Upward Mobility Among Different

Upward Mobility Among Different  Groups of Migrants and Natives in  Stockholm, 1878‐1926  An Event History Analysis    Paul Puschmann ‐ Per‐Olof Grönb...
Author: Beverly Daniels
3 downloads 0 Views 327KB Size
Upward Mobility Among Different  Groups of Migrants and Natives in  Stockholm, 1878‐1926  An Event History Analysis    Paul Puschmann ‐ Per‐Olof Grönberg ‐ Jan Kok ‐ Koen Matthijs      Working paper 

  

   WOG/HD/2012‐7

      D/2012/1192/12     ©  Centrum voor Sociologisch Onderzoek (CeSO)    Parkstraat 45 – bus 3601    B – 3000 Leuven    All  rights  reserved.  Except  in  those  cases  expressly  determined  by  law,  no  part  of  this  publication  may  be  multiplied,  saved  in  an  automated  datafile or made public in any way whatsoever without the express prior  written consent of the author    Alle rechten voorbehouden. Behoudens de uitdrukkelijk bij wet bepaalde  uitzonderingen  mag  niets  van  deze  uitgave  worden  verveelvoudigd,  opgeslagen  in  een  geautomatiseerd  gegevensbestand  of  openbaar  gemaakt,  door  middel  van  druk,  fotokopie,  microfilm,  of  op  welke  andere wijze ook, zonder voorafgaande schriftelijke toestemming van de  uitgever

Upward Mobility Among Different Groups of  Migrants and Natives in Stockholm, 1878‐1926    An Event History Analysis    Paul Puschmann  Family and Population Studies  Centre for Sociological Research  Parkstraat 45 – 3601  KU Leuven, Belgium  Room 02.205  +32 (0)16 32 34 72  [email protected]leuven.be   

Per‐Olof Grönberg  Centre for Population Studies, Umeå University  Norra Beteendevetarhuset 4 trappor, Demografiska databasen  SE‐901 87 Umeå, Sweden  +46 90 786 93 69  [email protected]    

Jan Kok  Economic, Social and Demographic History  Erasmusplein 1, room 9.04a  6525 HT Nijmegen  Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen ‐ The Netherlands  [email protected]  Family and Population Studies (FaPOS)  Centre for Sociological Research  Parkstraat 45, B‐3000 Leuven  KU Leuven ‐ Belgium  [email protected]   

Koen Matthijs  Family and Population Studies  Centre for Sociological Research  Parkstraat 45 – 3601  KU Leuven, Belgium  Room 02.207  +32 (0)16 32 31 73  [email protected] 

 

Table of Contents  List of Tables   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



List of Figures  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Abstract 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



1. Introduction 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



2. Migration and Integration in the 19th  and early 20th Century 

 

 



3. Measuring Economic Integration of Migrants 

 

 

 

 



4. Determinants of Social Mobility among Migrants 

 

 

 



5. Event History Analysis 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



6. Variables and Hypotheses   

 

 

 

 

 

 



7. Source and Data 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 

8. Historical Context   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 

9. Results  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 

10. Conclusion  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16 

Appendix   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17 

Endnotes 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19 

Bibliography   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19 

 

       

1

 

  List of Tables  Table 1: Results Event History Analysis for Upward Mobility  

 

15 

  List of Figures  Figure 1: Conceptual Model: Event History Analysis Upward Mobility   8  Figure 2: Cumulative hazard according to geographic origin 

 

17 

Figure 3: Cumulative hazard according to sex 

 

 

 

17 

 

 

 

18 

Figure 5: Cumulative hazard according to environment    

 

18 

 

Figure 4: Cumulative hazard according to social class 

   

     

2

 

Abstract   The aim of this paper is to increase the insight into the economic integration process among  migrants  in  Stockholm  during  the  period  1878‐1926.  An  event  history  analysis  (Cox  proportional  hazard  model)  was  carried  out  in  which  the  timing  and  incidence  of  upward  mobility functioned as dependent variable. We compared the  ‘risk’ of climbing up the social  ladder among natives and migrants. We selected only those natives who were continuously  present  in  Stockholm  (from  birth  on)  and  who  at  age  18  were  unmarried  and  practiced  an  occupation.  We  compared  these  groups  of  natives  with  (mainly  internal)  migrants  who  arrived at age 18, who were unmarried at that time, but practiced an occupation. We found  that migrants had a higher risk of experiencing upward mobility. Moreover, males had lower  risks  of  climbing  the  social  ladder  compared  to  females.  Middle  class  and  skilled  workers  had  lower  risks  of  upward  mobility  in  comparison  with  unskilled  workers.  Apart  from  Södermalm, we found no significant neighborhood effects. However, people who were born  in  the  countryside  had  significantly  higher  chances  of  experiencing  upward  mobility  compared  to  persons  born  in  an  urban  environment.  Last  but  not  least,  migrants  from  Stockholm  County and wider Central Sweden had better chances of  climbing up the social  ladder  compared  to  native  born  Stockholm  dwellers.  These  results  indicate  that  Stockholm  was  a  meritocratic  city  during  the  period  under  investigation  and  that  labor  market  adaptation was a relatively smooth process. It seems that discrimination against vulnerable  groups  (e.g.  internal  migrants,  people  with  a  rural  background,  unskilled  workers  and  women)  hardly  existed.  After  all,  success  in  the  labor  market  was  not  limited  to  some  privileged  groups.  Rather,  the  opposite  was  the  case  as  all  kind  of    ‘vulnerable’  groups  enjoyed higher risks of experiencing upward mobility.  

1. Introduction  A  few  years  ago,  Tommy  Bengtsson,  Christer  Lundh  &  Kirk  Scott  (2005)  published  a  contribution on the economic integration of immigrants in post war Sweden. The conclusions  these  scholars  reached  were  rather  gloomy  as  the  head  title  of  their  text    ‐  ‘From  Boom  to  Bust’  ‐  already  suggests.  According  to  Bengtsson  et  al.,  the  aim  of  the  Swedish  integration  policy to provide immigrants with the same opportunities and same standard of living as the  native  born  Swedish  population,  has  failed:  “Today  the  exclusion  from  the  regular  labour  market and unemployment among immigrants is much higher and the standard of living is  much lower than among natives. However, this was not the case in the past. In the 1960s the  immigrant population had a higher employment rate and had higher average earnings than  the native population”(Bengtsson et al. 2005:1).  Bengtsson’s, Lundh’s and Scott’s rise and fall metaphor, encompasses the transition from a  ‘golden  age’  of  European  labour  immigrant  integration  (mainly  in  the  1950s  and  1960s)  towards  a  period  of  economic  disintegration  of  new  waves  of  non‐European  newcomers,  mainly  refugees  from  Developing  World  countries.  It  is  argued  that  there  has  arisen  a  mismatch  between  the  supply  and  demand  of  immigrant  labour  in  Sweden.  Most  of  the  recent newcomers have professional profiles, which match with unskilled jobs in sectors of  the  economy.  These  are,  however,  the  types  of  jobs  which  are  no  longer  growing.  In  the  growing skilled sectors of the economy, immigrants have less chances to find jobs, since they  lack  highly  necessary  skills  related  to  language  and  communication.  Moreover  discrimination of non‐white immigrants seems to play a role. Today’s immigrants are more 

3

often  unemployed,  their  earnings  are  lower  and  they  show  a  higher  dependency  on  the  welfare state than the native born Swedish population. In the view of Bengtsson cum suis, the  decline  of  the  industrial  sector  explains  to  a  high  degree  the  weak  attachment  of  the  latest  waves of newcomers to the Swedish labour market.   

2. Migration and Integration in the 19th  and early 20th Century  The  suggestion  of  Bengtsson  cum  suis    that  the  1950’s  and  1960  were  a  ‘golden  age’  of  economic integration of newcomers in Sweden, raises questions about how process of labour  market adaptation for earlier waves of migrants evolved. It is true that Sweden only in the  1930s  became  a  net‐immigration  country.  However,  like  many  other  Western  European  countries, Sweden started to receive already in the latter half of the  nineteenth and the early  twentieth  century,  thousands  of  immigrants  (Lucassen  2005;  Lucassen,  Feldman  &  Oltmer  2006;  Grönberg  2010).  The  largest  part  of  these  immigrants  settled  in  larger  cities  notably  Stockholm  and  Göteborg,  where  they  were  accompanied  by  ever  growing  numbers  of  internal migrants from the countryside, who likewise had to adapt to an alien environment  (Grönberg 2010; Lucassen & Lucassen 2011).   The existing literature on urban in‐migration in Western European cities during nineteenth  and  early  twentieth  century  sketches  a  somewhat  diffuse  picture  of  how  the  integration  of  different  groups  of  urban  in‐migrants  evolved.  In  the  older  literature,  the  integration  of  urban  in‐migrants  in  the  nineteenth  century  is  presented  as  a  highly  problematic  process.  According  to  the  adherents  of  the  Chicago  School  of  Sociology,    newcomers  were  more  or  less  doomed  to  end  up  at  the  edge  of  urban  society,  mainly  because  they  lacked  a  crucial  social network and because the movement from the countryside to the city had an uprooting  effect  (Park  1928;  Park  &  Burgess  1967;  Thomas  &  Znaniecki  1958;  Handlin  1951).  Disoriented,  isolated  and  economically  deprived,  these  urban  in‐migrants  hardly  managed  to keep their head above water. High rates of alcohol abuse, prostitution, illegitimacy, crime  and  infanticide  all  point  at  the  difficulties  the  integration  process  posed  to  these  urban  newcomers (Moch 2003).   Another  gloomy  view  on  the  (economic)  integration  process  of  nineteenth  and  early  twentieth  century  urban  in‐migrants  is  provided  by  Stephan  Thernstrom  in  the  1970’s.  He  formulated in The Other Bostonians the so‐called floating proletariat thesis. According to this  thesis most of the nineteenth century urban in‐migrants in American cities were laborers and  they  enjoyed  considerable  less  chances  than  the  native  population  to  climb  up  the  social  ladder.  Because  of  limited  employment  opportunities  for  newcomers,  many  of  these  urban  in‐migrants  were  perpetually  on  the  move.  In  this  apocalyptic  view,  the  economic  integration of urban in‐migrants is again portrayed as highly problematic:   “…one wonders whether the exceptional earlier volatility of the American working class  and especially of its least‐skilled members, does not point at the existence of a permanent  floating  proletariat  made  up  of  men  ever  on  the  move  spatially  but  rarely  wining  economic gains as a result of spatial mobility (Thernstrom 1973: 42).” 

Both  the  picture  of  the  uprooted  migrant  and  the  image  of  the  floating  proletariat  were  originally  described  for  newcomers  in  nineteenth  century  American  cities,  but  found  their  way  also  in  the  literature  on  urban  in‐migration  in  European  cities  for  the  same  period  of  time.  An  excellent  example  of  the  uprooted  peasant,  we  find  in  the  study  of  Bouman  &  Bouman (1955) on rural‐to‐urban migration towards the Dutch port city of Rotterdam. These 

4

sociologists  stressed  that  integration  into  urban  society  was  all  but  an  easy‐going  process  among  former  peasants.  In  their  view,  poverty  and  misery  were  normal  states  of  affairs  among the recently arrived rural‐to‐urban migrants in Rotterdam. Unprepared for the urban  labor market and with little or no financial resources at their disposal the uprooted peasants  became involved in a struggle for survival upon their arrival in the city. As day labourers in  the  port,  in  construction  work,  or  other  low‐skilled  labour  demanding sectors  of  the  urban  economy, these urban in‐migrants could hardly make a living. Even if the wife contributed  to  the  family  budget  by  performing  paid  labour  outside  the  household,  financial  problems  were far from solved if we may believe the following account, cited by Bouman & Bouman:  “The  first  years  were  years  of  poverty.  Mother  had to  work  outside  the  home,  cleaning  offices, do the washing for other people, etc. It happened, that we kids, sat at home with  empty stomachs, waiting for our mother to come home. From some woman, she worked  for,  she  had  received  then,  thick  sandwiches,  which  she  had  preserved  for  us,  and  of  which everyone got half a piece, with which we had to go to bed” (Quoted from Bouman  & Bouman 1955: 33). 

An  example  of  the    image  of  the  floating  proletariat  thesis  we  find  in  David  Crew’s  social  history of the German city of Bochum:   “Being able to live in one community for more than a few years was thus a considerable  achievement in industrial Germany, since it meant that the worker had found and kept a  regular,  relatively  attractive  job  with  some  prospects  for  advancement.  Yet,  migrants  especially those from the distant provinces found that the kinds of jobs that would make  it  possible  for  them  to  settle  in  Bochum  were  not  readily  accessible.  Indeed  they  were  usually  forced  to  accept  the  most  unskilled,  unhealthy,  irregular  and  hence  most  unsettled forms of work that the industrial community had to offer (Crew 1979: 67‐68).”   

In the 1980’s a more positive picture of the integration of 19th century urban in‐migrants was  gradually  taking  root.  In  this  respect,  William  Sewell’s  study  on  Marseille  has  been  influential  as  it  was  one  of  the  first  studies,  in  which  was  proved  that  although  migrants  were  more  likely  to  get  involved  in  crime,  and  revolutionary  events,  certain  groups  of  migrants, notably stayers, prospered upon arrival in a new urban environment. Non‐Italian  migrants who stayed for a longer while in Marseille were even more successful in the labor  market  than  many  natives,  as  they  made  more  use  of  new  opportunities  change  brought  about:   “In Marseille, the response to change seems to have been systematically different among  natives of the city than among immigrants. Natives, in general resisted change, whereas  immigrants,  on  the  whole,  accepted,  explored,  and  exploited  the  opportunities  that  change offered. This is quite clear in the case of social mobility, where immigrants were  more  responsive  to  opportunities  for  upward  mobility.  Natives  usually  confined  their  search  to  familiar  jobs  and  social  categories,  remaining  within  the  same  social  world  as  their  parents.  Immigrants  explored  the  entire  horizon  and  took  special  advantage  of  expanding opportunities in clerical occupations” (Sewell 1985: 314).  

Italian  migrants  were  an  exception,  as  their  careers  were  rather  unsuccessful.  Because  of  limited  education  and  discrimination  their  chances  for  social  upward  mobility  were  considerably lower than among natives and other migrants, while their risk of experiencing  social  downward  mobility  was  considerably  higher.  Moreover,  Sewell  stretched  that  the  integration  of  temporary  migrants  was  also  more  difficult,  as  was  proven  by  high  crime  statistics.  In  this  sense,  Sewell  did  not  reject  the  floating  proletariat  thesis.  He  just 

5

demonstrated that the fate of stayers was much better than that of the leavers and often also  better than that of natives.   That  stayers  were  rather  successful  has  also  been  proven  by  Leo  Lucassen  (2004).  He  demonstrated that German stayers in Rotterdam were positively selected and reached even  higher  socio‐economic  positions  than  many  native  born  urban  dwellers.  Schrover  (2002)  equally found that a considerable proportion of the German migrants in Utrecht managed to  become part of the city’s elite and that others fared considerably well. Apparently for some  groups  of  migrants  economic  integration  was  a  relatively  easygoing  process,  whereas  for  others it was a struggle.  

3. Measuring Economic Integration of Migrants  One way of measuring economic integration, is to investigate the position and performance  of migrants on the labour market (Münz 2008). In this respect, scholars focus on employment  and  unemployment  rates  (Chriswick,  Cohen  &  Zach  1997),  wage  levels  (Chriswick  1978),  occupational structures (Dryburgh 2005) and social mobility (Papademetriou, Sommerville &  Sumption  2009).i  All  these  indicators  can  lead  to  a  deeper  understanding  of  intra‐  and  intergenerational  integration,  as  they  allow  to  compare  labor  market  performance  between  natives and first, second and third generation migrants on the one hand and among different  groups  of  migrants  on  the  other.  With  economic  or  labor  market  integration  we  mean  ‘the  path  by  which  labor  market  performance  of  [im]migrants  converges  towards  that  of  their  native  born  counterparts’  (Hums  &  Simpson  2004:  47).    Economic  performance  is  a  key  indicator  of  integration,  as  it  affects  amongst  other  things  social  equality,  social  cohesion  (Toye  2007),  and  the  physical  and  mental  wellbeing  (Linn,  Sandifer  &  Stein  1985;  Clark  &  Oswald  1994)  of  individuals.  Bad  labour  performance  in  terms  of  high  unemployment  and  low  income  is  interrelated  with  discrimination,  social  exclusion,  health  problems,  and  increased risks of criminal behaviour (White & Cunneen 2011).   In this paper we will use the incidence and timing of upward social mobility among different  groups of migrants in the city of Stockholm as a proxy of their economic integration process  in  the period 1878‐1926. We interpret upward social mobility as a sign of successful labour  market  integration.  In  our  view,  the  more  migrants  experienced  upward  mobility  and  the  earlier it took place after arrival, the easier it was for migrants to find their way in the labour  market. The lower the rates of upward mobility and the longer the time‐lags between arrival  and the event of climbing up a rung on  the social ladder, the more difficult integration went.  We are not only interested in the incidence and timing of social mobility over the life course,  but also in its determinants.  

6

4.

Determinants of Social Mobility among Migrants 

Individual Characteristics  That certain groups of migrants thrived upon arrival in the city, whereas others seem to have  struggled,  presumes  that  certain  categories  of  migrants  disposed  of  certain  characteristics   which  other  (groups  of)  migrants  lacked.  In  this  respect,  the  literature  often  points  at  the  impact of human capital. Migrants who were better educated, who had more labor market  skills and more working experience are believed to have integrated more easily in the labor  market  (Lucassen  2005;  Bengtsson,  Lundh,  Scott  2005:22).  Social  contacts  also  must  have  played a crucial role. Those migrants who had families and friends in the city they moved to,  could  count  on  assistance  when  they  were  in  want  of  it,  while  individual  migrants  who  suffered  misfortune  had  to  deal  with  it  themselves  (Darroch  1981).  A  network  of  relatives  and friends might have positively influenced individual career prospects. Another factor of  importance  in  the  literature  on  social  mobility  among  migrants  is  the  migrant’s  socio‐ economic  position  before  migration.  The  chances  of  uneducated  non‐inheriting  farmer’s  children to thrive in the city they settled, must have been many times lower than the chances  of  highly  educated,  heritable  children  from  the  local  elite  (Kok  &  Delger  1998:290).   Furthermore, some individual characteristics like ambition, intelligence and industriousness,  which are more difficult to measure (especially in historical data) surely must have had an  impact on the chances of experiencing upward mobility.   Structural Conditions  Next  to  individual  characteristics  of  migrants,  more  structural  elements  also  seem  to  have  had an impact on career mobility. In this respect, the openness of the labor market seems to  have played a crucial role. In times of economic boom the integration of newcomers is less  problematic,  because  the  demand  for  labor  is  large.  In  times  of  recession,  economic  integration  is  more  difficult,  because  less  labor  power  is  needed.  Moreover,  competition  between natives and migrants, which can lead to discrimination of newcomers is more likely  to rise during periods of economic decline. In general the more open a society is, the better  the chances for social upward mobility are.  

5.

Event History Analysis 

Event  history  models  are  used  to  predict  the  incidence  and  timing  of  historical  events  (Allison  1984).  We  use  event  history  analysis  in  order  to  describe  and  explain  why  certain  groups of people are at a higher ‘risk’ of experiencing the event of social upward mobility.  Event  history  analysis  is  an  often  used  technique  to  study  contemporary  career  mobility  (Maas  2004).  In  historical  research  this  method  is,  however,  seldom  used  for  the  study  of  social  mobility  because  existing  sources  hardly  provide  information  on  the  exact  timing  of  occupational changes. Population registers contain occupational titles at a certain moment in  time, for example at marriage, but when the person in consideration started to practise this  occupation remains unknown (Schultz & Maas 2010: 671.). This problem is largely absent in  the  data  we  use,  since  the  Roteman  in  Stockholm  updated  occupational  changes  for  all  residents  of  Sweden’s  capital  on  a  yearly  basis.  In  this  sense,  the  Stockholm  Historical  Database is an extremely rich and scarce source for the study of historical career mobility.   We  use  Cox  (1972)  proportional  hazard  models  which  is  a  conventional  semiparametric  approach  to  event  history  data  (Cleves,  Gutierrez,  Gould  &  Marchenko  2010).  We  have 

7

defined  the  time  at  risk  to  start  at  age  18  for  all  persons  in  the  data.  That  means  that  we  selected migrants who arrived at age 18 and natives who were born in Stockholm and lived  there  continuously  till  their  18th  birthday.  In  this  way  we  wanted  to  avoid  left‐censoring,  which  might  bias  the  results  of  the  analysis.  Moreover,  subjects  are  only  included  in  the  analysis  if  they  practiced  an  occupation  at  age  18.  Failure  (the  occurrence  of  the  event  of  upward social mobility) is defined as the first occupational change of a person that led to a  higher social position than the previous registered occupational title suggested according to  the  Hisco‐classification  scheme  (Van  Leeuwen&  Maas  2011).  Downward  mobility  might  occur  before  upward  mobility  and  is  not  treated  as  a  censoring  moment.  This  decision  has  been  taken  as  we  are  foremost  interested  in  the  economic  integration  of  migrants  and  the  literature  on  this  topic  suggests  that  an  initial  decline  in  social  status  (and  earnings)  at  destination (compared to the postiation at the place of origin) is common among newcomers  (Chriswick 1978). We argue therefore that the incidence and timing of career improvement at  destination (rather than real improvement compared to the occupational title at the place of  origin  or  the  first  reported  occupation  at  destination)  is  a  decent  proxy  for  economic  integration.   In  our  approach  right‐censoring  occurs  once  a  person  leaves  the  area  of  observation  (out‐ migration), turns age 50,  dies (before age 50) or when registration ends (in 1915)  In the case  of women, the time at risk stops also once a female got married, since occupations of married  women were hardly registered and thereby any form of upward mobility cannot be detected  on  the  basis  of  our  source  material.  Finally,  analysis  time  is  specified  as  the  years  passed  since the 18th birthday. This brings us to the following conceptual model:  

Figure 1: Conceptual Model: Event History Analysis Upward Mobility     

Failure:

Native: Turning 18

Upward Mobility

  Censoring:

     

Death Out-Migration Turing 50 Marriage (women) Registration End

Migrant: Arrival at age 18

     

Age 18

Time at Risk

32 Years (Max)

8

6.

Variables and Hypotheses 

Mobility  Since migrants first had to adapt to the local labour market, we expect migrants to have had  lower chances for social upward mobility than natives. Migrants probably first had to obtain  specific  local  human  capital.  Moreover,  the  lack  of  a  social  network  could  make  it  more  complicated to realize upward mobility.   Sex  In  the  age  of  the  male  breadwinner  when  females  were  encouraged  to  devote  themselves  first of all to reproduction and family life, we expect men to climb more often and faster on  the  social  ladder  than  females.  The  fact,  that  most  women  stopped  working  once  they  got  married,  might  have  lowered  their  ambitions  regarding  their  professional  careers.  Men,  on  the other hand were expected to be successful, as the family’s financial well‐being dependent  upon them. This might have stimulated males to invest in their career.   Social Class on Arrival  Since  migrants  belonging  to  the  upper  class  on  arrival,  cannot  climb  much  higher  on  the  social  ladder,  we  expect  them  to  experience  at  most  very  little  upward  mobility.  In  theory,  the highest jumps can be made, by temporary unskilled labourers. If this type of newcomers  experiences  high  rates  of  upward  mobility  than we  have  a strong  indicator  that  Stockholm  was a truly open urban society (Crew 1973:55). However, we do not expect them to make too  much  progress,  because  of  their  limited  human  capital  in  terms  of  education  and  skills.  Skilled  labourers  did  have  more  human  capital,  and  we  expect  them  therefore  to  be  more  often upward mobile.   Period  The early literature on social mobility suggested that industrialization gave rise to high intra‐  and  intergenerational    mobility  rates.  In  this  view  pre‐industrial  societies  have  been  static  when it comes to occupational mobility. Someone’s father’s occupation, determined to a very  high degree the own career possibilities. The industrial revolution is believed to have opened  up  the  road  to  meritocratic  societies,  in  which  someone’s  own    talent,  capacities,  and  achievements are more important than the social status of previous generations. More recent  research, has proven that the industrial revolution did not cause revolutionary change to the  rates of occupational mobility. Nevertheless, industrialization seems to have  a slight positive  effect  on  the  chances  to  experience  upward  social  mobility  (Kaelble  1978;  Janssens  2004;  Vikström  2003).  We  expect  therefore  that  the  incidence  of  upward  mobility  increased  for  those migrants who arrived later in time when the industrialization process had developed  further.   Environment: Rural/Urban  We  anticipate  that  migrants  who  were  born  and  raised  in  a  rural  environment  had  more  difficulties to become integrated in Sweden’s capital than migrants who grew up in a rural  environment. Rural migrants might have more often ended up in the second segment of the  double labour market, because they simply had less urban experience (Sewell 1985)   

9

Region: Country of Birth  We  expect  that  people born  in  Sweden  experienced  more often  social mobility  than  people  born  abroad,  because  they  consisted  already  of  country‐specific  human  capital  (Bengtsson,  Lundh  &  Scott  2005).  Furthermore  migrants  from  other  Nordic  countries  might  have  been  more successful than migrants from other countries, because these migrants had no or only  small language problems compared to non‐Nordic migrants.   Neighbourhood   Some studies have pointed out that people settling in working‐class districts often had lower  chances of upward social mobility. We may therefore expect that migrants settling in  Kungsholmen and Södermalm had lower chances for upward social mobility. Södermalm,.  in particular, hosted the city’s poorest inhabitants and migrants going there can be assumed  to have arrived with less human capital than people settling in other city districts.  Östermalm was a district that to a large extent attracted people with a higher social status;  their chances to “climb” were limited. In addition, the area can be assumed to have had some  “locked” structures for less well‐off migrants. Gamla Stan  experienced economic decline  during our period and may therefore have provided limited chances for upward social  mobility among migrants. Klara, the area that ‘received’ many of the new businesses, was  hypothetically the district where migrants had the highest chances of upward social  mobility. Although the population decreased, the new activities of this district provided  employment opportunities, to a large extent within occupations that can be characterised as  skilled worker or middle‐class ones. Klara was, hypothetically, the ‘best mix’ of migrants  with appropriate amounts of human capital and an occupational structure that was relatively  open for social advancement.  

7.

Source and Data 

The  source  for  this  study  is  the  Stockholm  Historical  Database  (SHD)  whose  base  is  the  Roteman  registration  system,  in  operation  in  the  city  between  1878  and  1926.  In  1878,  Stockholm  was  divided  into  16  rotar  (wards)  with  between  8.000  and  10.000  inhabitants.  Forty‐eight  years  later,  when  the  system  was  abolished,  this  number  had  increased  to  36.  Every  rote  was  assigned  a  roteman,  who  carried  out  two  main  duties;  being  a  population  registrar and a ‘social worker’ carrying out certain social welfare services. The background of  this  system  was  Stockholm’s  extraordinary  population  growth,  in  the  wake  of  large‐scale  industrialisation in late 19th and early 20th century. Local authorities needed to ‘keep track’ of  the  population  and  thereby  organise  policies  regarding  for  example  city  planning,  sewage  management,  and  poor  relief.  The  Church  Examination  Registers  were  regarded  as  insufficient  in  coping  with  population  increase  as  well  as  extensive  in‐,  out‐  and  intra‐city  migration (Fogelvik & Geschwind, 2000: 207‐208).   Everyone  who  lived  and  was  registered  in  Stockholm  during  the  time  period  mentioned  above was recorded by the rotemen in a longitudinal population register (ledger) for all real  estates  inside  the  rote’s  boarders.  The  main  ledgers  were  completed  with  special  ones  on  births  and  deaths  as  well  as  in‐  and  out‐migration.  The  ledgers,  and  thereby  the  database,  contain  information  on  names,  sex,  birthplaces,  birthdates,  occupational  titles,  civil  status,  family relations, head of household markers, and migrations to and from the properties. A  roteman  continuously  updated  ‘his’  (women  were  not  eligible  to  be  rotemen)  ledger  and 

10

noted migrations to and from the properties as well as when children were born and when  people  died.  Information  in  the  ledgers  were  also  updated  every  year,  at  the  time  of  the  yearly census registration (Fogelvik & Geschwind, 2000: 208‐209). As these updates included  occupational  changes,  SHD  provides  an  unusually  good  source  for  a  comparative  study  of  social mobility among migrants and natives.   The dataset originates from a 2011 SHD retrieval, which includes every fifth person having  their  first  date  of  entrance,  i.e.  a  birth,  an  in‐migration,  or  simply  being  present  in  the  ‘covered’ area of Stockholm when registration began, at some moment in time between 1878  and 1915. From this retrieval we have chosen all migrants (n=3172) who arrived at age 18 and  all  natives  (n=936)  who  were  continuously  present  from  their  birth  till  their  18th  birthday.  Next,  we  selected  only  those  migrants  and  natives  who  were  unmarried  at  age  18  and  practiced  a  registered  occupation.  For  all  these  persons  a  person‐period  file  was  created  to  which  the  following  background  variables  were  added:  birth  date,  birth  place  and  birth  county (and country for foreign‐born migrants), place of departure (and county/country) and   occupational  title.  On  the  basis  of  these  variables,  we  created  the  following  independent  variables:  mobility,  sex,  social  class,  period  (year  at  which  someone  turned  18),  neighbourhood (in which one lived at age 18) and environment (rural or uban) &  region (in  which one grew up).  

8. Historical Context  Trade and craft dominated urban Sweden in the 18th and early 19th century. Factories became  however more common and many of the new industrial establishments were sugar refineries  and textile factories, usually located close to waterfalls. Stockholm’s lack of water power was  one  major  reason  behind  its  relatively  slow  early  19th  century  industrial  development.  However, as steam power developed and proved superior to water power, Stockholm rose to  a  major  industrial  city,  a  development  that  was  intensified  with  the  large‐scale  industrialisation  from  the  1870s  onwards.  In  the  mid  1890s,  Stockholm  hosted  around  600  industries  with  a  total  of  about  21.500  industrial  workers.  Ten  years  later,  the  number  of  industries  had  increased  to  about  750  and  the  number  of  workers  employed  to  around  31.000.  In  addition,  Stockholm’s  immediate  suburbs  also  experienced  a  considerable  industrialisation. The capital and its vicinity represented 15% of Sweden’s industrial output  value  around  1905  and  remained  the  country’s  most  pronounced  industrial  district  in  the  earliest  decades  of  the  20th  century.  Stockholm’s  manifold  industry  can  partly  be  explained  by  the  capital  position.  Scientific  and  cultural  institutions  facilitated  foreign  contacts,  and  technological innovations often reached Stockholm earlier than other parts of Sweden. Local  industrialists  were  able  to  utilise  from  this  situation.  Engineering  industry  was  one  important  cornerstone;  large  mechanical  workshops  such  as  Bolinders,  Atlas,  the  shipyards,  and  later  some  of  the  so‐called  ‘genius  industries’  –  telephone  manufacturer  L.  M.  Ericsson  and  AB  Separator  –  provided  employment.  The  food  and  stimulus  industry  played  another  major  role;  Stockholm’s  breweries  experienced  for  example  a  period  of  prosperity  in  the  latter  half  of  the  19th  century.  Well‐off  circles  around  the  Royal  court  and  the  civil  service  departments contributed to keep up the demand for foodstuffs. Like in most countries, the  graphic  industry  in  general  and  the  printing‐houses  in  particular,  constituted  typically  capital‐based industries whose vitality was safeguarded by the demands of the government,  the  parliament  and  the  civil  service  departments  (Högberg  1981:  91‐95,  98‐99,  104‐115;  Ahlenius & Kempe 1909: 874). . 

11

Stockholm’s port was undoubtedly important for the local economy; no other Swedish city  was as dependent of shipping in the 19th century. Early 19th century Stockholm was a major  port  for  exports  of  iron  from  the  nearby  Bergslagen  district  and  timber  from  northern  Sweden.  However,  the  importance  of  Stockholm’s  merchant  navy  and  the  capital  as  a  port  for exports gradually declined in favour of Gothenburg. The capital remained however the  country’s major port of imports and it was not uncommon that fully loaded ships arriving in  Stockholm  had  to  leave  the  port  in  ballast.  “Daily”  shipping  was  of  course  also  important;  dairy  products,  fish  and  berries  as  well  as  wood,  hay  and  building  materials  came  with  yachts  and  rowing‐boats  from  the  archipelago  and  other  parts  of  Sweden.  (Högberg  1981:  130‐133)   The  port  was  of  course  also  of  importance  for  migrants.  One  thing  was  that  it  provided  employment  opportunities.  Employment  in  the  port  was  depicted  as  hard,  unhealthy  and  poorly paid in the beloved novel suite about Stockholm from mid 19th to mid 20th century by  author  Per‐Anders  Fogelström  (Fogelström  &  Bäverstam,  2000).  This  was  almost  certainly  true for the lumpenproletariat, of whom many could only count on temporary employment.  A lot of the loading and unloading of ships was however carried out by workers organised  according  to  the  statutes  of  a  guild.  Over  time,  stevedore  firms  began  to  push  these  organised  dock  workers  aside,  but  storehouse  workers,  measurers  and  measurers  working  with weighing were often able to remain in work and so were heavers of grain. Stockholm’s  steamship  connections  with  nearby  regions,  remoter  areas  of  Sweden,  Finland,  as  well  as  with foreign cities like Sankt Petersburg, Reval and Lübeck were of course important for also  important  for  migrants.  The  steamship  leaving  for  Lübeck  once  every  fortnight  provided  a  comfortable connection to continental Europe at an early stage (Högberg, 1981: 133‐136, 141)   Urban in‐migration explains to a considerable degree how the capital city in eastern central  Sweden grew from about 93,000 inhabitants in 1850 into a metropolis of over half a million  souls  in  1930.  The  proportion  of  non‐native  born  has  been  high  from  around  1850,  also  by  international  standards.  Although  international  migrants  were  relatively  well  represented  among the newcomers, a huge majority of the urban in‐migrants were internal migrants. In  the 1910 census, it was stated that Sweden’s remoteness led to one of the lowest numbers of  ‘strangers’  in  Europe  and  Hammar  (1964:  17‐22)  concludes  that  only  one  percent  of  the  country’s interwar population was born abroad. The Swedish newcomers, for a considerable  part of rural descent, equally had to adapt to Stockholm’s urban labour market. At first sight,  internal  migrants  seem  to  have  had  some  advantages  compared  to  international  migrants,  since  they  had  Swedish‐specific  human  capital  in  terms  of  language  and  communicational  skills  at  their  disposal.  Moreover,  internal  migrants  in  Stockholm  might  have  become  less  isolated  upon  arrival  since  their  movement  to  the  capital  was  more  likely  part  of  a  wider  chain of migration and because their language skills enabled them to get into contact with a  wide  range  of  Swedes  living  in  Stockholm.  A  more  closer  look,  at  the  countries  of  birth  of  international  migrants,  suggest,  however,  that  at  least  half  of  the  international  newcomers  might  have  had  few  communicational  problems,  since  they  either  had  Swedish  (Finland‐ Swedes and return migrants) or another Scandinavian language as their mother tongue.   In  this  study,  six  districts  covered  by  the  Stockholm  Historical  Database  are  included.  The  Old  Town  (Swedish:  Gamla  Stan)  is  located  in  the  middle  of  the  city  and  experienced  economic  decline  during  our  period.  Shipping  and  retailing  were  however  still  important  and  some  public  administration  remained.  Old  Town’s  population  decline  was  not  high  in 

12

numbers, but the area experienced a relative decline in its share of Stockholm’s population.  As the city became ‘modernised’, many people began to regard this ‘medieval’ part as dark,  overcrowded,  less  airy,  and  non‐comfortable.  The  Klaradistrict,  in  the  lower  north,  was  a  major  ‘receiver’  when  banks  and  businesses  moved  out  of  the  Old  Town.  Residential  apartments  were  vacated  to  give  way  for  an  urban  office  landscape,  and  this  conversion  involved population decrease; the number of inhabitants roughly halved between 1870 and  1930.  Employment  was  offered  by  numerous  newspapers  and  printing  houses,  but  also  at  hotels, restaurants, and at the city’s main railway station and post office. Östermalm was one  of  Stockholm’s  richest  districts  and  developed  into  a  residential  area  for  wealthy  people  in  the 19th century. Domestic work provided employment opportunities as upper‐class families  could afford civil servants. Several public institutions, such as the country’s most prestigious  technical  university,  were  located  this  district.  In  numbers,  the  population  decrease  in  this  district was relatively moderate, but it went from hosting every seventh‐sixth inhabitant in  the  city  in  1880  to  every  twentieth  in  1920.  Kungsholmen,  the  island  in  the  west,  was  a  sparsely populated area until industrialisation made it into the city’s fastest growing district  in the late 19th century. The population more than sevenfold from 1870 to 1930 and the share  of  Stockholm’s  total  population  doubled.  Major  industries  like  Bolinders  and  Separator  provided  employment  in  this  working‐class  district.  Early  in  the  20th  century  the  area  gradually changed character and to be dominated by administration. Södermalm, the island in  the  south,  was  Stockholm’s  most  pronounced  working‐class  district  and  hosted  the  city’s  poorest  inhabitants.  It  was  also  Stockholm’s  most  populous  district.  Its  share  of  the  city’s  total number of inhabitants lay between 28% and 30% through the period, but the population  grew  with  270%;  more  or  less  the  same  as  for  the  city  at  large.  Shipyards,  electro‐technical  industries  and  other  mechanical  workshops  as  well  as  chemical  factories  and  breweries  offered  employment.  Brännkyrka,  finally,was  a  former  ‘rural’  district  about  six  kilometres  south  of  central  Stockholm  that  was  incorporated  in  the  city  in  1913.  Industrialisation  transformed the area in  the late 19th century and the earlier  dominating estates and landed  properties  were  divided  into  industrial  and  housing  allotments.  Some  minor  farming  remained however until the mid 20th century. This part had about 3.500 inhabitants in 1915;  and about 5.500 fifteen years later.  

9. Results  Before starting to interpret the results of the event history analysis, it is important to realize  that these outcomes only refer to a specific group of people in Stockholm: those natives who  were  continuously  present  in  Stockholm,  unmarried  and  practiced  an  occupation  at  age  18  and those migrants who arrived as singles at age 18 and practiced an occupation on arrival.  Consequently, these results might not apply for migrants who arrived earlier or later, natives  who  were  not  continuously  present  in  Stockholm,  people  who  were  married  at  age  18,  people  who  were  unemployed  or  still  studying  at  their  18th  birthday.  Finally,  foreign  migrants are highly underrepresented, because of the applied selection criterions.  With the above shortcomings in mind, we found the following remarkable results. Migrants  had a 23,4% higher chance on upward mobility for every next year of analysis (according to  model 1 and even 24,9% according to model 2). Males had lower hazard ratio’s than females  and  the  ‘risk’  of  social  mobility  was  higher  in  the  period  1890‐1905  compared  to  the  years  1905‐1915. When it comes to social class, people from the middle class, and skilled workers 

13

had a smaller risk of experiencing upward mobility compared to unskilled workers. Because  of a very small number of observations (n=13), the results for the elite were not significant.   We did not find remarkable effects of the neighborhood in which someone lived at age 18 on  the incidence and timing of upward mobility. Apart from Södermalm, the results in model 2  were  not  significant  for  neighborhood.  People  in  Södermalm  had  a  19,9%  higher  chance  of  upward  mobility  compared  to  the  inhabitants  of  Östermalm  The  environment  in  which  someone  grew  up,  by  contrast,  seems  to  have  mattered,  and  again,  in  an  unexpected  way:  people  who  were  born  in  the  countryside  enjoyed  considerably  better  chances  of  experiencing upward mobility than people who grew up in a city. According to model 4, the  region  in  which  someone  was  born  also  had  an  effect  on  the  timing  and  occurrence  of  upward mobility. Migrants from Stockholm County and wider Central Sweden turned out to  have  had  better  chances  of  climbing  up  the  social  ladder  than  natives.  The  results  for  international migrants and migrants from other regions within Sweden were not significant.  In the case of international migrants this can be ascribed to a limited number of observations.   

14

Table 1: Results Event History Analysis for Upward Mobility   

Model 1 Haz. Ratio St.Err.  0.776 

Sex 

Native  Migrant (Ref)  Male 

Social Class 

Female (Ref.)  Elite 

Period 

Middle class  Skilled  Unskilled(Ref.)  1878‐1890 

Neighborhood

Mobility 

15

Environment Region

No. of subects  No. of Failures  Log likelihood  LR chi2  Prob>Chi2 

0.802 

Model2 Model 3  Model 4  P>z  Haz.Ratio St.Err  P>z  Haz.Ratio  St.Err.  P>z  Haz.Ratio  St.Err.  P>z    0.072  0.006  0.751  0.072  0.003                0.0715  0.013  0.788  0.071  0.008  0.798  0.074  0.016  0,800  0,71  0.012 

0.192 

0.193 

0.101  0.205 

0.456  0.551 

0.072  0.059 

0.000  0.459  0.000  0.554 

1.056 

0.113 

0.608  1.054 

1890‐1905  1905‐1915 (Ref.)  Brännkyrka 

1.276 

0.121 

0.010  1.276 

 

 

 

Klara  Kungsholmen  Old Town  Söderlmalm  Östermalm (Ref.)  Rural  Urban (Ref.)  Abroad and Unknown  Central Sweden  Northern Sweden  Southern Sweden  Stocholm County  Sockholm City (Ref.) 

       

       

           

  0,206  0.115  0.213 

0.215 

0.125  0.200 

0.201 

0.109 

0.077  0.063 

0.00  0.00 

0.458  0,548 

0.072  0.059 

0.000  0.000 

0.118 

0.651  1.060 

0.114 

0,588 

0.135 

0.006  1.270 

0.122 

0.013 

0.816 

0.122  0.011  1.313    0.584  0.777   

 

 

 

 

 

       

1.160  1.077  1.179  1.199 

0.181  0.153  0.192  0.129 

       

       

       

       

       

       

 

 

 

 

1.335 

0.127 

0.001   

 

 

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

0.454  0.145  0.234  0.137  0.196 

0.667  0.001  0.940  0.512  0.003 

3434  639  ‐4659.7727  53.50  0.0000

0,073  0.000  0.467  0,060  0.000  0.567    0.114  0.627  1.052 

3424  639  ‐4658.0262  56.99  0.0000

0.343  0.600  0.311  0.092                   

3081  593  ‐4261.6419  57.24  0.0000

0.778  1.392  0.982  1.086  1.478 

3424  639  ‐4655.3918  62.26  0.0000

10. Conclusion  As  we  have  stated  earlier  we  should  be  careful  with  the  interpretation  of  our  results,  since  several  social  groups  are  underrepresented  in  our  sample.  Nevertheless,  we  think  that  our  analysis makes assumable that Stockholm was a very open society in the period 1878‐1926,  where  there  was  little  room  for  discrimination.  After  all,  all  kind  of  ‘vulnerable’  groups  ranging from women, unskilled workers and all sorts of newcomers, enjoyed higher chances  for social upward mobility than the majority groups. Migrants, more precisely rural‐to‐urban  migrants,  especially  from  Central  Sweden,  including  Stockholm  county,  had  higher  hazard  ratio’s than native born Stockholm dwellers for the event of social upward mobility.  The  economic  integration  of  newcomers  within  Sweden,  especially  also  former  country  dwellers seems to have happened smoothly. These results are in line with results from Leo  Lucassen (2004) and William Sewell (1985) for the port cities of Rotterdam and Marseille in  the latter half of the 19th century. These authors likewise found that certain groups of urban  in‐migrants  enjoyed  even  higher  rates  of  upward  mobility  than  natives.  Our  results,  by  contrast,  contradict  the  ideas  expressed    by  the  Chicago  School  of  Sociology  on  the  fate  of  rural‐to‐urban  migrants.  We  found  no  evidence,  that  the  integration  process  of  urban  newcomers with a rural background faced almost insurmountable barriers to integration in  the city. Rather the opposite seems to have been true, in the case of Stockholm.  However, these conclusions are preliminary. We must take into account that migrants who  upon  arrival  became  unemployed  or  were  still  studying  do  not  make  part  of  the  analysis.  They  could  alter  the  over‐all  picture.  Moreover,  in  order  to  make  better  grounded  conclusions about the economic integration of migrants, it would be wise to investigate also  other  proxies  of  economic  integration  like  unemployment  rates  and  wage  levels.  Nevertheless,  for  the  moment  it  looks  like  what  Chriswick  has  described  for  post‐war  migrants in America is also applicable to migrants in Stockholm in the period: 1878‐1915:   “…  economic  migrants  are  described  as  tending  on  average  to  be  more  able,  ambitious,  aggressive, entrepreneurial, or otherwise more favourably selected than similar individuals  who choose to remain in their place of origin.” (Chriswick 1999:181) 

16

Appendix: Nelson‐Aalen cumulative hazard estimates for upward mobility  Figure 2: Cumulative hazard according to geographic origin 

0.00

0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

Nelson-Aalen cumulative hazard estimates

0

10

20

30

analysis time natives

migrants

  Figure 3 Cumulative hazard according to sex 

0.00

0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

Nelson-Aalen cumulative hazard estimates

0

10

20

30

analysis time females

males

  17

Figure 4: Cumulative hazard according to social class 

0.00

0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

Nelson-Aalen cumulative hazard estimates

0

10

20

30

analysis time unskilled workers middle class

skilled workers elite

  Figure 5: Cumulative hazard according to environment 

0.00

0.20

0.40

0.60

0.80

Nelson-Aalen cumulative hazard estimates

0

10

20

30

analysis time unknown/missing rural

urban

   

18

Endnotes  i

Investments, entrepreneurship and personal capital, savings, remittances, etc. can equally be used as indicators of labor market performance (among migrants).

Bibliography  Allison, P. (1984). Event history analysis, Regression for longitudinal event data. Newbury Park:  Sage.  Chriswick,  B.  (1978).  ‘  The  Effect  of  Americanization  the  Earnings  of  Foreign‐born  Men’,  Journal of Political Economy 86(5), 897‐921.   Chriswick, B., Cohen Y. & Zach T. (1997). ‘The Labor Market Status of Immigrants: Effects of  the Unemployment Rate at Arrival and Duration.’, Industrial and Labor Relations Review 50(2),  289‐303.    Chriswick,  B.  (1999).  ‘Immigrant  Policy  and  Immigrant  Quality.  Are  Immigrants  Favorably  Self‐Selected?’, The American Economic Review 89(2),181‐185.  Clark  &  Oswald  (1994).  ‘Unhappiness  and  Unemployment’,  The  Economic  Journal  104,  648‐ 659.   Cleves,  M.,  Gutierrez,  R.,  Gould,  W.  &  Marchenko,  Y.  (2010).  An  Introduction  to  Survival  Analysis Using Stata. Lakeway Drive: Stata Press.   Cox, D. R. (1972). ‘Regression models and life‐tables (with discussion)’. Journal of the Royal  Statistical Society Series B 34, 187‐220.  Crew,  D.  (1973).’Definitions  of  Modernity:  Social  Mobility  in  a  German  Town,  1880‐1901’,  Journal of Social History 7(1), 51‐74  Crew, D. (1979). Town in the Ruhr. A Social History of Bochum, 1860‐1914. New York: Columbia  University Press.   Dryburgh, H. (2005). ‘Social structures and the Occupational Composition of Skilled Worker  Immigrants to Canada’, Canadian Studies in Population 32(1), 97‐130.   Grönberg, P. (2010). ‘City of Dreams? Immigrant Life in Stockholm, 1878‐1926’, Unpublished  paper.   Handlin, O. (1951). The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the American  People. Boston: Little Brown & Co.   Hums,  D.  &  Simpson,  W.  (2004).  ‘Economic  Integration  of  Immigrants  to  Canada:  A  Short  Survey’, Canadian Journal of Urban Research 13(1), .  Janssens,  A.  (2004).  ‘‘Voor  een  dubbeltje  geboren…’,  Sociale  mobiliteit  en  sociale  fluïditeit  tijdens het proces van industrialisatie’, Noordbrabants Historisch Jaarboek 21, 141‐163.  Kaelble, H. (1978). Historische Mobilitätsforschung. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche  Buchgesellschaft.   Kok & Delger (1998). ‘Success or Selection? The Effect of Migration on Occupational Mobility  in a Dutch Province, 1840‐1950’, Histoire & Mesure 13(3‐4), 289‐322.  

19

Leeuwen Van, M., Maas, I., Miles, A. (2002). HISCO. Historical International Standard  Classification of Occupations. Leuven: Leuven University Press.  Linn, M., Sandifer, R. & Stein, S. (1985). ʹEffects of Unemployment on Mental and Physical  Healthʹ, Pubmed 75(5), 502‐506.   Lucassen, L. (2004). ‘De selectiviteit van blijvers. Een reconstructie van de sociale positie van  Duitse migranten in Rotterdam (1870‐1885). Tijdschrift voor sociale en economische geschiedenis  1(2), 92‐115.   Lucassen, L. (2005). The Immigrant threat: the integration of old and new migrants in Western  Europe since 1850. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.   Lucassen, L., Feldman, D. & Oltmer. J. (Eds.) (2006). Paths of Integration. Migrants in Western  Europe (1880‐2004). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.   Maas, I. (2004). ‘The Use of Event‐History‐Analysis in Career Research’, in: D. Mitch, J.  Brown & M. van Leeuwen (Eds.). Origins of the Modern Career. Aldershot: Ashgate.  Moch, L. (2003). Moving Europeans. Migration in Western Europe since 1650. Bloomington &  Indianapolis: Indiana University Press.   Münz, R. (2008). ‘Migration, Labor Markets, and Integration of Migrants: An Overview for  Europe’, SP Discussion Paper NO.0807  Papademetriou, D., Sommerville, W. & Sumption, M. (2009). The Social Mobility of  Immigrants and their Children, Working Paper of the Migration Policy Institue.   Park, R. (1928). ‘Human Migration and the Marginal Man’, American Journal of Sociology 33(6),  881‐893.    Park, R. & Burgess, E. (1967). The City. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.  Schrover, M. (2002). Een kolonie van Duitsers. Groepsvorming onder Duitse immigranten in  Utrecht in de negentiende eeuw. Amsterdam: Aksant.   Schultz, W. & Maas, I. (2010). ‘Studying historical occupational careers with multilevel  growth models’, Demographic Research23‐24:669‐696.   Sewell, W (1985). Structure and Mobility. The Men and Women of Marseille, 1820‐1870.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Söderberg,  J.,  Johnsson,  U.  &Persson,  C.  (2001).  A  Stagnating  Metropolis.  The  Economy  and  Demography of Stockholm, 1750‐1850. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.   Thernstrom, S. (1973). The Other Bostonians. Poverty and Progess in the American Metropolis.  Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.   Thomas, W. & Znaniecki, F. (1958). The Polish Peasant in Europe and America. New York:  Dover.   Tilly, C. (1967). ‘On Uprooting, Kinship, and the Auspices of Migration’, International Journal  of Comparative Sociology 8, 139‐164  Toye, M. (2007) Social Cohesion: The Canadian Urban Context. Ottawa: Parliament of Canada 

20

Vikström, L. (2003). The Socio‐Spatial Mobility of Migrants in Nineteenth‐Century Sundsvall,  Sweden. Umeå: Report no21. From the Demographic Database Umeå.  White, R. & Cunneen (2006). ‘Social Class, Youth Crime and Justice’, in: B. Goldson & J.  Muncie (Eds.), Youth Crime and Justice (Pp. 17‐30). London: Sage.   

21