better suited to the child’s overall educational development. The parents shall be fully informed of their right to refuse to agree to a waiver. VVUSD procedures for granting parental exception waivers include the following: Procedures for Parent Notification regarding Parental Exception Waivers The district has established a procedure for granting Parental Exception Waivers for children who are already enrolled in district schools in a Structured English Immersion or Mainstream program. In order to notify all parents/guardians of the district’s placement options for English Learners and the opportunity to apply for a Parental Exception Waiver, each parent/guardian of an English Learner is informed of our program options two times per year through our district’s Parental Notification process. First, the parent/guardian receives the NCLB Annual Placement Notification within 30 days of the first day of school. This notification advises the parent/guardian of the child’s placement into either an SEI or Mainstream class and the opportunity for the parent/guardian to apply for a Parental Exception Waiver. Second, each spring, the parent/guardian is informed of the child’s official CELDT results and reminded of the three placement options when s/he receives the Parent Notification. Parents/guardians may request an initial or continuing Parental Exception Waiver at this time. Parents interested in completing the waiver process will meet with the school principal or designee to complete the waiver process and paperwork. At time of filing, parents are reminded of the criteria required to grant Parental Exception Waivers. Any recommendations made by the school principal and educational staff is shared with the parents and are given notice of their right to refuse the recommendation. Once the waiver is filed, the principal has 20 instructional days from the day of submission to take action. Parents are then informed of the principal’s and educational staff’s decision to grant the waiver. Staff Development on the Waiver Process The district provides focused in-services on the Parental Exception Waiver process so that district personnel are informed about the program options. With a thorough knowledge of the waiver process, principals, Bilingual Facilitators, Language Assessment Center team, and other district employees can answer parent/guardian’s questions, and explain the program options.

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Sample Parent Waiver Request Form

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Sample Parent Waiver Denial Form

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Dimension VII – Teaching and Learning EL 19 – English Language Development (ELD) As part of the core program provided through general funds, each English Learner must receive a program of English language acquisition in order to develop proficiency in English as rapidly and effectively as possible.

English Language Development Each English Learner receives a program of instruction in English Language Development (ELD) in order to develop proficiency in English as rapidly and effectively as possible. Our Commitment Val Verde Unified School District provides services to English Learners to ensure that they acquire English language proficiency and also recoup any academic deficits that may have been incurred in other areas of the core curriculum. We offer three types of instructional settings for English Learners. Instructional settings are Structured English Immersion (ELD in Secondary), English Language Mainstream (SDAIE in Secondary), and a third instructional setting exists when set criteria for Alternative Program have been met. Please see placement options for a detailed description of these three options.

Three Instructional Settings 1. Structured English Immersion (TK-12) 2. English Language Mainstream (TK-12) 3. *Alternative Program *An alternative program may be provided when there are 20 or more students per grade level at a given site with approved waivers. All of the instructional programs designed for English Learners students must contain the following components: ✓ Explicit, systematic, standards-based, differentiated English Language Development (ELD) instruction, specifically designed for English Learners; ✓ Well-articulated, standards-based, differentiated core curriculum instruction provided with primary language support as necessary and/or through specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE); ✓ Structured activities designed to develop multicultural competency and positive selfesteem. Access to the core, standards-based curriculum shall be provided via Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE). Alternate programs are available. State and federal guidelines will be followed in the program’s implementation of the EL Master Plan. 69 | P a g e









In the design and delivery of programs for English Learners, Val Verde Unified School District is and will be guided by what we know and understand about effective education and quality programs for English Learners that are research-based and comply with current state and federal laws. Every effort will be made to support the student’s self-concept, including the recognition and validation of the student’s culture and language, support in the adjustment to a new environment, and integration of multicultural activities into the core, standards-based curriculum. English Language Development, SDAIE content classes, and primary language support are part of the English Learner’s base program and shall receive the same support as other core, standards-based curriculum classes. At the secondary level, teachers of English Language Development and SDAIE content classes will articulate with the matching subject area department.

Program Design – Grades TK-5 ● All TK-5 schools shall provide services for English Learners. Students are placed in either Structured English Immersion (SEI) program, an English Language Mainstream (ELM), or an Alternative Program based on California English Language Development Test (CELDT) scores. ● Each site will implement the English Learner Program according to state, federal and district guidelines. The implementation criteria will include the number of English Learners per grade level, proficiency levels, diverse language needs, and the program option if selected by the parents. ● Elementary students will be clustered at their respective sites and in their respective grade levels to maximize the effective use of resources (instructional materials, teachers with appropriate authorizations to teach English Learners, and Bilingual Instructional Aides). ● In order to derive full benefit from staff expertise, elementary teachers who do not yet possess appropriate authorizations to teach English Learners should be mentored by teachers who do possess those authorizations. Model and Program Design – Grades 6-12 ● Guidance counselors will place students in classes based on assessment criteria, teacher recommendations, individual student strengths, high school graduation requirements, high expectations of English Learners, and/or an Alternative Program. ● Site personnel will have clear procedures implemented for the placement of English Learners in classes. ● The English Language Development Program for ELD I - IV (for beginning through early advanced students) will place equal emphasis on developing skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. These classes are aligned with the California English Language Development standards with benchmarks appropriate to the level of language proficiency. The ELD standards and benchmarks for advanced students are identical to those for mainstream language arts classes.

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English Learner Program Settings* Elementary Grades TK - 5 Type of Setting

Eligible Students English Learners ➢ CELDT Level 1 Beginning

➢ CELDT Level 2 Structured English Immersion

Early Intermediate

➢ CELDT Level 3 Intermediate A (*See L3 Flex Group Criteria)

English Learners ➢ CELDT Level 3 Intermediate B (*See L3 Flex Group English Language Mainstream

Criteria)

➢ CELDT Level 4 Early Advanced

➢ CELDT Level 5 Advanced

Curriculum Components ♦Explicit ELD Daily: a minimum of 30 minutes (K -5) standards-based supplementary ELD materials ♦ Access to core: differentiated instruction in reading, writing, mathematics, social studies, and science with specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE) strategies and materials ♦Art, music, P.E.: mixed groups with ELs, R-FEPs, I-FEPs, EOs ♦Primary Language support to motivate, clarify, direct, support, explain ♦ Students in grades 3/4 who are two or more grade levels behind will be placed in INSIDE for the following year. ♦Explicit ELD Daily: a 30 minutes (TK-5; standards-based supplementary ELD materials ♦Access to core: differentiated instruction in reading, writing, mathematics, social studies, and science with specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE) strategies and materials ♦Art, music, P.E.: mixed groups with ELs, R-FEPs, I-FEPs, EOs ♦Primary Language Support: minimal, as needed

Staffing Requirements BCLAD preferred, CLAD, or equivalent (Primary language support provided by BCLAD or bilingual instructional assistant if available)

BCLAD preferred, CLAD, or equivalent (Primary language support provided by BCLAD or bilingual instructional assistant if available)

**An alternative program is provided when there are 20 students per grade level with approved waivers. * All of the instructional programs designed for English Learners must contain the following components: 1. Explicit, systematic, standards-based, differentiated ELD instruction that is specifically designed for English Learners; 2. Well-articulated standards-based core curriculum instruction provided with primary language support and/or through specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE); and 3. Structured activities designed to develop multicultural competency and positive self-esteem that are woven throughout the core curriculum.

Note: When considering Level 3 Intermediate placement, please refer to the CELDT: Level 3 Flex Group Criteria.

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English Learner Program Settings* Secondary Grades 6 - 12 Type of Setting

Eligible Students

Curriculum Components

Staffing Requirements

English Learners

♦Explicit ELD: 2 periods daily minimum (Level I) or 1 period daily BCLAD preferred minimum (Level II) with ELD or equivalent ➢ CELDT Level 1 standards-based text and Beginning supplementary materials in addition (Primary language to English literacy instruction. support provided ♦Access to core: differentiated by BCLAD or Structured ➢ CELDT Level 2 instruction in math, social studies, bilingual Early and science with SDAIE strategies English instructional Intermediate and materials: 1 period of each assistant if Immersion class daily. available) ♦ Physical education and one ➢ CELDT Level 3 elective: mixed groups with ELs, RIntermediate Bilingual FEPs, I-FEPs, EOs: 1 period each Instructional A (*See L3 Flex daily if required. Assistant Group Criteria) ♦Primary language support in core content areas to motivate, clarify, direct, support and explain. English Learners ♦Explicit ELD: 1 period daily with ELD BCLAD, CLAD, or standards-based text and equivalent supplementary materials. ➢ CELDT Level ♦Reading/Writing: Levels III -V: one Primary language 3 English Language Arts class daily support provided Intermediate with interventions designed through by BCLAD or teacher assessment and diagnosis. B (*See L3 Flex bilingual English ♦Access to core: differentiated Group Criteria) instructional instruction in math, social studies Language assistant if and science w/ SDAIE available) Mainstream ➢ CELDT Level strategies/materials: 1 period each 4 Early daily. Advanced ♦Physical education and one elective: mixed groups with ELs, R-FEPs, I-FEPs, ➢ CELDT Level 5 Advanced EOs: 1 period each daily. ♦Primary Language Support: minimal, as needed. **An alternative program is provided when there are 20 students per grade level with approved waivers. * All of the instructional programs designed for English Learners must contain the following components: 1. Explicit, systematic, standards-based, differentiated ELD instruction that is specifically designed for English Learners; 2. Well-articulated standards-based core curriculum instruction provided with primary language support and/or through specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE); and 3. Structured activities designed to develop multicultural competency and positive self-esteem that are woven throughout the core curriculum.

Note: When considering Level 3 Intermediate placement, please refer to the CELDT: Level 3 Flex Group Criteria.

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CELDT: Level 3 Flexible Grouping Criteria ● ● ● ●

CELDT Scaled Score Ranges: Intermediate A & B State Exam Data: ELA ELD Online Matrix ELA Benchmark Tests



Student Writing Samples



Grades: ELD, ELA and Reading Teacher Observation Parent Consultation

● ●

Val Verde Unified School District is committed to provide English Learner services that meet the needs of the students we serve. In an effort to provide targeted support for our English Learners who score Intermediate (3) on the CELDT test, we have developed the following criteria to be used when considering their instructional setting. By focusing on our Intermediate Level 3 students, analyzing multiple sources of data to determine less than reasonable fluency and reasonable fluency and meeting the needs of students through flexible grouping we can better support our English Learners in their transition towards English proficiency based on a combination of the following criteria: English Language Development Instruction Each English Learner receives a program of instruction in English Language Development (ELD) in order to develop proficiency in English (listening, speaking, reading and writing) as rapidly and as effectively as possible. ELD lessons are differentiated to be appropriate for ELs’ varying identified levels of language proficiency. The recommended instructional delivery model in VVUSD for ELD instruction is to cluster ELs by their English language proficiency levels. ELD is designed to: • provide an on-ramp to the English Language Arts curriculum • teach English Learners to understand, speak, read and write English • build academic language proficiency that includes functions, forms and fluency • scaffold content and tap into prior knowledge to make learning accessible for all ELs • assist ELs in acquiring the linguistic competencies that native English speakers already possess when they enter school and continue developing throughout life Five Component Language Star and Designated ELD Time Val Verde teachers and support staff have been trained on the effectiveness and best practice of implementing the Five Component Language Star (see below) during their designated ELD instructional time. The Language Star refers to the five basic reading and language acquisition components - phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Teachers and support staff are encouraged to be cognizant of the language star components as they prepare their ELD lessons in order to ensure a balanced language arts and reading instruction in their classrooms.

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Overview of ELD The English Language Development component of all instructional program models is research-based and recognizes that the acquisition of English as a second language is a developmental process. Research recognizes that no two students will develop proficiency in English at the same rate. In most cases, Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) appear long before Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP), and time and opportunity must be allowed for this development to occur. Indeed, it may take five or more years for some English Learners to achieve academic English proficiency comparable to that of their native English-speaking peers. (Refer to Expected Benchmarks for English Learners table). Each English Learner will develop at his/her own pace, depending on a multitude of environmental, personality, learning and educational factors. ELD is a component of all instructional programs designed to serve the needs of English Learners. Further, ELD is a specific curriculum (based on the California English Language Development Standards) that addresses the teaching of the English language according to the level of English proficiency of each student. The purpose of ELD is to teach second language learners to communicate (listen, speak and write) with high levels of understanding in English. Additionally, ELD provides the foundation for literacy (reading and writing) as well as a pathway to the California English Language Arts Standards. The shared goal is to assist students in developing skills in order to achieve cognitive academic proficiency in English. ELD can occur in a variety of instructional settings (e.g. self-contained classroom or clustering by proficiency level). English Language Development must be a planned, explicit, systematic part of the daily program for every English Learner student; indeed, the law requires that each EL receives English Language Development instruction as part of his/her core curriculum. There is no maximum amount of time for a student’s ELD. However, our district mandates that each EL Level I-III receive these minimums of ELD per day: 30 minutes (K – 5th), a minimum of a double block in (grades 6th – 12th) in middle and high school. EXPECTED BENCHMARKS FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS

1

2

3

4

5

CELDT Levels

Beginning

Early Intermediate

Intermediate

Early Advanced

Advanced

Time line toward reclassification based on CELDT levels at time of initial enrollment year

1st Year

2nd Year

3rd Year

4th Year

5th Year

1st Year

2nd Year

3rd Year

4th Year

1st Year

2nd Year

3rd Year

1st Year

2nd Year 1st Year

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Timeline for English Learners: when they are expected to reach each level of English proficiency up to and including reclassification. (ELD Level)

(Time in Program)

Beginning

1 year

Early Intermediate

2 years

Intermediate

Early Advanced Intermediate

3 years

4 years

5 years

Performance Expectations (Time in Program)

0

1

2

3

4

5

(NCE)

0

10

20

30

40

50

Conditions Favorable to Acquiring Language Various conditions help facilitate second language development. Language is comprehensible to the English Learner when: • It is in context; • It has real-life purpose; • Prior knowledge is activated; • Background knowledge is developed; • The affective filter is low; • Risk-taking and approximations are encouraged; • Errors are accepted as a part of the acquisition process; • Input is comprehensible through contextualization (e.g. the use of real objects or “realia,” props, visuals, facial expressions, and/or gestures); • Positive feedback and correction by modeling are used. ELD Standards English Language Development Standards have been distributed to all ELD teachers in our district. The ELD Standards provide expectancy and achievement at the Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced, and Advanced proficiency levels for EL students. ELD Standards address skills ELs must acquire in initial English learning to enable them to become proficient on the ELA Common Core State Standards. The ELD Standards are designed to supplement the ELA Common Core State Standards to ensure that English Learners develop proficiency in both the English language and the concepts and skills contained in the ELA Standards. The ELD Standards integrate listening, speaking, reading, and writing. These are written as pathways and in unification with the California ELA Common Core Standards. 76 | P a g e

ELD Fluency Levels In order to best understand appropriate strategies, materials, and techniques to help English Learners acquire English Language proficiency, our district uses the CELDT Skill Area Proficiency Level Descriptors. These descriptors note the characteristics and behaviors expected of ELs as they progress through the five levels of language proficiency: Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced, and Advanced. Teachers use these descriptors to guide lesson planning for their English Learners. ELD Materials and Instructional Time English Learners in grades TK-12 access state-approved, standards-based ELD materials for their ELD instruction. These supplementary instructional materials are used “to accelerate pupils as rapidly as possible” towards grade level proficiency in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Materials have been verified by the California Department of Education as being substantially correlated to identified state standards. A full selection of ELD materials is used at each of our schools. In accordance with district guidelines, daily ELD instructional time has been allocated for each English Learner: A minimum of 30 minutes for Kindergarten through fifth grade and an ELD block (minimum of 1 period) for all English Learners in grades 6th through 12th. For English Learners in mainstream settings (generally, CELDT Levels 3, 4, and 5), ELD instruction is focused on the EL’s identified need and delivered and monitored by the classroom teacher. Grades TK – 5

Val Verde Unified School District ELD Instructional Resources

Medallion (Houghton Mifflin) Core Adoption Intensive Intervention Grades 4-5 Inside (National Geographic/Hampton-Brown) Supplemental Materials HM-ELD (Houghton Mifflin) Grades 6 – 8 Supplemental/Intervention Materials Inside (Hampton-Brown) Inside the USA (Hampton-Brown) for EL Newcomers and Special Education Grades 9 - 12 Supplemental/Intervention Materials Edge (Hampton-Brown) Inside the USA (Hampton-Brown) for EL Newcomers and Special Education

Monitoring ELD Progress A number of assessments are used to monitor our ELs’ progress through the English Language Development standards. In addition to the district-administered Annual California English Language Development Test (CELDT), each English Learner completes regular benchmark assessments in ELD at the site level to demonstrate regular progress in language proficiency.

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Assessment of English Learners English Learners are assessed on a regular basis using a variety of assessment tools. For each reporting period, teachers use collected data to make informed decisions about each English Learner’s growth. Teachers and Site Facilitators then use that information to initiate necessary interventions. An individual student online profile which includes previous State English Language Arts Exam and CELDT scores, current results of trimester or quarterly Benchmark and pertinent Multiple Measure Assessments (writing), ELD Online Matrix, and report card grades will be maintained in an AERIES database and student profile (online). The assessments will be maintained by the ELD teacher and monitored by the Bilingual Reclassifier, Bilingual Facilitator and site Principal. At the end of the year, staff will file portfolio information in the green EL folder in the student’s cumulative (CUM) folder. Student data shall be disseminated to counselors, ELD and English teachers when students change schools/grade levels. This information will assist teachers and counselors with making placement recommendations for the following year. TK-5 Student proficiency and growth in English is assessed continuously using a variety of measures. Students are evaluated in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Assessments include: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Publisher-created assessments from Houghton Mifflin’s Medallion Publisher-designed assessments from Hampton Brown’s Inside Teacher observation Student work Running records District Benchmark Assessments Writing assessment using District Rubrics Classroom Grades ELD Online Matrix State Standardized Test

6-12 As with TK-5, student proficiency and growth in English is assessed continually. However, the measures used are different. Assessments include: ● ● ● ● ● ●

California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Publisher-designed assessments from Hampton Brown’s Inside and Edge Teacher observation Student work Writing assessment using District Rubrics Publisher-designed assessments Pierson 78 | P a g e

● ● ● ●

Grades ELD Online Matrix District Benchmark Assessments Writing assessment using district rubrics State Standardized Test (CAASPP)

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EL 20 – Access to the Core Subject Matter Academic instruction for ELs must be designed and implemented to ensure that English Learners meet the district’s content and performance standards for their respective grade levels within a reasonable amount of time.

Academic Instruction/Access to the Core Curriculum Academic instruction for English Learners is designed and implemented to ensure that they meet the district’s content and performance standards for their respective grade levels in a reasonable amount of time. The district has implemented a plan to assist all English Learners to achieve at high levels in the core academic subjects so that those children can meet the same challenging state academic content and achievement standards all children are expected to meet. The district has developed and is implementing a plan for monitoring and overcoming any academic deficits English learners incur while acquiring English. Actions to overcome academic deficits are taken before the deficits become irreparable. Accessing the Core Curriculum in Content Areas It is essential that English Learners access well-articulated, standards-based core curriculum instruction. In Structured English Immersion and Mainstream settings, this core instruction in all subjects is taught “overwhelmingly” in English with Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) strategies and primary language support as appropriate to further motivate, clarify, direct, support and explain. In the event students enroll in the Alternative Program, they will receive full access to grade level core curriculum by means of direct instruction in their native language and in English, using SDAIE approaches, as appropriate to their levels of English language proficiency. English Learners access the core curriculum through classes that “shelter” the curriculum via specially designed academic instruction in English (SDAIE). SDAIE is an approach to teaching grade-level content using English as the medium of instruction with special strategies and techniques geared to help students access the core curriculum. What is SDAIE? • Contextualized instruction (e.g. non-verbal language, visual support, realia, graphic organizers, oral/verbal amplification), because students have a variety of resources in the environment that enable them to construct meaning out of what is said or read; • Task-based instruction, because it allows students to work with concepts and the language of those concepts in a variety of ways (e.g. via reframing, where students can act, draw, or map out the concepts, or use poetry, song, chant, letters, and diaries); • Grade-level content instruction in English designed for English Learners; • Facilitating English Learners in accessing the same core curriculum as that of English only students; • Language-sensitive and culture-sensitive content instruction; • Delivered through comprehensible language; 80 | P a g e

• Making accommodations in the learning environment so more students are able to access the content; • An ideal place to use oral language for communication; • Good content instruction when the input is made comprehensible; • Instruction encouraging the active use of language and the emphasis on enduring understanding; • Instruction that allows the teacher to check for understanding frequently using interactive strategies; • Integrating assessment in an on-going and formative manner through observations, portfolios, journals, and product-development. • Built on language modifications such as pause time, questioning, pacing, and highlighting. Key Features of SDAIE In effective SDAIE classrooms, principals and teachers work together to ensure the use of sound practices that make content comprehensible for English Learners. These practices include: ▪ Modeling & scaffolding ▪ Contextualizing & building schema ▪ Reframing & developing metacognition ▪ Checking for comprehension ▪ Monitoring/assessing/questioning ▪ Adjusting speech register ▪ Orchestrating all modalities of learning ▪ Collaborating, interacting, and creating effective student groups Primary Language Support For English Learners at Beginning, Early Intermediate, and sometimes Intermediate level, access to the core can be facilitated by primary language support (PLS). The assignment of a BCLAD teacher is always the best method for providing PLS. However, when a BCLAD teacher is not available, then the students will be grouped together with a CLAD-certified teacher and every effort will be made to provide a bilingual instructional assistant, who will use the primary language to motivate, clarify, direct, support, and explain. Policy for Retention of English Language Learner Students All students classified as English Language Learners (ELL) will be held to the same standards established by the Board of Education for promotion and retention. The retention or promotion of the EL students will be based upon their achievement within the curriculum provided to them in either English or in their primary language. The law states that if any student does not achieve at the established academic level due to the lack of English Language skills, he/she will not be retained. Students who do not make adequate progress throughout the year towards English language proficiency will be placed into one of the following intervention programs: before/during/after school programs, tutoring, and/or summer school.* Students enrolled in an Alternative Bilingual Program also will be expected to meet benchmarks in Spanish. *When funding is available. 81 | P a g e

Supplement B: English Learners and G.A.T.E. Gifted and Talented Education (GATE) for English Learners Val Verde Unified School District recognizes the need for a program model that identifies and services the gifted English Learners. The increasing diversity of the school-age population and difficulty of identifying gifted children with diverse backgrounds point to a pressing need for assessment models that take into consideration the complex cultural, linguistic, and experiential factors that affect expression of gifted potential. The intent of this program is to increase the identification of GATE students amongst the English Learner population. State and Federal Guidelines The Federal government has defined “gifted and talented children” as children and youth who are identified at the elementary or secondary levels as possessing demonstrated or potential abilities that give evidence of high performance capability in such areas as intellectual, creative, academic, leadership, or performing and visual arts, and who thereby require services or activities not ordinarily provided by the school. The California legislature has found and declared that it is in the public interest to support unique opportunities for high-achieving and underachieving pupils in the public elementary and secondary schools of California who are identified as gifted and talented. The legislature further declared its intent that special efforts be made to ensure that students from economically disadvantaged and varying cultural backgrounds be provided with full participation in these unique opportunities. The State of California has very clear guidelines for the identification process for gifted and talented students. It is the school district’s responsibility to develop the methods and procedures for identifying these students. The method of identification must conform to these general principles: ● ● ● ● ● ●

Standards shall ensure the identification of pupils who possess a capacity for excellence far beyond that of their chronological peers Methods shall be designed to seek out and identify those pupils whose extraordinary capacities require special services and programs Provision shall be made for examining a student’s range of capacities Methods and techniques of identification shall generate information as to a student’s capacities and needs There shall be equal opportunity to be identified in the categories served Methods shall be designed to seek out and identify gifted and talented students from varying linguistic, economic, and cultural backgrounds

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Current Recommendations In an effort to identify more language minority students as gifted and talented, the following current recommendations are made: ● ● ●

An emphasis must be made on the nomination of underrepresented minorities, particularly English Learners Development of criteria and procedures that allow access by language minority students Provision of staff development for teachers of English Learners in the identification and recognition of giftedness in minority students

Identification of English Learner GATE Students In order to address the area of identification of students from historically underrepresented cultural and linguistic groups, Val Verde Unified School District instituted the use of the Raven Progressive Matrices (RPM) Test in 1998. The RPM is a non-reading test of cognitive processing skills that tests general mental ability, which correlates positively with success in school. However, standardized test scores are still weighted heavily in the identification process. The district has implemented multiple measures in order to ensure equitable access to the program, including: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Parent Survey (available English and Spanish) Teacher Survey A: Student Characteristics Teacher Survey B; Creative or Productive Thinking School Performance: Report Card Grades Academic Achievement: California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) Intellect: Raven Progressive Matrices Demonstrated Talents Special Consideration Checklist

Service for English Learner GATE Students Any student identified as gifted or talented has access to all programs and services for GATE students, which may include class clusters, after-school enrichment, and/or Saturday academies. Special considerations are made on a case-by-case basis for classroom placement of English Learners because of their linguistic needs.

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Supplement C: English Learners & Special Education Services Special Education for English Learners This document is a supplementary section of the Val Verde Unified School District (VVUSD) Special Education Handbook and Master Plan for the Education of English Learners. It ties together the components that need to be implemented into educational program services for students who are identified as English Learners (EL) who may need and/or are identified for special education program services It includes guidelines for understanding second language acquisition, assessing English language proficiency, referral to RtI 2 team, special education evaluation, eligibility considerations, development of individualized education program goals, instructional setting options, and reclassification procedures. Understanding Second Language Acquisition It is important for all school personnel to maintain a patient, but attentive, perspective while observing the development of second language learning. A student often displays certain language transfers and over-generalizations from one language to another, which may appear to mislead the student and impede progress. The reality may be that the student is merely passing through common second language learning processes. ● ●











Limited English Proficiency: It is normal for second language learners to demonstrate a lower level of English proficiency than their monolingual-speaking peers. Silent Period: Many children learning a second language need a “silent period” in which they do not speak but focus on the sounds, syntax, and comprehension of the new language and produce little output. This period may last from several weeks to a year and should not be confused with an expressive language delay. Interference: A communicative behavior from the first language may carry over into the second language, which creates errors in English. This can occur in all areas of language: syntax, morphology, phonology, pragmatics, and semantics. Language patterns from the first language may influence how one phrases a particular message in the second language. For example, a Spanish speaker learning English may invert the noun and adjective in English. Fossilization: This may occur when “errors” in the first language becomes fixed into the second language and is no longer receptive to correction (i.e., I have sixteen years; my brother he like coffee). Inter-Language: This is characterized by transitional linguistic patterns that are similar to children learning English as their first language. For example, when children learn to form the past tense with –ed, overgeneralization occurs by applying this rule to all verbs. Inconsistent errors reflect the progress the student is making in learning a new language and should not be viewed as evidence of an abnormality. Code-Switching: This common phenomenon involves alternating between first and second language within the same sentence or paragraph and is not necessarily an indicator of a problem. Primary Language Loss: When the primary language is not reinforced while learning a second language, the skills and proficiency in the primary language will diminish from 84 | P a g e



lack of use. While children may appear “deficient” in their primary language, this should not be interpreted as a language disorder or primary language delay. Reduced Primary and Secondary Language Learning: Minimal language exposure to either language may result in delays or deficiencies on most formal, standardized language measures and cannot be attributed to an inherent language-learning disability.

There are also affective variables that may influence second language acquisition. In regard to motivation, one needs to consider if the student is becoming acculturated into the English language environment, how much there are shared experiences in both languages, if there is congruence between the student’s culture and the dominant group, if the student’s family is transient, and if the student feels the second language will threaten his/her identity. Personality factors of self-esteem, extroversion, and assertiveness may influence acquisition. High anxiety will impact the acquisition of the second language. Finally, socioeconomic status may impact social interactions and the development of friendships. An iceberg has been utilized to symbolize two major components of second language proficiency: Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (BICS) and Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP). The “tip of the iceberg” or surface area above the water represents BICS, the language skills which others can readily “see” as fluency. BICS is often referred to as “playground” or “survival” English as it is the basic language ability required for face-to-face communication where linguistic interactions are embedded in a situational context. BICS language is often accompanied by gestures, is relatively undemanding cognitively, and relies on the context to aid understanding (e.g., asking permission to go to the bathroom, following directions to line up for recess). It takes approximately two years to be commensurate with English-speaking peers. The Iceberg Theory BICS CALP

In contrast, the area of the iceberg below the surface represents CALP, the language skills which are “hidden” from view but are required to perform cognitively demanding academic tasks in a context reduced environment (e.g., classroom lectures, textbook reading, standardized tests). Development of CALP takes approximately 5-7 years to be commensurate with English-speaking peers. In part this is because CALP language is not heard in everyday conversation and is comprised of low frequency words, complex syntax, and abstract expressions.

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The Stages of Sequential Second Language Acquisition It is important to understand the sequential stages of language acquisition to be able to compare how a student is doing with what is expected at each stage, particularly when considering making a referral to determine if a student has a possible deficit or delay in development. Stage (Level) 1 - Preproduction: 0 - 6 Months in US School Student focuses on comprehending the communicative message. Children try to associate new words with the vocabulary in their first language. They pay particular attention to nonverbal communication such as facial expressions and gestures. They may respond with simple words or nonverbally by pointing, touching, or nodding. This is sometimes called the Silent Period. Activity/Lesson Focus: Emphasize receptive skills with listening comprehension, choosing, matching, drawing, and miming activities. Stage (Level) 2 - Early Production: 6 Months -1 Year in US School Student communication is characterized by one and two word phrases and many grammatical errors. Common nouns, verbs, and adjectives emerge first. Vocabulary must be learned in context of themes, stories, or personal lives of students. The student focuses on conveying meaning as opposed to using correct forms. Activity/Lesson Focus: Emphasize expressive skills using listening, naming, and categorizing activities which encourage students to use the vocabulary that they already understand. Stage (Level) 3 - Speech Emergence: 1- 3 Years in US School Students have now acquired limited vocabulary and can respond to literal questions and use simple sentences and engage in conversations. Students may still make punctuation and grammatical errors. Many of their utterances are "chunks" which they have learned as a whole without understanding the exact meaning of each word. Errors of omission are common. Activity/Lesson Focus: Emphasize more complete language forms such as comparing and contrasting, definitions, descriptions, and retelling (stories, legends, fables, etc.) Stage (Level) 4 - Intermediate Fluency Stage: 3 - 5 Years in US School Students continue to develop excellent comprehension and are beginning to function in normal conversation. However, they continue to lack sufficient academic language to compete with native English speakers. Students actively engage in communication and fluency. Literacy skills and academic language are continuing to develop. Activities/Lesson Focus: Use existing skills to produce responses that require creativity, critical thinking skills, and complex sentence structures.

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Stage (Level) 5 - Proficient Stage: 5 - 7 Years in US School Students can "be themselves" in a variety of situations and settings and using listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills with few errors. Activities/Lesson Focus: Continue reading and writing assignments with increased focus on evaluation and analysis. Referral to the RtI2 Team When a student is not making sufficient progress on the ELD standards and has an identified or suspected disability, it is appropriate for the teacher and/or parent to make a referral to the Response to Intervention Team (RTI) for consideration of interventions. On the RTI forms, the teacher must identify the student’s current EL Level and note any concerns that may be pertinent to the student’s language acquisition. Special Education Evaluation Once the RtI2 file has been reviewed, a disability is suspected, and an evaluation for special education services has been deemed appropriate, the parent/guardian shall be provided with the following forms in a language understandable to them (available in English and Spanish): Parent Rights and Procedural Safeguards, Prior Written Notice, and a proposed Assessment Plan. Students classified as English only (EO) or Fluent English Proficient (FEP) may be tested in English. When a student is identified as an English Learner (EL), the decision-making process requires more thought. When a student is classified as Beginner or Early Intermediate it is recommended that the assessment be conducted in the student’s primary language unless to do so is clearly not feasible. The data collected by the RtI2 members on students identified at Intermediate, Early Advanced, or Advanced levels should be comprehensive enough to determine if the assessment should be conducted in English and/or in the student’s primary language using qualified personnel. Eligibility Considerations When determining eligibility for special education services for students identified as English Learners, the following factors must be documented in the multidisciplinary report: ● ● ● ● ● ●

Limited English language acquisition, cultural and experiential differences, and/or economic disadvantages are not the primary cause of the student’s learning problems. Other school resources have been considered and, when appropriate, utilized yet still found to be insufficient to meet the student’s needs. Academic achievement is significantly below English oral language proficiency – verified by language assessment data. Alternative and/or nonverbal assessment data are considered valid indicators of the student’s abilities. The student meets one or more of the special education eligibility criteria delineated in Education Code Whether the student’s needs can be met with supplementary aids and services within the general education environment and if the student does or does not require special education support services. 87 | P a g e

Development of Individualized Education Program Goals Each student’s individualized education program (IEP) must indicate the student’s language classification and stage of language acquisition, describe his/her present levels of performance, and eligibility criteria. For students eligible for special education services, the IEP team must develop desired outcome goals designed to remediate or improve the specific area(s) of deficit. The goals should address the curriculum standards of the core instructional programs and should be based on baseline/present level data. For students with significant disabilities, goals must also include benchmark objectives and may be based on alternative curriculum standards. If a student is identified as an English Learner and in need of special education services, the IEP team must mark “yes” in the “linguistically appropriate goals needed” box on the IEP. The team must develop goals that reflect the student’s cognitive and linguistic development and their language of instruction in order to be linguistically appropriate. The following criteria should be included for any goal and objective to meet the definition of being linguistically appropriate: ●

● ●



It states specifically in what language (i.e., English, Spanish) the particular goal(s) will be accomplished. It may also address methodology and the credential of the service provider. It is appropriate to the student’s level of linguistic development and proficiency in that language – reflected in the ELD level addressed in present levels and growth desired. It is consistent with the known developmental structure of that language – it follows the stages of language acquisition from Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced, to Advanced. It provides cultural relevance in the curricular framework.

Some sample ELD goals and objectives are provided within the IEP Guidebook Appendices. Instructional Setting Options A continuum of program options is available to meet the needs of all students. The IEP team’s determination of appropriate program placement, related services needed, and curriculum options to be offered is based upon the unique needs of the student rather than the label describing the disabling condition or the availability of the program. Each student with a disability has the right to an educational program designed to meet his/her individual needs based on his/her present levels of performance, identified goals, supports and services needed. The special education service options include Specialized Academic Instruction, Intensive Individual Services, and/or Individual and Small Group Instruction. A student with an identified disability may be provided with Related Services (RS) while participating in the general education or special education environment. RS are defined as developmental, corrective and other services as may be required to assist an individual with exceptional needs to benefit from special education. RS options include: language and speech, adapted physical education, health and nursing – specialized physical health care services, health and nursing – other services, assistive technology services, occupational therapy, physical therapy, individual counseling, counseling and guidance, parent counseling, social work services, psychological services, behavior intervention services, day treatment services, 88 | P a g e

specialized services for low incidence disabilities, specialized deaf and hard of hearing services, interpreter services, audiological services, specialized vision services, orientation and mobility, Braille transcription, specialized orthopedic services, reader services, note taking services, transcription services, recreation services, and transportation. RS options for transition planning for students 16 and older include college awareness/preparation, career awareness, vocational assessment, counseling, guidance, and career assessment. The educational program options available for English Learners include Structured English Immersion (SEI), English Language Mainstream (ELM), and Alternative Education Program with primary language instruction when available. In making instructional program decisions on behalf of a student in need of both special education and English language support, the following factors should be considered: ●



● ●

● ● ●

For a student in need of part-time special education support services, the general education teacher’s classroom setting and qualifications are the primary considerations. For a student in need of special education support the majority of the school day, the special education teacher’s classroom setting and qualifications are the primary considerations. Teachers working with ELL students need to know SDAIE methodologies. Students in need of ELD instruction specially tailored to his or her fluency level must receive such instruction from a qualified (i.e., CLAD certified) teacher or teacher-intraining using board-approved instructional materials. Such instruction may occur within special education or be provided by a mainstream general education teacher, as determined by the IEP team. At TK-5 grade levels, ELD instruction must be provided a minimum of thirty (30) minutes per day. At 6-12 grade levels, ELD instruction must be provided a minimum of fifty (50) minutes per day. Primary language support needs must be considered and may be provided as available within the school staffing arrangements. It is especially critical to coordinate program services between general and special education for this population.

All instructional program decisions must be documented on the student’s IEP and subsequently implemented as stated once parental consent is obtained. There must be a 1-1 correspondence between the IEP program statements and the student’s class schedule to be legally compliant. The IEP must be reviewed at least annually and may be changed during that time through an addendum/amendment IEP team meeting. For the English Learner, the CELDT shall be updated annually, with results guiding decisions about possible reclassification.

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Sample RTI2 Referral For ms to Support English Learners

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Sample RTI2 Referral Forms to Support English Learners (Continued).

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Appendix

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CELDT English Proficiency Levels Level

CELDT

1

Beginning

2

Early Intermediate

3

Intermediate

4

Early Advanced

5

Advanced

I-FEP

Initially scores Fluent English Proficient

FEP-C

An English Learner who is a Candidate for reclassification

FEP-R/M

Student has been Reclassified and is being Monitored for two years

FEP-DNQ

Student Did Not Qualify for reclassification

FEP-X

Student has been Exited from the program after being reclassified and monitored for two years

EL-WV

Parents requested instruction in student’s primary language

EL-WD

Parents requested their child be Withdrawn from the program; however, ELD instruction is provided daily

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CELDT Scale Score Ranges Kindergarten

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

220 - 361

140 - 352

220 - 231

220 - 254

220 - 296

184 - 345

Early Intm

362 - 408

353 - 404

232 - 299

255 - 326

297 - 353

346 - 396

Intermediate

409 - 454

405 - 456

300 - 379

327 - 382

354 - 416

397 - 447

Early Adv

455 - 501

457 - 508

380 - 467

383 - 429

417 - 484

448 - 498

Advanced

502 - 570

509 - 630

468 - 570

430 - 600

485 - 570

499 - 598

Grade 1

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

220 - 361

140 - 352

220 - 356

220 - 371

220 - 358

184 - 357

Early Intm

362 - 408

353 - 404

357 - 392

372 - 405

359 - 400

358 - 405

Intermediate

409 - 454

405 - 456

393 - 467

406 - 443

401 - 460

406 - 455

Early Adv

455 - 501

457 - 508

468 - 569

444 - 517

461 - 535

456 - 508

Advanced

502 - 570

509 - 630

570 - 570

518 - 600

536 - 570

509 - 598

Grade 2

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

220 - 374

140 - 369

280 - 420

220 - 422

250 - 397

215 - 396

Early Intm

375 - 425

370 - 419

421 - 472

423 - 468

398 - 448

397 - 446

Intermediate

426 - 475

420 - 469

473 - 523

469 - 513

449 - 499

447 - 495

Early Adv

476 - 526

470 - 519

524 - 553

514 - 559

500 - 539

496 - 539

Advanced

527 - 570

520 - 630

554 - 650

560 - 690

540 - 610

540 - 635

Grade 3

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

220 - 388

200 - 387

280 - 447

220 - 436

250 - 417

230 - 414

Early Intm

389 - 442

388 - 435

448 - 481

437 - 478

418 - 461

415 - 459

Intermediate

443 - 497

436 - 481

482 - 541

479 - 536

462 - 519

460 - 513

Early Adv

498 - 551

482 - 531

542 - 576

537 - 569

520 - 563

514 - 556

Advanced

552 - 640

532 - 720

577 - 700

570 - 740

564 - 670

557 - 700

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CELDT Scale Score Ranges (Continued) Grade 4

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

220 - 401

200 - 404

280 - 473

220 - 450

250 - 437

230 - 432

Early Intm

402 - 460

405 - 450

474 - 490

451 - 488

438 - 475

433 - 472

Intermediate

461 - 518

451 - 496

491 - 559

489 - 549

476 - 538

473 - 530

Early Adv

519 - 577

497 - 542

560 - 599

550 - 579

539 - 588

531 - 574

Advanced

578 - 640

543 - 720

600 - 700

580 - 740

589 - 670

575 - 700

Grade 5

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

220 - 410

200 - 410

280 - 477

220 - 454

250 - 443

230 - 437

Early Intm

411 - 472

411 - 458

478 - 503

455 - 496

444 - 487

438 - 482

Intermediate

473 - 536

459 - 506

504 - 563

497 - 550

488 - 549

483 - 538

Early Adv

537 - 600

507 - 555

564 - 603

551 - 586

550 - 601

539 - 586

Advanced

601 - 640

556 - 720

604 - 700

587 - 740

602 - 670

587 - 700

Grade 6

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 412

225 - 416

320 - 480

220 - 457

275 - 446

248 - 441

Early Intm

413 - 483

417 - 466

481 - 515

458 - 501

447 - 499

442 - 491

Intermediate

484 - 569

467 - 517

516 - 567

502 - 552

500 - 568

492 - 551

Early Adv

570 - 637

518 - 567

568 - 608

553 - 592

569 - 622

552 - 601

Advanced

638 - 715

568 - 720

609 - 750

593 - 780

623 - 732

602 - 741

Grade 7

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 417

225 - 422

320 - 484

220 - 461

275 - 450

248 - 446

Early Intm

418 - 494

423 - 475

485 - 528

462 - 507

451 - 511

447 - 501

Intermediate

495 - 571

476 - 527

529 - 571

508 - 553

512 - 571

502 - 555

Early Adv

572 - 648

528 - 580

572 - 612

554 - 599

572 - 630

556 - 609

Advanced

649 - 715

581 - 720

613 - 750

600 - 780

631 - 732

610 - 741

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CELDT Scale Score Ranges (Continued) Grade 8

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 426

225 - 422

320 - 496

220 - 464

275 - 461

248 - 452

Early Intm

427 - 507

423 - 479

497 - 542

465 - 510

462 - 524

453 - 509

Intermediate

508 - 594

480 - 538

543 - 587

511 - 556

525 - 590

510 - 568

Early Adv

595 - 669

539 - 594

588 - 626

557 - 601

591 - 647

569 - 622

Advanced

670 - 715

595 - 720

627 - 750

602 - 780

648 - 732

623 - 741

Grade 9

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 435

235 - 422

320 - 508

220 - 466

275 - 471

251 - 457

Early Intm

436 - 518

423 - 484

509 - 556

467 - 513

472 - 537

458 - 517

Intermediate

519 - 605

485 - 546

557 - 604

514 - 559

538 - 604

518 - 578

Early Adv

606 - 690

547 - 609

605 - 647

560 - 605

605 - 668

579 - 637

Advanced

691 - 725

610 - 740

648 - 770

606 - 810

669 - 747

638 - 761

Grade 10

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 444

235 - 422

320 - 520

220 - 469

275 - 482

251 - 463

Early Intm

445 - 533

423 - 489

521 - 570

470 - 516

483 - 551

464 - 527

Intermediate

534 - 622

490 - 556

571 - 620

517 - 562

552 - 621

528 - 590

Early Adv

623 - 711

557 - 623

621 - 664

563 - 609

622 - 687

591 - 651

Advanced

712 - 725

624 - 740

665 - 770

610 - 810

688 - 747

652 - 761

Grade 11

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 444

235 - 422

320 - 520

220 - 469

275 - 482

251 - 463

Early Intm

445 - 533

423 - 489

521 - 570

470 - 516

483 - 551

464 - 527

Intermediate

534 - 622

490 - 556

571 - 620

517 - 562

552 - 621

528 - 590

Early Adv

623 - 711

557 - 623

621 - 664

563 - 609

622 - 687

591 - 651

Advanced

712 - 725

624 - 740

665 - 770

610 - 810

688 - 747

652 - 761

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CELDT Scale Score Ranges (Continued)

Grade 12

Listening

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Comprehension

Overall

Beginning

230 - 444

235 - 422

320 - 520

220 - 469

275 - 482

251 - 463

Early Intm

445 - 533

423 - 489

521 - 570

470 - 516

483 - 551

464 - 527

Intermediate

534 - 622

490 - 556

571 - 620

517 - 562

552 - 621

528 - 590

Early Adv

623 - 711

557 - 623

621 - 664

563 - 609

622 - 687

591 - 651

Advanced

712 - 725

624 - 740

665 - 770

610 - 810

688 - 747

652 - 761

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Relevant English Learner Online Sources CELDT Information: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/el/resources.asp

CELDT Released Test Questions: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/el/documents/celdtrtqs0111.pd f#search=CELDT%20RTQS&view=FitH&pagemode=none

CELDT Blueprints: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/el/documents/blueprnt2010.doc

Title III Accountability Report Card: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/t3/documents/infoguide13-14.pdf

Next Generation ELD Standards: http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/el/er/eldstandards.asp

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CELDT Question & Answer Prepared by California Department of Education December 2010 What is the California English Language Development Test? Federal and state laws require a state test that school districts must give to students whose primary home language is not English. In California, this test is called the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). What is the purpose of the CELDT? The purpose of this test is to: • Identify new students who are English learners in kindergarten through grade twelve • Determine their level of English proficiency • Annually assess their progress in learning English Who is an English learner? An English learner is a student in kindergarten through grade twelve who needs additional English language instruction to develop the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills required to fully participate in the regular school program. Who must take the CELDT? All students in kindergarten through grade twelve, whose primary language listed on a home language survey is not English, must take the CELDT within 30 calendar days after they are enrolled in a California public school for the first time. The CELDT also must be given once each year to English learners until they become proficient in English. Do English learners with disabilities take the CELDT? Yes. All English learners must take the CELDT, and this includes English learners with disabilities. Students with disabilities who take the CELDT may use test variations, accommodations, modifications, and/or alternate assessments as specified in their individualized education programs (IEPs) or Section 504 Plans. Students with Section 504 Plans may not use an alternate assessment for the CELDT. What does the CELDT cover? Beginning in 2009–10, the CELDT for all grades tested covers listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The CELDT is based on California English language development standards, adopted by the State Board of Education. Who gives the CELDT? Only trained examiners give the test. In grades two through twelve, the speaking domain of the CELDT is administered individually to each student and the listening, reading, and writing domains are administered to groups of students. In kindergarten, all domains are administered individually to each student. In grade one, the domains of speaking, reading, and writing are administered individually; however, the listening domain may be administered to groups of students. 100 | P a g e

CELDT Questions & Answers (Continued) How long does it take for students to complete the CELDT? The CELDT is not a timed test. In kindergarten and grade one, each domain takes approximately 15 to 30 minutes for each student to complete. In grades two through twelve, the speaking domain of the test takes about 10 to15 minutes for each student to complete. The listening, reading, and writing domains combined take about two hours to complete. The writing domain may be divided into two sessions. How are the CELDT results reported for individual students? There are five levels of performance a student can achieve. These levels are: Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced, and Advanced. The report of results for each student provides: • The overall performance level and score • A performance level and score for each domain of the test (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) • A comprehension score (average of the scores for listening and reading) How are results of the CELDT used? Test results for newly enrolled students are used to help identify English learners who need to develop their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in English. Results from annual CELDT testing are used to see how well students are learning English. School districts also use annual assessment results as one of four criteria to help decide when students may be reclassified as fluent English proficient (RFEP). What criteria in addition to the CELDT are used to decide when students may be reclassified? Additional reclassification criteria used by school districts include performance on an assessment of basic skills in English (such as the California English–language arts Standards Test), teacher evaluation, and parent opinion and consultation. How can parents or guardians find out more about the CELDT or their child’s results? Parents or guardians, who want more information about the CELDT or their child’s results on the CELDT, should contact their child’s teacher and/or school office. Parents or guardians also are invited to request a conference to review the CELDT results or to attend one of the information meetings scheduled by the school.

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Glossary of Terms and Acronyms Annual Assessment (AA)

The California English Language Development Test (CELDT) is given once each year to English learners as an annual assessment (also referred to as AA) of their progress toward English language proficiency. AA data are included in AMAO calculations.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is the federal accountability measure with a series of annual academic performance targets established for local educational agencies (LEAs) and the state. Under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), LEAs are required to meet or exceed requirements within two areas of the English learner subgroup in order to meet AYP annually: Participation Rate and Percent Proficient for English-language arts and mathematics.

Annual Assessment Window

A designated time period each year during which schools must administer the CELDT to all students who were identified as English learners during the previous academic year. The AA window runs from July 1 to October 31 each year.

Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs)

California English Language Development Test (CELDT)

Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) sets AMAOs or targets that local educational agencies (LEAs) receiving Title III funds must meet. The first AMAO (AMAO 1) relates to making annual progress on the CELDT, the second (AMAO 2) relates to attaining English proficiency on the CELDT, and the third AMAO (AMAO 3) relates to meeting AYP by the English Learner subgroup at the LEA level. AMAOs 1 and 2 are based on CELDT results. AMAO 3 is based on data from the California Standards Test, the California Modified Assessment (CMA), the California Alternate Performance Assessment (CAPA), and/or the California High School Exit Examination. The CELDT is the state test of English language proficiency that local educational agencies in California are required to administer to newly enrolled students whose primary home language is not English and to students who are ELs as an AA (Education Code Section 313 and Title 5, California Code of Regulations, Section 11510). CELDT results are included in AMAOs 1 and 2 calculations.

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The CELDT measures limited English proficient students’ achievement of California English Language Development (ELD) Standards in kindergarten through grade twelve. Three purposes for the CELDT are specified in state law, including: (1) identifying students as limited English proficient, (2) determining the level of English language proficiency (ELP) for students who are limited English proficient, and (3) assessing the progress of limited English proficient students in acquiring the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English.

CELDT Blueprints

The CELDT blueprints outline the specific ELD standards tested and the number of questions included within each domain on the CELDT for each grade from kindergarten through grade twelve.

CELDT Common Scale

The CELDT was rescaled in 2006 to allow for the comparison of a student’s scale score on each domain (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) going forward from 2006-07. A student’s scale score on the new common scale can be compared to prior year’s performance level and scale score to measure the annual growth of learning English.

Consortium

CELDT Criterion for English Language Proficiency

To be eligible for a direct-funded LEP student subgrant, LEAs must be scheduled to receive a subgrant of $10,000 or more. If an LEA is projected to receive a LEP student subgrant of less than $10,000 the LEA must enter into an agreement to form and/or join a consortium in which the total amount of the subgrants of members of the consortium collectively total $10,000 or more. In the case of a consortium of LEAs, only the lead LEA is the grantee. (Title III, Section 3114). The accountability data for the consortium lead and the consortium members are aggregated up to the consortium level to determine if the AMAOs have been met for the consortium as a whole. For grades two through twelve (2–12), the CELDT criterion is an overall score of Early Advanced or higher and scores for each domain (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at Intermediate or higher. For kindergarten and grade one (K–1), the CELDT criterion is an overall score of Early Advanced or higher and scores for the listening and speaking domains at Intermediate or higher. The reading and writing domain scores are not considered for K–1. 103 | P a g e

Composite Score

A composite score is the average of two or more other scores. For example, the comprehension score is the average of the listening and reading scale scores.

Data Review Module (DRM)

The DRM is a Web-based application available to LEAs for a three-week period after the close of the AA window. Designated CELDT district coordinators are granted secure access to the Student Score File (SSF) to make corrections to student demographic data to ensure accuracy for reporting purposes.

Domains

Domains are the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing assessed by the CELDT. The ESEA also requires that comprehension be assessed, which is calculated as the average of the listening and reading scale scores.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)

Title III of the ESEA requires states to administer a test to newly enrolled students whose primary (home) language is not English to determine their level of English Language fluency. In California, the CELDT serves this purpose. Students identified through the initial assessment as English Learners must be given the CELDT annually until they are reclassified as fluent English proficient. Title III sets AMAO targets that school district receiving Title III funds must meet.

English Language Development (ELD) Standards

The ELD standards, adopted by the State Board of Education (SBE) in 1999, define what English learners in California’s public schools must know and be able to do as they progress toward full fluency in English. Links to the ELD standards are available in both English and Spanish on the CDE Content Standards Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/.

English Learner (EL)

English learners are students with a primary language other than English who are not yet proficient in English.

English Proficient Level

The criterion for English language proficiency is an overall score of Early Advanced or higher and a score of Intermediate or higher for each domain (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). For Kindergarten and grade one, the criterion for English language proficiency is an overall score of Early Advanced or higher and a score of Intermediate or higher for the domains of listening and speaking. 104 | P a g e

Home Language Survey (HLS) Initial Assessment (IA)

In accordance with California Education Code (EC) Section 52164.1, LEAs are required to have a HLS form completed by the student’s parent or guardian at the time of first enrollment in a California public school, indicating the language used in the home. A sample is available on the CDE English Learner Forms Web page at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/cr/el/elforms.asp. The CELDT is first given to newly enrolled students, whose primary language is not English, as an initial assessment of English language fluency. AMAO 2 calculations include initial CELDT takers tested during the AA window if they are classified as EL.

Initial Fluent English Proficient (IFEP)

IFEP students are students with a primary language other than English who took the CELDT within 30 days of enrollment in a U.S. public school and who met the school district criterion for English language proficiency (i.e. those students who were initially identified as fluent in English). IFEP students are not included in AMAO calculations.

Local Educational Agency (LEA)

An LEA is a government agency which supervises local public primary and secondary schools in the delivery of instructional and educational services. For Title III Accountability, LEAs include school districts, county offices of education, direct-funded charter schools, and consortium leads.

Performance Levels

Performance levels are ranges of scores in which students have demonstrated sufficient knowledge and skills to be regarded as performing at a particular English-proficient level. In accordance with ELD standards, student CELDT scores are identified as falling into one of five performance levels: Beginning, Early Intermediate, Intermediate, Early Advanced, or Advanced.

Performance Level Cut Scores Performance Level Summary Report

The SBE has established performance level cut scores for all four domains (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and overall performance on the CELDT. A score report provided to LEAs that summarizes the total number of assessments scored and the percentage of students who tested within each performance level by school and grade level within each LEA.

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Primary Language

The language identified (at the local level) to be the student’s primary language based on information provided in the HLS upon his or her first enrollment in a California public school. This identification is done only once during the course of the student’s academic career and is used to identify whether he or she is to be assessed with the CELDT.

Raw Scores

A CELDT raw score is the number of test questions answered correctly. Raw scores should not be used to compare results from grade to grade or year to year.

Reclassification

Reclassification is the local process used by LEAs to determine if a student has acquired sufficient English language fluency to perform successfully in academic subjects without ELD support. EC Section 313(d) specifies the four criteria that must be used when making reclassification decisions locally.

Reclassified Fluent English Proficient (RFEP)

Students with a primary language other than English who were initially classified as English learners, but who have subsequently met the LEA criteria for English language proficiency are determined to be RFEP. EC Section 313(d) specifies four criteria that LEAs must use in reclassifying students from English learner to fluent English proficient (RFEP). The four criteria are: ● Assessment of English language proficiency, which in California is the CELDT. ● Teacher evaluation of a student’s academic performance, which can be based on the student’s report card grades, grade point average, or other measure that LEAs use to determine students’ academic performance. ● Parent opinion and consultation, which involves parents or guardians, if possible, in a discussion about their child’s English language proficiency and meeting the guidelines for reclassification. ● Comparison of performance in basic skills, against an empirically established range of performance in basic skills (e.g., the State Standardized Test for ELA or the CMA for ELA).

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Released Test Questions (RTQs)

RTQs are a series of retired test items by grade span that site and district coordinators, teachers, and support staff who work with English learners may use as practice questions to help prepare their students for the types of questions that may be encountered on the CELDT. They may also be used as a resource for parents whose children have taken the CELDT. RTQs cover the four domains assessed by the CELDT: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Research Files

Electronic reports available to LEAs at the completion of the DRM each spring. Both AA and IA reports are accessed through DataQuest on the CDE Web site.

Scale Score

Scale scores are derived from the number or percentage of questions that students must answer to score at each performance level and are used to equate tests from one administration to the next. Higher scale scores indicate higher levels of performance, while lower scale scores indicate lower levels of performance.

State Board of Education (SBE)

The SBE is a state educational agency that sets education policy for kindergarten through grade twelve in the areas of standards, instructional materials, assessment, and accountability. The SBE adopts textbooks for kindergarten through grade eight, adopts regulations to implement legislation, and has the authority to grant waivers for certain sections of the EC. The SBE has eleven members appointed by the Governor.

Student Performance Level Report

The Student Performance Level Report provides results of the CELDT for individual students. The report includes student identifier information, purpose of the assessment (IA or AA), performance levels for each domain, overall performance, and the comprehension score based on the average of the listening and reading scale scores.

Student Score File

The Student Score File is an electronic data file containing CELDT scores for students tested during the previous and current years’ AA window. The LEAs have the opportunity to review and update student demographic data during the annual DRM prior to public posting of AA results.

Test Performance Descriptors

Test performance descriptors that are based on the ELD standards characterize what students at each performance level know and can demonstrate in English.

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Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)

Title III of the ESEA requires states to administer a test to newly enrolled students whose primary language is not English to determine their level of English language fluency. In California, the CELDT serves this purpose. Students identified through the IA as ELs must be given the CELDT annually until they are RFEP. Title III also sets AMAOs or targets that LEAs receiving Title III funds must meet, which in part are based on CELDT results.

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