THE OECD LOGO GUIDE AN EXPLANATION AND GUIDE FOR USE

THE OECD LOGO GUIDE AN EXPLANATION AND GUIDE FOR USE Given the diversity and multiplicity of dissemination, it is vital to follow branding guidance....
Author: Aubrey Jones
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THE OECD LOGO GUIDE AN EXPLANATION AND GUIDE FOR USE

Given the diversity and multiplicity of dissemination, it is vital to follow branding guidance. Brand cohesion pays off for many reasons. The more OECD communications resemble each other, the faster constituents will recognise them. If consistency is based on professional and visually compelling graphics, it will help to generate increased interest, loyalty and positive recognition. Conversely, if graphics are unprofessional and unappealing, audiences will question the source’s credibility and competency.

This part of the branding guide provides an explanation of the OECD’s logo and visual identity while giving guidance on how to apply them for maximum cohesion and impact.

Visual Identity

1/ THE OECD LOGO To be sure that all communications contribute positively to brand recognition, a few principles must be applied at all times: - So there is no mistaking it, there is only one OECD logo. In exceptional cases other logos may be used with the express approval of the OECD’s Secretary-General. - The logo should never be recreated or modified, only reproduced using the graphic files provided by the OECD’s Public Affairs and Communications Directorate (PAC). - The logo used must always be the most current version; obsolete versions are just that, obsolete. This section explains the logo’s origins, the allowed language variables (acronym and mission statement) and other rules for use. Questions about applying the logo should be addressed to [email protected]

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Visual Identity

1.1/ The symbol The symbol in the OECD logo is made up of a globe, and a pair of forward-pointing arrows. Together they symbolise the Organisation’s global reach, pioneering thinking and the green imperative. As our identifier, the logo is a visual expression of the OECD’s mission: better policies for better lives.

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Visual Identity

1.2/ The acronyms The OECD has two official languages: English and French. For each language there is an official acronym and logo. While a handful of languages use different acronyms than these (less than 8% of OECD 40 countries), most use and recognise the official ones.

English version

For the sake of brand consistency, no other acronym can be used as part of the OECD logo. French version

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Visual Identity

1.3/ Language versions For French, Portuguese and Spanish communications, use the OCDE version of the logo. For all other communications, use the OECD version.

English version

French version

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Visual Identity

1.4/ The mission The logo including the mission statement should be used whenever possible. If there are only two languages for OECD acronyms, the mission statement can be in one of its many official translations. These graphics can be obtained on the OECD’s communication intranet site (PAC’s CCP) or by contacting: [email protected]

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Visual Identity

1.5/ Colours The logo is composed of three colors: blue, green and grey.

C: 50 / M: 0 / J: 100 / N: 0 R: 140 / V: 200 / B: 65 Pantone 376 C # 8cc841

C: 85 / M: 45 / J: 0 / N: 25 R: 4 / V: 98 / B: 154 Pantone 7462 C # 04629a

C: 00 / M: 00 / J: 00 / N: 70 R : 114 / V : 114 / B : 114 Pantone Cool Gray 9 C # 727272

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Visual Identity

1.6/ Placement The logo should be used in full colour on a white background whenever possible. On covers, posters, flyers and other “print” products, the logo is placed in the lower right-hand corner, inside of an angle. This arrangement allows for a distinctive OECD graphic identity. In situations where this is not possible, or where the logo is being published on nonOECD content, it is important to respect the logo’s integrity and use appropriate and readable proportions. Classic version

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White version

Visual Identity

1.7/ Colour schemes Again, it is important to use the full colour logo on a white background whenever possible. When this is not possible, the appropriate combinations are as follows: - A white logo is used on a photographic, illustrated or multi-colour background.

White version

- A white logo is used on a solid colour background that provides sufficient contrast. - If the background is too light to provide sufficient contrast to the white version, the 70% grey logo is appropriate. White version

K : 70

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Visual Identity

1.8/ Minimum sizes With mission statement: To ensure the logo is readable, the minimum size for both the English and French versions is 22 mm.

22 mm

18 mm English version

Without mission statement: When used without the mission statement the logo can be smaller, 18 mm.

22 mm

18 mm French version

45 mm

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Visual Identity

1.9/ Buffer zone The logo needs to be kept a minimum distance from other graphic elements and zones. This buffer zone is proportional to the size of the logo: the value of the “O”.

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Visual Identity

1.10/ Obsolete versions These older versions of the OECD logo are obsolete as of 21 May 2012.

2011 - 2012

These versions are obsolete and therefore no longer be used.

2006 - 2011

2000 - 2006

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Visual Identity

1.11/ Don’ts Consistency is key to recognition. For this reason, the logo must always be used in its existing form, without changes to colours, proportions, text or fonts. Only use the graphic files provided by the OECD branding team, with no modifications.

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Visual Identity

2.3/ Colours Contrast between colours is an important aspect to graphic design yet frequently overlooked. Without sufficient contrast with a background, text cannot be read. If one of the principal colours does not offer enough contrast, for example with text and a background color, it is possible to add black to the color.

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OECD blue is a signature colour for the Organisation, symbolising our global nature. This blue below is the official OECD blue. C: 85 / M: 45 / J: 0 / N: 25 R: 4 / V: 98 / B: 154 Pantone 7462 C # 04629a

Visual Identity

OECD green symbolises the “green imperative” that all policy making must take into account. Graphically, it can serve as a “warm” colour in contrast to the cold blue (green is typically a cool colour but our green contains a large amount of yellow, which warms it up). C: 50 / M: 0 / J: 100 / N: 0 R: 140 / V: 200 / B: 65 Pantone 376 C # 8cc841

White is the foil to all other colours, allowing for maximum value. It is mainly used as a background, but also for typefaces on top of the other three principal colours. Grey serves as a neutral grounding colour, well suited for text and dividing elements. The blue, green and grey can be used in darker or lighter tones, by adding or subtracting black as necessary, in single-colour printing or to create volume.

C: 00 / M: 00 / J: 00 / N: 70 R : 114 / V : 114 / B : 114 Pantone Cool Gray 9 C # 727272

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QUESTIONS? [email protected]