Student Planners General Printing City State Zip

2016 - 2017 Squibb Student Planners • General Printing 412-879-0751 www.squibb-it.com Montgomery Blair Student Assignment Book >> This assignment...
Author: Blaze Reynolds
2 downloads 0 Views 5MB Size
2016 - 2017

Squibb Student Planners • General Printing

412-879-0751 www.squibb-it.com

Montgomery Blair Student Assignment Book

>>

This assignment book belongs to: Name Address City

State

Phone

>>

Zip

Homeroom No.

School Information Name Address City Phone

Montgomery Blair High School 51 University Boulevard East Silver Spring

State

MD

301-649-2800

Homeroom No.

Zip

20901

Student Name: ________________________________ Table of Contents Bell Schedule......................................................................................inside front cover Blair Mission Statement ...............................................................................................2 Our History ..................................................................................................................2 Instructional Leadership Team ....................................................................................3 Administration and Staff ..............................................................................................3 Where to go if you need something ..............................................................................4 Graduation Requirements ............................................................................................5 Success for Every Student ............................................................................................5 Academic Interventions ................................................................................................6 Academic Support Schedule .........................................................................................7 Semester Grade Calculation ........................................................................................7 Fire and Emergency Procedures .................................................................................8 Policies and Procedures ..............................................................................................8 Attendance Policy ......................................................................................................12 Student Rights and Responsibilities ...........................................................................13 Student Government Association ...............................................................................13 Discipline Policy ........................................................................................................14 Honor Code................................................................................................................15 School Services ..........................................................................................................15 Eligibility for Extracurricular Activities ....................................................................17 Athletics .....................................................................................................................17 Clubs and Organizations ...........................................................................................18 Instructional Media Center ........................................................................................19 Computer Use at Blair ...............................................................................................20 The Academies ...........................................................................................................21 School Counseling Office ...........................................................................................22 Standardized Testing..................................................................................................23 Career Center ............................................................................................................23 School Calendar ........................................................................................................27 Word of the Day .........................................................................................................28 Media Center Databases.................................................................... inside back cover School Map .................................................................................................. back cover

1

Blair Mission Statement The mission of Montgomery Blair High School is to ensure that all students graduate equipped with the skills to successfully navigate their chosen path. Belief Statements:  Education is the shared responsibility of the school, student, family, community, and government.  Education works best when there is mutual respect among teachers, parents, students, and the community.  The school environment meets the emotional, academic, social, and physical needs of each student along with stimulating the desire to explore and participate in activities in and beyond the classroom.  Preparation for career decisions and higher education is essential to the future success of every student.  A collaborative learning environment fosters a sense of belonging, cultivating creative thinking, and problem-solving.  The school sets high expectations and provides meaningful and challenging instruction, allowing each student to achieve their highest potential.  The school community respects, protects, and celebrates the diversity, talent, and potential to learn of each student. Montgomery Blair High School: Our History Over eighty years ago, the rapidly expanding Takoma ParkSilver Spring area began to feel the need for a new high school to relieve its overcrowded junior-senior high school. Plans were drawn for the construction of this new school, and the hill overlooking Sligo Creek was chosen for its natural beauty, its central location, and its size, which allowed room for expansion. The first student body chose to name the school in honor of Montgomery Blair, the famous son of the founder of Silver Spring. Blair’s original building, on Wayne Avenue and Dale Drive, opened to students in March 1935. In the spring of 1996, the Blair Community celebrated groundbreaking for the “new” Montgomery Blair High School, which opened its doors to 2750 students and 250 professional and supporting staff members on August 31, 1998. The facility has a large media center, a student activity center, a large, fullyequipped Fine Arts wing, a TV studio, a greenhouse, a professional-size gymnasium, a 750-seat auditorium, outdoor tennis and basketball courts, and football, soccer, track, and baseball fields. At its new location, Montgomery Blair continues to emphasize academic excellence through interdisciplinary and innovative instruction with the support of the latest technology. School Colors: Red and White School Mascot: The Blazer

2

Alma Mater: By old Sligo’s winding waters Gentle hills of green Shelter as their proudest treasure Alma mater queen. We, thy students, will be loyal, For thy glory fight, Always keep thy name untarnished And thy honor bright. As the years shall bring thee power And thy share of fame, Countless students coming after Shall exalt thy name. Speak thee fairly, speak thee proudly, Shout it to the air: Hail to thee our Alma Mater, Hail Montgomery Blair. School Song: Fight! Blazers, fight for old Blair High! Right behind you, everyone is with you! Break the line and follow down the field And you’ll be up on the top, up on the top. Oh, Blazers, you will always win Proud to see your colors flying skyward! In the end you’ll win a victory So Blazers fight for old Blair High! FIGHT!!!

The Instructional Leadership Team MBHS is a professional learning community united in the belief that all students can learn. Learning is the primary purpose of our school and collaboration is the surest way to increase student achievement. The Instructional Leadership Team is composed of administrators, resource teachers, the academy coordinator, staff development teacher, the media specialist, elected faculty representatives, representation from supporting services staff, parents, and students. Educational topics are discussed and decisions are reached collaboratively. As leaders, the ILT believes strongly that when instructional leaders commit themselves to the improvement of relationships between all people in the school, when they ensure the relevance of the high school experience through the academy pathways, and when they monitor the teaching rigor of the curriculum, the excellence and achievement of all students will improve.

Administration and Staff Principal ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mrs. Johnson Asst. Principal, Grade 12 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mrs. Harvey Asst. Principal, Grade 11 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ms. Richardson Asst. Principal, Grade 10 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mr. Cauley Asst. Principal, Grade 9 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mr. Currence Asst. School Administrator --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ms. Carrillo Academy Coordinator ----------- Ms. Blaha CAP Coordinator----------------- Ms. Fillman Magnet Coordinator ------------- Mr. Ostrander Business and Tech Ed RT ------ Mr. Street Counseling RT ------------------- Ms. Godwin English RT ------------------------ Ms. Adamson ESOL RT -------------------------- Ms. Adler Fine Arts RT ---------------------- Ms. Armstead-Thomas Health and Phys Ed RT --------- Mr. McMahon Math RT --------------------------- Ms. Davis Reading RT ----------------------- Ms. Hiller Science RT ------------------------ Ms. Roark Social Studies RT ---------------- Ms. Thornton Special Education RT ----------- Ms. Shaffer World Languages RT------------ Ms. Galloway Athletic Director ----------------- Ms. Boule Building Services Manager ----- Mr. Agbonselobho Business Administrator --------- Mr. Funk Cafeteria Manager --------------- Ms. Blanton Staff Development --------------- Dr. Fields Principal’s Secretary------------- Ms. Biggs

3

Attendance Secretary ----------- Ms. Fus Financial Specialist ------------- Ms. Franklin Magnet Secretary --------------- Ms. Adelman Administrative Secretary------- Ms. Addison Administrative Secretary------- Ms. Heiss Administrative Secretary------- Ms. Barillas Administrative Secretary------- Ms. Platky Counseling Dept Secretary ---- Ms. Flores Counseling Dept Secretary ---- Ms. Shub Registrar -------------------------- Ms. Berardi/Ms. Ponce Career Center Coordinator----- Ms. West Media Specialist----------------- Ms. Lamphier Testing Coordinator ------------ Mr. Currence Security Team Leader ---------- Ms. Greene Security Assistant --------------- Mr. Hernandez-Carias Security Assistant --------------- Mr. Johnson Security Assistant --------------- Mr. Kelly Security Assistant --------------- Mr. Ngbea Security Assistant --------------- Mr. Leatherwood Security Assistant --------------- Mr. Seals Security Assistant --------------- Ms. Walsh

Where to go when you need information about: Absences .......................................................................................... Attendance Office Age of Majority ............................................................................... Attendance Office Athletics ........................................................................................... Athletic Director Audio Visual Equipment & Library Materials ................................. Media Center Bus Problems ................................................................................... Main Office Capstones ......................................................................................... Academy Office Change of Address ........................................................................... Counseling Office College/Career Information ............................................................. Career Center Early Departure/Extended Absence ................................................. Attendance/Administrator Eligibility Requirements .................................................................. Athletic Director Enrollment Verification ................................................................... Registrar Free and Reduced Lunch Applications............................................. Main Office Grade Changes ................................................................................. Teacher/Counseling Graduation Requirements ................................................................ Counseling Office Health Information ........................................................................... Health Room (Rm. 140) Health Problems ............................................................................... Health Room (Rm. 140) High School Intervention ................................................................. Counseling Office Home Instruction ............................................................................. Counseling Office Interims ............................................................................................ Teacher/Counseling Office Internships ....................................................................................... Career Center/Work Program Teacher Jobs .................................................................................................. Career Center/Work Program Teacher Locker Problems .............................................................................. Security Lost books........................................................................................ Department for that subject Lost Valuables and Clothing ............................................................ Security Office Obligations....................................................................................... Financial Specialist Personal Problems ............................................................................ Counselor/Administrator Report Card Pickup .......................................................................... Counseling Office Schedule Changes ............................................................................ Counselors Scholarships ..................................................................................... Career Center/Counselors Selective Service Registration.......................................................... U.S. Post Office Senior Class Activities ..................................................................... Ms. Norris (Math Department) and Ms. Fus Short Term Illness (Homework Collection) ..................................... Counseling Office Standardized Testing (PSAT, SAT, ACT) ....................................... Career Center/Testing Coordinator Student Service Learning Hours ...................................................... Ms. Hiscock (Special Education Office) Student Aide .................................................................................... Ms. Godwin (Counseling Office) Student Parking ................................................................................ Ms. Fus (Attendance) Student Records ............................................................................... Registrar Study Problems ................................................................................ Academic Support/Counselor Tardiness.......................................................................................... Attendance Office Transcripts ....................................................................................... Registrar Transfer/Withdrawal ........................................................................ Registrar Tutoring ........................................................................................... Counseling Office Visitors to School............................................................................. Main Office Work Permits ................................................................................... Counseling Office

4

Graduation Requirements Credits (minimum 22) 4 English 4 Math 3 Social Studies (U.S. History, NSL Govt, Modern World History) 3 Science (Biology, Physical Science, Elective) 1 Physical Education

1 Fine Arts 1 Technology Education ½ Health Education 2 Foreign Language or advanced technology or career development

Additional Requirements: State Assessments (passing HSA and PARCC scores depends on your year of graduation) 75 Student Service Learning Hours

Success for Every Student Academic Support Blair’s academic departments will continue to provide students with academic support after school and during 5th and 6th period lunches. Any student who needs help with any subject or with a specific assignment is encouraged to take advantage of the Academic Support Program. Departments will post exact times and locations of their sessions. For additional information, contact individual department resource teachers. Block Scheduling Educational research has concluded that students learn more easily and retain more information if they are taught in longer blocks of time; therefore, Montgomery Blair has adopted alternating odd/even block scheduling days. Periods 1-3-5-6-7-9 meet on Odd Days and Periods 2-4-5-6-8-9 on Even Days. Periods 5, 6, and 9 meet every day for 45 minutes; all other classes meet every other day for 90 minutes. Literacy Plan Literacy is the key to success in all academic areas. A thorough analysis of various student performance data indicates that a comprehensive school-side focus on literacy is necessary to increase the reading comprehension level of every student so that all students are reading and comprehending at or above grade level. We must provide our students with the academic and content-specific vocabulary and effective reading comprehension strategies to be successful in all content areas and in academic and professional pursuits beyond high school. Rec Zone An academic support program, organized by the Montgomery County Department of Recreation, offers a variety of after school sports and gaming activities in conjunction with a study hall session for students to get extra help and complete homework assignments. Student Planner Students in all four grades use the school-issued planner to help them organize their time, keep track of their assignments, and improve study skills. The planner also enables parents/guardians to follow on a day-by-day basis what students are doing in each of their classes. Summer Assignments To encourage students to become more enthusiastic, thoughtful, and skillful, all incoming ninth graders and returning students are required to complete specified reading, writing, and viewing assignments by the opening of school. Brochures that provide assignment guidelines for each grade level have been distributed to all incoming and current students and are available in the counseling office and the school website www.mbhs.edu

5

Academic Interventions for Students English

Fine Arts

Magnet Mathematics

Reading

Science

Social Studies

Special Education

 The Writing Center/Lab (open both lunches and after school, Monday-Thursday) and staffed by English Composition Assistants  Teacher Academic Support before and after school and during scheduled lunch periods  BLISS Peer Tutoring in selected classes  Test Prep Course for the SAT and ACT  Bridge Classes for ESOL students to transition to mainstream courses  One-on-one help with music, art projects, and re-teaching during lunches and after school by appointment  Teacher-recommended websites to use for additional individualized study of music theory, music technology, and photography tips  Lunch time math tutoring rooms staffed by teachers and upper classmen  Lunch time chemistry tutoring rooms for freshman chemistry  BLISS tutors in the classroom/help room  Math Help room during lunch (room 233)  Individual Teacher Academic support  Adult Tutor List distributed to Math and Counseling departments  S.A.T. in College Test Prep classes  Summer Math Program  Mu Alpha Theta Honor Society tutoring  Graphing Calculator Rental Program  BLISS tutors to support student learning goals in the classroom  Quarterly conferences to discuss progress towards reading goals  Use Edline and/or Google Classroom to communicate assignments and grades to students  Test all students in the fall and spring to determine student progress                 

BLISS tutors in the classroom/help room Science Help room during lunch; room number posted outside Rm 341 Individual PLC academic support Tutor List posted on website Academic Support in room 147; Tuesday-Thursday during both lunches; students make up assignments MCPS student portal and Google Classroom Peer Tutoring in select classes AP Test Prep review sessions Teach academic skills Rewards Reading, Reading Plus, Reading Assistant, and Writing Program Inclusion co-taught Double Period Algebra I and Geometry classes Resource Room Testing to determine academic levels and disability Abbreviated schedule Use of Kurzweil and Bookshare Daily lunch time Academic Support 5-6 year graduation plan

6

2016-2017 Academic Support Schedule DEPARTMENT

LOCATION

Business/Computer Science

222/223

English

174

ESOL

154

Fine Arts – Art Classes Fine Arts – Music Classes

4, 7, 9, 11, 13 5, 14, 16

Foreign Language

166

Health

117, 119

Magnet

Magnet classrooms

Math

233

Science

341

Social Studies

147

Technology

120

TIMES Tuesday-Thursday Per. 5, 6, After School Monday-Thursday Per. 5, 6, After School Monday-Friday: Per. 5, 6 Tuesday–Thursday: After School Per. 5, 6, and After School Contact your teacher Tuesday-Thursday Per. 5, 6, After School Also By Appointment Monday-Friday By Appointment Monday-Friday 3:00 – 4:00 Monday-Friday: Per. 5, 6 Also By Appointment Monday-Friday: Per. 5, 6 Tuesday-Thursday: After School Tuesday-Thursday Per. 5, 6, After School Tuesday-Thursday Per. 5, 6, After School

Calculation of Semester Grades Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) has replaced the two-hour semester final exams with centrally developed, in-class marking period assessments. Centrally developed quarterly assessments will be administered each marking period in courses for which there was previously a countywide final exam, to count for 10% of the marking period grade. The separate final exam grade on the student report card will be removed going forward. Similar to current semester grade calculations for courses in which there is no final exam, the semester grade will be calculated using the letter grades from each marking period. For all high school courses, the semester grade will be calculated by averaging the letter grade for each marking period, using a “quality point” assignment (A = 4, B =3, C = 2, D = 1, E = 0).

7

Fire and Emergency Evacuation Locations If the fire alarm rings during class or advisory, you will follow your teacher to your room’s assigned evacuation location. If the fire alarm rings before school starts, report to the location for your first block class of the day (1 st period on an odd day, 2nd period on an even day). If the fire alarm rings between classes, report to the location for your next period class. If the fire alarm rings during your lunch period, students in SAC report to Area 5 along the fence separating the practice field and the stadium. Location Key: Area 1 – Grass inside track and basketball courts Area 2 – Practice football field Area 3 – Grass area in front of stadium, near baseball/softball fields Area 4 – Grass area in front of fine arts wing, at 29 and University Blvd. Area 5 – Practice football field next to stadium

Policies and Procedures Age of Majority Status. When students reach the age of 18 and wish to assume age of majority status, they must complete an Age of Majority application. The forms are available in the attendance office and must be approved by an assistant principal. The school may continue to call parents to confirm reasons for absences and to report discipline problems as long as the student attends school and resides in the home. Age of Majority status may be revoked for abuse of school rules and procedures. Bus Rules. Students will follow the rules listed below. When a student is referred to school officials for misconduct, consequences will follow.  Keep hands, feet, and objects to themselves and inside the bus.  No displays of affection.  Remain seated unless given permission by the bus driver to move.  Do not eat, spit, drink, or use tobacco, lighters, matches, drugs, or alcohol on the bus.  Do not distract the driver’s attention with loud noises or language, such as cursing, yelling, name calling, or any form of sexual behavior/misconduct.  Do not push, shove, slap, hit, fight, damage property (vandalism to bus), tamper with the bus, throw objects on or from the bus, display sharp or potentially sharp objects.  Obey the bus driver at all times! Cell Phones. The Board of Education and the Maryland State Department of Education allows high school students to have cell phones in the school building. Any student who needs to phone home in an emergency situation should go to his/her administrator or counselor to seek help rather than use a cell phone during the instructional periods. Cell phones may be used between classes, before school, during lunch, and after school. Cell phones must be off and put away during instructional periods. Closed Campus. Students are not to leave the property at any time during the day unless they are on an abbreviated schedule or they have acquired documented permission from the administrative offices.

8

Dress Code. Students and staff are allowed to wear hats and religious head coverings. Hoods, masks, or any face coverings are prohibited and will be confiscated. Clothing which advertises or advocates the use of tobacco, drugs, alcohol, or weapons or which has contents of a sexual and/or profane nature may not be worn. No underwear may be worn as outerwear. Other examples of inappropriate dress include, but are not limited to, tube tops, clothing that exposes midriffs, mesh-type clothing without a covering undergarment, clothing with large armholes that exposes skin, and gang-related rosaries or gloves. Wearing of chains, studs, or spikes are not permitted. When necessary, administration will judge if clothing is disruptive to or inappropriate for school. Electronic Devices. Electronic devices may be used between classes, before school, during lunch, and after school. Electronic devices AND headphones must be off and put away during instructional periods unless authorized by the teacher. Eligibility for Extracurricular and Athletic Activities. Students must maintain a 2.0 average with no more than one E to participate in athletics and other extracurricular activities.  Unexcused absences, chronic tardiness, or infractions of the student discipline code may be sufficient reasons for declaring a student ineligible at any time.  In order to participate in any extracurricular activity, a student must be on time and in attendance at all scheduled classes the day of the event, unless he or she has obtained prior approval from an administrator.  The marking period for eligibility purposes begins on the day that a report card is issued and continues until the day that the next report card is issued. Students who have more than one failing grade during the final marking period will not be eligible in the fall unless all, or all except one, of the failed courses are successfully repeated during summer school.  Eligibility requirements do not apply to students who are entering from non-MCPS schools, to freshmen when they first enter high school in the fall, or to students who must participate in an activity in connection with a course requirement.  Don’t forget your activity fee! Students pay a $32.50 annual fee when they participate in one or more extra-curricular activities. For your convenience, you may pay online at http://montgomeryschoolsmd.org/activityfee.  All financial obligations must be paid prior to participation in an extracurricular or athletic activity. Emergencies and Evacuations.  Fire and Emergency Drills: All emergency announcements must be taken seriously. During an emergency, students and staff must walk quickly and quietly to designated assembly areas and follow directions of staff and student safety committee members. See page 7 for fire emergency procedures.  Shelter in Place and Tornado Drills: An alert established as part of the Homeland Security system, designed specifically for chemical, biological, and/or radiological incidents or tornadoes. Staff and students should remain calm and quiet in the nearest classroom and await instructions as to how to proceed.  Lockdown: Alerts which indicate that there is imminent danger in or outside the school. A lockdown situation requires all classrooms locked, lights turned off, and silence established until the emergency is cleared by local authorities. Final Exams. See Quarterly Assessments. Financial Obligations. Students may incur financial obligations for lost or damaged textbooks, replacement IDs, replacement planbooks, media center materials, and unpaid activity fees. It is the student’s responsibility to pay all financial obligations by the end of each semester. Students unable to pay because of financial hardship should talk to the Financial Specialist to set up a financial plan to help them meet their obligations. Seniors must be clear of any outstanding obligations in order to purchase prom tickets and/or pick up graduation cap and gown.

9

Fundraising Activities. Fundraising activities must benefit Montgomery Blair organizations. A fundraising plan must be completed and pre-approved by the Business Administrator prior to the start of any functions related to the activity. No students may sell candy or other goods on school grounds for non-Montgomery County Public Schools organizations. Grades. The 36-week school year is divided into two 18-week semesters. Report cards are issued after each 9-week period. Students receive half a credit for each semester class in which a passing grade (D or better) is earned. Report cards for marking periods 1, 2, and 3 are carried home by students. Fourth marking period report cards are mailed to the home. Blair has an automated interim system that enables teachers to notify parents/guardians if their child is failing or is in danger of failing any of his or her classes. Interims are mailed home at the mid-point of each 9-week period. Hall Passes. All students must have a pass from a staff member in their plan book or on a MCPS pass form when leaving a classroom. Hats and Head Coverings. Students and staff are allowed to wear hats and religious head coverings at Montgomery Blair High school. Hoods, masks, or any face coverings are prohibited and will be confiscated. Health Room. Unless physically unable, students must have a signed planbook from their classroom teachers prior to admissions to the Health Room. Students who feel ill during the day may not excuse themselves from school. The health room staff must make the determination regarding all early dismissals for health reasons, and students who leave school without obtaining permission from a member of the Health Room staff will receive unexcused absences in the classes they miss. Students who leave school must sign out in the attendance office. Students who need to take medications need to bring them to the nurse, who will dispense them as instructed by the student’s physician. IDs. All staff and students are required to have IDs in their possession at all times while on school grounds. In addition to helping provide a safe environment for the Blair community, the IDs are used for administering free and reduced lunch tickets, checking out library materials, gaining admission to school events. Students without an ID badge can obtain one from the Security Office in Rm. 118 after school on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The first replacement ID badge is free. Each additional replacement ID badge will result in a $5.00 obligation fee. Lockers. Students should keep their personal belongings in their lockers and carry materials for their morning block classes so they do not have to go to the lockers between classes. The display of rude, distasteful, or obscene pictures or other items is prohibited. School officials, with reasonable cause, may search lockers. Each locker is the responsibility of the person to whom it is assigned. Lunch. Since MBHS is a closed campus school, students are not to leave school grounds for lunch. Students are allowed on Blair Boulevard up to the media center during lunch periods. In addition, students may eat outside of the building in the courtyard areas and by the playing fields. The other hallways are offlimits unless students are going to Academic Support. Parking. Student parking is limited and parking on campus is a privilege, not a right. Eligible students complete an application each semester. To be eligible, students must have a GPA of at least 2.0, owe no obligations, and have no history of parking violations on campus. Permits are issued on a first-come, firstserved basis. Each parking permit is $37.50 per semester. Violations of the following rules may result in towing and/or the loss of parking privileges.  All vehicles must be registered with the school & display a current parking tag on the front window.  The school is not responsible for damage to the vehicle or its contents.  Students are prohibited from parking in the lot on the Colesville Road side of the school building.  All drivers must enter and exit at the light on University Blvd. and Williamsburg Dr.

10



All drivers must follow the arrows in the parking areas. Each parking area is one-way traffic only. The speed limit in the parking lot is 5mph.

Partial Schedule. Students having partial schedules are to be on school grounds only during their scheduled periods and are to leave school grounds immediately following their last class. Students whose schedules begin after the first block should plan to arrive at school no sooner than 10 minutes before their first assigned class. Quarterly Assessments. Centrally developed quarterly assessments will be administered each marking period in courses for which there was previously a countywide final exam, to count for 10% of the marking period grade. The separate final exam grade on the student report card will be removed going forward. Theft. To avoid theft, all personal items should be kept with you at all times. Student victims of property theft should check with friends and associates and then report all thefts immediately to security. Delay in reporting may result in difficulty in the return and recovery of property.  Students will call their parents to notify them of the theft.  Students who experience theft or loss of valuable items will be encouraged to notify the School Resource Officer. When a theft is reported, students will list all items issued by the school system that may result in an obligation for the student. Note: The loss of school related items (planbook, projects, notebooks) are generally not items the police will investigate.  When security recovers the lost or stolen items, they will notify the student as soon as possible.  Prevention of theft is key. Items not needed for school (valuable electronics) should be left at home. Visitors. All visitors are required to register with school staff. An ID will be issued to each visitor. Visitor parking spaces are available on both the Colesville and University parking lots.

11

Attendance Policy The following absences are excused: 1. illness of student 2. religious holidays, pre-approved 3. court summons (copy of summons required) 4. death in the immediate family (parent, sibling, grandparent) Note: Absences for vacations, family emergencies, traffic problems, and car trouble are unexcused. Policies and Procedures:  Anticipated Absences: Students who anticipate being absent should bring a note to their administrator at least 24 hours prior to the absence, e.g., religious observances, school activities.  College Visits and Educational Experiences: College visits are typically for juniors and seniors. Students may be excused for a maximum of three days to visit colleges. A parental note must be submitted to the attendance office 24 hours in advance.  Dismissal from Health Room: Students who feel ill during the day must report to the Health Room in order to be excused for early departure. Students dismissed from school by the Health Room technician or nurse must sign out at the Attendance Office. Upon departing, students must present the Health Room dismissal slip to the Attendance Office. In return, the Attendance Office will enter the excuse into the computer.  Early Departure Procedures: Students will be excused for early departure only by presenting a note to the Attendance office before 7:45 a.m. No student will be excused without a note. Telephone calls requesting early departure will not be honored. Students will not be permitted to leave without confirmation of note. Only parents and/or persons authorized in writing by parents may pick up a child from school. Parents may designate these other individuals on the emergency information card completed at the beginning of each school year. Parents also may send the school a note authorizing a specific individual to pick up their child. Schools typically contact parents by telephone to confirm such arrangements. Schools will ask the individual to show a photo identification card before releasing a student.  Excuse Notes: A note from a parent or guardian is required to excuse any absence. A physician’s note is required for any absence of five or more days due to illness. Notes regarding absences must be presented to the student’s first or second period teacher within three days of returning to school. It is the standard policy of the Attendance Office to verify notes excusing absences, tardies, and early departures by telephoning parents/guardians. o The following information must be on all absence/tardy/early departure notes:  Student name and ID number  Date of note  Date(s) of and reason for absence/tardy/early dismissal  Current work and home phone numbers  Parent/Guardian name and signature  Late Arrival: Students arriving after 8:05 must sign in at the Attendance Office. A note from a parent/guardian or physician/dentist citing an excusable absence (see above) is required to excuse any tardies.  Loss of Credit: Students with three unlawful absences in a class will be warned of the possibility of failure and receive a letter in the mail. Students who are unlawfully absent from class five times will automatically receive a loss of credit. Students and parents can appeal the loss of credit with the grade level administrator. In addition, unlawful absences should be considered disciplinary infractions that can result in nonacademic consequences that would range from a minimum of a conference to a maximum of administrative detention.  Make-Up Work: Upon returning from an absence, students have three days to make-up work missed during the period of absence. Teachers are obligated to assist students in making up work when the absence is excused; however, they are not obligated to accept missed work when the absence is unexcused. It is the student’s responsibility to find out what work they missed and to make arrangements for completion within the three-day time period following their return to school.  Notification: Automated phone calls are made every evening when a student is marked absent from any class period. Information is also available on Edline under the homeroom tab.  Tardies: Missing twenty minutes of any class constitutes an absence from that class.

12

Student Rights and Responsibilities Student Due Process Rights

Student Responsibilities

If a student has a problem or complaint, including a complaint of discrimination, the student may:  meet with the principal to seek an informal resolution, or  request, in writing, that the principal formally review the complaint.

Students will develop…

If the student chooses the first option and is not satisfied with the informal process or with the proposed resolution, or it no resolution is reached within 15 school days, the student may file a written request for formal review of the complaint by the principal. When the principal formally reviews a student’s complaint, the principal shall provide the student with the opportunity to present witnesses and evidence in support of the complaint from the student.

Critical thinking skills by gathering, processing, and evaluating evidence and information to form opinions, make decision, and solve problems.

Appeal of the Decision of the Principal If a student is not satisfied with the decision rendered after a formal review by the principal, he or she may appeal to the Superintendent or to his or her designee within 10 school days of the principal’s written decision. The appeal statement should include (1) a request for a review of the complaint and the decision of the principal, (2) all pertinent factual information, (3) the remedy requested. Following submission of the appeal statement, the superintendent or designee reviews the issue and related information. Within 10 school days of receipt of the appeal, the superintendent or designee renders a decision and notifies the student and principal in writing.

Effective communication skills by reading and writing across the curriculum.

Personal responsibility by learning strategies for time management, utilizing study skills, and developing the capacity for effective self-advocacy and selfreflection. Social responsibility by modeling behavior appropriate to an academic setting, respecting our school environment, and actively contributing to the Blair community.

You many initiate an appeal of the superintendent’s decision by contacting the Office of the Board of Education.

Student Government Association Sponsor: Mr. Klein

Rm. 161

http://sga.mbhs.edu

The Student Government Association (SGA) provides students with a voice in school affairs and an opportunity to express views to the administration. Blair’s student government is also responsible for coordinating fund-raising projects and social events. The Leadership Class meets daily and is comprised of Executive officers elected and persons appointed the previous spring. It handles the day-to-day operations of the SGA. Membership in the Leadership Class is by application only. Blair Congress, the voting body of the SGA, is comprised of the Senate (the President and Vice-President of each grade level) and the House of Representatives (any student may join). To join the House of Representatives and be a part of Blair Congress, all you need to do is show interest and attend the meetings. Blair Congress will have the opportunity to be involved in daily operations, submit motions, resolutions and initiatives which will be considered for ratification and action according to the procedures set out in the Constitution. Blair SGA's Constitution is accessible on the SGA's website. Class Councils are comprised of elected officers for each grade and interested students. Each President and Vice-President will distribute applications and convene a council to handle grade-related activities, and raise money for prom and graduation for their senior year. President: Hana Bekele Vice President: Caitlin Little

Chief of Staff: Fatu Kposowa Chief of Operations: Joelle Nwulu

13

Montgomery Blair Discipline Policy The cornerstone of Blair’s discipline policy is that each student has the right to learn in an atmosphere free from disruption. It is, therefore, the responsibility of staff to help create a climate at Blair in which students can mature educationally and emotionally as they gain knowledge, self-control, and self-confidence. Students are also expected to help take responsibility for their successful completion of high school by respecting others’ rights to a safe and comfortable school environment. The following guidelines clarify rules and regulations in effect at Blair and in MCPS. The rules and regulations not only apply to student behavior while at Blair, but also extend to any situation that may occur on the way to or from school or at extracurricular activities. During September, students will be provided with a copy of the MCPS Code of Conduct indicating what constitutes serious violations of the Discipline Policy and the penalties for such violations. Any infraction of the following items in the discipline policy will result in a referral and disciplinary action. Notes:   

Every rule and policy cannot be stated. Exceptions will be handled at the discretion of the principal. Every rule and policy applies during any school related activity. The policies listed below are recommended minimum consequences. Each offense will be handled on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration the severity and frequency of non-compliance.

DISCIPLINE POLICY 2016-2017 Violations

Academic Dishonesty/ Violating Test Procedures

Dress code violation

Arguing with other students

Electronics, including cameras, unauthorized Extortion

Arson

Fighting

Assault on a staff/student

Fire alarm (false alarm)

Alcohol/Drugs (Distribution)

Bomb/Facsimile Possession or Bomb Threats Bullying Bus misconduct Destruction of property; vandalism, graffiti Display of affection Disrespect/being rude/ use of profanity Distribution of Intoxicants Disruption of class

Intimidation/threats, hazing, bullying, harassment Leaving school without sign-out Sexual Harassment/ Misconduct Skateboards, rollerblades, etc., use on school grounds Stink or smoke bombs, mace, pepper spray, etc.

Firearms

Tardies

Forgery Gambling

Theft Threatening a staff member

Gang Activity, Inciting/Participating

Tobacco, possession/use

Horseplay, play fighting, rough housing Inciting/refusing to leave a disturbance and/or conflict Insubordination, refusal to follow simple request Internet/Network violation

14

Trespassing Truancy, cutting class Violent Physical Attack on a Staff Member Weapons, dangerous instruments Weapons Used to Cause Bodily Harm/Injury

Honor Code The faculty, staff, and students are committed to developing honesty and integrity in the Montgomery Blair community.  Follow test procedures.  Adhere to academic honesty by using only authorized materials, information, and study aids.  Verify and correctly document information and citations in written and oral presentations.  Tell the truth to other members of the Blair community.  Respect the property of other members of the Blair community.  Present valid signatures on documents, excuse notes, and passes.  Abide by the guidelines for appropriate use of school computer networks. MCPS definition of plagiarism and academic dishonesty Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to, the following: the willful giving or receiving of an unauthorized, unfair, dishonest or unscrupulous advantage in academic work over other students, using fraud, duress, deception, theft, trickery, talking, signs, gestures, copying, electronics or any other methodology including the use of photographs without the permission of the photographer (MCPS JFA-RA). Range of Consequences as outlined by MCPS The consequences of plagiarism and academic dishonesty can range from a conference to a recommendation for expulsion (MCPS JFA-RA). For further information regarding consequence for Academic Dishonesty, please refer to the Montgomery Blair Discipline Policy.

School Services Blazer Hotline. MBHS has an anonymous phone line students can use to report information regarding school and student safety. You can call or text the Blazer Hotline at 240-688-7940. Cafeteria. The cafeteria serves breakfast and snacks from 7:00 - 7:30 a.m. A hot meal and a la carte items are available at lunch. Blair is a closed campus and students may not leave during lunch time. Courtyard areas are open to students during lunch. Students must present a current ID in order to purchase meals. Career Information Center. The Career Information Center is located within the School Counseling Services Suite. The Career Coordinator helps students obtain information about colleges and careers, provides information about college testing programs and part-time summer employment, and assists students to obtain work permits. Counseling Services. Students’ assigned counselors are located in the School Counseling Services Suite located on Blair Blvd. Counselors are available to help students with personal, social, or educational issues, and are responsible for advising students regarding course selection and scheduling for progress toward graduation. Free and Reduced Lunch. Students receive forms to take home so parents or guardians can determine if their child is eligible to free or reduced meals. Students eligible for free or reduced breakfast and lunch scan the barcode on their ID cards at the cafeteria cash registers. These cards are non-transferable and cannot be shared. Additional applications are available on the MCPS website. Completed forms should be turned in to the main office.

15

Health Room Services. The health room, located in Rm. 140, is open to students between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The Community Health Nurse provides consultation, counseling, and health education on all aspects of health, including emotional, mental, physical, social, and environmental. Students who feel ill many not excuse themselves from school; doing so will result in administrative consequences. Infoflow. InfoFlow, a TV program produced by and for students, is transmitted into all classrooms. The daily programs include information and features that are of interest to Blair’s student community. Instructional Media Center. The IMC, located on Blair Boulevard, is open for student use before and after school and during their lunch period. For more information on resources and expectations, please see page 18. Lost and Found. Students should bring any textbooks and items such as keys and clothing that they find to security staff. Those who have lost items should check in with a security staff member to see if it has been turned in. Pictures. Each year students have their pictures taken for the yearbook and for picture IDs. They have the option of purchasing their school pictures from the photographer. Additional purchase information may be obtained from the Business Office. Publications.  Silver Chips and Silver Chips Online, Blair’s newspaper, traditionally win more awards than any other school paper in the state. Published six times a year, Silver Chips covers topics interesting and relevant to Blair students. Silver Chips Online provides current news and timely features for the Blair community.  Silver Quill, Blair’s literary magazine, contains student stories, poems, essays, and artwork. School Insurance. A student insurance program is available to all students. Information about the program is distributed to all students during the first week of school. School Store. The school store, located on Blair Boulevard across from the SAC, sells snacks during fifth and sixth period lunches. Yearbooks. Yearbooks are available for purchase through the yearbook sponsor. Purchase your yearbook at the beginning of the school year to get the best price. Youth Hotline. The Montgomery County Youth Hotline is a free and confidential support program. Trained counselors are available 24 hours a day for active listening, crisis intervention, and referral service. Contact 301-738-9697 for help.

16

Eligibility for Extracurricular and Athletic Activities Students must maintain a 2.0 average with no more than one E to participate in athletics and other extracurricular activities. See “School Policies and Procedures” on p. 8 of this planbook for more details.

Athletics Blair’s sports teams have the reputation of producing fine athletes and competitors. In our long history, our teams have won many championships and awards. Below are the sports offered at Blair and sanctioned by MCPS. Athletic Director: Ms. Rita Boule Assistant Athletic Directors: Mr. Michael Horne and Mr. James Mogge Season

Fall

Boy’s Teams Varsity Football......... Dr. Fields JV Football ................ Mr. Herbold Varsity Soccer ........... Mr. Haigh JV Soccer .................. Ms. Werdann Golf ........................... TBD

Girl’s Teams Varsity Volleyball ......Mr. Klein JV Volleyball .............Mr. Liang Varsity Field Hockey .Ms. Lusby JV Field Hockey ........Mr. Shiotani Tennis ........................Mr. Ngbea Varsity Soccer............Mr. Gibb JV Soccer ...................Mr. Young Poms ..........................Ms. Soriano Varsity Basketball ......Ms. Hollis JV Basketball .............Ms. Ferguson Poms ..........................Ms. Soriano

Varsity Basketball ..... Mr. Pigrom JV Basketball ............ Mr. Charles Winter Varsity Wrestling ...... Mr. Herbold JV Wrestling ............. TBD Varsity Baseball ........ Mr. Zolkiewicz Varsity Softball ..........Mr. Hoelman JV Baseball ............... Mr. Morris JV Softball .................Ms. Rich Volleyball .................. Mr. Liang Varsity Lacrosse ........Mr. Horne Spring Tennis........................ Mr. Ngbea JV Lacrosse................Ms. Lusby Varsity Lacrosse ........ Mr. Brown Gymnastics ................Ms. Ruderman JV Lacrosse ............... Mr. Feeney Co-Ed Teams Cross Country ........... Ms. Bosse and Mr. Zick Fall Team Handball .......... Mr. Hoelman Cheerleaders .............. Ms. Fus and Mr. Johnson Indoor Track .............. Mr. Williams and Mr. Zick Swim/Dive ................ TBD Winter Bocce Ball ................. Ms. McGurkin and Mr. Terry Cheerleaders .............. Ms. Fus and Mr. Johnson Track and Field ......... Mr. Williams, Mr. Zick, Mr. Fleming, and Mr. Nance Spring Volleyball .................. TBD Allied Softball ........... TBD

17

Clubs and Organizations Clubs and organizations at Blair involve students in a wide variety of school activities. Listed below are some of the clubs and their sponsors. An Activities Fair is held each fall to acquaint students with available activities. Any students who have an interest in an activity that does not exist should contact their administrator. Club/Organization Advocates for Biodiversity African Club Art and Science Club Bible Fellowship Biology Club Blair Network Comm. Blair One Acts BLISS Tutoring Program Ceramics Club Chemistry Club Chess Club Color Guard/Flag Squad Concert Series Crew Club Debate Team Envirothon Team Ethiopian Club. ESOL Leadership Council Film Club Forensics Club French Honor Society Future Teachers Green Club Human Rights Club InToneNation It’s Academic Japanese Anime Club Jewish Culture Club Key Club Korean Club Language and Linguistics Latin Club Linguistics Club Logic Club Marching Band Martial Arts Tricking Club Math Club

Sponsor Mr. Haigh/Ms. Hart Mr. Ngbea Ms. Hart/Ms. Roark Mr. D. Lee Ms. Bosse/Ms. Sloe Mr. Mayo Mr. Anderson Mr. Cauley Mr. Verock Mr. Pham (Magnet) Mr. Pham (Magnet) Mr. Oldham Ms. Hernandez-Cata Ms. Gil Mr. Gabaree Mr. Pham (Magnet) Ms. Seyoum Ms. Zarou and Ms. Gil Mr. Shiotani Ms. Scanlan Ms. Austin Ms. Jacobs Ivey Mr. Cirincione/Ms. Mason Ms. Manuel Ms. Hernandez-Cata Mr. Schafer Ms. Zoll Mr. Grossman Ms. Bruno Mr. Pham (Magnet) Ms. Hamouch Mr. Johnson Mr. Rose Mr. Ostrander Mr. Oldham Mr. D. Lee Mr. Schwartz

Club/Organization Math Team Mock Trial Model UN Montgomery Blair Players Muslim Students Assoc. National Art Honor Soc. National Honor Society National Latin Honor Soc. No Labels Diversity Wksp Ocean Science Bowl Team Performing Arts Club Philosophy Club Photography Club Physics Team Pit Orchestra Robotics Club Sankofa Science Bowl Science Nat’l Honor Soc Sign Language Club Sisters Club SmartPhone Programming Smart Sacks Club Spanish Honor Society STEM Club Step Team Student Government Students for Global Resp. Ted-ED Club Tri-M Music Honor Soc. WEB Dubois Honor Soc. Weight Training Club Winter Running Club Women’s Advocacy Group Yearbook Yoga Club

Sponsor Mr. Stein Ms. Bach Mr. Moose/Mr. Cirincione Ms. O’Connor Ms. Lamphier Ms. Wall Mr. Pham (Math) Mr. Johnson Ms. Jeral Mr. Pham (Magnet) Mr. Anderson/Mr. Clay Mr. Schwartz Ms. Fillman Mr. Schafer Mr. Oldham Mr. Davis Ms. Edwards Mr. Pham (Magnet) Mr. Haigh/Ms. Hart Ms. Wheatley Ms. Roark/Ms. Ferguson Mr. Rose Ms. Catzva Ms. Araujo Ms. Hart/Mr. Haigh Ms. Barclay Mr. Klein Mr. Moose Mr. Shindel Ms. M. Roberts Dr. Howard/Ms. Blake Mr. McMahon Mr. Giles Ms. Bryant Dr. Simel Mr. Rose

More clubs and activities can be found on the Blair Homepage or by visiting http://www.mbhs.edu/activities/

18

Instructional Media Center (IMC) Blair Boulevard, 301-649-2831 Staff: Media Specialist: Media Assistants: Media Services Technician:

Ms. Lamphier Ms. Boshart and Ms. Catzva Mr. Nance

Hours: 7:15 – 3:30 Monday - Friday Open during lunch and after school except when classes are scheduled. These times may be changed in order to accommodate major research projects. A daily schedule of activities is posted on Blair Boulevard each morning. Code of Conduct: Media Center users respect the mission of the IMC: to provide a quiet place for research, homework, reading, or school activities. Blair Media Center follows MCPS and Montgomery Blair High School policies to ensure that the Media Center environment promotes student learning.  Media Center seating at tables and computers provided for individual and group study. Media Center staff may request students without study materials to move in order to accommodate students who need table space for study.  Computers and printing may be used only for schoolwork. Food and drink (except water) are not allowed in the media center.  Students must present a current student ID in order to use the media center facilities or borrow materials. Electronic Responsibility:  Cell phones are allowed for silent uses only. Phone calls may not be placed or taken in the media center.  Students will be asked to remove headphones when seated with other students at tables. Students are asked to remove headphones when talking with or listening to others, including to staff.  All uses of computers and the computer network at Blair must be for educational use and comply with MCPS computer regulations.  Students who print non-school related material will be charged a fee of $0.10 per page. Borrowing Periods:  Books and magazines (past issues only): 3 weeks  Special Reserve: due by 7:45a.m. the next day (fine of $0.50 per day per item)  AV equipment: Some AV equipment may be borrowed for in-school use with written permission of a teacher. Students may borrow some AV equipment overnight if parents have signed a form acknowledging financial responsibility.  Overdue notices will be sent to first period teachers. Financial obligations are updated routinely and recorded in the Business Office. Online Databases and Computer Services  Over 50 PC computers for individual and class use. Before school, during lunch, and after school, students must present ID cards to check out computer use cards at the circulation desk.  A scanner  Color laser printer – $0.50 per page The Web Page Blair students can access a number of internet-based instructional, research, search tools, and student projects from both school and home computers. For access to databases and class projects/pathfinders, go to http://imc.mbhs.edu.

19

Computer Use at Blair Blair is fortunate to have the latest in computer technology available to both students and staff. Each student has a personal account that can be accessed at any networked computer in the school. In order to receive a personal log-in ID and password, students agree to follow the MCPS and MBHS computer guidelines. For safety and security reasons, all computer usage at MBHS is monitored. A Review of the Guidelines for Inappropriate Use of Computer Networks The following guidelines are taken from MCPS regulations (IGT-RA) which all students should read and understand. This list is NOT intended to be all-inclusive but to serve as a guide. UNAUTHORIZED ACCESS  Trying to read, delete, copy or change the email of another person  Trying to find out another person’s password  Trying to get to an unauthorized high level of network privileges and access  Allowing others to use your password, your account, or your personal e-mail address  Sharing your password  Using someone else’s account INAPPROPRIATE COMMUNICATION  Using obscene, vulgar, abusive, or inappropriate language, pictures or other material  Deliberately interfering with other computer users  Attempting to libel, slander, or harass other users  Forging or attempting to forge e-mail; trying to send mail that looks like it has come from another person COMPUTER VANDALISM  Tampering with the system, software or the network to try to harm them  Introducing viruses  Vandalizing (damaging) computer equipment, software, or someone’s data  Stealing computer equipment

20

INAPPROPRIATE USE OF YOUR ACCOUNT  Using the network for something other than education  Using the network for illegal activities  Using the network for advertising, chain letters, or non-educational games  Accessing chat rooms and instant messaging  Downloading and installing software  Allowing someone else to use your account PLAGIARISM  Copying or transferring copyrighted material – for example, taking something from a website and using it in your site or work without giving credit to the source  Placing any copyrighted material on the network without permission of the author  Unauthorized copying or transferring of copyrighted materials or any other violation of copyright law Consequences for computer-use violations may include:  Loss of computer privileges  Detention  In-school suspension or suspension from school  Police referral  Expulsion

The Academies at Montgomery Blair

Learning Through Interests and Pursuing Passions Rm. 342 301-649-8510 Academy Coordinator: Ms. Leslie Blaha

http://academies.mbhs.edu [email protected]

The Academies at Montgomery Blair are communities of students and educators united by a set of common interests and career goals. Our mission is to enhance the academic experience of students through special electives and events that allow students to explore their career interests. Entrepreneurship Academy Lead Teacher: Mr. Murley, [email protected] The mission of the Academy of Entrepreneurship is to provide students with the business and interpersonal skills required to successfully manage a business of any size. Human Services Professions Academy Lead Teacher: Ms. Jacobs-Ivey, [email protected] The mission of the Academy of Human Service Professions is to prepare students with the skills to provide essential human services, especially to those who are least able to help themselves International Studies and Law Academy Lead Teacher: Mr. Moose, [email protected] The mission of the Academy of International Studies is to provide students with the information and experiences essential in fostering a more global perspective of political systems, history, economic issues, and cultures. Music, Media, and the Arts Academy Lead Teacher: Mr. Horne, [email protected] The mission of the Academy of MMA is to give students authentic experiences in creating and using media to entertain, inform, and persuade and provide students with critical thinking skills, which enable them to deconstruct and interpret messages and to develop independent judgments about media content. Science, Tech, Engineering, Math Academy Lead Teacher: Mr. Haigh, [email protected]psmd.org The mission of the Academy of STEM is to provide students with the technological, scientific, mathematical, research, and problem-solving skills needed in STEM careers.

Academy Certificate Requirements Academy Certificate of Completion  

successful completion of three academy courses/electives successful completion of the capstone experience with a rating of satisfactory

The Capstone Experience

The capstone experience provides each student with the opportunity to explore an area of his or her choice. The activity must be in depth, challenging and reflective of the collective learning of the student relative to the selected academy strand and career focus. Approval The capstone experience must be approved by the Academy Lead Teacher. Evaluation A capstone experience will be evaluated by a committee including the Academy Lead Teacher, mentor, peers, and community members. The capstone portfolio must include the following:  Journal  Oral presentation or performance with visual aids  Reflective essay These pieces are required regardless of the type of capstone experience selected. Capstone experiences will be evaluated by rubrics, which will be available to students once their capstone is approved, and will receive a rating of unsatisfactory, satisfactory, or outstanding.

21

School Counseling Office

Resource Counselor: Ms. Jane Godwin Counselors: Ms. Charlain Bailey Ms. Leanna Binick Ms. Susanne Bray Mr. Alphonso Burwell

301-649-2810 Mr. Roland Hollins Dr. Daryl Howard Dr. Vilma Nadal Ms. Emily Putney

Ms. Antia Reddicks Ms. Betsy Ramirez Mr. Kirk Simms Ms. Jennifer S. Taylor

Secretaries: Ms. Dee Shub and Ms. Estrella Flores Registrar: Ms. Marge Berardi and Ms. Rosa Ponce College/Career Information Coordinator: Ms. Phalia West Comprehensive School Counseling Services Program Description The MCPS Comprehensive School Counseling Services Program (CSCSP) organizes a conceptual foundation for the delivery, management and accountability of guidance and counseling services for all students. The program is developmental in nature and attempts to integrate the various facets of students’ development. At the high school level, the CSCSP focuses on student development in the following domains:  Academic Development  Career Development  Personal Development  Healthy Development  Interpersonal Development Montgomery Blair High School Counseling Department Strategic Statement 

VISION: Montgomery Blair High School counselors are professional educators who are dedicated to empowering every student to achieve academic success, social growth, and emotional wellness



MISSION: Montgomery Blair High School Counseling Staff serve as leaders and act as positive change agents in collaboration with the Blair learning community. We promote student success by providing responsive and preventive counseling services to support students’ personal, academic and career development.



PLAN: All members of the Blair Counseling Department Team collaborate with each other and with school staff to deliver student services in response to student need. We allocate our resources to analyze and evaluate data, develop and maintain records, and implement a program of prevention, intervention and crisis preparedness for the Blair community. We develop objectives and implement our plan through a program of classroom/group guidance, organized delivery of information, community partnerships, systematic individual planning activities, a range of responsive counseling services and crisis training.

Check out the Counseling Department Web Site! Follow us on Twitter! @BlairCounseling www.mbhs.edu/departments/counseling/ for more information about counseling services  Frequently asked questions and answers about counseling services  Information about enrolling and registering students  Information about requesting transcripts  Link to Family Connections program that connects counselors in schools with students and parents to help them navigate and improve the post-secondary planning process. You can register for Career Center college visits, get information on local scholarships, research colleges and compare yourself to colleges and prior Blair graduates

22

Counselor Assignments

Student Last Name A – Ben Ber – Coq Cor –Fla Flo – Ham Han – Kha Khr – Marr Mars – Nd Ne – O P – Rom Ron – Ta Tb – X Y–Z METS I, II and ESOL 1

School Counselor Mr. Roland Hollins Mr. Kirk Simms Ms. Susanne Bray Ms. Emily Putney Dr. Daryl Howard Ms. Leanna Binick Mr. Alphonso Burwell Ms. Betsy Ramirez Ms. Antia Reddicks Ms. Charlain Bailey Ms. Jennifer S. Taylor Ms. Jane Godwin Dr. Vilma Nadal

Counselors are available during both lunch periods for drop-in meetings.

2016-2017 Testing Dates

www.collegeboard.com

SAT Testing: www.collegeboard.com ACT Testing: www.act.org AP Testing: http://professionals.collegeboard.com/testing/ap/about/dates/next-year HIGH SCHOOL/CEEB CODE: 210965 SAT TEST CENTER CODE: 21-440

College/Career Center

College/Career Information Coordinator: Ms. Phalia West

301-649-2819

The mission of the Career Center is to assist students with individual post-secondary planning. In the Center, students, counselors, and teachers meet with representatives of post-secondary institutions, technical and career schools, and armed services personnel. Teachers use the Center for class projects to help students see the connection between academics and career post-secondary planning to be ready for the rigors of our everchanging global economy. Get A Naviance/Family Connections Account Naviance/Family Connections is a valuable website that can help students and parents:  Search for colleges, research careers, and locate scholarships.  Use scattergrams to see data about where other Blair students applied, were accepted, and attended college.  See the list of upcoming college visits in the Career Center.  Receive weekly Career Center Notes email with announcement and other pertinent information.  Complete a personality inventory. How To Get A Naviance/Family Connections Account  Parents can email Ms. West at [email protected] or call her at 301-649-2819, to get signed up for Family Connections.  Students can stop by the Career Center to get their Family Connections account activated.

23

How To Access Naviance/Family Connections  Go to the Blair website, www.mbhs.edu  Click on Counseling  Click on Naviance/Family Connections for Students & Parents  Log on by entering your email address and password (your student ID#) Career and occupational information. Extensive resources covering hundreds of occupations, including Bridges, the MCPS Career Center Central web site, the weekly Career Center Notes that lists local current job openings, career/college planning guides, and guest speakers from various disciplines. Career – Technical – Trade School and Apprenticeship information. Applications and catalogs for accredited post-secondary career schools and training programs; information about career and technical education programs at Montgomery College’s Gudelsky Institute for Technical Education, Thomas Edison Center for Technology. College information. Weekly posting of scheduled college/university representatives visiting the Career Center: files with catalogs, viewbooks, CDs, applications, assortment of college guides, and internet-based career and college search programs. Employment preparation. Employment binder, job skills worksheets, resume writing tools, mock interview session, personal development activities. Financial aid information. State/Federal financial aid and scholastic applications for the FAFSA and the CSS Financial Aid Profile: books, guides, computer scholarship search questionnaires, workshops, and advertised public and private scholarships. Internships. Internships offer students the opportunity to work in a selected career environment while earning credit and experience. Most MCPS internships are open to juniors and seniors who must apply one semester in advance for scheduling. MCPS offers three types of internships: executive, entrepreneurial, and summer. Counselor approval is required prior to participation. Maryland work permits. Work permits are required for anyone under age 18 for each job held. Maryland work permits are distributed by the Counseling Office only after the student has been offered a job. The student, parent, and employer must then complete all required information and sign prior to the issuing officer’s signature. The issuing officer will then verify birth date and acceptable employment placement. DC and Virginia child labor laws are different and require their own forms. Military information. Information on all branches of the U.S. armed services, active and reserves, the U.S. military academies for the Coast Guard, Air Force, Navy, and West Point. Registration materials for the career and college admission testing programs such as the PSAT (National Merit Qualifying Test for Juniors), ACT, SAT Reasoning and Subject Tests, and TOEFL. Summer programs and enrichment opportunities. Information on pre-college summer enrichment programs, camps, workshops, information sessions, travel abroad, and exchange programs.

24

Career and College Planning Education Beyond High School

Finding success in today’s workplace means having more than one set of skills. Realistically speaking more and more careers demand that applicants have gone to college and virtually all jobs in this technology driven world requires some form of education beyond high school. Use the steps below to begin the journey of choosing a career and determining which educational option is the right path to take.

Tips for finding the post-secondary institution that is right for you: 





 



Be aware of what colleges will be looking at when they evaluate your application: school record, extracurricular activities, recommendations, interviews, community service, and an essay. Many will consider your SAT Reasoning Test, SAT II Subject Tests, ACT, or TOEFL scores. Narrow your choices. Make sure you are aware of the school’s admissions procedures and deadlines. Most applications are now available online. o Look at the type of institution, e.g., 2 or 4 year college or university, technical, trade or career school, public or private, liberal arts or specialty school. o Look at factors such as size, location, programs, costs, test requirements, academic requirements, affiliations, social aspects, and athletics. o Meet with representatives from 2 or 4 year colleges, universities, proprietary schools, and businesses who visit the Career Center on a regular basis. Visits are posted on the Career Center’s website at http://career.mbhs.edu (see Family Connections) and outside the Career Center door. To meet with representatives, you must obtain permission from your classroom teacher and the Career Center Staff one day prior to the visit. Meeting and speaking with the reps directly provides a valuable opportunity to get first-hand information about that school’s unique programs, admissions requirements and scholarship opportunities. Plan visits to several institutions you are interested in. We suggest this be done while classes are in session at these institutions, preferably in the spring of your junior year or the fall of the senior year. The visits help you learn what admissions people expect, help you get a feel for the institution, and allow you to talk with students and observe the school’s community. Take required entrance exams, e.g., SAT Reasoning Test, SAT II Subject Tests, ACT, or TOEFL. Check registration deadlines. Fine tune that transcript! Schools and some employers will require your transcript, which is a copy of your high school record starting from grade 9, and test scores. Some schools also require recommendations from teachers and/or counselors.

Look into financing your higher education. An array of scholarship information is available in the Career Center from the Maryland State Scholarship, the U.S. Department of Education-FAFSA, colleges and universities, and private organizations. Family Connections offers a list of hundreds of scholarships. You can also check out these websites for additional help: www.mhec.state.md.us, www.fafsa.ed.gov, www.finaid.org, or www.fastweb.com.

The College Application Process

These steps are the responsibility of the students and parents! Counselors are ready and willing to assist in the process.

1. Be certain that you have either an ACT or SAT score on file in the registrar’s office. If you have not yet taken the SAT/ACT, sign up for the earliest available date. Most colleges require one of these scores as part of their application process. Registration materials for all tests are available online or in the Career Center. Students needing the TOEFL tests should come to the Career Center. 2. Complete your Trailblazer documents as soon as possible. Your Trailblazer documents include:  Student Self-Evaluation Survey (Online in Naviance/Family Connections)  Parent Questionnaire (Online in Naviance/Family Connections)

25

 Resume (Online in Naviance/Family Connections or submit a paper copy)  Summary of Four Year Activities Form (white handout)  Authorization to Release Records Form (yellow handout)  Teacher Checklist (3 blue handouts) Remember that the information you provide helps your counselor compose a letter of recommendation that is personally tailored to you. IMPORTANT: You must complete these documents before you can submit a Request for Transcript/Counselor Recommendation Form in the fall of senior year. 3. Obtain college applications. Most applications are available on-line. Some are on file in the Career Center. You also have the option of applying to many colleges and universities with the Common Application. Go to www.commonapp.org for more information. 4. Transcript requests require a 30 school day turnaround time for processing. Note: No request will be accepted until the yellow “Authorization to Release Records” from is signed and on file in the Registrar’s office. Turn in only the Secondary School Report when submitting a request; we do not handle entire applications or checks for college application fees. Return the form directly to the Registrar before school, during lunch, or after school. 5. Transcript fees are due at the time of transcript requests. The first three transcripts are free. Additional official transcripts are $3 each and the fees are paid directly to the Registrar. 6. Teacher recommendations are requested by many colleges. Find out the requirements for each college to which you are applying and then o make your request personally, at least 20 days before the recommendation is due. o provide a resume, brag sheet, and/or any other pertinent information about yourself. o provide the teacher with a stamped, addressed envelope for each recommendation. o follow up with a thank you note when the letter is written. 7. Mailing the applications and application fees is the responsibility of the student. Speak with your counselor if the college requires all materials be sent together. Generally, the Counseling Department and Registrar are responsible for mailing the transcript, counselor recommendations, and the school profile, NOT the application and application fees. 8. Some colleges require mid-year reports. In February, give the Registrar a business-sized, pre-addressed, stamped envelope and any required forms. 9. Time table for transcripts and recommendations. Seniors can begin requesting transcripts for college applications in late September. Students must submit the required forms from their “Trailblazer Packets” before they can make a request. Students must request transcripts at least 30 days in advance. 10. Scholarship applications frequently require a transcript. Students must give the registrar three days notice. Students mail the transcript themselves. 11. A final transcript is required by the school you plan to attend. During the last two weeks of May, give the Registrar a business-sized, pre-addressed, stamped envelope and any required forms. 12. After graduation, if you need a transcript for any reason, the fee is $3. Students graduating more than 4 years ago must call MCPS Central Records at 301-320-7301 to request transcripts.

26

School Calendar for 2016-2017 Jul. 4 Aug. 23-26 Aug. 29 Sep. 5 Sep. 12 Sep. 30 Oct. 3 Oct. 12 Nov. 7 Nov. 8 Nov. 10 Nov. 11 Nov. 17 Nov. 23 Nov. 24-25 Dec. 26-30

Holiday—Independence Day Offices & schools closed Professional days for teachers - No school for students First day of school for students Holiday—Labor Day Offices & schools closed Professional day for teachers – No school for students Grading/planning - Early release day K-12 Non instructional day - No school for students and teachers Non instructional day – No school for students and teachers Professional day for teachers. No school for students. Election Day – No school for students and teachers Parent conferences. Early release day K-8 Parent conferences Early release day K-8 Report Card Distribution Day before Thanksgiving Early release day K-12 Holidays—Thanksgiving Offices & schools closed Winter break - No school for students and teachers

Jan. 2 Holiday—New Year's Day Offices & schools closed Jan. 16 Holiday—Martin L. King, Jr.,Day - Offices & schools closed Jan. 20 Inauguration – No school for students and teachers Jan. 27 Professional day for teachers - No school for students. Feb. 8 Report Card Distribution Feb. 20 Holiday—Presidents' Day Offices & schools closed Mar. 3 Grading/planning Early release day K-12 Apr. 7 Professional day for teachers – No school for students Apr. 10-Apr. 17 Spring break. No school for students and teachers Apr. 19 Report Card Distribution May 29 Holiday—Memorial Day Offices & schools closed Jun. 16 Last day of school for students Jun. 19 Professional day for teachers

27

Word of the Day for 2016-2017 Quarter 1: Academic Adjustment Alter Amendment Aware Capacity Challenge Clause Compounds Conflict Consultation Contact Decline Discretion Draft

Enable Energy Enforcement Entities Equivalent Evolution Expansion Exposure External Facilitate Fundamental Generated Generation Image Liberal

License Logic Marginal Medical Mental Modified Monitoring Network Notion Objective Orientation Perspective Precise Prime Psychology

Pursue Ratio Rejected Revenue Stability Styles Substitution Sustainable Symbolic Target Transition Trend Version Welfare Whereas

Diversity Domain Edition Enhanced Estate Exceed Expert Explicit Federal Fees Flexibility Furthermore Gender Ignored Incentive

Incidence Incorporated Index Inhibition Initiatives Input Instructions Intelligence Interval Lecture Migration Minimum Ministry Motivation Neutral

Nevertheless Overseas Preceding Presumption Rational Recovery Revealed Scope Subsidiary Tapes Trace Transformation Transport Underlying Utility

Quarter 2: Abstract Accurate Acknowledged Aggregate Allocation Assigned Attached Author Bond Brief Capable Cited Cooperative Discrimination Display

28

Quarter 3: Adaptation Adults Advocate Aid Channel Chemical Classical Comprehensive Comprise Confirmed Contrary Converted Couple Decades Definite

Deny Differentiation Disposal Dynamic Eliminate Empirical Equipment Extract File Finite Foundation Global Grade Guarantee Hierarchical

Identical Ideology Inferred Innovation Insert Intervention Isolated Media Mode Paradigm Phenomenon Priority Prohibited Publication Quotation

Release Reverse Simulation Solely Somewhat Submitted Successive Survive Thesis Topic Transmission Ultimately Unique Visible Voluntary

Contradiction Crucial Currency Denote Detected Deviation Displacement Dramatic Eventually Exhibit Exploitation Fluctuations Guidelines Highlighted Implicit

Induced Inevitably Infrastructure Inspection Intensity Manipulation Minimized Nuclear Offset Paragraph Plus Practitioners Predominantly Prospect Radical

Random Reinforced Restore Revision Schedule Tension Termination Theme Thereby Uniform Vehicle Via Virtually Visual Widespread

Quarter 4: Abandon Accompanied Accumulation Ambiguous Appendix Appreciation Arbitrary Automatically Bias Chart Clarity Conformity Commodity Complement Contemporary

29

30

General resource Eight Parts of Speech Noun A noun is a naming word. It names a person, place, thing, idea, living creature, quality, or action. Common Nouns Refer to any place, person, thing or idea. Examples: Women / country Proper Nouns Refer to any particular place, person, thing or idea. Examples: Greta / Israel Pronoun A pronoun is used instead of a noun, to avoid repeating the noun. Nominative case For the subject of a sentence/clause. Examples: He went to bed. Possessive case Shows ownership Examples: The water bed is his. Objective case Receives action, or is after a preposition. Examples: They sold him a leaky water bed. Verb A verb is a word which describes an action (doing something) or a state (being something). Examples: Past: She waited in the car. Present: She needs gas now. Future: She will enjoy her trip. Adjectives An adjective is a word that describes a noun. It tells you something about the noun. Examples: big, yellow, thin, amazing, beautiful, quick, important Adverbs An adverb is a word which usually describes a verb. It tells you how something is done. It may also tell you when or where something happened. Examples: slowly, intelligently, well, yesterday, tomorrow, here, everywhere Conjunctions A conjunction joins two words, phrases or sentences together. Examples: but, so, and, because, or

Prepositions A preposition usually comes before a noun, pronoun or noun phrase. It joins the noun to some other part of the sentence. Examples: on, in, by, with, under, through, at Interjections An interjection is an unusual kind of word, because it often stands alone. Interjections are words which express emotion or surprise, and they are usually followed by exclamation marks. Examples: Ouch!, Hello!, Hurray!

Spelling Rules Adding -er/est Just add -er or -est to the end of the adjective, for example: quick > quicker > quickest great > greater > greatest full > fuller > fullest Exceptions If the adjective ends in: consonant + -y do this: change the -y to an -i and add: -er or -est For example: happy > happier > happiest If the adjective ends in: consonant + -e do this: remove the -e and add: -er or -est For example: late > later > latest If the adjective ends in: consonant + vowel + consonant do this: double the last letter and add: -er or -est For example: hot > hotter > hottest Note: adjectives ending in -l are regular except: cruel > crueller > cruelest Adding -ing/-ed Just add -ing or -ed to the end of the base verb: work > working > worked play > playing > played open > opening > opened Exceptions If the base verb ends in: consonant + vowel + consonant and a stressed syllable do this: double the final consonant and add: -ing or -ed

General resource Spelling Rules For example: stop > stopping > stopped, begin > beginning, tap > tapping > tapped If the base verb ends in: consonant + -e do this: remove the -e and add: -ing or -ed For example: phone > phoning > phoned, dance > dancing > danced, make > making, rake > raking > raked, dye > dying > dyed If the base verb ends in: -ie do this: change the -ie to –y or nothing and add: -ing or -d For example: lie > lying, die > dying Adding -ly Just add -ly to the end of the adjective: coy > coyly, loud > loudly, beautiful > beautifully, senseless > senselessly, intelligent > intelligently Exceptions If the adjective ends in: -ll do this: nothing and add: -y For example: full > fully If the adjective ends in: consonant + -le do this: remove the final -e and add: -y For example: terrible > terribly If the adjective ends in: -y (except 1-syllable adjectives) do this: remove the -y and add: -ily For example: happy > happily Note: 1-syllable adjectives ending in -y are regular, except: day > daily, gay > gaily. Adding -s Just add -s to the end of the word, for example: dog > dogs, play > plays, demand > demands Exceptions If the word ends in: -ch , -s , -sh , -x , or -z do this: nothing and add: -es For example: church > churches, mass > masses, brush > brushes, fax > faxes, box > boxes, chintz > chintzes If the word ends in: -f or -fe do this: remove the -f or -fe and add: -ves

For example: wife > wives and calf > calves. Except: beliefs, chiefs, dwarfs, griefs, gulfs, proofs, roofs If the word ends in: consonant + -y do this: remove the -y and add: -ies For example: spy > spies or baby > babies Note: words that end in -o normally just add s, except: buffalo > buffaloes cargoes (or cargos) domino > dominoes echo > echoes go > goes grotto > grottoes halo > haloes hero > heroes mango > mangoes mosquito > mosquitoes motto > mottoes (or mottos) potato > potatoes tomato > tomatoes tornado > tornadoes torpedo > torpedoes veto > vetoes volcano > volcanoes -ible or -able If you remove -able from a word, you are left with a complete word. If you remove -ible from a word, you are not left with a complete word. -ie- or -eiI before E except after C. Examples I before E: achieve, believe, brief, chief, friend, grief, hygiene, patience, pierce, priest, thief Except after C: ceiling, conceit, conceive, deceit, deceive, perceive, receipt, receive Of course, there are some exceptions to this rule. 1. When the sound rhymes with “may”, the spelling is -ei-: beige, feint, freight, inveigle, neighbor, sleigh, vein, weigh, weight 2. Here are a few more common exceptions: either, neither, caffeine, codeine, counterfeit, foreign, forfeit, height, leisure, protein, their, weird, seize, seizure

General resource Punctuation Period Use a period (.) at the end of a declarative or imperative sentence. • The meeting lasted for three hours. (declarative sentence) • Return this video tape to the store. (imperative sentence) Use a period after initials, abbreviations, and contracted words. (Abbreviations do not have internal spacing.) • U.S.A. • Ms. • A.A.R.P. • etc. • P.M. • tsp. Use only one period to complete a sentence which ends in an abbreviation. • Fax the order to Harris and Son, Inc. Use a period, rather than a question mark, after an indirect question. • She asked what time you would be home. Comma Use a comma to separate words and phrases in a series. • Curtis had lost it, it seemed. Semicolon Use a semicolon (;) to separate independent coordinate clauses closely connected in meaning when no coordinate conjunction (such as and, but, for, or, nor, or while) is used •N  obody got 100% on the examination; the highest score was 98%. Use a semicolon before a transitional word or phrase which joins the coordinate clauses of a compound sentence.  • Mark was not thrilled about flying; besides, the air fare was prohibitive. Use a semicolon in lists where a comma is insufficient to separate the items clearly. • He is deciding among the Taurus, which has his favorite color combination; the Honda, which gets the best gas mileage; and the Nissan, which is the best deal. Colon Use a colon (:) before a list of items or details. • He studies three subjects: Biology, Chemistry, and English.

Use a colon before an appositive phrase or clause, which is a group of words that defines or identifies another word or group of words. • One of the lamps is cyan: a combination of blue light and green light. Use a colon after the salutation of a business letter. • Dear Dr. Marcos: • To whom it may concern: Use a colon to divide the parts of time, chapters, and scripture references. • 5:18 P.M. • Chapter 6: Part II • John 3:16 Use a colon between the city/state and the publisher in a book reference. • Rosenthal, Marvin J. The Pre-wrath Rapture of the Church . (Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 1990), p. 53. Question Marks Use a question mark (?) after an interrogative sentence that asks a direct question. • Can we go with her? • Where did you put all those colorful shells that you found at the beach? Use a question mark after each separate part of a sentence containing more than one question. • Have you seen Matt? Ben? Russell? Use a question mark in various places within a sentence in which only part of it is a question or questions. • I bet Fran wondered, what was he doing there? Apostrophe Use an aspostrophe for: Contractions: It’s all right. (for it is) The possessive case of a noun: That is Bart’s dog. Exclamation Point Use a exclamation point to express a strong feeling: That’s crazy! Quotation Marks Use double quotation marks around a direct quotation. Do not use quotation marks for indirect statements. He said, “Go away”

General resource Units of Measurement

Conversions

Geometry Formulas

General resource Trigonometry

General resource Algebra

1

3

5

7

2

4

6

8

Physics Equations

General resource Periodic Table of the Elements

Arctic Ocean

AK

GREENLAND

NU

NT

CANADA

NU

NF

BC AB SK

MB

NF PQ

ON

HI

PE

WA

NB MT

ID

WI

SD WY

UNITED STATES

MI

NH io Ontar Lake

e Eri ke La

NJ DE MD

CO CA

WV

KS

MO

MA RI

NY

PA

OH

IN

IL

UT

VT

Lake Huron

IA

NE

NV

VA

KY NC

NM

Pacific Ocean

AR

SC

2

MS

Canada

6

3

Province/Territory Capital AB Alberta Edmonton BC British Columbia Victoria MB Manitoba Winnipeg NB New Brunswick Fredericton NF Newfoundland St. John’s NT Northwest Territories Yellowknife NS Nova Scotia Halifax ON Ontario Toronto PEI Prince Edward Island Charlottetown PQ Quebec Québec City SK Saskatchewan Regina YK Yukon Whitehorse

GA

AL

LA

TX

25

FL

Gulf of Mexico

7 24 9

18

MEXICO

BAHAMAS

27

31 23

17 10

13 1

28

12

15

20 21

11

32 16

29 19

26

4

DOM. REP.

CUBA

30

14

8

22

JAMAICA

BELIZE

HAITI

PUERTO RICO

HONDURAS

5

Caribbean Sea GUATEMALA EL SALVADOR

NICARAGUA COSTA RICA

CENTRAL AMERICA

United States State Capital AL Alabama Montgomery AK Alaska Juneau AZ Arizona Phoenix AR Arkansas Little Rock CA California Sacramento CO Colorado Denver CT Connecticut Hartford DE Delaware Dover FL Florida Tallahassee GA Georgia Atlanta HI Hawaii Honolulu ID Idaho Boise IL Illinois Springfield

Atlantic Ocean

TN

OK

AZ

NS

ME

Lake Superior

MN

ND

OR Lake Michigan

Map of North America

NT

PANAMA

State Capital IN Indiana Indianapolis IA Iowa Des Moines KS Kansas Topeka KY Kentucky Frankfort LA Louisiana Baton Rouge ME Maine Augusta MD Maryland Annapolis MA Mass. Boston MI Michigan Lansing MN Minnesota St. Paul MS Mississippi Jackson MO Missouri Jefferson City MT Montana Helena

State Capital NE Nebraska Lincoln NV Nevada Carson City NH New Hampshire Concord NJ New Jersey Trenton NM New Mexico Santa Fe NY New York Albany NC North Carolina Raleigh ND North Dakota Bismarck OH Ohio Columbus OK Oklahoma Oklahoma City OR Oregon Salem PA Pennsylvania Harrisburg RI Rhode Island Providence

State Capital SC South Carolina Columbia SD South Dakota Pierre TN Tennessee Nashville TX Texas Austin UT Utah Salt Lake City VT Vermont Montpelier VA Virginia Richmond WA Washington Olympia WV West Virginia Charleston WI Wisconsin Madison WY Wyoming Cheyenne

Mexico State Capital 1 Aguascalientes Aguascalientes 2 Baja California Mexicali 3 Baja California Sur La Paz 4 Campeche Campeche 5 Chiapas Tuxtla Gutiérrez 6 Chihuahua Chihuahua 7 Coahuila Saltillo 8 Colima Colima

State Capital 9 Durango Durango 10 Guanajuato Guanajuato 11 Guerrero Chilpancingo 12 Hidalgo Pachuca 13 Jalisco Guadalajara 14 México Toluca 15 Michoacán Morelia 16 Morelos Cuernavaca

State Capital 17 Nayarit Tepic 18 Nuevo Léon Monterrey 19 Oaxaca Oaxaca 20 Puebla Puebla 21 Querétaro Querétaro 22 Quintana Roo Chetumal 23 San Luis Potosí San Luis Potosí 24 Sinaloa Culiacán

State Capital 25 Sonora Hermosillo 26 Tabasco Villahermosa 27 Tamaulipas Ciudad Victoria 28 Tlaxcala Tlaxcala 29 Veracruz Jalapa 30 Yucatán Mérida 31 Zacatecas Zacatecas 32 Federal District Mexico City

World Map North America Bermuda Canada (all provinces and territories) Caribbean (all islands and countries) Central America (all countries) Great Lakes area Greenland Mexico United States

South America Argentina Bolivia Brazil Chile Colombia Ecuador Guyana Paraguay Peru Suriname Uruguay Venezuela

Australia Australia Oceania: Fiji Kiribati Marshall Islands Micronesia Nauru New Zealand Palau Papua New Guinea Samoa Solomon Islands Tonga Tuvalu Vanuatu Western Samoa

Asia Afghanistan Armenia Azerbaijan Bahrain Bangladesh Bhutan Brunei Cambodia China Cyprus Georgia

India Indonesia Iran Iraq Israel Japan Jordan Kazakhstan North Korea South Korea Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan Laos Lebanon Malaysia Maldives Mongolia Myanmar Nepal Oman Pakistan Philippines

Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Ethiopia Gabon Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Ivory Coast Kenya Lesotho Liberia Libya Madagascar Malawi

Mali Mauritania Mauritius Morocco Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Rwanda Sao Tome & Principe Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Somalia

Qatar Russia Saudi Arabia Singapore Sri Lanka Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Thailand Turkey Turkmenistan

Africa Algeria Angola Benin Botswana Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Rep. Chad Comoros Congo Dem. Rep. of Congo Djibouti Egypt

United Arab Emir. Uzbekistan Vietnam Yemen

Europe South Africa Sudan Swaziland Tanzania Togo Tunisia Uganda Zambia Zimbabwe Western Sahara

1 Albania 2 Andorra 3 Austria 4 Belarus 5 Belgium 6 Bosnia 7 Bulgaria 8 Croatia 9 Czech Rep. 10 Denmark 11 Estonia 12 Finland 13 France

14 Germany 15 Greece 16 Hungary 17 Iceland 18 Ireland 19 Italy 20 Latvia 21 Liechtenstein 22 Lithuania 23 Luxembourg 24 Macedonia 25 Malta 26 Moldova

27 Monaco 28 Netherlands 29 Norway 30 Poland 31 Portugal 32 Romania 33 Russia 34 San Marino 35 Slovakia 36 Slovenia 37 Spain 38 Sweden 39 Switzerland

40 Ukraine 41 United Kingdom 42 Vatican City 43 Yugoslavia

Sunday

28

ODD

29

22

21

Homeroom

15

14

First Day of School

8

1

7

Monday

EVEN

Homeroom

Professional Day

Tuesday

30

23

16

9

2

ODD

Professional Day

Wednesday

31

24

17

10

3

August 2016

Professional Day

Thursday

25

18

11

4

Professional Day

Friday

26 27

19 20

12 13

5 6

Saturday

Sunday

25

18

11

4

ODD

EVEN

NO SCHOOL Professional Day

NO SCHOOL Labor Day

Monday

26

19

12

5

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

EVEN

Tuesday

27

20

13

6

ODD

EVEN

ODD

ODD

Wednesday

28

21

14

7

Thursday

1

EVEN

Senior Unity Day

ODD

EVEN

Back to School Night

EVEN

29

22

15

8

7pm Grade 9 Parent Info Meeting

EVEN

September 2016

ODD

Half Day

EVEN

ODD

ODD

ODD

Friday

Saturday

30

23 24

16 17

9 10

2 3

ACT

23

Sunday

30

16

9

2

ODD

24

ODD

ALL

EVEN

DCC Open House

Parent Visitation

NO SCHOOL

Monday

31

17

10

3

ODD

EVEN

EVEN

EVEN

Tuesday

25

18

11

4

EVEN

CAP Info Night

ODD

5

12

26

19

College Readiness Day

NO SCHOOL

ODD

Wednesday

ODD

EVEN

Thursday

ODD

EVEN

6

13

27

20

7pm Magnet 8th Grade Info Night

October 2016

EVEN

ODD

Friday

EVEN

ODD

6:30pm Homecoming Game vs. Kennedy



Saturday

28 29

21 22

7pm Homecoming Dance

14 15

7 8

1

SAT

Sunday

27

20

13

6

ODD

EVEN

ODD

NO SCHOOL Professional Day

Monday

28

21

14

7

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

NO SCHOOL Election Day

EVEN

Tuesday

29

22

15

8

1

ODD

EVEN

Half Day

ODD

EVEN

Fall Play Teaser

ODD

Wednesday

.30

23

16

9

2

Thursday

EVEN

Fall Play – Hamlet

ODD

Fall Play – Hamlet

Fall Play Teaser

EVEN

November 2016

ODD

Fall Play – Hamlet

24

Saturday

Fall Play – Hamlet

4 5

SAT

25 26

18 19

Fall Play – Hamlet

11 12 Report Card Distribution

EVEN

Fall Play – Hamlet

ODD

NO SCHOOL Thanksgiving Break

17

10

3

Friday End of First Quarter

Sunday

26

25

12

5

19

EVEN

ODD

Interims due

EVEN

18

11

4

Monday

ODD

EVEN

ODD

Tuesday

27

20

13

6

NO SCHOOL Winter Break

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

Wednesday

28

21

14

7

Thursday

ODD

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

December 2016

29

22

15

8

1

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

ODD

Friday

Saturday

30 31

23 24

16 17

9 10

ACT

2 3

Magnet Testing

SAT

Sunday

29

22

15

8

1

2

23

16

9

ODD

30

First day of 2nd semester

ODD

NO SCHOOL MLK, Jr. Day

ODD

Online HSA window opens

NO SCHOOL

Monday

EVEN

EVEN

EVEN

EVEN

ODD

Tuesday

31

24

17

10

3

ODD

ODD

ODD

EVEN

Access window opens

Wednesday

25

18

11

4

ODD

Thursday

5

EVEN

EVEN

EVEN

26

19

12

Theatre Class Performance

January 2017

NO SCHOOL Professional Day

NO SCHOOL Inauguration

ODD

Saturday

6 7

27 28

SAT

20 21

13 14

Theatre Class Performance

EVEN

Friday

Sunday

26

19

12

5

EVEN

NO SCHOOL President’s Day

ODD

7pm Magnet Invited Students Night

EVEN

Monday

27

20

13

6

ODD

EVEN

EVEN

ODD

Tuesday

28

21

14

7

1

ODD

ODD

EVEN

22

15

8

Report Cards Distributed

ODD

Wednesday

Thursday

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

EVEN

February 2017

23

16

9

2

ODD

ODD

EVEN

Sankofa

ODD

Friday

24 25

17 18

10 11

Sankofa

ACT

3 4

Saturday

Spring Musical

Sunday

26

19

12

5

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

ODD

Monday

27

20

13

6

ODD

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

Tuesday

28

21

14

7

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

Wednesday

29

22

15

8

1

ODD

EVEN

ODD

Thursday

ODD

Spring Musical

EVEN

Spring Musical Teaser

March 2017

30

23

16

9

2

Friday

EVEN

Spring Musical

ODD

Spring Musical

Spring Musical Teaser

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

Half Day

31

24 25

Spring Musical

17 18

10 11

SAT

3 4

Saturday

23

Sunday

30

16

ODD

24

17

10

9

NO SCHOOL Spring Break

3

2

ODD

Monday

EVEN

ODD

EVEN

Tuesday

25

18

11

4

12

5

ALL

SMOB Elections

EVEN

26

19

Report Cards Distributed

Wallops Island Field Trip

NO SCHOOL Spring Break

ODD

Wednesday

April 2017

ODD

ODD

6

13

27

20

Wallops Island Field Trip

EVEN

End of 3rd quarter

Thursday

EVEN

EVEN

Day of Silence

Saturday

ACT

1

Spring Musical

28 29

21 22

Wallops Island Field Trip

14 15

7 8

Wallops Island Field Trip

NO SCHOOL Professional Day

Friday

Sunday

28

21

14

7

Monday



NO SCHOOL Memorial Day

NSL HSA

ODD

EVEN

AP Bio AP Physics C AP Music Theory

ODD

AP Chem AP Env Sci AP Psych

29

22

15

8

1

Tuesday

EVEN

BIO HSA

EVEN

Fine Arts Festival

ODD

AP Calculus AP French Lang AP Spanish Lit

EVEN



AP Comp Sci AP Spanish Lang AP Physics 1

30

23

16

9

2

ODD

Fine Arts Festival

EVEN

AP Eng Lang AP Macro Interims due

ODD



AP Eng Lit AP Physics 2 AP Japanese Senior Interims due

Wednesday

31

24

17

10

3

May 2017 Thursday

4

Fine Arts Festival

ODD

25

18

11

Theatre Class Performance

AP World History AP Comp Gov AP Stat

EVEN

AP US Gov AP Chinese

Friday

Fine Arts Festival

EVEN

Saturday

5 6

SAT

26

27

19 20

12 13

AP Micro AP Human Geo AP Euro History AP Latin Theatre Class Performance

ODD

AP US History AP Studio Art

Sunday

19

26

18

25

12

11

Professional Day

5

4

Monday

Tuesday

27

20

13

6



Wednesday

28

21

14

7

June 2016 Thursday

29

22

15

8

1

Half Day

Friday

Saturday

30

23 24

16 17

9 10

ACT

2 3

SAT

Notes

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER MONDAY

29

ODD

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

30

EVEN

2 4 5/6 6 9

WEDNESDAY

31

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

1

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 6 9

FRIDAY

2

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

3

SATURDAY

4

SUNDAY

SEPTEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

SEPTEMBER MONDAY

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

5

TUESDAY

6

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

7

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

8

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

9

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

10

SATURDAY

11

SUNDAY

SEPTEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

SEPTEMBER MONDAY

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

12

TUESDAY

13

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

14

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

15

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

16

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

17

SATURDAY

18

SUNDAY

SEPTEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

SEPTEMBER MONDAY

19

EVEN

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 8

TUESDAY

20

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 8

WEDNESDAY

21

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 8

THURSDAY

22

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

23

EVEN

1 3 5/6 7 8

TO DO LIST:

24

SATURDAY

25

SUNDAY

SEPTEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER MONDAY

26

ODD

2

0

1

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 8

TUESDAY

27

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

28

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 8

6

THURSDAY

29

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 2 3 4 5/6 5/6 7 8 9 9

FRIDAY

30 30

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 8

TO DO LIST:

1

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

OCTOBER MONDAY

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

3

TUESDAY

4

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

5

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

6

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

7

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

8

SATURDAY

9

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

OCTOBER MONDAY

10

ALL

TUESDAY

11

EVEN

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

12

THURSDAY

13

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

14

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

15

SATURDAY

16

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

OCTOBER MONDAY

17

ODD

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

18

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

19

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

20

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

21

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

22

SATURDAY

23

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

OCTOBER MONDAY

24

EVEN

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

25

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

26

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

27

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

28

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

29

SATURDAY

30

SUNDAY

OCTOBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER MONDAY

31

ODD

2

0

1

5

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

1

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

2

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

3

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

4

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

5

SATURDAY

6

SUNDAY

NOVEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M 6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

NOVEMBER MONDAY

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

7

TUESDAY

8

WEDNESDAY

9

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

10

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

11

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

12

SATURDAY

13

SUNDAY

NOVEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

NOVEMBER MONDAY

14

ODD

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

15

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

16

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

17

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

18

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

19

SATURDAY

20

SUNDAY

NOVEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M 6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

NOVEMBER MONDAY

21

EVEN

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 89

TUESDAY

22

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

23

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

24

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

25

EVEN

2 4 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

26

SATURDAY

27

SUNDAY

NOVEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M 6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

W 2 9 16 23 30

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER MONDAY

28

ODD

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

29

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

30

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

1

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

2

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

3

SATURDAY

4

SUNDAY

DECEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

DECEMBER MONDAY

5

EVEN

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

6

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

7

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

8

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

9

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

10

SATURDAY

11

SUNDAY

DECEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

DECEMBER MONDAY

12

ODD

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

13

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

14

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

15

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

16

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

17

SATURDAY

18

SUNDAY

DECEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

DECEMBER MONDAY

19

EVEN

2

0

1

6

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

20

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

21

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

22

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

23

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

24 42

SATURDAY

25

SUNDAY

DECEMBER 2 0 1 6

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

JANUARY MONDAY

2

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

3

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

4

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

5

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

6

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

7

SATURDAY

8

SUNDAY

JANUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

JANUARY MONDAY

9

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

10

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

11

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

12

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

13

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

14

SATURDAY

15

SUNDAY

JANUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

JANUARY MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

16

TUESDAY

17

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

18

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

19

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

20

TO DO LIST:

21

SATURDAY

22

SUNDAY

JANUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

JANUARY MONDAY

23

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

24

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

25

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

26

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

27

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

28

SATURDAY

29

SUNDAY

JANUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

3 10 17 24 31

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

JANUARY / FEBRUARY MONDAY

30

ODD

2

0

1

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

31

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

1

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

7

THURSDAY

2

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

3

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9 TO DO LIST:

4

SATURDAY

5

SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28

W 2 9 16 23

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

FEBRUARY MONDAY

6

EVEN

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

7

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

8

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

9

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

10

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

11

SATURDAY

12

SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28

W 2 9 16 23

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

FEBRUARY MONDAY

13

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

14

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

15

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

16

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

17

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

18

SATURDAY

19

SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28

W 2 9 16 23

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

FEBRUARY MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

20

TUESDAY

21

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

22

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

23

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

24

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

25

SATURDAY

2626 26 5

SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 2 0 1 7

S M

T 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28

W 2 9 16 23

T 3 10 17 24

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

FEBRUARY/MARCH MONDAY

27

EVEN

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

28

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

1

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY ODD

2

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

3

3

5/6 7

7

9

9 FRIDAY

3

HOMEWORK

1

1

5/6

OBJECTIVE

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

4

SATURDAY

5

SUNDAY

MARCH 2 0 1 7

S M 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T W 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

F 3 10 17 24 31

S 4 11 18 25

MARCH MONDAY

6

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

7

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

8

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

9

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

10

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

11

SATURDAY

12

SUNDAY

MARCH 2 0 1 7

S M 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T W 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

F 3 10 17 24 31

S 4 11 18 25

MARCH MONDAY

13

EVEN

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

14

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

15

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

16

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

17

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

18

SATURDAY

5 19

SUNDAY

MARCH 2 0 1 7

S M 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T W 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

F 3 10 17 24 31

S 4 11 18 25

MARCH MONDAY

20

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

21

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

22

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

23

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

24

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

25

SATURDAY

26

SUNDAY

MARCH 2 0 1 7

S M 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

T W 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

F 3 10 17 24 31

S 4 11 18 25

MARCH / APRIL MONDAY

27

EVEN

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

28

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

29

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

30

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

31

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

1

SATURDAY

2

SUNDAY

APRIL 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

APRIL MONDAY

3

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

4

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

5

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

6

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

7

TO DO LIST:

8

SATURDAY

9

SUNDAY

APRIL 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

APRIL MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

17

TUESDAY

18

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

19

EVEN

2 4 5/6 6 9

THURSDAY

20

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

21

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

22

SATURDAY

23

SUNDAY

APRIL 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

APRIL MONDAY

24

ODD

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

25

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY ALL PERIODS

26

THURSDAY

27

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

28

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

29

SATURDAY

30

SUNDAY

APRIL 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

T

F

2 9 16 23 30

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

3 10 17 24

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

MAY

2

MONDAY

1

ODD

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

2

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

3

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

4

EVEN

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

FRIDAY

5

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

TO DO LIST:

6

SATURDAY

7

SUNDAY

MAY 2 0 1 7

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

MAY

2

MONDAY

8

EVEN

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

2 4 5/6 8 9

TUESDAY

9

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

WEDNESDAY

10

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

THURSDAY

11

ODD

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

FRIDAY

12

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

TO DO LIST:

13

SATURDAY

14

SUNDAY

MAY 2 0 1 7

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

MAY

2

MONDAY

15

ODD

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1 3 5/6 7 9

TUESDAY

16

EVEN

2 4 5/6 8 9

WEDNESDAY

17

ODD

1 3 5/6 7 9

THURSDAY

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

18

FRIDAY

19

TO DO LIST:

20

SATURDAY

21

SUNDAY

MAY 2 0 1 7

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

MAY MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

22

TUESDAY

23

WEDNESDAY

24

THURSDAY

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

25

FRIDAY

26

TO DO LIST:

27

SATURDAY

28

SUNDAY

MAY 2 0 1 7

S M 1 7 8 14 15 21 22 28 29

T 2 9 16 23 30

W 3 10 17 24 31

T 4 11 18 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

MAY/JUNE MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

29

TUESDAY

30

WEDNESDAY

31

THURSDAY

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

1

FRIDAY

2

TO DO LIST:

3

SATURDAY

4

SUNDAY

JUNE 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

JUNE MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

5

TUESDAY

6

WEDNESDAY

7

THURSDAY

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

8

FRIDAY

9

TO DO LIST:

10

SATURDAY

11

SUNDAY

JUNE 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

School Calendar for 2016-2017 Jul. 4 Aug. 23-26 Aug. 29 Sep. 5 Sep. 12 Sep. 30 Oct. 3 Oct. 12 Nov. 7 Nov. 8 Nov. 10 Nov. 11 Nov. 17 Nov. 23 Nov. 24-25 Dec. 26-30

Holiday—Independence Day Offices & schools closed Professional days for teachers - No school for students First day of school for students Holiday—Labor Day Offices & schools closed Professional day for teachers – No school for students Grading/planning - Early release day K-12 Non instructional day - No school for students and teachers Non instructional day – No school for students and teachers Professional day for teachers. No school for students. Election Day – No school for students and teachers Parent conferences. Early release day K-8 Parent conferences Early release day K-8 Report Card Distribution Day before Thanksgiving Early release day K-12 Holidays—Thanksgiving Offices & schools closed Winter break - No school for students and teachers

Jan. 2 Holiday—New Year's Day Offices & schools closed Jan. 16 Holiday—Martin L. King, Jr.,Day - Offices & schools closed Jan. 20 Inauguration – No school for students and teachers Jan. 27 Professional day for teachers - No school for students. Feb. 8 Report Card Distribution Feb. 20 Holiday—Presidents' Day Offices & schools closed Mar. 3 Grading/planning Early release day K-12 Apr. 7 Professional day for teachers – No school for students Apr. 10-Apr. 17 Spring break. No school for students and teachers Apr. 19 Report Card Distribution May 29 Holiday—Memorial Day Offices & schools closed Jun. 16 Last day of school for students Jun. 19 Professional day for teachers

131

Word of the Day for 2016-2017 Quarter 1: Academic Adjustment Alter Amendment Aware Capacity Challenge Clause Compounds Conflict Consultation Contact Decline Discretion Draft

Enable Energy Enforcement Entities Equivalent Evolution Expansion Exposure External Facilitate Fundamental Generated Generation Image Liberal

License Logic Marginal Medical Mental Modified Monitoring Network Notion Objective Orientation Perspective Precise Prime Psychology

Pursue Ratio Rejected Revenue Stability Styles Substitution Sustainable Symbolic Target Transition Trend Version Welfare Whereas

Diversity Domain Edition Enhanced Estate Exceed Expert Explicit Federal Fees Flexibility Furthermore Gender Ignored Incentive

Incidence Incorporated Index Inhibition Initiatives Input Instructions Intelligence Interval Lecture Migration Minimum Ministry Motivation Neutral

Nevertheless Overseas Preceding Presumption Rational Recovery Revealed Scope Subsidiary Tapes Trace Transformation Transport Underlying Utility

Quarter 2: Abstract Accurate Acknowledged Aggregate Allocation Assigned Attached Author Bond Brief Capable Cited Cooperative Discrimination Display

132

JUNE MONDAY

2

0

1

7

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

12

TUESDAY

13

WEDNESDAY

14

THURSDAY

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

OBJECTIVE

HOMEWORK

15

FRIDAY

16

TO DO LIST:

17

SATURDAY

18

SUNDAY

JUNE 2 0 1 7

S M

T W

4 11 18 25

6 13 20 27

5 12 19 26

7 14 21 28

T 1 8 15 22 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24

Hall Pass Record Date

Time

From

Name: To

Teacher Signature

Hall Pass Record Date

Time

From

Name: To

Teacher Signature

Hall Pass Record Date

Time

From

Name: To

Teacher Signature

Hall Pass Record Date

Time

From

Name: To

Teacher Signature

Absence Date(s)

Period 1

Period 2

Period 3

Period 4

Period 5

Period 6

Name Period 7

Period 8

Reason

Note: Only the following reasons should be utilized by teachers for excused absences: illness, court summons, death in family, religious holiday

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Day

Attendance Log Date Issued

Issuing Teacher

Period 1

Period 2

Period 3

Period 4

Period 5

Period 6

Name Period 7

Period 8

Reason

Note: Only the following reasons should be utilized by teachers for excused absences: illness, court summons, death in family, religious holiday

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Even

Odd

Day

Absence Date(s)

Attendance Log Date Issued

Issuing Teacher

Suggest Documents