Statistical Process Control for Global Textile Markets

Statistical Process Control for Global Textile Markets John McCombs 12 October, 2006 Copyright © 2005 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved....
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Statistical Process Control for Global Textile Markets

John McCombs 12 October, 2006

Copyright © 2005 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Quote from Hindustan Times 9 October, 2006

• Indian entrepreneurs have learnt to think big • Money not a problem, • Quality and management are – The message is clear: Quality is non-negotiable. There is no dearth of capital. However, the core issue is: Does the management have the required mental bandwidth to face the challenges thrown up by globalization. By Uday Kotak Repeatable Repeatable Quality Quality through through Statistical Statistical Process Process Control Control is is aa Goal Goal of of Automation Automation in in the the Textile/Fibers Textile/Fibers Industry Industry 2

Textiles and Fibers Process

Copy right 1997 R oc k well Internatio nal C orporation.A l rights res er ved. Printe d in USA

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Statistical Process Control for Textiles • The Electrical Control Industry has grown with the Textile Industry into automation systems including Statistical Process Control • Manual systems have become automated • Technical improvements have improved quality/repeatability – Many of the steps in Textile production is to assure repeatable quality • Opening Blending, 1st sliver, 2nd Sliver, drafting –all aimed at repeatable quality • Dyeing variations are a certainty without repeatable quality

• Dyeing and Finishing have become an automated necessity for World Class Quality. Dye matching is a requirement even when runs are two months apart. • Computer Scheduling Can add a layer of improved quality to normal automated systems. Repeatable Repeatable Quality Quality through through Statistical Statistical Process Process Control Control is is aa Goal Goal of of Automation Automation in in the the Textile/Fibers Textile/Fibers Industry Industry 4

Example 1 from Synthetic Fiber History

Synthetic Spinning History Automation the Process Partner

The The controls controls grew grew as as the the process process improved improved 5

Synthetic Fiber Progress Diagram Phase Phase 11 Mechanical MechanicalLine LineShaft Shaft Two TwoStep StepProcess Process

Phase Phase 33 Analog Analogregulators regulatorsreplaced replacedinin 1970s 1970sby bydigital digitalregulators, regulators,which which greatly greatlyincreased increasedrepeatability repeatability

Phase Phase 22 Inverters, Inverters,synchronous synchronousmotors motors one onestep stepprocess process Electrical ElectricalLine LineShaft Shaft

Phase Phase 44 Single SingleMotor MotorDrives Drives controlled controlledby byhierarchal hierarchal computers and computers andplcs plcs 6

Phase Phase 11 • In the beginning a two step process • Machines were mainly mechanical Form the fiber Quench Unwind Draw

Drawing the fiber Different draw ratios required different gear sets

Wind Winding The The controls controls grew grew as as the the process process improved improved 7

Inverters invented for this process 60’s

Inverters

Phase Phase 22

Synchronous Motors

Meter Pump Drive

Hot Chest Drive Godet Drive

Winder Drive

By changing the relative speed of the draw rolls different products could be made without time consuming gear changes yielding a single step process 8

Case Study Number 1

Major Fiber Producing Chemical Company Single step process still meant same product on an entire machine – More Flexibility Required – Motivated by JIT - Automotive Carpet Customer Decided to replace bulk inverters with small single motor inverters - Good Price, Good Performance - NO TOTAL AUTOMATION PLAN

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Typical BCF Single Position Architecture * 3 PHASE, 50HZ 230V

AC FEED ALLEN -

310 VDC

310VDC

RS 232 Multidrop

1336G

1336G

8A 230V

8A 230V

HIM 1DM PORT

HIM 2DM PORT

HIM PORT

1336G

1336G

8A 230V

8A 230V

3DM

HIM 4DM PORT

1336G

1336G

8A 230V HIM PORT

5DM

HIM PORT

1336G

1336G

17A 230V

17A 230V

17A 230V

6DM

HIM 7DM PORT

HIM PORT

8DM

DYNAMIC BRAKE

Black Box RS 232

2.9A

2.9A

METER PUMP A

METER PUMP B

0.6A

FINISH

5.2A

FEED WHEEL

Atlanta PVG

4.7A

Bulking

4.5A

TRAVERSE

8.75A

DRIVE ROLL A

8.75A

DRIVE ROLL B

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Case Study 1 •

2 years later building an ASCII interface to a DCS is not complete (at least 1.5 man years wasted) • In an attempt to connect the drives to the main control system a “black box device” to interface to the RS 232 port on each drive has 10 second update time to read all speeds and currents of 8 drives. 40 positions x 10 Seconds = Failed Network 1st operator interface for drives

2nd DCS operator interface for the rest of the machine = Errors 11

Four Position 3 Color BCF Machine Arch One Common Data Base

MMIM

Plant EtherNet

Zone heater Control for 3 extruders

PROFIBUS

Controller ControlNet

160’s AC fed Extruder

Godet Heater Control

9 Spiders

METERING PUMP 100 RPM

Godet Heater Control

CHIMNEY AIR TEMP 150 C

6 Spiders are shared bus with fuses in the ac feed and dc link. 2 Spiders

Controller

Position 1 of 4

Winder drives are ac fed

Godets

DeviceNet Winder Bale Roll

Motion Turret Position

Pulse p/u 1 of 4 Winder Panels

BCF Machine

DRAW ROLLS 3500 MPM

HOT CHEST 190 C

WINDERS 3500 MPM SINGLE SPINNING POSITION

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Example No. 2 Fabric Processing • Processing Fabric – Better fabric through chemistry is achieved , delivering the quality customer’s desire. – The stages include washing, bleaching, shrinking, dyeing and adding stay pressed finishes.

• Automation has enhanced repeatable processes and enhances cost control • A common data base including line speed, concentrations of chemical and temperatures insures repeatable higher quality. – For example by optimizing the bleaching process can reduce the amount of dye needed to achieve the quality color desired in the dyeing process.

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Example No. 2 • In the past multiple data bases had to be coordinated • Processing fabric was often considered an art – Time in the chemical was set by the speed of the line, which was controlled by one data base – a Drive system

Motors & Gears Drives 14

Chemical Concentrations often manually set by valves

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Multiple data bases yield multiple chances for errors • Even when a control loop is used to set concentration or temperature, is it the right value for the product being run. • Multiple data bases yield multiple changes for errors • Take Temperature Control – The easiest – Sometimes Single Loop Controllers were used to maintain temperatures • Often set for wrong product being run – Manual Controls with temperature read out • Cannot be monitored 100% – Temperatures Drifted from beginning to end of the same lot of fabric – No Chance to repeat the next time a product is run

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WEB Based Reports

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Reports can be show on the plant Email system

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Case No. 3

ColorWorks Process Automation

System Highlights:

Dyeing

• Flexible system able to accommodate all new dyeing technology • Able to communicate with existing control systems and equipment • Data collection • Process monitoring • Friendly system easy to expand and configure • Low cost

Process Benefits: • Reduced process variation • Increased efficiency • Reduced process waste and rework • Cost savings • Process capable for all products 27

Enterprise / Control Integration Internet

ERP

Access

Excel

PDA Enterprise Systems

Ethernet Manufacturing Execution Ethernet

MMI

RSSQL

EOI

Automation Platforms

Ethernet DH + RSLinx

DCS Remote I/O Control Net Device Net Ethernet

Automation Components Plant Floor

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Communication Standards Aid DeltaV Implementation – SQL Integration

Data Exchange System View

Communications between control and ERP networks via RSSQL OPC* technology

RSSQL OPC client was used to connect SQL to DCS and PLC * OPC: OLE for Process Control; OLE:: Object Linking and Embedding

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Scheduler

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Enterprise / Control Integration IT Culture Process Culture

ERP Planning and Scheduling Inventory Control

Setpoints, Limits Supervisory Control

Analog, Digital Signals

Control

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What is S 95?

• •

A committee organized by ISA Members from end users, vendors, integrators and consultants – Dupont, Eli-Lilly, Hewlett-Packard, Dow Corning, Union Carbide, Lyondell Chemical, Honeywell, Bailey, Fisher Rosemont, Intellution, ABB, SAP, Moore, Yokogawa, OSI Software, Sequencia, Rockwell Automation – AMR, PriceWaterhouseCoopers



Chartered with developing a standard for Enterprise System to Control System Integration

• ISA.ORG

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S95 Three Categories of Information Business Planning & Logistics Information Plant Production Scheduling, Operational Management, etc

Production Capability Information

Product Definition Information

(What is available)

(How to make a product)

Production Information (What to make and results)

Manufacturing Operations & Control Information Area Supervision, Production, Scheduling, Reliability, Assurance, etc 33

Block Diagram Sample • y

Where are we?

Where do We Want To be?

Step by Step Plan

Total Automation

Where are we

Where do

Adopt a

If you do not

now in Total

we want to

step by step

have a plan

Automation

be in 5

approach

Years?

one project

you will never

at a time

achieve your goal

for Automation

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The no. 1 result of automation Is repeatable, higher quality Have a plan for automation and apply it on every project

Copyright © 2005 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved.

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