Tips for healthy living

n Try relaxation techniques to relieve anxiety and reduce muscle tension. n Practice pre-sleep rituals, such as a warm bath or a few minutes of rea...
Author: Henry Evans
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n Try

relaxation techniques to relieve anxiety and reduce muscle tension.

n Practice

pre-sleep rituals, such as a warm bath or a few minutes of reading.

n If

you don’t fall asleep within 15 or 20 minutes, get up, go into another room, and lie quietly in darkness until you feel sleepy.

Lower your stress. Contain your fear. Stress and anxiety take a toll on our well-being. We can’t always control events, but we can learn healthy ways to cope with them. n Be

aware of situations that have caused you stress in the past.

n Engage

Tips for healthy living

in meaningful and enjoyable activities.

n Schedule

time for relaxation.

n Stay

active and involved. Exercise. Avoid drugs and alcohol. Practice good sleep habits.

n Develop

a support system of friends, family members or peers.

n Talk

about your feelings or write them in a journal. be hard on yourself. Give yourself credit for your talents and strengths.

OUR MISSION As people of Providence, we reveal God’s love for all, especially the poor and vulnerable, through our compassionate service.

n Don’t

OUR CORE VALUES

n If

Respect, Compassion, Justice, Excellence, Stewardship

you’re feeling fearful, try this self-talk technique:



Inhaling, think: Breathing in, I calm my body.



Exhaling, think: Breathing out, I smile.



Inhaling, think: Dwelling in the present moment.



Exhaling, think: I know it is only a moment.

help still your mind, sit quietly. Don’t force your breath; let it come naturally. When you notice your mind wandering, gently bring your attention back to your breathing. You can practice this self-talk technique anywhere and as many times of the day as needed.

The basics for living a healthy, balanced life apply to everyone. Those basic activities include respecting ourselves and others; learning and growing; taking care of our body, mind and spirit; and connecting with other people.

www.providence.org/bh

When life becomes turbulent, these basics can sometimes become a challenge. This guide provides simple tips and tools to help you live well.

n To

Providence Health & Services, a not-for-profit health system, is an equal opportunity organization in the provision of health care services and employment opportunities.

111943 RP 12-11

Set goals for yourself.

n Listen

Focus on recovery.

Goals help us live productively. Achieving our goals can bring satisfaction and self-confidence. To achieve your goal, it helps to:

n Avoid

If you’re recovering from substance use, you’ll increase the odds of long-term sobriety if you:

n Break

a large plan into several small, manageable goals, starting with short-term goals.

n Focus

on one goal at a time. List at least three possible ways to achieve that goal.

n Decide

how you will carry out your plan for achieving your goal: Who will be involved? What’s the time frame? What resources are needed?

n Get n Set

support to help you achieve your goal. a date to evaluate how well your plan is working.

n Don’t

be discouraged if reaching your goal takes longer than you expect. Don’t give up!

to what the other person is saying. Smile and nod your head to show you are listening. telling very personal things about yourself. When you know the person better, he or she will feel more comfortable with conversations about more personal topics.

Connecting with others can nourish the spirit and provide support for daily living. To form or strengthen relationships: n Let

loved ones know you care for them.

n Develop

a support network of family, friends and peers.

n Attend

a church, synagogue or other spiritual gathering.

If you’re shy or uncomfortable talking to people, here are some ways to start a conversation: n Find

someone who is not busy. If you do not know the person, introduce yourself.

n Choose n Look

an interesting topic.

at the person. This shows that you’re interested in what he or she is saying. If you feel uncomfortable looking into someone’s eyes, you can look somewhere close to the eyes, such as the forehead or nose.

n Stay

yourself in self-help programs.

active.

Respect yourself and others.

n Develop

Self-respect is about what you do; self-confidence is how you feel. If you respect yourself and others, you’re more likely to feel better about yourself.

n Maintain

Respect others: kind (for example, ask permission before borrowing things, be polite).

n Be

a support system. physical health.

n Be

aware of the environment and how it affects you.

n Make

n Be

honest.

n Listen

Reach out to people.

n Involve

to them.

Respect yourself: a balanced diet, with vegetables and fruits making up at least half of every meal.

time for leisure activities and recreation.

n Practice

creativity.

n Practice

spirituality.

n Follow

through with your treatment choice.

n Eat

n Stop

smoking.

n Exercise

at least 10 to 30 minutes a day. (Talk with your doctor about any limitations.)

n Get

regular check-ups for blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol.

n Get

to know yourself. The more you understand yourself, the more you’ll appreciate your value.

n Speak

kindly to yourself.

n Be

responsible with your finances and possessions.

n Be

honest with yourself.

n Recognize n Be

when people disrespect you; take steps to stop it.

patient. Building self-confidence can take time, so be persistent and believe in yourself.

Sleep well. One of the best things you can do for your health is to get a good night’s sleep. This can be a challenge, particularly if you have a physical illness or if you’re depressed or stressed. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe sleep medications. Otherwise, try these tips: n For

several hours before bedtime, avoid alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, chocolate and heavy, sugar-filled foods.

n Warm

milk and foods high in tryptophan, such as bananas, may help you sleep. Otherwise, restrict fluids right before bed.

n Exercise

regularly, particularly in the afternoon, but not right before bedtime.

n Try

going to bed and getting up at the same times every day to put your body into a good sleep-wake rhythm.

n Use

your bed for sleep and sex but not as an office or recreation room.

Set goals for yourself.

n Listen

Focus on recovery.

Goals help us live productively. Achieving our goals can bring satisfaction and self-confidence. To achieve your goal, it helps to:

n Avoid

If you’re recovering from substance use, you’ll increase the odds of long-term sobriety if you:

n Break

a large plan into several small, manageable goals, starting with short-term goals.

n Focus

on one goal at a time. List at least three possible ways to achieve that goal.

n Decide

how you will carry out your plan for achieving your goal: Who will be involved? What’s the time frame? What resources are needed?

n Get n Set

support to help you achieve your goal. a date to evaluate how well your plan is working.

n Don’t

be discouraged if reaching your goal takes longer than you expect. Don’t give up!

to what the other person is saying. Smile and nod your head to show you are listening. telling very personal things about yourself. When you know the person better, he or she will feel more comfortable with conversations about more personal topics.

Connecting with others can nourish the spirit and provide support for daily living. To form or strengthen relationships: n Let

loved ones know you care for them.

n Develop

a support network of family, friends and peers.

n Attend

a church, synagogue or other spiritual gathering.

If you’re shy or uncomfortable talking to people, here are some ways to start a conversation: n Find

someone who is not busy. If you do not know the person, introduce yourself.

n Choose n Look

an interesting topic.

at the person. This shows that you’re interested in what he or she is saying. If you feel uncomfortable looking into someone’s eyes, you can look somewhere close to the eyes, such as the forehead or nose.

n Stay

yourself in self-help programs.

active.

Respect yourself and others.

n Develop

Self-respect is about what you do; self-confidence is how you feel. If you respect yourself and others, you’re more likely to feel better about yourself.

n Maintain

Respect others: kind (for example, ask permission before borrowing things, be polite).

n Be

a support system. physical health.

n Be

aware of the environment and how it affects you.

n Make

n Be

honest.

n Listen

Reach out to people.

n Involve

to them.

Respect yourself: a balanced diet, with vegetables and fruits making up at least half of every meal.

time for leisure activities and recreation.

n Practice

creativity.

n Practice

spirituality.

n Follow

through with your treatment choice.

n Eat

n Stop

smoking.

n Exercise

at least 10 to 30 minutes a day. (Talk with your doctor about any limitations.)

n Get

regular check-ups for blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol.

n Get

to know yourself. The more you understand yourself, the more you’ll appreciate your value.

n Speak

kindly to yourself.

n Be

responsible with your finances and possessions.

n Be

honest with yourself.

n Recognize n Be

when people disrespect you; take steps to stop it.

patient. Building self-confidence can take time, so be persistent and believe in yourself.

Sleep well. One of the best things you can do for your health is to get a good night’s sleep. This can be a challenge, particularly if you have a physical illness or if you’re depressed or stressed. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe sleep medications. Otherwise, try these tips: n For

several hours before bedtime, avoid alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, chocolate and heavy, sugar-filled foods.

n Warm

milk and foods high in tryptophan, such as bananas, may help you sleep. Otherwise, restrict fluids right before bed.

n Exercise

regularly, particularly in the afternoon, but not right before bedtime.

n Try

going to bed and getting up at the same times every day to put your body into a good sleep-wake rhythm.

n Use

your bed for sleep and sex but not as an office or recreation room.

Set goals for yourself.

n Listen

Focus on recovery.

Goals help us live productively. Achieving our goals can bring satisfaction and self-confidence. To achieve your goal, it helps to:

n Avoid

If you’re recovering from substance use, you’ll increase the odds of long-term sobriety if you:

n Break

a large plan into several small, manageable goals, starting with short-term goals.

n Focus

on one goal at a time. List at least three possible ways to achieve that goal.

n Decide

how you will carry out your plan for achieving your goal: Who will be involved? What’s the time frame? What resources are needed?

n Get n Set

support to help you achieve your goal. a date to evaluate how well your plan is working.

n Don’t

be discouraged if reaching your goal takes longer than you expect. Don’t give up!

to what the other person is saying. Smile and nod your head to show you are listening. telling very personal things about yourself. When you know the person better, he or she will feel more comfortable with conversations about more personal topics.

Connecting with others can nourish the spirit and provide support for daily living. To form or strengthen relationships: n Let

loved ones know you care for them.

n Develop

a support network of family, friends and peers.

n Attend

a church, synagogue or other spiritual gathering.

If you’re shy or uncomfortable talking to people, here are some ways to start a conversation: n Find

someone who is not busy. If you do not know the person, introduce yourself.

n Choose n Look

an interesting topic.

at the person. This shows that you’re interested in what he or she is saying. If you feel uncomfortable looking into someone’s eyes, you can look somewhere close to the eyes, such as the forehead or nose.

n Stay

yourself in self-help programs.

active.

Respect yourself and others.

n Develop

Self-respect is about what you do; self-confidence is how you feel. If you respect yourself and others, you’re more likely to feel better about yourself.

n Maintain

Respect others: kind (for example, ask permission before borrowing things, be polite).

n Be

a support system. physical health.

n Be

aware of the environment and how it affects you.

n Make

n Be

honest.

n Listen

Reach out to people.

n Involve

to them.

Respect yourself: a balanced diet, with vegetables and fruits making up at least half of every meal.

time for leisure activities and recreation.

n Practice

creativity.

n Practice

spirituality.

n Follow

through with your treatment choice.

n Eat

n Stop

smoking.

n Exercise

at least 10 to 30 minutes a day. (Talk with your doctor about any limitations.)

n Get

regular check-ups for blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol.

n Get

to know yourself. The more you understand yourself, the more you’ll appreciate your value.

n Speak

kindly to yourself.

n Be

responsible with your finances and possessions.

n Be

honest with yourself.

n Recognize n Be

when people disrespect you; take steps to stop it.

patient. Building self-confidence can take time, so be persistent and believe in yourself.

Sleep well. One of the best things you can do for your health is to get a good night’s sleep. This can be a challenge, particularly if you have a physical illness or if you’re depressed or stressed. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe sleep medications. Otherwise, try these tips: n For

several hours before bedtime, avoid alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, chocolate and heavy, sugar-filled foods.

n Warm

milk and foods high in tryptophan, such as bananas, may help you sleep. Otherwise, restrict fluids right before bed.

n Exercise

regularly, particularly in the afternoon, but not right before bedtime.

n Try

going to bed and getting up at the same times every day to put your body into a good sleep-wake rhythm.

n Use

your bed for sleep and sex but not as an office or recreation room.

n Try

relaxation techniques to relieve anxiety and reduce muscle tension.

n Practice

pre-sleep rituals, such as a warm bath or a few minutes of reading.

n If

you don’t fall asleep within 15 or 20 minutes, get up, go into another room, and lie quietly in darkness until you feel sleepy.

Lower your stress. Contain your fear. Stress and anxiety take a toll on our well-being. We can’t always control events, but we can learn healthy ways to cope with them. n Be

aware of situations that have caused you stress in the past.

n Engage

Tips for healthy living

in meaningful and enjoyable activities.

n Schedule

time for relaxation.

n Stay

active and involved. Exercise. Avoid drugs and alcohol. Practice good sleep habits.

n Develop

a support system of friends, family members or peers.

n Talk

about your feelings or write them in a journal. be hard on yourself. Give yourself credit for your talents and strengths.

OUR MISSION As people of Providence, we reveal God’s love for all, especially the poor and vulnerable, through our compassionate service.

n Don’t

OUR CORE VALUES

n If

Respect, Compassion, Justice, Excellence, Stewardship

you’re feeling fearful, try this self-talk technique:



Inhaling, think: Breathing in, I calm my body.



Exhaling, think: Breathing out, I smile.



Inhaling, think: Dwelling in the present moment.



Exhaling, think: I know it is only a moment.

help still your mind, sit quietly. Don’t force your breath; let it come naturally. When you notice your mind wandering, gently bring your attention back to your breathing. You can practice this self-talk technique anywhere and as many times of the day as needed.

The basics for living a healthy, balanced life apply to everyone. Those basic activities include respecting ourselves and others; learning and growing; taking care of our body, mind and spirit; and connecting with other people.

www.providence.org/bh

When life becomes turbulent, these basics can sometimes become a challenge. This guide provides simple tips and tools to help you live well.

n To

Providence Health & Services, a not-for-profit health system, is an equal opportunity organization in the provision of health care services and employment opportunities.

111943 RP 12-11

n Try

relaxation techniques to relieve anxiety and reduce muscle tension.

n Practice

pre-sleep rituals, such as a warm bath or a few minutes of reading.

n If

you don’t fall asleep within 15 or 20 minutes, get up, go into another room, and lie quietly in darkness until you feel sleepy.

Lower your stress. Contain your fear. Stress and anxiety take a toll on our well-being. We can’t always control events, but we can learn healthy ways to cope with them. n Be

aware of situations that have caused you stress in the past.

n Engage

Tips for healthy living

in meaningful and enjoyable activities.

n Schedule

time for relaxation.

n Stay

active and involved. Exercise. Avoid drugs and alcohol. Practice good sleep habits.

n Develop

a support system of friends, family members or peers.

n Talk

about your feelings or write them in a journal. be hard on yourself. Give yourself credit for your talents and strengths.

OUR MISSION As people of Providence, we reveal God’s love for all, especially the poor and vulnerable, through our compassionate service.

n Don’t

OUR CORE VALUES

n If

Respect, Compassion, Justice, Excellence, Stewardship

you’re feeling fearful, try this self-talk technique:



Inhaling, think: Breathing in, I calm my body.



Exhaling, think: Breathing out, I smile.



Inhaling, think: Dwelling in the present moment.



Exhaling, think: I know it is only a moment.

help still your mind, sit quietly. Don’t force your breath; let it come naturally. When you notice your mind wandering, gently bring your attention back to your breathing. You can practice this self-talk technique anywhere and as many times of the day as needed.

The basics for living a healthy, balanced life apply to everyone. Those basic activities include respecting ourselves and others; learning and growing; taking care of our body, mind and spirit; and connecting with other people.

www.providence.org/bh

When life becomes turbulent, these basics can sometimes become a challenge. This guide provides simple tips and tools to help you live well.

n To

Providence Health & Services, a not-for-profit health system, is an equal opportunity organization in the provision of health care services and employment opportunities.

111943 RP 12-11