Sustainability Report Card for Telephone Directories. Yellow Pages

Sustainability Report Card for Telephone Directories Yellow Pages Prepared by: The Product Stewardship Institute July 2014 Sustainability Report C...
Author: Rodney Knight
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Sustainability Report Card for Telephone Directories

Yellow Pages

Prepared by: The Product Stewardship Institute July 2014

Sustainability Report Card: Introduction Background Yellow Pages telephone directories, or “phone books,” which most Americans receive at their doorstep whether they want them or not, are a waste of environmental resources, a burden on taxpayer-funded recycling programs, and a general household nuisance. Despite the near ubiquitous use today of online search engines and digital directories, which has all but replaced the use of printed paper directories, publishers continue to produce and deliver phone books to residences—sometimes multiple times per year. It is estimated that virgin paper production for phone books in the U.S. uses an estimated 4,680,000 trees annually; that’s about 14 football fields’ worth of forest. Yet, in 2009, only 37 percent of all phone books were actually recycled, while 410,000 tons of them were sent to landfills or waste combustion facilities—a cost of about $60 million to local governments (and taxpayers) nationwide. To try to minimize these impacts, beginning in 2007, the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) set out to work with the directory publishing industry to identify a series of sustainability best practices that, if adopted and implemented, would help publishers reduce their environmental, social, and economic footprint. While we commend the industry on its early sustainability efforts, we also believe that much more remains to be done. This is why, six years later, we have produced the following Sustainability Report Card for Telephone Directories—part of a 2013 PSI paper source reduction project funded by the Merck Family Fund—which shines a spotlight on the sustainability efforts of the phone book publishing industry, highlighting those who are leading the pack while also calling out those with room for improvement. In generating this Report Card, it is our hope that publishers will respond proactively, making whatever changes are necessary to improve their sustainability “grades” and, in turn, reducing paper waste, minimizing greenhouse gas emissions, decreasing lifecycle impacts, and assuming greater financial responsibility for the recycling and management of their products once consumers discard them.

About this Document The Report Card covers three primary areas: 1) Support for consumer opt-outs (reducing the number of directories that are produced and delivered); (2) Support for recycling (reducing the burden that directories place on recycling programs); and (3) Sustainable production (minimizing the impacts of directory production). PSI attempted to collect information for this Report Card via a brief online survey, which we distributed to 15 directory publishers representing the top four market share leaders of 2013. These include AT&T (YP), SuperMedia, Yellowbook, and Dex. We identified these publishers using the membership directory of the industry’s trade group, the Local Search Association.

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Sustainability Report Card: Introduction

However, despite repeated attempts to engage the publishers with the survey, only one company—Best Media—responded. Lacking primary source data, we opted to create another online survey targeting PSI members and partners around the country. This survey required that respondents obtain a hard copy of their local phone book and use it to answer a series of questions, such as whether they could find any opt-out messaging on the cover or within the pages of the directory, or whether they could find information about the recycled paper content of the directory. Fifty people (each representing a PSI member or partner) from 20 states across the country responded, providing detailed information, including photos, of their local directories. While this approach yielded a narrower set of data than what we could have obtained from the directory publishers themselves, we were nevertheless able to gather enough information to produce a Sustainability Report Card for five major directory publishers: Dex Media, Hibu/Yellowbook, SuperMedia, The Berry Company, and YP. We were also able to use the survey that Best Media completed to produce a report card for them. To those for whom we were unable to collect enough information, we assigned provisional scores of “Fail/Incomplete” (F/I), denoting a failing grade unless they provide (or we obtain) more, sufficient data. PSI made every effort to score the directory publishers fairly based on the information available to us. Overall, our data show that publishers’ progress toward implementing sustainability best practices is mixed. While there are clearly leaders in certain areas of sustainability, none of the publishers that we graded excelled in all areas of sustainability. We have done our best to identify concrete steps that individual publishers can take to improve their grades.

A Word In Closing While this Report Card highlights the efforts of individual directory publishers, PSI applauds the industry as a whole for the collective progress that it has made toward making consumer opt-outs a reality. For example, in response to our requests and those of our government members over the years, the industry implemented, and subsequently revised and improved, a voluntary, nationwide opt-out program for Yellow Pages. While this opt-out program does not address all of PSI’s concerns, it does represent a significant step in the right direction, and it demonstrates the industry’s willingness to improve its sustainability performance. We hope to continue working with the industry now and in the future to both improve each publisher’s Report Card grades and help the industry as a whole advance on its journey toward sustainability. We welcome all comments and feedback.

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Sustainability Report Card: Grading + Evaluation

PSI evaluated directory publishers in three primary performance categories:

1. Consumer Opt-Out As most consumers today use online search engines and other digital tools for their information needs, paper telephone directories are quickly becoming obsolete. Yet, consumers are still receiving phone books at their doorstep, whether they want them or not. This is not only a nuisance, but it also results in wasted natural resources. One solution is a directory opt-out, whereby consumers register with an association of publishers, an individual publisher, or a third party to stop receiving phone book deliveries. The industry has, at the request of PSI and our members, created a voluntary opt-out program for yellow pages directories, known as the National Yellow Pages Consumer Choice and Opt Out Site (www.yellowpagesoptout.com). Some publishers also accept third-party opt-out requests from the TrustedID Mail Preference Service (www.catalogchoice.org), or maintain their own opt-out sites. We assigned a high score in this category to publishers that honor opt-out requests from multiple programs (not just the industry’s). This is because multiple consumer options can serve as a system of “checks and balances,” ensuring that the industry is held accountable for honoring all opt-out requests. Whereas the non-industry programs are transparent about how many opt-out requests they receive and honor, the industry program lacks this transparency. Thus, we gave lower scores for those that accept opt-out requests only from the industry’s program. Additionally, the grades we assigned take into account the ease with which consumers are able to find opt-out information within the pages of the directory itself, as well as how prominently such information is displayed. Grading Criteria: • Does the publisher accept opt-out requests from third parties, such as the Trusted ID Mail Preference Service (formerly Catalog Choice)? • Does the company educate consumers on how they can opt out of receiving future directories? • Is information about opting out prominently displayed (i.e., printed on the cover or near the front of the directory)?

2. Support for Recycling Telephone directory publishers have a responsibility to both educate consumers about phone book recycling and undertake activities that support recycling while reducing the financial burden on local governments. Examples of this include running recycling campaigns, conducting neighborhood sweeps to collect unwanted directories, and maintaining consumer-accessible drop-off locations. The grades we assigned in this category take into account whether the publishers assume financial and managerial responsibility for phone book recycling, as well as the degree to which they educate consumers about available recycling options.

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Grading Criteria: • Does the company take financial and/or managemerial responsibility for the recycling of its directories? • Does the company advise consumers to recycle their directories? • Does the company provide adequate and convenient resources to help consumers understand how to recycle directories in their area (e.g., contact information for local recycling programs, interactive tools to locate nearby drop-off locations, etc.)? • Is the information about recycling prominent and easy for consumers to find (i.e. printed on the cover or near the front of the directory)?

3. Sustainable Production Directory publishers have a responsibility to adopt and implement sustainable sourcing, production, and distribution practices. This category assesses several factors, including use of post-consumer recycled materials; use of sustainably-sourced materials; use of non-toxic, plant-based materials; and efforts to reduce paper use, among other initiatives. Grading Criteria: • Does the company use post-consumer recycled-content paper, and is the percentage of post-consumer recycled content clearly indicated in the directory? • Does the company procure its paper from sustainable sources? Does the directory use paper certified by a third-party sustainable forestry certification program (e.g., FSC)? • Does the company use non-toxic, plant-based inks, glues, dyes and other materials in its directories? • Does the company take other measures to produce its directories more sustainably (e.g., making its directories smaller, using lighter-weight paper, etc.) We used the following system for assigning grades to each publisher within each category:

A

The publisher is an industry leader in the specified sustainability area.

B

Solid effort. While room exists for improvement, the publisher is taking meaningful steps to increase its sustainability in this area.

C

Average effort. The publisher is making an effort to be more sustainable, but has significant room for improvement.

D

Weak effort. While the publisher is making some effort to be more sustainable, it is well behind others in the industry in this sustainability area.

F

Lack of effort. PSI found no evidence that the publisher makes a significant effort to be sustainable in this area.

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Sustainability Report Card: Failing/Incomplete Grades

The following companies did not respond to our online survey. We were also unable to collect information about these publishers from our members and partners. (While our members and partners were able to access a good number of directories and subsequently respond to our surveys, they did not have access to every directory from every publisher in the U.S.) We therefore assigned a grade of Failing/Incomplete to these publishers. Should they provide us with more information, we will revise their grades, as appropriate. • Choice Directory • Great Lakes Community Directories • Haines Publishing • Mueller Publishing • Sunshine Media • SureWest Directories • USA Northland Directories • User Friendly Media • Valley Yellow Pages

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Sustainability Report Card: Recommendations While we have provided publisher-specific recommendations within each report card, the following general recommendations can apply to all publishers:

Be transparent about sustainability efforts. Only one company chose to respond to our request for information for this report card. This indicates the industry’s lack of interest in being transparent about the sustainability criteria that PSI’s state and local government members care about (these criteria are represented by the three key performance categories that we used to evaluate each publisher in this report card). By working with PSI and our members across the country, publishers will be able to demonstrate and receive recognition for the progress they have made. They will also be able to better understand areas where they need to put in additional effort.

Accept third-party opt-outs. Of the companies we graded, only one (Dex Media) accepts third-party opt-out requests. Accepting third-party opt-out requests increases consumer choice and gives consumers more options for holding publishers accountable for honoring their opt-out requests. We recommend that all directory publishers honor third-party opt-out programs, in addition to the industry’s opt-out program.

Take responsibility for directory recycling. While most directory publishers advise consumers to recycle their phone books, this can place a significant burden on taxpayer-funded recycling programs. Some publishers provide and pay for programs—such as recycling campaigns and directory drop-offs—to reduce this burden. We recommend that all publishers follow their lead and commit to seeing that their products are properly recycled at their own expense.

Commit to using post-consumer recycled paper. Many publishers either do not mention post-consumer recycled paper use, or make non-specific claims about recycled paper content. We recommend that all directory publishers: (1) commit to using post-consumer recycled paper in all of their directories; (2) clearly indicate, in print and on the cover of their directories, the post-consumer recycled paper content of that particular phone book; and (3) commit to increasing the post-consumer recycled paper content of their directories over time.

Independently verify claims about sustainable paper sourcing. Many publishers claim to source their paper sustainably, but these claims need independent verification. We recommend that all publishers work with a credible third party, such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), to verify that all paper used in their directories is sustainably sourced.

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Sustainability Grades At A Glance

Consumer Opt-Out Best Media

D

Support for Recycling

Sustainable Production

C

B

n/a

n/a

n/a

A

D

C+

Great Lakes Community Directories

n/a

n/a

n/a

Haines Publishing

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hibu/Yellowbook

B

D

C+

Mueller Publishing

n/a

n/a

n/a

Sunshine Media

n/a

n/a

n/a

C

C

C

SureWest Directories

n/a

n/a

n/a

The Berry Company

B

B

C

USA Northland Directories

n/a

n/a

n/a

User Friendly Media

n/a

n/a

n/a

Valley Yellow Pages

n/a

n/a

n/a

B

B-

Choice Directory Dex Media

SuperMedia

YP

D

Overall Grade

C F/I C+ F/I F/I C F/I F/I C F/I BF/I F/I F/I C+

Best Media earns a star for its commitment to transparency, as shown by its willingness to communicate its sustainability efforts to PSI directly.

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C

Publisher Name: Best Media

This report card is based on Best Media’s response to PSI’s April 2014 sustainability survey. Best Media earned an overall score of “C”.

Consumer Opt-Out:

D

While Best Media does accept consumer opt-out requests through the National Yellow Pages Consumer Choice and Opt Out Site (www.yellowpagesoptout.com), it does not print opt-out information in its directories and does not accept opt-out requests from thirdparty programs. The company could improve its score in this area by clearly printing information about the availability of opt-outs in its directories, and by increasing consumer choice by accepting third-party opt-out requests.

Support for Recycling:

C

Best Media makes a good effort to reduce the burden that recycling its products has on local governments, providing drop-off sites where consumers can bring their unwanted directories for recycling, and picking up unwanted directories when visiting clients. While information about how to recycle directories is printed within the company’s phone books, respondents noted that this information it is located “within the first 20 pages,” rather than within the first few pages or on the covers, of their directories. This may cause some consumers to overlook the information. The company could improve its score by making this messaging more prominent.

Sustainable Production:

B

Best Media has indicated that its directories contain 80% post-consumer recycled paper, the highest recycled paper content of any of the publishers that we scored. The company also indicated that it uses paper certified by a third-party sustainable forestry certification program; however, it does not provide any further information to validate this claim. The company says its directories are printed with soy-based inks, but again, the claim is unverified. Best Media could improve its score by seeking third-party validation of its sustainability claims, making a commitment to purchasing only paper that is certified by a credible forestry certification program, and clearly identifying, by name, all third-party certifiers. This would allow consumers to put more trust in the company’s claims.

Best Media earns a star for its commitment to transparency, as shown by its willingness to communicate its sustainability efforts to PSI directly.

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C

+

Publisher Name: Dex Media1

This report card is based on survey responses received from fourteen Product Stewardship Institute members and partners who receive directories from Dex Media2. Dex Media earned an overall score of “C+”.

Consumer Opt-Out:

A

Dex Media provides an extensive list of opt-out solutions to consumers. These include www.yellowpages optout.com, a toll-free telephone number, and the company’s opt-out site, www.dexknows.com/green. Dex Media also accepts third party opt-out requests through www.catalogchoice .org, and promotes this option to consumers in at least some of the markets it serves. Dex Media typically prints a short message about how to opt-out of deliveries on the front cover of its directories, with further messaging relating to sustainability and opt-outs printed within the first few pages of the directory.

Support for Recycling:

D

Dex Media does not appear to take any actions to reduce the burden that collecting and recycling its directories has on taxpayer-funded recycling programs. The company does promote recycling through its website, www.dexknows.com /green, which is listed prominently in its directories. This website contains a link to Earth 911, where Dex Media sponsors a phone book recycling page, including an online locator tool for directory recycling programs. However, this tool directs consumers to existing recycling programs run by private recycling companies (which may charge fees) or local governments. The tool can also be difficult to find, as it requires navigating several layers of menus on the Earth 911 website. The company could improve its score by taking meaningful actions to reduce the burden that its products have on taxpayer-funded recycling programs, such as funding recycling campaigns, picking up unwanted directories, or hosting collection events.

Sustainable Production:

C+

In some markets, the company states that it uses “up to 40% recycle[d] fiber,” but it does not specify the exact amount of recycled content used in the directory itself, and does not indicate whether the fiber is from post-consumer sources. In other markets, the company states that it uses a “minimum of 25% post-consumer” fiber. Neither claim is validated by an independent third party. Additionally, Dex Media does not appear to use paper certified by a third-party sustainable forestry certification organization; however, in at least one market, the company states that it works only with suppliers who have sustainable forestry and ISO certifications. The company says that it uses non-toxic inks, glues, and dyes wherever possible. Dex Media could increase its score by prominently disclosing and third-party validating the amount of post-consumer recycled paper content in its directories in all markets, by committing to increasing this amount over time, and by purchasing only paper certified by a credible third-party forestry certification program.

In April 2013, Dex Media merged with Super Media, publisher of SuperPages directories. The company continues to publish directories under the SuperPages brand in some markets. SuperMedia directories are covered in a separate report card. It remains to be seen whether the company will harmonize sustainability practices across its two brands.

1

PSI distributed a sustainability survey to Dex Media in April 2014 as an opportunity to provide input on this report card. However, Dex Media did not respond. Information for this report card was collected from PSI’s members and partners who receive directories from Dex Media. PSI hopes to work with this company and other directory publishers to ensure that the information presented here is accurate, and welcomes comments and feedback.

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C

Publisher Name: Hibu/Yellowbook1

This report card is based on survey responses received from nine Product Stewardship Institute members and partners who receive directories from Hibu/Yellowbook2. Hibu/Yellowbook earned an overall score of “C”.

Consumer Opt-Out:

B

Hibu/ Yellowbook promotes consumer opt-outs on the front cover of its directories, with more information printed prominently either inside the front cover or within the first few pages. However, the options available to consumers are limited to the industry’s National Yellow Pages Consumer Choice and Opt-Out website (www.yellowpagesoptout .com) and a toll-free telephone number. The company could improve its score in this area by accepting and honoring consumer opt-out requests from third-parties.

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Support for Recycling:

D

Hibu does not appear to take any action to reduce the burden that collecting and recycling its products has on taxpayer-funded recycling programs. The company prints recycling information prominently in its directories in some, but not all, markets. Where present, this information is located within the first few pages of the directory. The company maintains a recycling website, www.recycleyellowbook .com. This site contains a toll-free telephone number that consumers can call to learn about recycling options, as well as a web-based information request form. However, the toll-free number appears to direct consumers to a recording advising them to look for recycling options through the Earth 911 website. The company could improve its score by taking meaningful actions to reduce the burden that its products have on taxpayer-funded recycling programs, such as funding recycling campaigns, picking up unwanted directories, or hosting collection events.

Sustainable Production:

C+

The company’s website states that its directories contain recycled paper, but no survey respondents were able to locate the percentage of post-consumer recycled paper content used in their directory. The company states that it works only with suppliers with sustainable forestry and ISO certifications, and that its fiber comes from sustainable forests, but the company’s directories do not display a third-party sustainable forestry certification. The company claims to use non-toxic and biodegradable soy-based inks, and it produces smaller directories, which it calls an “eco-friendly” size. Hibu/ Yellowbook could increase its score by prominently displaying and third-party validating the post-consumer recycled paper content of its directories, by committing to increase this content over time, and by making a commitment to only purchase paper certified by a credible third-party forestry certification program.

Hibu, a multinational directory publisher based in the United Kingdom, publishes directories in the United States under the Yellowbook brand.

PSI distributed a sustainability survey to Hibu in April 2014 as an opportunity to provide input on this report card. However, Hibu did not respond. Information for this report card was collected from PSI’s members and partners who receive directories from Hibu. PSI hopes to work with this company and other directory publishers to ensure that the information presented here is accurate, and welcomes comments and feedback.

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C

Publisher Name: SuperMedia1

This report card is based on survey responses received from nine Product Stewardship Institute members and partners who receive SuperMedia directories2. SuperMedia earned an overall score of “C”.

Consumer Opt-Out:

C

SuperMedia promotes consumer opt-out solutions through the National Yellow Pages Consumer Choice and Opt Out Site (www.yellowpagesoptout.com), as well as a toll-free telephone number. This information is printed in small type on the cover of the directory. In at least some SuperMedia directories, this information is also contained in the “Customer Info Guide” within the first few pages of the directory. The company could improve its score by making its messaging more prominent, and by providing consumers with more options by accepting opt out requests from third parties in addition to the industry’s opt out program.

Support for Recycling:

C

Neither SuperMedia, nor its parent company Dex Media, appears to take any significant measures to reduce the burden that collecting and recycling their products has on local governments. Most of the company’s directories contain a “Recycling Guide,” giving contact information for local recycling programs that accept directories. However, this guide only directs consumers to existing, taxpayerfunded recycling programs. In addition, the recycling guide is located near the back of the directory, where it may be overlooked by consumers. The company could improve its score by taking meaningful actions to reduce the burden of its products on taxpayer-funded recycling programs, such as funding recycling campaigns, picking up unwanted directories, or hosting collection events.

Sustainable Production:

C

Several survey respondents reported that their SuperMedia directories claim to use “up to 40%” recycled fiber. SuperMedia directories do not display a sustainable forestry certification, and any survey respondents were unable to identify any other claims about sustainable sourcing. SuperMedia could improve its score by clearly identifying the post-consumer recycled content of its directories, by committing to increase this content over time, and by taking clearly identified and independently verified steps to source its paper sustainably.

In April 2013, Dex Media merged with Super Media, publisher of SuperPages directories. Dex Media continues to publish directories under the SuperPages brand in some markets. Dex Media directories are covered in a separate report card. It remains to be seen whether the company will harmonize sustainability practices across its two brands.

1

PSI distributed a sustainability survey to Dex Media (now parent company for SuperMedia) in April 2014 as an opportunity to provide input on this report card. However, Dex Media did not respond. Information for this report card was collected from PSI’s members and partners who receive directories from SuperMedia. PSI hopes to work with this company and other directory publishers to ensure that the information presented here is accurate, and welcomes comments and feedback.

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B

-

Publisher Name: The Berry Company

This report card is based on survey responses from four1 Product Stewardship Institute members and partners that receive directories from The Berry Company2. The Berry Company earned an overall score of “B-”.

Consumer Opt-Out:

B

The Berry Company earns a “B” in the Consumer Opt-Out category. Opt-out messaging is printed very prominently on the cover of the company’s directories, and is also linked through the company’s Think Yellow, Go Green website. However, the company only accepts opt-out requests through the industry’s National Yellow Pages Consumer Choice and Opt Out Site (www.yellowpagesoptout.com).The company could improve its score by accepting opt-out requests through third-party programs, which would offer consumers greater choice and flexibility.

Support for Recycling:

B

The Berry Company hosts collection events for its directories through its Think Yellow, Go Green campaign. Dates and locations of these collection events are available at www.thinkyellowgogreen.com. Availability of these collection events varies by market. In the Lincoln, Nebraska area, the company has set up six collection sites at parks and recreation centers, and works with local Boy Scouts to collect directories. In other markets, such as Maryland, collections appear to be limited to a single event once per year. Messaging about recycling and the company’s Think Yellow, Go Green campaign is located prominently in the company’s directories. At least some directories include a code that can be scanned to access the website from a mobile phone. Some of the company’s directories also contain a full page of local recycling information on page 7. The company is a leader in this area, but could improve its score by ensuring that convenient and widely available collection events are available in all markets it serves.

Sustainable Production:

C

The Berry Company’s directories do not appear to contain messaging about their recycled paper content. Survey respondents were unable to locate information about sustainable paper sourcing, and the directories did not display a sustainable forestry certification. The company states that it uses soy-based inks and non-toxic glues and dyes, and that its manufacturing facilities reduce their carbon footprint through energy conservation and the use of renewable energy; however, there is no third-party validation of these claims. The Berry Company could improve its score in this area by clearly displaying and third-party validating the post-consumer recycled content of its directories, committing to increasing this content over time, and by making a commitment to source its materials sustainably and with independent verification.

All four respondents were from the state of Nebraska. PSI will assume that information reported for Nebraska holds true in other markets served by The Berry Company, and welcomes comments and feedback if this information is not reflective of other markets served by the company.

1

PSI distributed a sustainability survey to The Berry Company in April 2014, as an opportunity to provide input on this report card. However, The Berry Company did not respond. Information for this report card was collected from PSI’s members and partners who receive directories from The Berry Company. PSI hopes to work with this company and other directory publishers to ensure that the information presented here is accurate, and welcomes comments and feedback.

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C

+

Publisher Name: YP

This report card is based on survey responses received from eight Product Stewardship Institute members and partners who receive directories from YP1. YP earned an overall score of “C+”.

Consumer Opt-Out:

B

Messaging about opting out is prominently and clearly printed on the front covers of YP’s directories. YP directs consumers to the National Yellow Pages Consumer Choice and Opt Out site, (www.yellowpagesoptout.com), and provides a toll-free telephone number to opt out of deliveries, but does not accept third-party opt-out requests. The company could improve its score by accepting opt-out requests through third-party programs, thereby offering consumers greater choice and flexibility.

Support for Recycling:

B-

YP sponsors Project ReDirectory, a community-based campaign done in partnership with Keep America Beautiful and local recycling companies to promote the collection and recycling of directories. The campaign includes education about recycling and opting-out. It also offers annual prizes for the school that recycles the most directories. While YP operates approximately 70 Project ReDirectory initiatives2, it is not clear if these cover all markets in which the company operates. The company includes messaging about how to recycle directories in some, but not all, of its directories. In some cases, this messaging includes lists of local recycling centers, while in other cases, it consists of a toll-free number. Respondents from California were unable to locate any recycling information. Overall, the company makes a solid effort to support recycling and reduce the burden on local governments. It could improve its score by offering clear, consistent, prominent messaging about recycling in all of its directories, including prominently promoting Project ReDirectory in all areas where it is available.

Sustainable Production:

D

No respondents were able to find a percentage of recycled paper content listed in the directory. The company does not appear to use sustainably sourced paper, and does not provide information about sustainable materials or production in its directories. If further information becomes available, PSI will revise this score as deemed appropriate. YP could improve its score by making a public and transparent commitment to producing its directories in a more sustainable manner. This would include using post-consumer recycled paper in all of its directories, third-party validating the recycled paper content of each directory and then printing this information in a prominent location within the directory itself, committing to increasing the recycled content of its directories over time, and working with a credible independent sustainable forestry certification program to verify that the non-recycled paper content is sustainably sourced.

PSI distributed a sustainability survey to YP in April 2014 as an opportunity to provide input on this report card. However, YP did not respond. Information for this report card was collected from PSI’s members and partners who receive directories from YP. PSI hopes to work with this company and other directory publishers to ensure that the information presented here is accurate, and welcomes comments and feedback. 2 Source: Local Search Insider. “Overview of AT&T’s Sustainability and Consumer Choice Initiatives”. June, 2011. Accessed July 3, 2014 from: http://www.localsearchinsider.org/overview-of-att%E2%80%99s-sustainability-and-consumer-choice-initiatives/archives/ 1

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