THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FALL 2016

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – FALL 2016 3010-001 CREATIVE WRITING, TR 9:30-10:45, FH 1350 MILLER The purpose of this class is to i...
Author: Poppy Ryan
5 downloads 1 Views 110KB Size
THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS – FALL 2016

3010-001

CREATIVE WRITING, TR 9:30-10:45, FH 1350 MILLER The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the art and craft of creative writing through studying narrative and poetic conventions, reading exemplary poems and stories, and analyzing their own works in progress. Students are required to write at least fifteen pages of fiction and five poems, along with any in-class exercises, quizzes and critiques. The majority of the course is discussion/workshop: one half poetry, the other half fiction. Students must be prepared to contribute to discussions eloquently and often. At the end of the semester students will assemble a portfolio of their own best quality stories and poems to be turned in for a final grade. Also, be warned: this is not a class for congratulatory ego-fluffing, so students should come with thick skin, a rigorous work ethic and prepared to produce quality writing.

3010-002

CREATIVE WRITING, TR 12:30-1:45, FH 2430 MILLER The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the art and craft of creative writing through studying narrative and poetic conventions, reading exemplary poems and stories, and analyzing their own works in progress. Students are required to write at least fifteen pages of fiction and five poems, along with any in-class exercises, quizzes and critiques. The majority of the course is discussion/workshop: one half poetry, the other half fiction. Students must be prepared to contribute to discussions eloquently and often. At the end of the semester students will assemble a portfolio of their own best quality stories and poems to be turned in for a final grade. Also, be warned: this is not a class for congratulatory ego-fluffing, so students should come with thick skin, a rigorous work ethic and prepared to produce quality writing.

3010-003

CREATIVE WRITING, MW 2-3:15, FH 1050 BRADLEY In this class students will develop writing skills by studying narrative and poetic conventions, reading exemplary poems and stories, and analyzing works in progress. Students are required to write fifteen pages of fiction and five poems. Students will also complete short writing exercises and are required to critique each other's work. However the class is not a competition; it is a supportive, nurturing environment for helping us all to become better readers and writers. 1

3020-001

READINGS FOR WRITERS, MW 5:45-7:00, FH 1200 BRADLEY Through the analysis of a diverse range of literary genres, this course will teach writer show to develop their own material by studying as models the formal strategies of other writers, including but not limited to language, structure, narrator or speaker, character, dialogue, plot, tone, and the many other elements of literature, as well as the elements of personal memoir about the writing process.

3080-001

ART AND THE PROCESS OF THE BOOK, TR 11-12:15, FH 1310 GEIGER In this class students will learn about the history of the book, from scrolls, to the codex, to electronic publishing. We will examine the relationship between authors and publishers, in regards to the American small-press movement, in order to develop a deeper appreciation for the concept of the book. Students will learn the fundamentals of operating a small-press, and will have hands-on experience in the book arts, by producing (printing and binding) a limited edition letterpress chapbook of their own design.

3150/5-001

LINGUISTIC PRINCIPLES, TR 2-3:15, FH 1210 COLEMAN The goals of this course are slightly different for undergraduate and graduate students enrolled. For undergraduates, the primary goal of the course will be to gain an overall understanding of the nature of human communication, especially through speech and writing. The difference between speech and writing as things people actually do and language as an ancient explanation of what people do will be examined. Students will receive some exposure to formal methods of description and analysis used in contemporary linguistics. For graduate students, a significantly greater emphasis will be placed on formal linguistic analysis. Assignments for undergraduates: quizzes, two midterm exam, and final exam. Assignments for graduates: same as for undergraduates, but with additional reading and required homework.

3150/5-002

LINGUISTIC PRINCIPLES, TR 4:10-5:25, FH 2230 COLEMAN The goals of this course are slightly different for undergraduate and graduate students enrolled. For undergraduates, the primary goal of the course will be to gain an overall understanding of the nature of human communication, especially through speech and writing. The 2

difference between speech and writing as things people actually do and language as an ancient explanation of what people do will be examined. Students will receive some exposure to formal methods of description and analysis used in contemporary linguistics. For graduate students, a significantly greater emphasis will be placed on formal linguistic analysis. Assignments for undergraduates: quizzes, two midterm exam, and final exam. Assignments for graduates: same as for undergraduates, but with additional reading and required homework. 3600-001

AMERICAN LITERARY TRADITIONS, TR 3:30-4:45, FH 1210 REISING Rather than surveying the entire range of American literature, this course will focus on important examples of non-fiction, fiction, and poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth century. Writers to be studied include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Richard Wright, Ken Kesey, and Tom Robbins. Students will write two papers and take a final examination.

3650-001

SCI-FI AND FANTASY LITERATURE – WAC, MW 12:30-1:45, FH 1200 COMPORA This course will examine middle to late 20th Century works of fantasy and science fiction literature focusing on a cross section of prominent writers in the genres. Texts will be approached in a variety of ways, including, but not limited to, a consideration of backgrounds and archetypes; an examination the socio-political elements and the “worlds” created by the authors; an examination of moralistic elements, including comparisons to prominent religious works; and the apocalyptic elements of some of the novels. Two essays, short writing assignments, and quizzes will be completed.

3760-001

EUROPEAN LITERATURE TO THE RENAISSANCE - WAC, TR 9:30-10:45, FH 1210 FITZGERALD This course will serve to introduce students to significant works of European literature (in translation) from the Classical period through the 14th century, as well as their continued influence on and relevance for later writers and artists as sources of inspiration and fascination. (Example texts: Homer’s Odyssey, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Dante’s Inferno, Boccaccio’s Decameron, and the poetry of Sappho, Catullus, and Petrarch, among other works.) Students will have opportunities to produce assignments both analytical and creative, and will be encouraged to make connections between the ancient, medieval, and 3

early modern literature we study and later periods, including contemporary literature and popular culture. Requirements will likely consists of a series of short, informal writing assignments (such as a reading journal or response papers), active participation and engagement in class discussion, two to three short analytical essays, and a final paper developed from one of the shorter papers. 3790-001

FOUNDATIONS OF LITERARY STUDY – WAC, MW 9:30-10:45, FH 1200 This class will be intensely concerned with three or four primary texts in prose and poetry, for each describing its style and determining its themes, and discussing the ways it goes about telling its truths. We will be learning the vocabulary that readers use to describe how literature works. We will also ask the larger questions of literary study: What is literature? Why do we read; how do we read? How do our assumptions and expectations color the way we read? How do our social and educational circumstances affect our reading? What is criticism? What kinds of ways do writers respond to literature? What is a literary essay? How does one go about constructing an interesting thesis about a piece of literature? We will begin with Formalism, which teaches awareness of the writer's stylistic choices, his/her craft and art. How does the writer employ these in conveying his/her concerns and passions? We will then consider several schools of contemporary criticism and theory, always with our primary texts as focus.

3790-002

FOUNDATIONS OF LITERARY STUDY – WAC, TR 5:45-7:00, FH 1210 REISING I will approach this course as the English Department intends--as a threshold class for English majors. We will address important topics, terms, and debates in contemporary literary studies by studying some influential literary theories. We will also engage in practical criticism by working closely with a variety of literary works from various genres. Students will contribute regularly to class discussions with reports and questions, will write three papers, and take a comprehensive final examination.

3810-001

SHAKESPEARE I, MW 7:20-8:35, FH 2230 MATTISON This course is an introduction to Shakespeare via a selection of plays drawn from the various genres in which he wrote—comedy, tragedy, history, and romance—and from all of the periods of his career. The emphasis throughout will be on the study of Shakespeare’s language—the choices he has made on a small level—a study that 4

should serve both as an introduction to this quintessential English playwright and a preparation for more advanced work on Shakespeare or other Renaissance writers. We will also discuss the historical background of Elizabethan England and the Renaissance Theater. 4030-001

WRITING WORKSHOP – NONFICTION PROSE, MW 11-12:15, FH 2050 MILLER This workshop-format class is for practicing nonfiction writers who want to improve their craft and work toward publication. Over the semester we’ll focus on memoir, music, film and visual art criticism, travel writing and New Journalism. Students will work toward a final portfolio of three to four smaller (5-7 pages) nonfiction pieces and one longer (10-15 pages) piece, which they will submit for publication to journals or magazines chosen in conjunction with the instructor. Also, be warned: this is not a class for congratulatory ego-fluffing, so students should come with thick skin, a rigorous work ethic and prepared to produce quality, publishable writing.

4070-001

WRITING WORKSHOP – POETRY, TR 12:30-1:45, FH 2210 GEIGER This workshop-format course is for the practicing poet. Each class will begin with a serious discussion of a poetry-related topic, or a reading assignment, and advance into the actual workshop itself. Students will work towards achieving a final unified portfolio of completed poems (a chapbook). Grades will be based on that portfolio (chapbook) and on class discussion and participation.

4080-001

WRITING WORKSHOP – FICTION, MW 12:30-1:45, FH 2820 STROUD In this class you'll each workshop two stories. You'll also deepen your understanding of craft through readings and discussions. Be prepared to write, read, and talk.

4090/5-001

CURRENT WRITING THEORY – WAC, TR 7:20-8:35 This course is devoted to studying current theories, trends, and authors in the field of writing studies, with a particular focus on various literacies connected to how we read and write. Specifically, we will focus on key articles and studies from the field of composition that guide research and practice. To better understand these studies and the underlying theories, students will read a variety of texts, complete course papers and be active participants during course discussions. The class will be primarily discussion-based (both full

5

class and small group), with some lecture and student presentation involved. 4210/5-001

ISSUES IN ESL WRITING – WAC, MW 2-3:15, FH 1030 REICHELT Course content includes key concepts in ESL writing instruction and research; characteristics of second language writers and their texts; curricular options; and responding to and assessing ESL writing.

4280-001

AMERICAN FICTION: 20TH CENTURY, MW 11-12:15, FH 1270 STROUD Major developments in content and form of the 20th-century American short story and novel. Writers studied include Wharton, Hemingway, Faulkner, Ellison, Roth, Oates, DeLillo, and Wallace.

4400-001

BRITISH LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL PERIOD, TR 11-12:15, FH 1210 FITZGERALD The Fall 2016 version of this course will address the later Middle Ages, that is, the literature that developed in the British Isles after the coming of Normans in 1066. Texts will be focused around the motif of “devotion,” both romantic and religious (and its intersections). Students will encounter an eclectic and engaging body of literature that seems at once strange and familiar. We will read literature both sacred and profane—and often a surprising mix of the two—written by men and women in genres as diverse as romance, saints' lives, devotional texts, autobiography, bawdy tales, drama, lyric poetry, and more. All students will be expected to engage actively with the material through weekly short writing assignments and studentgenerated discussion questions. In addition, undergraduates will turn in a medium-length analytical paper during the term and take a final essay exam. Graduate students will do a longer research project in place of the shorter essay and final exam.

4560-001

LITERATURE OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE 1850 TO PRESENT, TR 2-3:15 SARKAR This course offers an introduction to the literature produced in Britain and its former colonies from the late nineteenth century to the present age, focusing on the way writers deal with Britain’s imperial legacies. The nineteenth century witnessed some major historical changes -- unprecedented industrial growth and production following the Industrial Revolution, Britain’s growing imperial ambitions and the seeds of the feminist movement, the effects of which continued well into the twentieth century. And with widespread decolonization, the Nationality Act of 1948 and the arrival of the Empire Windrush, 6

Britain’s demographics were fundamentally altered in the twentieth century. In this course, we will approach some of these issues by analyzing the circulation and travel between the empire and the metropolis of British subjects and their formerly colonized counterparts. We will seek to answer, among others, the following broad questions: Were the major British writers’ proponents or opponents of imperialism? How did the British intelligentsia react to the rapid transformation of Britain from an agrarian to an industrial economy and how did the devastating effects of the world wars fundamentally change Britain? With the fading away of the empire, how did British writers envision a new Britain? How are contemporary British novelists like Salman Rushdie, Hanif Kureishi and Zadie Smith re-imagining what it means to be British, citizens of a postcolonial and multicultural Britain faced with social and political instability and the growth of Islamic fundamentalism? We will also explore the expatriate’s perception of a newly decolonized nation and delve deeper into issues of postcolonial identity. We will study mostly novels, essays and film, but will also try to focus on how the assigned texts both engage and reflect the social and cultural anxieties of the times. 4660-001

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE – 20TH CENTURY, MW 23:15, FH 1110 MACK This class examines articulations of “blackness” in 20th- and 21stcentury African American literature and culture. Beginning with the Harlem Renaissance, and ending in our current post-soul moment, we will examine key primary and secondary works that raise questions about what counts as legitimate black cultural expression, as well as its goals—artistic, political, or otherwise. Through weekly reading assignments, lectures, and discussions, this course will culminate in final papers about the expression of “blackness” in one of our required readings. Possible required primary texts will include Passing by Nella Larsen, Black No More by George Schuyler, Native Son by Richard Wright, Dutchman and selected poems by LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka, Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, Caucasia by Danzy Senna, and The White Boy Shuffle by Paul Beatty. We will also read excerpts and short secondary works by various African American artists and scholars, including Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Larry Neal, Trey Ellis, and Mark Anthony Neal.

7

4860/5-001

HENRY JAMES, TR 12:30-1:45, FH 2270 REISING Students will read widely in James’s short fiction and will read The American, The Portrait of a Lady, The Bostonians, The Princess Casamassima, and The Ambassadors. Work will include one oral presentation, two papers and a final exam.

4900-001

ENGLISH HONORS SEMINAR, M 4-4:50 GREGORY This course should be taken toward the end of your college career. It is a workshop designed to help you develop, draft, and finish a critical thesis. You will be assigned a sequence of writing assignments— including but not limited to an abstract, annotated bibliography, and proposal—to help you successfully accomplish the various stages of your project. Weekly meetings will give you the opportunity to share and workshop your drafts in a structured environment. The rest of the work will occur through independent research, writing, and tutorials with the English Department Honors Advisor, Dr. Melissa Gregory, as well as with an outside thesis director. The project will culminate in a formal defense with the Honors committee. This is an ideal course for those students who wish to experience the pleasure of pursuing an independent research project or who are considering graduate school in English or another discipline. Prerequisite: Admission to the course is contingent on permission from the Honors Advisor and Committee. Interested students must contact Dr. Gregory before they sign up for the course: [email protected]; 419-530-4915; FH 1620

4960-001

ENGLISH HONORS THESIS GREGORY These thesis credit hours are taken in conjunction with the Honors Seminar (ENGL 4900) and are required of all candidates for departmental honors. They represent the actual research and writing of the thesis. Prerequisite: Approval of the Honors Committee (please contact Dr. Gregory: [email protected]).

4980-001

FEMINIST UTOPIAN LITERATURE SCHNEIDER This course explores feminist utopian and dystopian fictions, examining the ways in which writers critique their present day by proposing radically different worlds. Our readings will include, among others, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s imaginary Herland, William Marston’s Wonder Woman and Paradise Island and Margaret Atwood’s dystopian The Handmaid’s Tale. We will use a 8

couple of theoretical essays to ground our readings, and we will write both creative and critical responses to them. Our learning objectives include being able to discuss the cultural critique each writer makes, rhetorically analyze how these critiques are made, identify themes across texts and synthesize them to write a fresh interpretation, and proffer our own utopian landscapes. The reading list: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herland William Marston; Wonder Woman Shulamith Firestone; selections from The Dialectic of Sex Joanna Russ; The Female Man Marge Piercy; Woman on the Edge of Time Margaret Atwood;The Handmaid’s Tale 5790-001

RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, TR 4:10-5:25, FH 1200 SARKAR This course is designed to teach you how to do research in English, specifically in literary studies, but more generally it is designed to enable you to function effectively in graduate school. It should give you the basic information and tools that will help you make the most of our M.A. in Literature program as well as help if you choose to pursue a PhD program or choose a career somewhat related to literary studies. In other words, it is not a traditional literary course per se; instead, it is a course about the profession of literary studies and how to be an effective member of the profession. Contrary to what you may think, doing professional research and writing about literature is not a solitary activity. Rather, it involves entering a conversation that has been carried on by experienced scholars for decades or even centuries. This class seeks to teach you the conventions of this critical conversation along with the tools you need to enter it with authority. It is a safe space for you to ask questions and learn what you need to do in your two years here and beyond.

6010-001

SEMINAR: ENGLISH INSTRUCTION: COMPOSITION, TR 23:15, FH 1230 EDGINGTON James Zebroski argues that “Theory is practice, and practice is always theoretical.” This course will focus on this connection. Using keywords from the field of writing studies, we will look at how theory and practice is interconnected in areas such as process theory, the classroom environment, curriculum development, and methods of 9

assessing and responding to student writing. Students will be asked to read literature and research studies in the field of composition, participate in both in-class and online discussions of the readings, and develop a pedagogical assignment that could be used in the classroom. The class culminates in the production of a statement of teaching philosophy, a revised syllabus, and a paper which argues for how the syllabus enacts the philosophy. 6010-901

SEMINAR: ENGLISH INSTRUCTION: COMPOSITION, DL EDGINGTON SAME DESCRIPTION AS ABOVE.

6190-001

ENVIRONMENTS FOR ESL LEARNING, MW 3:30-4:45, FH 2820 REICHELT In the course, students learn how to analyze the various environments in which English as a second/foreign language is taught, and to identify the linguistic needs of students of English as a second/foreign language.

6440-001

SEMINAR: DEVOTION AND BLASPHEMY: 17TH CENTURY RELIGIOUS POETRY, M 4:15-6:45, FH 1270 MATTISON This course examines the intersection of two institutions—religion and poetry—that were subject to tremendous upheaval in 17th-century England. Sectarian religious differences were the subject of violent conflicts, including multiple civil wars and other national crises of governance, and poets were in the middle of these conflicts, with their poetry sometimes brutally suppressed. Our readings will include writers who were imprisoned or killed, and others who were reviled as heretics by some while held up as models of piety by others. The course will focus on poets who combined religious preoccupations with significant literary ambition, and who used poetry to explore and defend unconventional religious ideas. Topics will include trinitarian vs. non-trinitarian conceptions of God; iconography and iconoclasm; the election of souls; the nature of grace and of providence; the theology of love, marriage, and sex; and the three-way relationship between religion, economic policy, and politics. Contextual reading will include theological and polemical writings of John Donne, Eleanor Davies, Robert Persons, Gerrard Winstanley, and John Milton; poets to be studied will include Robert Southwell, Aemilia Lanyer, Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Milton, Thomas Traherne, Katherine Philips, and Henry Vaughan. 10

6640-001

SEMINAR: AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL IMPULSE IN 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN BLUES LITERATURE, DRAMA, AND MUSIC, W 4:15-6:45, FH 1110 MACK What constitutes autobiography? According to Paul John Eakin, “autobiographical truth is not a fixed but an evolving content in an intricate process of self-discovery and self-creation, and, further, that the self that is at the center of all autobiographical narrative is necessarily a fictive structure” (3). This interdisciplinary course examines the enunciation of autobiographical self-invention by various musician characters and narrators in 20th-century American blues literature, drama, and music. In this class, our exploration of blues autobiography will not be limited to literary and dramatic narrative (storytelling), but we will also analyze musical narrative forms. As such, we will study novels and plays side-by-side with selected blues songs. We will also use literary and musicological theories and methods to read the literary, dramatic, and musical texts. Through weekly reading assignments, music listening, and lively inclass discussion, this seminar will culminate in interdisciplinary final research projects. Class assignments will also allow for ongoing discussion about the goals, challenges, and outcomes of literary and musicological interdisciplinarity. What do we learn about literature when juxtaposed with music or when read through a musicological lens? Does our understanding of the literary and dramatic class readings change through a sustained engagement with music and musicological theory?

6940-001

EXTERNSHIP – ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE, MW 7:108:40, FH 1210 COLEMAN This is a practice-teaching course in English as a Second Language intended for majors in the MA in English — ESL and the MA-Ed. in ESL. The first and last few weeks of the semester will be spent in preparatory / tie-up, seminar-style meetings with the professor. For the remainder of the term, students practice team-teach the Basic ESL Tutorial which the UT Department of English offers free to the community. Primary responsibility for the teaching will be divided equally among those registered as assigned by the professor. Students must submit reports for all Tutorial meetings, except those meetings which they did not attend. Substitute assignments are provided to make up for absences. This course is graded "S" / "U" (satisfactory / unsatisfactory). Because the course involves practice teaching, enrollment may be capped, with priority given to second-year graduate majors in ESL. Interested students are encouraged to contact the professor for details ([email protected]). 11

Suggest Documents