THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON

Fall 2008 THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON John Shovlin History Department 53 Washington Square South, Rm. 422 e-mail: [email protected] tel: (212) 99...
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Fall 2008

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON John Shovlin History Department 53 Washington Square South, Rm. 422 e-mail: [email protected] tel: (212) 998-8639 Office Hours: Wednesdays 2.00 – 3:30 or by appointment

This course explores the origins, dynamic, and consequences of the French Revolution of 1789, and examines the character of the Napoleonic settlement that followed it. Readings and lectures explore the origins of the Revolution in the old regime, with special attention to the geopolitical, cultural, and political economic constraints under which the old regime monarchy operated. In examining the opening years from 1789 to 1794, the course reflects on the dynamic of revolutionary change—the processes whereby the Revolution generated many of the demands it subsequently sought to satisfy. Particular attention is devoted to the nature of Jacobinism, its association with revolutionary violence, and its relationship to the popular movement. The course considers how republicans met the problem of closing the Revolution, and explores the social, ideological, and military dimensions of the Napoleonic regime. A consideration of the global consequences of the Revolution, with attention to strategic, economic, and ideological viewpoints, concludes the course. Texts Available for Purchase Keith M. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution (University of Chicago Press). David A. Bell, The First Total War (Houghton Mifflin). William Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 3rd ed. (Oxford UP). Jeremy D. Popkin, A Short History of the French Revolution (Prentice Hall), any edition. Timothy Tackett, When the King Took Flight (Harvard University Press).

Guidelines and Grading Policy: Reading should be completed by the day they are assigned in the syllabus. Lectures will assume familiarity with the assigned readings for the day. Some of the reading for the course is available through the course Blackboard site rather than in assigned textbooks. On the Blackboard site, readings can be found under the “Course Documents” button. Some of the readings are from internet sites. To access these readings, right click on the link from the copy of the syllabus in Blackboard, or copy the URL into your browser. Some resources may be available only when linked to the campus network.

Fall 2008

EXAMS: There will be a mid-term exam worth 25% of your grade, and a final, worth 25%. The midterm is scheduled for October 21, in class, from 11.00-12.15 a.m. The final exam is scheduled for December 16, from 10.00-11.50 a.m. If you miss an exam for a non-medical reason you will forfeit the entire exam grade. It is your responsibility to provide written evidence of serious illness if you miss an exam. PAPERS: You will be required to write two papers (8-10 pages), based on primary sources. Each paper will count for 25% of your course grade. Paper deadlines will be announced in class. Late papers may be penalized up to one third of a letter grade per day.

WEEK 1

Introduction

Tues

Introduction to the course—no assigned reading.

9/2

Thurs 9/4

Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 1. William Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 3rd edition, 45-75.

WEEK 2

Origins of the Revolution

Tues

Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 76-107.

9/9

Bailey Stone, The Genesis of the French Revolution: A Global Historical Interpretation (Cambridge, 1994), 111-47. Thurs 9/11

Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 110-47.

WEEK 3

The Onset of Revolution

Tues

Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 2.

9/16

Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 148-77. H.-J. Lüsebrink and R. Reichardt, The Bastille: A History of a Symbol of Despotism and Freedom (Durham, 1997), 6-47. Thurs 9/18

Doyle, Origins of the French Revolution, 178-96. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, docs 18-20.

Fall 2008 WEEK 4

The Liberal-Nationalist Revolution

Tues

Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 3.

9/23

William H. Sewell, Jr., “The French Revolution and the Emergence of the Nation Form,” Revolutionary Currents: Nation Building in the Transatlantic World, ed. Michael A. Morrison and Melinda Zook (Lanham, MD, 2004). Thurs 9/25

Nigel Aston, Religion and Revolution in France, 1780-1804, 140-62. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, doc 23.

WEEK 5

The Flight to Varennes

Tues

Tackett, When the King Took Flight, 1-150.

9/30

Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, docs 28-29. Thurs 10/2

Tackett, When the King Took Flight, 151-223. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, doc 30.

WEEK 6

War and the Fall of the Monarchy

Tues

Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 4.

10/7

Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, docs 32, 33. Thurs 10/9

David A. Bell, The First Total War, 1-153.

WEEK 7

The Sans Culottes and Popular Democracy

Tues

10/14 HOLIDAY—NO CLASS SCHEDULED

Thurs 10/16 Albert Soboul, The Sans-Culottes: The Popular Movement and Revolutionary Government 1793-1794, 47-71. Dominique Godineau, The Women of Paris and their French Revolution (Berkeley, 1998), 221-47. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, doc 36.

Fall 2008

WEEK 8 Tues

The Revolution and Gender Politics

10/21 MIDTERM EXAM

Thurs 10/23 Lynn Hunt, “The Many Bodies of Marie Antoinette: Political Pornography and the Problem of the Feminine in the French Revolution,” Eroticism and the Body Politic, ed. Lynn Hunt (Baltimore, 1991), 108-30. S. Desan, “‘War between Brothers and Sisters’: Inheritance Law and Gender Politics in Revolutionary France,” French Historical Studies 20 (1997): 597-634. http://www.jstor.org/stable/286913 WEEK 9 Tues

The Terror

10/28 Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 5. David Andress, The Terror, 210-43.

Thurs 10/30 David A. Bell, The First Total War, 154-85. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, docs 41, 42. WEEK 10

Thermidor and Beyond

Tues

Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 6.

11/4

Peter McPhee, Living the French Revolution, 1789-1799, 154-77. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, docs 44, 45. Thurs 11/6

David Armstrong, Revolution and World Order: The Revolutionary State in International Society (Oxford, 1993), 79-111.

WEEK 11

The Napoleonic Settlement

Tues

11/11 Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 7. Martyn Lyons, Napoleon Bonaparte and the Legacy of the French Revolution, 60-76, 160-77.

Thurs 11/13 William Doyle, “Counterrevolution,” Oxford History of the French Revolution (Oxford, 1989), 297-317.

Fall 2008

Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, doc 48. WEEK 12 Tues

The Napoleonic Wars

11/18 Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 8. Paul W. Schroeder, “Napoleon's Foreign Policy: A Criminal Enterprise,” Journal of Military History 54, no. 2 (1990): 147-162. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1986040

Thurs 11/20 Bell, The First Total War, 186-301. WEEK 13 Tues

Legacies I

11/25 Franklin W. Knight, “The Haitian Revolution,” American Historical Review 115, no. 1 (2000): 103-115. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2652438 Laurent Dubois, Avengers of the New World, 91-114. Baker, ed., The Old Regime and the French Revolution, doc 24.

Thurs 11/27 THANKSGIVING—NO CLASS MEETING WEEK 14

Legacies 1I

Tues

Popkin, Short History of the French Revolution, chapter 9.

12/2

Gwyn A. Williams, Artisans and Sans-Culottes (New York, 1969), 3-18. Marianne Elliott, “Ireland and the French Revolution,” in Britain and the French Revolution, 1789-1815, ed. H. T. Dickinson (New York, 1989). Thurs 12/4

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution: 1789-1848, 109-31.

WEEK 15

Legacies III

Tues

Paul W. Schroeder, The Transformation of European Politics, 1763-1848 (Cambridge, 1994), vii-xiii, 1-11, 388-95, 575-82, 666-91.

12/9

Fall 2008 Mark L. Haas, The Ideological Origins of Great Power Politics, 1789-1989 (Ithaca, 2005), 73-104. Thurs 12/11 Wrap-up

Tues 12/16

***Final Exam 10.00-11.50 a.m.***