Staffordshire University

Heaton Mount, (Bradford) Edinburgh Napier Anglia Ruskin (Cambridge) Anglia Ruskin (Chelmsford) University of Westminster (Regent St) Weetwood Ha...
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Heaton Mount, (Bradford)

Edinburgh Napier

Anglia Ruskin (Cambridge)

Anglia Ruskin (Chelmsford)

University of Westminster (Regent St)

Weetwood Hall (Leeds)

Staffordshire University

Exeter University

Brighton University

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Contents

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Pages

Introduction 2 Application and Selection Procedure 3 Feedback 4 Command Leadership and Management Entrepreneurial Leadership Leading Change in Innovative and Rapidly Evolving Environments Leadership and Change Management Leadership and Change Leadership and Change Leadership Matters: Contemporary Debates Managing Human Aspects of Change Managing Innovation Organisational Behaviour Organisational Change in Context Strategic Leadership Strategy, Value and Change

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

African Security and Peacekeeping in Complex Political Emergencies China and the World: from Mao Zedong to the Present Conflict and the Media Counter Insurgency: Conventional War of the 21st Century Cyber Security: National Resilience and International Governance Foreign Policy: Leadership, Power & Responsibility Human Rights, Intervention and Democratic Reconstruction India, Pakistan and Kashmir Intercultural Communication International Criminal Law Introduction to Islam and Cultural Diversity Iran: History Culture & Political Economy Latin America Politics: Populism, Dictatorship and Democracy Russian Politics and Security Security and Conflict in Central Asia Sovereignty and Intervention after the Cold War Terrorism,Trends, Causes and Responses The Business of War and Terrorism Terror as Crime Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism Themes in the Global Politics of Energy

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

Languages Intensive Language Workshops

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USCP Frequently Asked Questions

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Example FEd 1011

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Contents

Regional and Strategic Studies

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Tri-Service University Short Course Programme Prospectus September 2014 – June 2015 Introduction

Qualifications

The Tri-Service University Short Course Programme (USCP) has been in existence since 1953 and is sponsored by the three Services. The USCP was established as part of the Services further education provision.

Qualifications are not awarded for courses but the content may contribute towards a portfolio of evidence or Personal Development Record. Certificates of attendance are issued for all courses. Some courses gain an award of Credit Accumulation Transfer Scheme (CATS) points if students are prepared to undertake an additional assignment – this will attract an additional fee payable by the student. Part of this fee may be reclaimed through the Standard Learning Credit scheme (SLC). See details against each course.

Purpose The USCP now forms part of the wider strategy of the Services to contribute to the improvement of the general education of Service personnel. Based upon the philosophy of Lifelong Learning, the USCP intends to help Service personnel make a more effective contribution to Service life by developing their knowledge and personal skills. This is achieved through personnel having the opportunity to address matters of current importance and research and development within an academic environment. The USCP is not intended for resettlement purposes or to supplement formal training.

Locations

Though pertinent for the current situation, these courses are not intended as pre-deployment courses; they are designed to stimulate thinking on a wider educational context.

Aim The aim of the USCP is to meet the personal development and broader educational needs of Service personnel of all rank/rate levels.

Languages



Edinburgh Napier



Exeter



Leeds



Staffordshire



Westminster

Travel costs are not included. Prospective students must check that their own Unit is able to meet their travel costs before applying for a course. Students who need to travel over a long distance should seek Unit authorisation prior to the course for any overnight subsistence allowance required either before or after the course.

The USCP offers courses in the following categories:



Brighton

Single Service regulations apply.

Courses are designed and delivered by university departments who have a recognised standing in the subject field.

Regional and Strategic Studies

Bradford



Travel & Subsistence

Subject Areas





The courses are residential. Students will be required to live in accommodation provided by the university for the duration of the course. Tuition and accommodation costs are paid under a central contract arrangement by the parent Service.

The Prospectus contains information to help students select an appropriate course to meet their own personal development needs. There are approximately 600 USCP places available each academic year. Prospective students should consult this prospectus before applying for any listed course. Some courses require a high level of participation, pre-course reading and group syndicate work. It is therefore essential that prospective students are made aware of the academic level and expectation of courses before application. To gain support for their application at Unit level prospective students are strongly advised to copy the relevant page from this prospectus to their authorising officer (Officer Commanding/Line Manager). If necessary, prospective students should consult either their respective Line Manager or Education/Training Officer for further guidance.

Command Leadership and Management

Anglia Ruskin

Accommodation

University Short Course Prospectus





Short courses

Courses are provided currently by:

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Application and Selection Procedure Cancellation and Reserve Lists

Students should apply on the Tri-Service USCP Application Form and submit their application through their respective Education Clerk/Officer/Co-ordinator to the appropriate HQ staffs as follows:

The relevant Service Desk should be informed without delay so that a replacement can be found. Only when, either the exigency of Service duty, or a Service recognised compassionate case, prevents attendance on a course will cancellation fees be waived. In all other instances of non-attendance, cancellation fees may be recovered from the applicant’s parent unit or the individual. These can range from £650 - £1900 per person depending on the course.

Naval Service NETS Co-ordinator Education and Resettlement Centre (Waterfront)

To be considered for the Reserve List of a course, students should indicate on their application form whether they could be released to take up a vacancy at short notice.

1-154 Building HM Naval Base

Civ: 02392 724288

Portsmouth

Fax: 02392 724498

PO1 3NH

Mil: 9380 24288



Fax: 9380 24498

Closing Date The closing date for applications is 6 weeks prior to the start of the course. Students should receive notification regardless of whether their application has been successful or not. Selected students will receive joining instructions shortly afterwards. This timescale may vary to take public holidays into consideration.

Army USCP Co-ordinator, D Ed Cap Army Headquarters, IDL 430 Marlborough Lines

Civ: 01264 381148

Administration

Andover

Fax: 01264 382039

Hants

Mil: 94391 7148

SP11 8HJ

Fax: 94391 2039

Joining instructions are emailed to selected personnel after the closing date for applications. This will be approximately 4/5 weeks before the start of the course. The instructions include a provisional programme, details of the accommodation, contact numbers, plus a map with directions to the course venue.

Royal Air Force Trenchard Hall, Room 227 RAF Cranwell

Civ: 01400 268179

Sleaford

Fax: 01400 268180

Lincs

Mil: 95751 8179

NG34 8HB

Fax: 95751 8180

Selection Courses are extremely popular and the number of places available is restricted. The aim is to provide an attendance group drawn from across the Services that is representative of the spectrum of ranks/ rates, background and experience. This is achieved by assessing all applications against agreed Tri-Service selection criteria which are laid out in the DIN.

Application To ensure the best chance for selection all the details requested on the Application Form must be provided. The reasons for applying for the course must be clearly explained in detail; applicants should note that the USCP is designed neither for core training nor resettlement preparation. Failure to complete the USCP Application Form correctly could prejudice selection see (page 31). Please contact your Education Centre or visit www.raf.mod.uk/ raflearningforces for an application form.

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Application

If you have been selected and have not received Joining Instructions three weeks prior to the course start date please contact your Service desk.

USCP Co-ordinator, Accreditation

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Feedback Internal Validation

”The ability to review the change models and reflect their application and relevance, the course was taught by an academic considered to be an SME in his area and widely acknowledged by his peers. The ability to discuss current change and organisation issues with the others to get different perspectives as how to manage them. ” “High Quality presenters. Time for reflection. Networking with a range of ranks and experiences.”

Your comments are important as the information assists in the selection of future courses, course design and fiscal support. To contribute to the programme course students will be asked to fill out a tri-Service validation report on the last day of the course and to hand it to the relevant security officer for onward transit. The following are some of the comments made by students. Students may also be asked to fill out separate validation forms by the university supplying the course being attended.

”Extensive access to leading academic tutors. Flexible and interactive engagement involving the subject and Service relevance. Inter-Service awareness and discussions.”

“Discuss strategic similarities/differences with personnel from other Services. Being taught by a civilian person away from a military environment allows you to but a different perspective y your thoughts. Insight into higher Education.”

”Excellent course is in a great location with great facilities - very relaxed. Broadening my view and making me think about how I work. Given me the bug to go further with my education.”

“It has sparked interest undertaking further study. The course has provided further information and interest in my additional duty (as MCO). The course has been very interesting.”

”Wider appreciation of the history behind change management. Good use of interactive group activities. Discovered a set of tools/processes that can be applied in my work environment.”

“Breadth of experience and backgrounds of the lecturers, scope of the course content, comprehensive and up to date! The structure of the course - interaction, groupwork, handouts, post and pre course material available on CD -ROM.”

”Interaction with other 2 Services and discussing issues (and educating them!). Learning the academic view of issues that affect us. Feeding the desire to undertake further study.”

“The lecturers were thought provoking, informative and engaging. I enjoyed the lecturers approach and it aided my learning and understanding.”

”I learned a lot of new and interesting information. 2. It was a ‘taste’ of university life. 3. Mixing amongst different ranks in a relaxed environment was a good way to hear other experienced and opinions within managerial roles.”

The teaching - atmosphere , location (in a university building), lectures … fantastic. Course pace - lots of breaks, mixed with intense learning. 4. Best thing I’ve done in the British Army other than going on tour.”

”Has inspired/encouraged me to undertake further study. 2. Staff communicated well and made learning subject matter interesting and enjoyable. 3. Facilities provided by Napier were excellent and made the experience worthwhile. ”

“ The group discussions and quite in depth analysis of specific issues on the military. Use of case studies on the subject of war and terrorism and how it’s affected the economy. Good knowledge delivery from the lecturers, and handouts to assist understanding.”

”Very relaxed environment. Very thought provoking. Subject was relevant to modern military life. ”

I was interested to see if this level of learning was something that suited me. It has certainly inspired me to take on some higher education during my career, and I intend to undertake a foundation degree in leadership and Management in the near future.

“Meeting personnel from across all 3 Services with a wide array of experience in the topic and giving me a good insight and better understanding of the subject. Enhancing my own personal development, getting my brain thinking!” “More insight into conflict, inspired me to further my learning on the topic.”

References/Other Publications http://www.raf.mod.uk/raflearningforces/ DIN: please check the website above for the current DIN

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Intended Student Population

Entrepreneurial Leadership

Open to all ranks and especially those who have management and leadership responsibilities and aspire to further personal development.

University:

Delivery Methods

Edinburgh Napier University

The module will be delivered by interactive workshops and supported with an on-line presence. The workshops will introduce the key concepts and issues of entrepreneurial leadership and encourage delegates to explore the topic in their own context to become familiar with methods and processes used in the practice of entrepreneurial leadership.

Location: Edinburgh, Craiglockhart Campus

Duration 4 days

The teaching strategy adopted is based on interactive, integrated and applied learning to infuse an entrepreneurial mindset capable of anticipating, leading and managing positive change in organisations. This involves students utilising the academic models and frameworks and experiencing decision-making through practical business / organisational scenarios. This will be achieved through the use of case studies, simulation games, guest speakers and local context to enrich the students’ learning experience.

Date: 19 - 22 January 2015

Times: 9:30-13:00 and 14:00-17:30 daily, plus one evening event

Course Director(s): Lead tutor – Dr Susan Laing, Support tutor – Dr Barbara McCrory

Additional Information

Course Objectives

Group activities - During the course a number of group and team activities will be facilitated. These include a team presentation in relation to the case study workshop, where students will spend the day embracing the principles of entrepreneurial leadership, capabilities and culture to then present their analysis of the case and their recommendations for the current challenges adopting prediction and creation logic in their thinking and action.

On completion of this course you will be able to; •

critically review what is required to become a leader of an entrepreneurial organisation;



appraise your personal entrepreneurial leadership capabilities;



examine the role of entrepreneurial leadership in a range of sectors;



analyse the process of creating entrepreneurial cultures and building entrepreneurial structures within a large organisation.

In addition a business simulation workshop will run over one day with groups analysing and making decisions with incomplete data and will compete against each others’ businesses in a virtual marketplace. As the rounds progress unexpected situations will materialise and the teams will be required to make rapid decisions against a tight timescale. The intention is that students develop an experiential understanding of key issues through exploring theory and practice in a blended learning environment. The day will culminate in teams presenting to the board of the European parent organisation. The presentation will be based on the output of the earlier simulation performance.

General Description You will explore the role of entrepreneurial leadership through experiential learning across a range of sectors involving case studies which require entrepreneurial thinking and action.

Evening event, dinner & networking event with other invited guests - with entrepreneurial leader speaker - On the final evening course tutors will host a dinner and networking event for course participants and invited guests where a guest speaker will commence the evening sharing their motivations and experiences in driving forward an entrepreneurially led organisation.

The course will consider the nature of entrepreneurial leadership focussing on leadership, structure, culture and strategy. Examples and case studies across a range of sectors will be utilised. The importance of developing an organisational and strategic capability not just to manage change, but embrace it, create it and shape it, and implement it at speed are considered. How can you create an organisational willingness to take and manage measured risk? Creating the entrepreneurial culture and building entrepreneurial performance and examining strategies for growth. The course will consider cognitive ambidexterity, through an appreciation of prediction logic and creative logic, as well as developing capability in 360 degree world views to create opportunities which maximise social, environmental, economic responsibility and sustainability (SEERS). Encouraging and implementing an entrepreneurial capability throughout the organisation with and through others.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) On successful completion of additional study and assessment students will gain 20 Post Graduate credits.

Statement of what progression route academic credits lead to; Recognition at masters level will be offered on our Masters Entrepreneurial Leadership, please enquire to Steven Murphy [email protected]

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. Bespoke pre-course work - Case study text issued in advance and to be read prior to joining the course.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

concepts. The workshop is divided into sections where personal experience is shared; cases are investigated in groups; tutor input is provided; audio visual techniques used. Participants reflect on and build new theory into evolving world views.

Leading Change in Innovative and Rapidly Evolving Environments

University Brighton

Certificate of Attendance

Location Horsham.

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Duration

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) On completion of the workshop, participants may elect to undertake a University of Brighton assessment, which delivers 20 Masters level credit accumulation and transfer points toward the Postgraduate Certificate in Change Management.

5 days

Date 11-15 May 2015

Completed assessment from other cognate courses within the USCP programme may be considered and used as equivalent CATS points toward the University of Brighton postgraduate certificate in change management.

Times 09:00 to 17:00

Course Director(s) Stephen Reeve, Mark Hughes, Stephen Flowers & Tim Brady

Course Objectives To enable participants to gain a working understanding of leadership as a major perspective on effecting change; the alignment of leadership and communications; the significance of power and politics in organisational change processes and the impact of innovation within the change environment. Use of systemsbased theories to understand complex emergent outcomes. Perspectives on how differing concepts of innovation are driving novel environments; co-creation, large project and user-led models. Orchestrating appropriate contingency when faced with non-linear trajectories for change projects.

General Description The leadership of change has become a crucial organisational topic. This course presents competing approaches to the theory and practice of leading change, particularly in the light of rapidly evolving environments. An emphasis on innovation; co-creation and user innovation is generating new frameworks for consideration. Systems thinking and the exploration of increasingly complex contexts for action provide a rich background against which to examine change leadership into the future.

Intended Student Population The course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to anyone with previous experience or new to this field of study. The management focus of the course will draw upon past experiences of either managing and/or being managed.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. There is no pre-course work. Work books and readers are provided on the course; early indications of introductory reading material are given pre-course.

Additional Information Delivery Mode - The course content will be delivered through a five day intensive block workshop. There will be a mix of focussed lecturer input and small group application of theories, models and

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Leadership and Change Management

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Leeds

Additional Information

Location

Delivery Mode - The course will be classroom based. Teaching methods will consist of individual and group activities, group discussions, individual reflection, theoretical background, lectures and the use of video and powerpoint presentations. Round-table discussions or panel sessions may also be offered. The course will be delivered by the Course Director, other members of the Business Management teaching team in the Lifelong Learning Centre (CV’s available on request), plus an external speaker.

Weetwood Hall

Duration 3 days

Date 14-17 April 2015

Times:

Certificate of Attendance

Tuesday afternoon to Friday lunchtime (21 contact hours)

Course Director(s)

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Mr David Gilding

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Course Objectives

There is no offer of accreditation or certification for this course.



To develop an understanding of contrasting leadership styles



To develop an understanding of what makes an ‘effective leader’



To provide delegates with the opportunity to explore and discuss both the principles and practice behind managing change



To develop an understanding of the change management process



To understand how leaders drive change through an organisation.

General Description The course seeks to provide delegates with the knowledge and skills such that they are able to recognise the change management process and can also successfully implement and manage change within their own area of responsibility. The course will cover; •

Historic and contemporary leadership theories and their impact on the change process



Managing the individual through the change process, identifying and overcoming resistance



The challenges of managing change within teams



Theoretical change management frameworks and how they have been applied

As well as fully engaging with theory, delegates are encouraged to identify and explore change processes in which they have been involved. Practical case studies drawn from a range of organisations are used to support and underpin discussions with the aim of developing transferable skills.

Intended Student Population The course is open to all ranks but may be of particular interest to individuals who are involved with or responsible for implementing and leading change, or those preparing for this type of role.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work:

Leadership and Change

Joining Instructions and pre-course materials will be forwarded to you by email between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University

Participants will receive a course handbook on arrival.

Anglia Ruskin University

Additional Information:

Location

The course will have a blend of practice and theory incorporating current thinking and practice. Sessions will be interactive and participative. A variety of delivery approaches will be employed, bearing in mind different learning styles. This will include critique and debate, and case studies and syndicated activities such as role play and discussion groups.

Cambridge Campus

Duration 3 days

Dates 13–15 May 15

The course will be led by our university academics who have rich organisational and consulting experience, as well as varied research interests.

Times 0900 - 1730

Certificate of Attendance

Course Director(s) Dr Kevin Roe

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Courses Objectives

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)



Critically evaluate classical and contemporary leadership theories and assess their relevance for leadership within modern organisations



Demonstrate a critical awareness of the principles of change and the change process



Analyse & evaluate the roles of the change agent, change management roles and techniques



Critically reflect on their own personal effectiveness and development as a leader in preparation for a more senior role within the organisation.

Students may be able to undertake additional study and assessment to gain 15 Postgraduate credits if they reach the required standard. Study support and online learning resources will be available to these participants during this period.

Progression Options Credit received for the Leadership and Change module will also account for a quarter of the CATS points required towards the first year of the MA Leadership and Management. The full course normally takes three years to complete and is delivered on a part time basis via distance learning.

General Description:

Completion of the Strategic Leadership module (30 credits) along with the Leadership and Change (15 credits) module and the Organisational Behaviour (15 credits) modules which are all part of the USCP would count as one third of the full MA Leadership and Management qualification.

This course investigates and critically evaluates historical and contemporary approaches to leadership theory, focusing especially on leadership at junior to middle management level. Classical theories of leadership will be examined including traits theory, behavioural theories and contingency theories. Some contemporary theories will include issues such as emotional intelligence, psychodynamics & leader-led relations. There will be a strong emphasis on applying the theory to one’s own personal leadership with a view to enhancing leadership performance in preparation for middle management roles within the organisation. Management of change will be another key emphasis. This will include organisational politics & power, change theories and the implementation of the change process. Issues for consideration will include the organisational context of change, resistance to change and practical management of the change process. One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes.

Intended Student Population: This course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to those with previous experience and/or those who are preparing for senior roles. The course will draw upon delegates’ previous and current experiences.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Additional Information

Leadership and Change Exeter

This course will be convened by a Fellow from Exeter’s renowned Centre for Leadership Studies, in the Business School. The course will also draw on Business School staff as secondary markers for the assignments and to bring an added dimension to the course.

Location

Certificate of Attendance

University

Streatham Campus, Exeter

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Duration 3 days

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Date

Participants will gain 15 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Masters if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

14-16 April 2015

Times 0845 - 1700

Course Director(s) Alan Hooper

Course Objectives The aim of this course is to provide middle and senior managers with a thorough understanding of the nature of change leadership together with the practical strategies for taking organisations successfully through dynamic, structural and cultural changes. The course uses appropriate academic models and practical case studies. It also provides an opportunity for participants to develop and analyse the key learning from the course to enable them to transfer this into their working environment.

General Description The course deals with such aspects as effective change leadership, the culture of organisations, the human aspects of change, creativity, innovation and handling those who block change. It provides participants with a deep insight into how to motivate and challenge people to accept change as a natural process. The emphasis is on the practicalities of the leadership of change, ranging from the front line to the top level, drawing on contemporary models and cutting-edge thinking. Participants have the opportunity to share their own issues and to explore appropriate tools, ideas and models to help towards resolution. The lecturers are experienced in change management and will facilitate the learning process by reference to relevant theories, using ‘live’ case studies and practical strategies. The course focuses on the human aspects of change implementation, especially how to achieve effective communication, alignment and momentum throughout an organisation.

Intended Student Population The course is designed for people involved in middle and senior management (from SNCO to OF5) who are responsible for part or all of an organisation that is undergoing change.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Intended Student Population

Leadership Matters: contemporary debates

The course is designed for people involved in middle and senior management.

University

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Exeter

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Location Streatham Campus, Exeter

Duration 3 days

Before attending this course students are required to interview someone on their views of leadership

Date

Additional Information

Times

This course will be convened by a Fellow from the Centre for Leadership Studies, in the Business School. Other members of the Centre for Leadership Studies teach on the course.

0845 - 1700

Certificate of Attendance

Course Director(s)

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

28 - 30 October 2014

Val Brookes, Professor Jonathan Gosling and Morgen Witzel.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Course Objectives

Participants will gain 20 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Masters if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

The course aims to: •

xamine precisely what leadership means, and what is e required of leadership in different contexts



nable participants to take a ‘critical’ look at theories of e leadership, and also at the assumptions that underlie these – assumptions about human nature, society, politics, power and cultural values



t o apply their growing understanding of leadership theory, to the practice of leadership in the workplace

(This is a reduction of 10 credits from 30 to 20 and will be reflected in the assignments and will subject to thorough evaluation when the Module goes through the accreditation process).

General Description On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

Module-Specific Skills •

identify and discuss various assumptions which lie behind theories of leadership and thus to appreciate the motives and interests they serve



istinguish between theories which aid the analysis and d diagnosis of organisational problems, and to evaluate the solutions proposed by a range of prescriptive models



escribe a range of leadership theories, and insight into the d ways in which these various strands are developing

Subject Specific Skills •

nalyse and evaluate the claims of competing models of a leadership, and to apply these to their own experience and current challenges



Personal and Key Skills:



analyse and critique the claims of authors



demonstrate reflective observation methods



i ntegrate their learning and organise their work to into a comprehensive written assignment, to a deadline

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Certificate of Attendance

Managing Human Aspects of Change

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

University

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Brighton

On completion of the workshop, participants may elect to undertake a University of Brighton assessment, which delivers 20 Masters level credit accumulation and transfer points toward the Postgraduate Certificate in Change Management.

Location Horsham.

Date

Completed assessment from other cognate courses within the USCP programme may be considered and used as equivalent CATS points toward the University of Brighton postgraduate certificate in change management.

26-30 January 2015

Duration 5 days

Times: 09:00 to 17:00

Course Director(s) Mark Hughes & Stephen Reeve

Course Objectives Are to understand the human aspects of managing change in terms of different perspectives (such as communications, culture, individuals, groups and teams and leadership), and to apply these perspectives to the management of change in organisations.

General Description This course focuses upon managing the human aspects of organisational change. These important aspects of organisational change are often overlooked, which may lead to an organisational change initiative not being effective. The course will emphasise the importance of understanding individual’s experience of organisational change as a means of managing people through on-going processes of organisational change. The course will draw upon the latest theories and research in this field as well as the classic studies.

Intended Student Population The course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to anyone with previous experience or new to this field of study. The management focus of the course will draw upon past experiences of either managing and/or being managed.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. There is no pre-course work. Work books and readers are provided on the course; early indications of introductory reading material are given pre-course.

Additional Information Delivery Mode - The course content will be delivered through a five day intensive block workshop. There will be a mix of focussed lecturer input and small group application of theories, models and concepts. The workshop is divided into sections where personal experience is shared; cases are investigated in groups; tutor input is provided; audio visual techniques used. Participants reflect on and build new theory into evolving world views.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Managing Innovation

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Edinburgh Napier University

Intended Student Population

Location Edinburgh, Craiglockhart Campus

Open to all ranks and especially those who have management and leadership responsibilities and aspire to further personal development.

Duration

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

4 days

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Date 26 - 29 January 2015

Bespoke pre-course work - Case study issued in advance and to be read prior to joining the course.

Times

Additional Information

Course Director(s)

Group activities - During the course a number of group and team activities will be facilitated. These include a team presentation in relation to the case study workshop, where students will spend the day embracing the principles of managing innovation to then present their analysis of the case and their recommendations to the ‘Board’ of the case organisation. Students will be encouraged to share experiences of bringing forward innovations and those in position of management and leadership will also be asked to reflect on how they encourage innovation amongst their teams and how they could do more.

Lead tutor – Lesley Hunter Support tutor(s) – Maebh Coleman

General Description During this course you will learn about and how to manage innovation in a practical way. We will do this by examining, discussing and critically evaluating, in detail, both the theory and practice of innovation management in some of the world’s most innovative organisations.

On the final evening course tutors will host a dinner and networking event for course participants and invited guests where a guest speaker will commence the evening sharing their experiences in encouraging and managing innovation in their organisation.

The course content can be divided into two main components. Firstly, a discussion of key concepts and why innovation management is crucial in most organizations. Secondly, an examination of the leading practical theory related to innovation management, in particular, this will include an, in depth, discussion of a conceptual model of innovation management. This model will outline the main contextual elements (e.g. innovation strategy, organisation structure etc.) that affect the process of innovation management and also the process itself. This examination and discussion of innovation management will utilize materials (e.g. examples, cases, etc.) dealing with different kinds of innovation (e.g. product, service, internal systems and procedures etc.) in a variety of organisations.

Mode of Delivery- The module will be delivered by interactive workshops. The workshops will introduce the key concepts and issues of managing innovation and encourage delegates to explore the topic in their own context to become familiar with methods and processes used. The teaching strategy adopted is based on interactive, integrated and applied learning to infuse a creative mindset capable of anticipating, leading and managing positive change in organisations. This involves students utilising the academic models and frameworks and experiencing decision-making through practical business / organisational scenarios. This will be achieved through the use of case studies, best practice examples, guest speakers and local context to enrich the students’ learning experience.

This course is about the management of innovation and you will learn how to manage it in a practical way.

Course Objectives

Participants are encouraged to identify key skills areas and relate these to their own personal and professional development throughout the course, and beyond for those seeking academic credit.

On completion of this course you will be able to; •

xplain and critically reflect on innovation and why it e is crucial to competitive advantage and organisational success;



onceptualise and critically explore the context and process c of innovation management;



nalyse the innovation management in a variety of a organisations using examples from the world’s most innovative firms;



ritically evaluate innovation management and provide c recommendations for change demonstrating appropriate judgement.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) On successful completion of additional study and assessment students will gain 20 Post Graduate credits. Statement of what progression route academic credits lead to; Recognition at Degree and Masters level will be offered on certain programmes (including MBAs), please enquire to Steven Murphy, [email protected]

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Command Leadership and Management Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Course Title

Joining Instructions and pre-course materials will be forwarded to you by email between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Organisational Behaviour

University

Participants will receive a course handbook on arrival

Anglia Ruskin University

Pre course reading for this course may contain selected sections from:

Location Chelmsford Campus

Duration 3 days

Date 10-12 March 15

Times



Robbins, S. and Judge, T.A. 2012. Organizational Behavior. 15th ed. Harlow: Pearson/Prentice Hall.



Mullins L.J. (2010) Management & Organisational Behaviour, (9th ed.) Harlow: FT Prentice Hall



Articles from academic and contemporary business publications such as;



The Journal of Management Studies



Harvard Business Review

Dr Theresa Simpkin



Financial Times, Times, Independent, Guardian, Economist etc.

Course Objectives:

Additional Information

0900 - 1730

Course Director(s)

A behavioural science perspective will be used to seek insights into behaviour and group dynamics in organisations. Along with enhanced knowledge and understanding, delegates are expected to gain a number of relevant and transferable skills. It is expected that delegates will be able to; •

Demonstrate a critical perspective of organisational theories and related management practice



Understand the complexity of organisational life and view organisations as socially, historically and psychologically constructed



Critically examine competing organisational theories and alternative theoretical frameworks around the study of organisations



Analyse the complex nature of the behaviour of people in work organisations.

The course will be delivered using a blend of practice and theory incorporating current thinking and practice. Sessions will be interactive and participative. A variety of delivery approaches will be employed, bearing in mind different learning styles. This will include critique and debate, case studies and syndicated activities such as discussion groups. The course will be led by our university academics who have rich organisational and consulting experience, as well as varied research interests.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT): Students may be able to undertake additional study and assessment to gain 15 Postgraduate credits if they reach the required standard.

General Description:

Study support and online learning resources will be available to these participants during this period.

The course offers a critical approach to organisational theories and key factors impacting on organisational behaviour.

Progression Options

The nature of organisations, the role of management and its relationships with the environment are issues which are undergoing continual redefinition. This course uses a number of conceptual frameworks to help participants make sense of their professional practice and context. Using these frameworks, the learner gains a critical awareness of the evolution of organisational theory and key factors impacting on organisational behaviour. Practical applications of inter-relationships between the structures and environment of organisations such as culture, group dynamics, management style, influence, conflict and motivation will be examined using real life examples. The content will also cover topics of relevance to the challenges faced by organisations and their impact on human behaviour and organisational effectiveness.

Credit received for the Organisational Behaviour module will also account for a quarter of the CATS points required for our MA Leadership and Management. The full course normally takes three years to complete and is delivered on a part time basis via distance learning. Completion of the Strategic Leadership module (30 credits) along with the Leadership and Change (15 credits) module and the Organisational Behaviour (15 credits) modules which are all part of the USCP would count as one third of the full MA Leadership and Management qualification.

Intended Student Population This course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to those with previous experience or an interest in this field of study. The course will draw upon delegates’ previous and current experiences.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Additional Information

Organisational Change in Context

Horsham.

Delivery Mode - The course content will be delivered through a five day intensive block workshop. There will be a mix of focussed lecturer input and small group application of theories, models and concepts. The workshop is divided into sections where personal experience is shared; cases are investigated in groups; tutor input is provided; audio visual techniques used. Participants reflect on and build new theory into evolving world views.

Duration

Certificate of Attendance

University Brighton

Location

5 days

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Date 2-6 March 2015

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Times

On completion of the workshop, participants may elect to undertake a University of Brighton assessment, which delivers 20 Masters level credit accumulation and transfer points toward the Postgraduate Certificate in Change Management.

09:00 to 17:00

Course Director(s)

Completed assessment from other cognate courses within the USCP programme may be considered and used as equivalent CATS points toward the University of Brighton postgraduate certificate in change management.

Stephen Reeve & Mark Hughes

Course Objectives Is to enable participants to understand the main drivers and impacts of macro-scale change. Appraise change and project management practice in the light of contextual understanding. Gain a clearer grasp of how interwoven economic, political, technological and social trends and issues influence the immediate service environment. Use academic change management theory to make sense of real events in the workplace. Understand the multi-agency, cross-boundary change agenda and investigate the nature of future service partnership. Use ‘futures probing’ techniques to prepare for discontinuous change.

General Description The course will provide a sound base from which to interrogate the concept of organisations within systems and to explore the context in which they operate. It allows participants to formulate strategies to investigate change issues within their own service environments. Organisations exist in the context of a wider environment, from where changes are triggered which may profoundly influence organisational policy and practice. However, organisations are not just the unwitting recipients of environmental change. They create their own environment for internal activities, and their strategy and structure is significant when considering their ability to respond to, or initiate, change.

Intended Student Population The course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to anyone with previous experience or new to this field of study. The management focus of the course will draw upon past experiences of either managing and/or being managed.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. There is no pre-course work. Work books and readers are provided on the course; early indications of introductory reading material are given pre-course.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Additional Information

Strategic Leadership

The course will have a blend of practice and theory incorporating current thinking and practice. Sessions will be interactive and participative. A variety of delivery approaches will be employed, bearing in mind different learning styles. This will include critique and debate, and case studies and syndicated activities such as role play and discussion groups.

University Anglia Ruskin University

Location Chelmsford Campus 5 days

The course will be led by our university academics who have rich organisational and consulting experience, as well as varied research interests.

Date

Certificate of Attendance

Duration

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

19 – 23 January 2015

Times

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

0900 - 1730

Students may be able to undertake additional study and assessment to gain 30 Postgraduate credits if they reach the required standard

Course Director(s) Jon Salkeld, MA

Study support and online learning resources may be available to these participants during this period.

Course Objectives •

Critically evaluate the role of the leader in developing strategy



Critically evaluate classical and contemporary approaches to strategy within a national & global context



Design a viable strategy for an organisation (or a part of an organisation), which takes account of the reality of strategic decision making and make appropriate recommendation



Identify and critically utilise relevant tools for strategic analysis



Demonstrate a critical understanding of the different approaches to research used in business/management and the social sciences.

Progression Options Credit received for the Strategic Leadership module will also account for a half of the CATS points required for the first year of our MA Leadership and Management. The full course normally takes three years to complete and is delivered on a part time basis via distance learning. Completion of the Strategic Leadership module (30 credits) along with the Leadership and Change (15 credits) module and the Organisational Behaviour (15 credits) modules which are all part of the USCP would count as one third of the full MA Leadership and Management qualification.

General Description This course explores how strategic leadership impacts on an organisation’s performance. Along with practically relevant frameworks that facilitate strategy design and implementation, the course also includes a thorough and rigorous critique of classical and contemporary theories on strategy from emergent, collaborative and ethical perspectives. The module is consciously designed to be practical and problem oriented. In particular the emphasis is on how the leader can take strategic concepts and gain insight into competitive situations and strategic dilemmas faced by organisations.

Intended Student Population This course is designed for individuals in middle or senior management or preparing themselves for senior roles in the organisation.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions and pre-course materials will be forwarded to you by email between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. A course handbook will be provided on arrival.

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Command Leadership and Management Course Title

Additional Information

Strategy, Value and Change

The course will have a blend of practice and theory incorporating current thinking and practice. Sessions will be interactive and participative. A variety of delivery approaches will be employed, bearing in mind different learning styles. This will include critique and debate, and case studies and syndicated activities such as role play and discussion groups.

University Anglia Ruskin University

Location Chelmsford Campus 5 days

The course will be led by our university academics who have rich organisational and consulting experience, as well as varied research interests.

Date

Certificate of Attendance

Duration

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

1-5 June 2015

Times

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

0900 - 1730

Students may be able to undertake additional study and assessment to gain 30 Undergraduate credits if they reach the required standard for entry.

Course Director(s) David Flude

Study support and online learning resources will be available to these participants during this period. In addition to the course handbook additional handouts and materials will be distributed as relevant.

Courses Objectives •

Identify and integrate key concepts and issues in relation to strategic management, leadership and change in the analysis of organisational situations



Appreciate the role and significance of leadership and the impacts of ethics, culture, information, knowledge and learning to organisational structure, behaviour(s) and the creation of value



Undertake a detailed and critical analysis and evaluation of an organisational situation and communicate the findings in an appropriate manner



Evaluate the usefulness of theory and knowledge in informing and improving organisational, group and individual practices and performance.

General Description This course builds upon knowledge, experience, and reflections of the learner and applies this to the realities of practice and organisations. Contemporary issues and the impacts and implications for strategy, leadership and change are explored. The role of resources, capabilities and competences and the operational aspects of strategy are covered. The concept of the value chain is introduced and in this context looks at value based approaches to the interaction of organisations with their stakeholders and environments.

Intended Student Population This course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to those with previous experience and/or those who are preparing for senior roles. The course will draw upon your previous and current experiences.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions and pre-course materials will be forwarded to you by email between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. A course handbook will be provided on arrival

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title



The challenges, approaches and experiences of developing adequate information and contextual understanding to develop and implement effective peace-support programmes.



The impact of drug, diamond, natural resource and people smuggling in prolonging conflicts; and the relationships between peacekeeping, peace building, humanitarian aid, post-war reconstruction and sustainable development.



The course will also examine the interaction between peacekeepers and international aid agencies in the context of actual conflicts. Opportunities for future engagement will be illustrated with small group desk-top exercises on a variety of subjects, such as the stabilisation or peace process in Somalia, Sudan, DR Congo or Mali.

African Security and Peacekeeping in Complex Political Emergencies.

University Peace Studies Division, School of Social and International Studies, University of Bradford.

Location Heaton Mount, Bradford, West Yorkshire.

Duration: 4.5 days

Date 20-24 October 2014

Intended Student Population

Times

Open Entry: The course will be of particular interest to personnel who wish to develop an understanding of African security issues and/or of the challenges of conflict prevention, stabilisation, peacekeeping, and security and peace building. .

Mon, 20 Oct 14.00–18.30; Tues–Thurs (21 – 23 Oct) 09.00–17.30; Fri (24 Oct) 09.00–16.00.

All ranks with and interest in the subject.

Course Director(s)

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Dr Owen Greene

Joining Instructions and training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Course Objectives The course will provide an introduction to the dynamics of peace and conflict in sub-Saharan Africa regions: the Horn; West Africa; Central Africa; and Southern Africa; and also their interactions with peace and security dynamics in North Africa. The course will: •

Examine the complex origins and development of conflicts and tensions, and implications for conflict prevention measures;



Assess the role, experiences and lessons-learned from peacekeeping, peace support and stabilisation missions within and across countries and regions in Africa;



Examine the challenges and lessons-learned of stabilisations, security-building and peace-building in countries in Africa emerging from conflict (including DDR, Security Sector Reform), drawing on case studies



Explore the lessons for future engagement through specific case studies.

Additional Information The Course Director (Dr Owen Greene) and his senior team are internationally-acknowledged experts on conflict, security, complex emergencies and stabilisation and peace-building processes in several African countries and regions. Speakers - a combination of University of Bradford ‘in-house’ speakers with relevant specialist academic and policy/practitioner experience, combined with selected external academic, policy and practitioner speakers with excellent specialist expertise. The speakers will vary from year to year, but will include for example: David Francis, Alex Vines, David Harris, Alice Hills, and experts from relevant UK agencies such as the UK Stabilisation Unit), and specialists on specific topics and countries selected that year.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

General Description

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Among the issues that will be covered by the interactive lectures and seminars are: •

Complex political emergencies in selected case cases (selected from Sahara Sahel/North Africa; West Africa; The Horn of Africa; the Great Lakes Region;



DDR and SSR processes in conflict prevention and postconflict stabilisation



Small arms proliferation and arms leakage to noncombatants; and the roles of militias and private military companies.



Post-conflict stabilisation and peace-building processes, and the roles and challenges for international peace-support missions in these contexts

Participants have the opportunity to register with the University of Bradford to use this course as a basis for pursuing an postgraduate level module on African Security and Peacekeeping, which is accredited by the University of Bradford (20 credits). Those wishing to take this option will be required to undertake further guided academic study for some 12 weeks after the course ends on 25 October and also to prepare and submit course work for assessment. This option will be introduced to all participants on day one of the the course. Any participants interested in obtaining further information about this option prior to ths course should contact Anastassia Belynskaia at the School of Social and International Studies (SSIS), University of Bradford (e-mail [email protected] Bradford.ac.uk).

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

China and the World: from Mao Zedong to the Present

Joining instructions, handouts and pre-course training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachment 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Westminster

Additional Information:

Location

Pre-course delivery will include: Access to and use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment with additional material delivered by e-mail where required; delegates will also have access to an asynchronous communication environment in which to communicate with each other and with the course tutor. The residential element of delivery will include: The physical learning environment of the University, including the standard IT specification for all teaching rooms; formal teaching processes, exercises and simulations; and, access to specialist facilities at the University, such as language laboratories and subject-specific journal collections in the relevant library.

Central London

Duration 3.5 days

Date 02-05 March 2015

Times Days 1-3:

09:00 to 17:00

Day 4:

09:00 to 12:30

Certificate of Attendance:

Course Director(s) Dr Cangbai Wang

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Course Objectives:

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT):

The aims of the course are to provide participants with detailed knowledge and critical understanding of China’s transformation over recent decades from an isolated and under-developed country to a global political and economic power. The course aims to enable students to grasp the extent, rapidity and complexity of this transformation through a study of the main social and political developments in China in the last forty years, including the Four Modernisations, emerging civil society, Chinese military development and Asian stability, democratisation and human rights, as well as US-China relations.

Subject to satisfactory completion of the formal assessment requirements, this course will provide 15 credits at Level 6 and, subject to the relevant course and university regulations, can contribute to the modular structure of undergraduate single and combined honours awards in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities.

General Description: The course addresses the enormous economic, social and political changes China has experienced in the last four decades and their impact on China’s position in the contemporary global world. It locates this change in both regional and international contexts and gains critical understanding from a variety of perspectives using appropriate frameworks and concepts. The course includes the evaluation and use of a diverse range of information and sources, including primary and secondary sources in translation.

Intended Student Population Access to Course Open to all Ranks

Academic Level Year 3 − Undergraduate

Key Concepts Economic, social and political transformation with special reference to Chinese political concepts and discourse

Prior Knowledge Specialist interest in China but no knowledge of Chinese language is required

Prior Experience None

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Intended Student Population

Conflict and the Media

All ranks with and interest in the subject.

University

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Staffordshire

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Location Stoke Campus.

Additional Information

Duration

Mode of Delivery - The module will be delivered in a workshop format. The intention is to deliver information and explain the context of the material under examination in lecture format with discussion points built in to the lecture material. PowerPoint will be used and will include images and additional video materials. The provided notes will be detailed and participants can follow these while the lecture sections are given. Every so often discussion boxes are included in the handout material and when these are reached participants will, in sub-groups, be asked to look at selected questions and in their groups to come to conclusions after a period of discussion. They will then report back to the full-group and further full-group discussion can take place. This format is particularly effective for groups with differing levels of prior knowledge and perhaps different levels of ability.

3 days

Date: 28-30 October 2014

Times 09.00 – 17.30

Course Director(s) Dr. Alan Russell and Dr Barbara Emadi-Cofin Supported by: Gary Hudson and Jackie Gregory

Supported by Gary Hudson and Jackie Gregory

Certificate of Attendance

Course Objectives: •

An understanding of the relationship between the media, national governments, and those involved in conflict



Evaluations of the impact of the media in situations of conflict



An understanding of how the changing nature of war has impacted on media reporting



An understanding of how the changing nature of technology has affected war and conflict reporting



An understanding of how new social media has had impact with respect to conflict situations

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students who wish to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Masters level, and submit 2 assignments - 1 x 1500 word essay and 1 x 4000 word essay, marked at Masters level. On successful completion, they will get 30 Masters level credits. Information on this option will be made available during the course. In addition to the 21 hours of the workshop they will undertake a further 50 hours of study organised though the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions.

General Description:

Bibliography - Two books and a selection of articles and chapters will be provided for all students taking the follow-up programme for credits (within the fee).

The course relates the changing nature of conflict and war reporting to changes in media technology as well as changes in the nature of war. The role of the war correspondent and the use of censorship and propaganda in times of total war will be compared with conflict reporting in the varied situations of limited war. The importance of the media in ‘constructing reality’, agenda setting and framing of issues will be considered including the so called ‘CNN effect’. In contrast, the course will consider government efforts to use the media to get their message across in times of conflict, in relation to the concept of ‘manufacturing consent’. The specific relationship of the media to the military will also be highlighted including the trend towards embedding journalists. Changes in the way modern media operate as a consequence of merging technologies and the growth of social media will be explored, indicating potential changes in relationships that may follow. Varied case studies will be considered including the reporting of Vietnam, the Falklands War, the Iraq wars, humanitarian interventions and the Arab Spring. Consideration will also be given to reporting ‘other people’s wars’.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course

Counter-Insurgency.

Counter-Insurgency: Conventional War of the Twenty-First Century Exeter

Additional reading will be published on the Exeter USCP webpages so the more interested student with capacity will be able to read around the subject. This will also be invaluable for those who elect to complete the assignment.

Location

Certificate of Attendance

University

Streatham Campus, Exeter

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Duration 3 days

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Date

Participants will gain 15 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Master if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

9 - 11 December 2014 28 - 30 April 2015

Times: 0845 - 1700

Course Director(s) Prof Tony King and Dr Sergio Catignani

Courses Objectives •

Understand the distinctive character of current insurgencies and counter-insurgency campaigns



To be aware of the academic literature on counterinsurgency



Recognise the institutional difficulties which counterinsurgency has posed for the armed forces

General Description In the early part of the twenty-first century, western armed forces are increasingly committed to stabilisation operations involving major counter-insurgency campaigns. The current and potentially temporary decline of interstate war has demanded a fundamental revision of concepts, doctrine, organisational structures and tactics among western armed forces. This module explores the shift to counter-insurgency from a critical historical perspective. It seeks to explore the difference between current insurgencies and counter-insurgency campaigns and equivalent political struggles in the twentieth century. The module examines the specific difficulties which the armed forces face today, especially in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the doctrinal, operational and tactical adaptations which they have tried to make in the face of these new conflicts.

Intended Student Population The course is designed for those involved at middle and senior management level, who are either existing or potential leaders.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. In recognition of the high tempo of military life the module convenor of this module provides a short selection (four pages – see additional pdf) of printed pre-reading for the course which will be sent with the joining instructions. The reading does not resume any ‘deep’ prior knowledge of the issues, but experience has shown this course is well-received by more senior commanders who have practical experience of

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

space. The Course will examine contending arguments for the development of norms and regulatory systems for the oversight and management of cyber space, paying particular attention to the application of international law to cyber-based conflict.

Cyber Security: National Resilience and International Governance

University Exeter

Intended Student Population

Location

3 days

This course will be suitable for those with an interest in the evolution of cyber security as a problem in national and international security. No previous policy or academic experience is required, and neither is it expected that students will have any more than a general familiarity with the technological aspects of the subject.

Date

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Streatham Campus, Exeter

Duration

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

24 - 26 March 2015

Times 0845 - 1700

Additional Information

Course Director(s)

This course will be convened by a Professor of Strategic Studies from the Strategy and Security Institute. The UK National Security Strategy lists Cyber and Terrorism as the most pressing threats whilst the risks of international conflict in failed or fragile states has not receded: this course stands alone but will be particularly effective in conjunction with “Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism” course and “Counter-Insurgency: Conventional War of the TwentyFirst Century”.

Prof Paul Cornish

Course Objectives Cyberspace can be understood as a medium for communication and information exchange which, if it does not already will soon touch the lives of every person and organisation on the planet. However value is calculated (morally, politically, commercially, strategically, socially and individually), and at whatever level of interaction (personal, local, regional, national and international) it is clear that cyberspace is a medium in which considerable value is currently invested, and that this investment is likely only to increase for the foreseeable future.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

With so much value invested, and with so much of that value critically vulnerable to various levels of cyber risk (from the individual hacker through organised crime and terrorism to statesponsored cyber espionage), the safety and stability of cyberspace as a place for interaction, communication and exchange is fast becoming one of the most challenging aspects of the 21st century international security policy agenda. However, at both the national and the international levels there appear to be more obstacles than opportunities for the development of a safe and secure global information and communications infrastructure.

Participants will gain 15 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Master if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

By the end of this Short Course students will have a clear understanding of the evolving cyber security debate; of security challenges which emanate from cyber space; of the notion of ‘resilience’ as the basis of national policy; and of national and international attempts at the governance of cyber space.

General Description The course will comprise a series of lectures and presentations, together with seminar discussions in which students will be required to take the lead. Day 1 of the Course will examine the evolution of cyber security as a policy problem. How is cyber space misused, by whom, for what purposes and with what effect? The focus of Day 2 of the Course will be on ‘resilience’ as the basis of national responses to cyber security challenges. The Course will examine in detail the protection of the critical national infrastructure, using the approach taken in the United Kingdom as a case study. Day 3 of the Course will turn to international governance of cyber

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Additional Information

Foreign Policy: Leadership, Power and Responsibility

This module will be convened by professors from the Institute of Arab and Islamic Studies.

University Exeter

Certificate of Attendance

Location

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Streatham Campus, Exeter

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Duration

Participants will gain 15 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Master if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

3 days

Date: 19 - 21 May 2015

Times: 0845 - 1700

Course Director(s) Prof Gareth Stansfield and Prof Jonathon Githens-Mazer

Courses Objectives: •

Demonstrate substantive knowledge of the main theories of foreign policy and be able to adopt critical positions adopted towards them.



Show an ability to identify and discuss the key concepts in relation to decision-making, particularly rational actor models and socio-psychological understandings.



Ability to identify clearly the contention made by the different theories of leadership, power and responsibility and engage in reasoned criticism of such theories.

General Description We tend to think of foreign policy as a territory inhabited by diplomats, foreign ministers and journalists. It surrounds us but does not affect us directly. Foreign Policy challenges this assumption: not only do non-state actors have foreign policies; the public is increasingly engaged in ‘international’ issues. The goals of actors are critically scrutinized – dominant accounts impute rational interests but recent literature challenges this view. Part one of the module covers definitions of foreign policy and the main theoretical understandings. The aim of part two is look more closely at the dominant actors who ‘do’ foreign policy, as well as the nature of the structure they inhabit. Part three looks at the role of leaders in terms of how decision-making is understood, including the psychological vs. rational-actor debate. Attention is also paid to the responsibilities that leaders have for acting in ways that strengthen international institutions and promote internationalist values. Throughout the module, seminars will draw on case studies from a variety of different geopolitical contexts including China, India, the US, the UK, Canada, and the EU.

Intended Student Population The course is designed for those involved at middle and senior management level, who are either existing or potential leaders.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

reaching consensus on intervention and the inconsistency of the international community’s responses to the problem. The course will also consider case examples of intervention (or indeed nonintervention). The concept of humanitarian intervention also requires a brief investigation of other forms of military intervention in order to understand the specific nature of involvement under the Right to Protect.

Human Rights, Intervention and Democratic Reconstruction

University Staffordshire

Location Stoke Campus.

The course will also investigate some of the issues relating to post-conflict reconstruction and rights, including democratic nation-building. It will explore the development of the foundations for security, justice, and governance, as well as the re-building of social and economic relationships. Case studies will be critically assessed, including some of the following: Kosovo, BosniaHerzegovina, Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan and (potentially) Syria.

Duration 3 days

Date: 10-12 February 2015

Times

Intended Student Population:

09.00 – 17.30

All ranks with and interest in the subject.

Course Director(s)

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work:

Dr. Barbara Emadi-Coffin and Dr. Alan Russell

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Course Objectives: •

Critically understand the concept of human rights and the issues of humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, and post-conflict reconstruction.



ritically assess the roles of international institutions C protecting human rights and undertaking intervention and reconstruction, particularly the United Nations, NATO and the European Union.



nderstand in-depth the significance of the concept human U rights for members of the armed services.



or accredited component of course only: Express F sophisticated and coherent expositions and arguments.

Students will be provided with a lengthy course handbook which outlines key aspects of the topics to be investigated. It is assumed candidates for the course have an understanding of military operations and minimal background understanding of human rights and nation-building.

Additional Information: Mode of Delivery - The course will be delivered in three day-long workshop sessions. Various teaching styles will be used to ensure that the day-long sessions are lively and students remain engaged. Teaching and learning techniques will include: tutor input using power point or prezi, short video presentations to illustrate essential points, and importantly, small group discussions feeding into whole group discussion. This works particularly well with groups of students who have varying levels of prior knowledge and formal qualification. In the group discussions, students will consider both prepared questions and student-elected case studies. Regular coffee breaks and a lunch break will be provided.

General Description: The course will explore three related areas of international political significance. The idea of human rights has serious implications for international society as it conflicts with the traditional idea of the sovereignty of the nation state. In addition, the nature of human rights is subject to extensive political debate. Humanitarian intervention involves the external use of force to protect vulnerable individuals and groups and can be grounded against infringements of human rights. The course will compare examples of humanitarian intervention with other types of military intervention, and will give consideration to post-conflict nation-building and reconstruction with a focus on the issues of rights and democracy.

Certificate of Attendance: A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT): Students wishing to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Level 7 (Masters Level). The course will require the submission of two 2 assignments marked at Level 7 to include: 1 x 2000 word essay and 1 x 3500 portfolio. Upon successful completion, they will receive 30 credits at Level 7. Information on this option will be made available during the course. In addition to the 21 hours of learning in the workshop, students will undertake a further 50 hours of study organised though the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions.

The human rights component examines both the philosophical origins of the concept of human rights, and the practical political aspects of international concern with human rights. It begins with an investigation of the philosophical underpinnings of the concept of human rights, including the idea of universality, the distinction between civil/political rights and social/economic rights, and cultural relativity. The course then explores international law relating to human rights such as the UN Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights, and practical debates around human rights in the new world order. The issue of humanitarian intervention is introduced as one of the mechanisms for the protection of human rights. It is explored initially in relation to the role of the United Nations and the constraints of its charter. The course then considers the political dynamics of

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

India Pakistan and Kashmir

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Staffordshire

Students will be provided with a lengthy course handbook which outlines key aspects of the subjects to be investigated. It is also suggested that the students visit selected web-sites as pre-course reading - all are freely available online.

Location Stoke Campus.

Duration

Additional Information

4 days

Mode of delivery - The module will be delivered in a lecture/ workshop format.

Date: 28 - 30 April 2015

The intention is to deliver information and explain the context of the material under examination in lecture format or through the use of films, with discussion points built in to the lecture material. A full handbook of lecture notes and discussion points will be provided and participants can follow notes during the lectures. Every so often there will be discussion and participants will, in sub-groups, be asked to look at selected questions in their groups and come to conclusions after a period of discussion. They will then report back to the full-group and further full-group discussion can take place. This format is particularly effective for groups with differing levels of prior knowledge and perhaps different levels of ability.

Times 09.00 – 17.30

Course Director(s) Dr. Sita Bali

Course Objectives •

Knowledge and understanding of Indian and Pakistani History, with a focus on 19th and 20th centuries.



Knowledge and understanding of post-Independence politics in India and Pakistan.



Knowledge and understanding of the competing claims on Kashmir.



Knowledge and understanding of how the Kashmir dispute impacts on wider India-Pakistan relationship.



Knowledge and understanding of Indian and Pakistani security concerns in the contemporary era and how they affect the region and the wider world.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students who wish to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Masters level, and submit 2 assignments - 1 x 1500 word essay and 1 x 4000 word essay, marked at Masters level. On successful completion, they will get 30 Masters level credits. Information on this option will be made available during the course. In addition to the 21 hours of the workshop they will undertake a further 50 hours of study organised though the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions.

General Description This course will examine the relationship between India and Pakistan from Independence to the present day. It will explore the history of the Indian sub-continent, with particular reference to the periods of the Mughal and British Empires, and will focus on the partition of 1947. The origins of the Kashmir dispute, which lie in this period will be examined. The importance of Kashmir to both countries will be considered, as will the impact of the dispute on not only the relationship between the two, but also on political developments within India and Pakistan. Further, the three wars between India and Pakistan and the Kargill conflict will be considered. The role of China, Cold war and post-Cold war politics on the subcontinent will also be explored, as will the impact of the end of the Cold war, 9/11 and the war in Afghanistan. Overall, the course will attempt to provide an understanding of the importance of the Kashmir dispute in the relationship between India and Pakistan, on the strategies adopted by the two countries to deal with it and the possible solutions to the dispute.

Intended Student Population This is an open entry course with no previous study of international relations or related subjects required. The course will be taught at undergraduate level but will be accessible to all ranks provided there is a willingness to engage and participate.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

This course will be led by our university academics who have rich organisational and consulting experience, as well as varied research interests.

Intercultural Communications

University

Certificate of Attendance

Anglia Ruskin University

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Location Cambridge Campus

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

Duration

Students may be able to undertake additional study and assessment to gain 15 Postgraduate credits if they reach the required standard for entry.

3 days

Date

Study support and online learning resources may be available to these participants during this period. In addition to the course handbook additional handouts and materials may be distributed as relevant.

13–15 January 2015

Times 0900 - 1730

Course Director(s) Professor Guido Rings

Course Objectives •

Demonstrate a systematic and in-depth understanding of the impact of culture on individuals, groups and organisations



Critically evaluate the influence of societal conditioning on individual behavior and communication style



Design strategies sensitive and responsive to the dynamics of inter-cultural influence

General Description Contact between people of different cultures is increasingly common and of prime economic and sociocultural importance in our global world. Whilst being able to speak a language will help significantly, understanding the social behaviour and values of different countries and groups of people can mean that communication will be much more effective. This course enables participants to understand how cultural differences impact on human interaction in both the workplace and social contexts. Using case studies and practical exercises, as well as the examination of film and cultural assets, it explores the development of relations, communicative styles and values between individuals and groups of different cultural backgrounds.

Intended Student Population This is an open entry course with no previous study of international relations or related subjects required. The course will be taught at advanced undergraduate level but will be accessible to all ranks provided there is a willingness to engage and participate.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions and pre-course materials will be forwarded to you by email between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. A course handbook will be provided on arrival.

Additional Information The course will have a blend of practice and theory incorporating current events, latest thinking and practice. Sessions will be interactive and participative and designed to engage participants in lively debate. A variety of delivery approaches will be employed, from critique and debate, and case studies, videos and guest lecturers where appropriate.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Intended Student Population

International Criminal Law

This course is designed for participants involved at middle and senior management level, who are either existing or potential leaders.

University Exeter

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Location

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Streatham Campus, Exeter

Duration 3 days

Additional Information

Date:

This course will be convened by Dr Aurel Sari is a specialist in International Law and military operations and Dr Annika Jones is a specialist in International Criminal Law.

23 - 25 June 2015

Times:

Prior knowledge of international law is recommended but not essential and attendance on the Exeter “International Law and Security” module would be sufficient for this purpose; otherwise wider pre-course reading on foundational aspects of public international law would be required.

0845 - 1700

Course Director(s) Dr Aurel Sari and Dr Annika Jones

This course stands alone but would be particularly effective in conjunction with the “Cyber Security: National Resilience and International Governance” course and “Counter-Insurgency: Conventional War of the Twenty-First Century”.

Courses Objectives The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of both institutional and substantive aspects of international criminal law. It offers an overview of the institutional framework for the investigation and prosecution of international crimes and a detailed examination of the substantive law relating to the crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression, as well as aspects of individual criminal responsibility and defences to international crimes.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Participants will gain 15 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Masters if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

General Description International criminal law is a relatively new but rapidly developing field of international law. Having emerged as a distinct discipline in the aftermath of the Second World War, it has now become firmly established as a means of responding to the commission of mass atrocities. Serious violations of human rights, grave breaches of international humanitarian law and acts of aggression now frequently spark calls for international criminal justice. The aim of this module is to provide students with a critical understanding of the institutional mechanisms that exist for the investigation and prosecution of international crimes, as well as an introduction to the substantive law that they apply. The first part of the course will focus institutional aspects of international criminal law. It will look at the nature and function of international institutions that have been created to investigate and prosecute international crimes, including the International Military Tribunals for Nuremberg and the Far East, established in the aftermath of the Second World War, the ad hoc International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, created under the Security Council’s Chapter VII powers in the mid-1990s, and the formation of the first permanent International Criminal Court. It will also consider the role that international, internationalised and domestic courts have come to play in the investigation and prosecution of international crimes and how they operate alongside other accountability mechanisms. The second part of the module will turn to substantive aspects of international criminal law. It will examine the evolution and current scope of four core international crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression. In addition, it will consider forms of participation in, and defences to, international crimes.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work:

Introduction to Islam and Cultural Diversity

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Leeds

Additional Information:

Location

Times

Delivery Mode - The course will be mainly classroom based. Teaching methods will consist of individual and group activities, group discussions, individual reflection, theoretical background, lectures and the use of video and powerpoint presentations. Roundtable discussions or panel sessions may also be offered. The provider will ensure that each course is delivered by experts from both the University of Leeds, and from other academic institutions. The course includes a visit to a local mosque, with the opportunity to meet the Imam to ask questions

Tuesday afternoon to Friday lunchtime (21 contact hours)

Certificate of Attendance:

Course Director(s)

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Weetwood Hall

Duration 3 days

Date 13-16 January 2015

Dr Samar Al-Afandi DDS

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT):

Course Objectives

There is no offer of accreditation or certification for this course.

The aim of this introductory course is to enable the participants to: •

Explore the key themes of Islamic belief and worship practices;



Identify and examine the distinction between normative teachings of Islam and diverse cultural practices;



Develop a basic understanding of the social, legal and political aspects of Islam;



Examine Islam in today’s global setting.

General Description: By the end of the course the participants will be able to demonstrate a better understanding of the following: •

The key themes of Islamic belief and worship; the concept of God and Prophethood, key texts and the fundamentals of Islam; Islamic jurisprudence and shariah law;



Morality, social etiquette and the distinction between normative teachings of Islam and diverse cultural practices;



Family law, women’s status, human rights, and the definition of democracy and Jihad in Islam;



Historical development of the two main Islamic sects Sunnah and Shiiah and rising contemporary political movements;



Contemporary issues facing Islam and Muslims in a global setting.

The course includes a visit to a local mosque, with the opportunity to meet the Imam to ask questions. Copies of the Muslims’ holy book, the Qur’an in Arabic with English translation will be available for participants to explore. Intended Student Population The course is intended for anyone with an interest in learning about Islam

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Staffordshire

Students will be provided with a lengthy course handbook which outlines key aspects of the subjects to be investigated. It is also suggested that the students visit selected web-sites (see below) that introduce aspects of Iranian history and politics. Precourse reading are all freely available online.

Location

Additional Information

Iran: History Culture & Political Economy

University

Mode of Delivery - The module will be delivered in a lecture/ workshop format.

Stoke Campus.

Date

The intention is to deliver information and explain the context of the material under examination in lecture format or through the use of films, with discussion points built in to the lecture material. A full handbook of lecture notes and discussion points will be provided and participants can follow notes during the lectures. Every so often there will be discussion and participants will, in sub-groups, be asked to look at selected questions in their groups and come to conclusions after a period of discussion. They will then report back to the full-group and further full-group discussion can take place. This format is particularly effective for groups with differing levels of prior knowledge and perhaps different levels of ability.

16-18 June 2015

Duration 3 days

Times 09.00 – 17.30

Course Director(s) Dr. Sita Bali and Dr. Barbara Emadi-Coffin;

Course Objectives •

Critically explore the history, culture, economy and politics of The Islamic Republic of Iran.



Understand and analyse factors and trends that affect contemporary Iran.



Critically assess the role of Iran in the contemporary international community.



For accredited component of course only: Express sophisticated and coherent expositions and arguments.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students wishing to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Level 7 (Masters Level). The course will require the submission of two 2 assignments marked at Level 7 to include: 1 x 2000 word essay and 1 x 3500 portfolio. Upon successful completion, they will receive 30 credits at Level 7. Information on this option will be made available during the course. In addition to the 21 hours of learning in the workshop, students will undertake a further 50 hours of study organised though the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions.

General Description The course will begin by examining the history of Iran, focussing on the 19th and 20th centuries. There will be a particular emphasis on exploring the political history of recent years, including the significance of the Qajar dynasty, the Russo-Persian Wars, the Constitutional Revolution, the 1953 CIA coup – Operation Ajax or 28 Mordad, the rise of Mohammad Reza Shah, the Revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, the post-Khomeini leadership, the government of Mahmoud Amadinejad, the Green Movement, and the outcomes of the presidential elections in the spring of 2013. International responses to these events will be considered. The course will investigate the culture of Iran, the influence of Shia Islam and the role of women in Iranian society. We will look at the Iranian economy, and analyse the role of oil and the current impact of sanctions. We will also explore Iran’s international relations, both regionally and with key global players like the US. The course will attempt to provide an understanding of the ideas and forces that have shaped contemporary Iran, and the role that Iran plays in the international community.

Bibliography- Two books and a selection of articles and chapters will be provided for all students taking the follow-up programme for credits (within the fee).

Intended student population This is an open entry course with no previous study of international relations or related subjects required. The course will be taught at undergraduate level but will be accessible to all ranks provided there is a willingness to engage and participate

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Latin America Politics: Populism, Dictatorships and Democracy

Joining instructions, handouts and pre-course training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachment 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Westminster

Additional Information

Location

Pre-course delivery will include: Access to and use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment with additional material delivered by e-mail where required; delegates will also have access to an asynchronous communication environment in which to communicate with each other and with the course tutor. The residential element of delivery will include: The physical learning environment of the University, including the standard IT specification for all teaching rooms; formal teaching processes, exercises and simulations; and, access to specialist facilities at the University, such as language laboratories and subject-specific journal collections in the relevant library.

Central London

Duration 3.5 days

Date 16-19 February 2015

Times Days 1-3:

09:00 to 17:00

Day 4:

09:00 to 12:30

Certificate of Attendance:

Course Director(s) Dr Sinéad Wall

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Course Objectives

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

The aims of the course are to provide students with knowledge and understanding of political developments in Latin America in the 20th and 21st centuries. It seeks to enable students to develop the skills required for political, economic and social analysis and apply them to an investigation of specific issues, including sources of instability, political representation, political participation, military intervention, and varieties of populism.

Subject to satisfactory completion of the formal assessment requirements, this course will provide 15 credits at Level 5 and, subject to the relevant course and university regulations, can contribute to the modular structure of undergraduate single and combined honours awards in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities.

General Description The course provides a broad investigation and analysis of political developments in Latin America from the 1940s to the present. The theoretical debate on populism will be discussed, including such questions as: Is populism a type of political movement or is it an ideology? What are its boundaries? Is the term “neo-populism” justified to describe the political leaders that emerged in the 1990s in Latin America? How successful have the attempts to overcome the traditional imprecision of the concept ‘populism’ been?

Intended Student Population Access to Course Open to all Ranks

Academic Level Year 2 − Undergraduate

Key Concepts Political representation and participation with special reference to populism and military intervention

Prior Knowledge Specialised interest in Latin America and/or regional politics but no knowledge of Spanish is required

Prior Experience None

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Students will be provided with a lengthy course handbook which outlines key aspects of the subjects to be investigated. It is also suggested that the students visit selected web-sites that introduce aspects of Russian politics and security.

Russian Politics and Security

University Staffordshire

Additional Information

Location

Dr Rainer-Elk Anders

Delivery Mode - The module will be delivered in a workshop format. The intention is to deliver information and explain the context of the material under examination in lecture format with discussion points built into the lecture material. PowerPoint will be used and will include images and additional video material. The provided notes will be detailed and participants can follow these while the lecture sections are given. During each session, participants will be asked to discuss selected questions in small sub-groups and report their findings to the whole group for further discussion. This format is particularly effective for groups with differing levels of prior knowledge and perhaps different levels of ability. Each day concludes with a scenario and projection exercise which will help participants to systematically analyse current and future trends in Russia.

Course Objectives:

Certificate of Attendance

Stoke Campus.

Duration 3 days

Date 19-21 May 2015

Times 09.00 – 17.30

Course Director(s)



An understanding of contemporary Russian politics



An understanding of current trends in Russian foreign policy and security



An understanding of Russia’s role in the post-Soviet space



An understanding of Russia’s role in the European and global security order



An evaluation of future trends in Russia

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students who wish to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Masters level, and submit 2 assignments - 1 x 1500 word essay and 1 x 4000 word essay, marked at Masters level. On successful completion, they will get 30 Masters level credits. Information on this option will be made available during the course.

General Description

In addition to the 21 hours of the workshop, they will undertake a further 50 hours of study organised through the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions.

This course is divided into three parts. It starts with an introduction to current Russian Politics under President Putin, examining how the state works and political decisions are being made in areas such as security and foreign policy, before exploring issues such as the role of the oligarchs, media and civil society in Russia. This part of the course is designed to increase participants’ knowledge about the ideas, influences and forces that have shaped the new Russia. The second part of the course provides an overview of Russia`s role in dealing with the current insecurity and instability in the Russian and post-Soviet space, with reference to the North Caucasus and Chechnya, Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan. In the last part of this course, participants will explore Russia’s role in the European and global security order. Examples of the themes covered include Russia`s relations with NATO, as well as Russia`s role in international crises, among them the Arab Spring, Syria, and Iran. The course finishes with an analysis of Russia’s ability to play a more constructive stabilising role in European and global security systems.

Bibliography - Two books and a selection of articles and chapters will be provided for all students taking the follow-up programme for credits (within the fee).

Intended Student Population All ranks with and interest in the subject.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Intended Student Population

Security and Conflict in Central Asia

All ranks with and interest in the subject.

University

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Staffordshire

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Location Stoke Campus.

Students will be provided with a lengthy course handbook which outlines key aspects of the subjects to be investigated. It is also suggested that the students visit selected web-sites (see above) that introduce aspects of Central Asian politics and security.

Duration 3 days

Date

Additional Information

9-11 June 2015

Delivery Mode - The module will be delivered in a workshop format. The intention is to deliver information and explain the context of the material under examination in lecture format with discussion points built into the lecture material. PowerPoint will be used and will include images and additional video material. The provided notes will be detailed and participants can follow these while the lecture sections are given. During each session, participants will be asked to discuss selected questions in small sub-groups and report their findings to the whole group for further discussion. This format is particularly effective for groups with differing levels of prior knowledge and perhaps different levels of ability. The course concludes with a scenario and projection exercise which will help participants to systematically analyse current and future trends in Central Asia.

Times 09.00 – 17.30

Course Director(s) Dr Rainer-Elk Anders, Supported by: Dr Sita Bali

Course Objectives: •

An understanding of the history and culture of Central Asia



An understanding of current trends in Central Asian politics and security



An understanding of the political, economic and sociocultural similarities and differences between Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan



An understanding of the sources of conflict in Central Asia



An understanding of the complexity of the security system in the wider Central Asian region



An evaluation of future trends in Central Asia

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students who wish to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Masters level, and submit 2 assignments - 1 x 1500 word essay and 1 x 4000 word essay, marked at Masters level. On successful completion, they will get 30 Masters level credits. Information on this option will be made available during the course.

General Description The course starts with an introduction to the history of Central Asia during pre-Islamic and early Islamic times, before focusing on the 19th and 20th century when the region became the subject of continued geostrategic interests by Britain, the US, the Soviet Union and Russia, as well as by neighbouring countries such as China, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan. The topics covered include the role of Islam; the rivalry between the British and Russian Empires (the Great Game); Soviet rule; and post-1991 independence of the Central Asian republics.

In addition to the 21 hours of the workshop, they will undertake a further 50 hours of study organised through the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions. Bibliography - Two books and a selection of articles and chapters will be provided for all students taking the follow-up programme for credits (within the fee).

Based on the historical and cultural understanding gained, the course will mainly focus on the present state of politics, security and conflict in Central Asia. Highlighting the importance of Central Asia as a world region, the countries examined are Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Discussions around state relations in Central Asia, as well as the conflicting strategic interests of Britain, the US, Russia, China and Turkey, will form the backbone of a deeper analysis of the emerging regional security architecture in Central Asia. By covering issues such as ethnic conflict; increasing social polarization; the conflict spill-over from neighbouring Afghanistan; rise of Islamic fundamentalism and terrorism; the difficulties of border management and border security on the borders to Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan; and the increased military presence of foreign powers in the region, the course will conclude by examining future security and conflict scenarios for Central Asia.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Sovereignty and Intervention after the Cold War

Joining instructions, handouts and pre-course training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachment 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

University Westminster

Additional Information:

Location

Pre-course delivery will include: Access to and use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment with additional material delivered by e-mail where required; delegates will also have access to an asynchronous communication environment in which to communicate with each other and with the course tutor. The residential element of delivery will include: The physical learning environment of the University, including the standard IT specification for all teaching rooms; formal teaching processes, exercises and simulations; and, access to specialist facilities at the University, such as language laboratories and subject-specific journal collections in the relevant library.

Central London

Duration 3.5 days

Date 9-12 March 2015

Times Days 1-3:

09:00 to 17:00

Day 4:

09:00 to 12:30

Certificate of Attendance:

Course Director(s) Mr Paul Robertson

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Course Objectives

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT):

The aims of the course are to introduce participants to the history of sovereignty and its traditional meaning; to identify the key sources of controversy inherent in the notion of sovereignty; to identify the key forces which have emerged to challenge the status of sovereignty; to provide insight into seminal events which have affected our understanding of sovereignty; to identify the key themes relating to sovereignty in the post-Cold War era; and to provide insight into the differing theoretical perspectives on sovereignty’s contemporary evolution.

Subject to satisfactory completion of the formal assessment requirements, this course will provide 15 credits at Level 6 and, subject to the relevant course and university regulations, can contribute to the modular structure of undergraduate single and combined honours awards in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities.

General Description The nature of sovereignty has changed dramatically in the postCold War era. The rights and responsibilities of states have been challenged by the increased focus on states’ human rights record and domestic political system. This course explores the forces which have shaped the evolution of sovereignty in the contemporary era and analyses the catalysts behind these changes.

Intended Student Population Access to Course Open to all Ranks

Academic Level Year 3 − Undergraduate

Key Concepts Sovereignty

Key Learning Factors and contexts relevant to the contemporary evolution of the concept of sovereignty

Prior Knowledge Specialised interest in international affairs

Prior Experience None

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title



CBRNE2 Terrorism: terrorist use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, extreme explosives and electronic / digital weapons;



Economic Terrorism: the use of economic targeting by paramilitary groups;



‘New’ Terrorism: origins and development of al-Qaida prior to 2001.



The ‘Global War on Terror’: US coalition response to 9/11 in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere.

4.5 days



Date

The complex deployment of political and terrorist violence in: Nigeria, Sahara Sahel, Somalia, and Middle East.



Terrorism Prevention: strategies and lessons learned



Counter Terrorism: An assessment of the effectiveness of current counter-terrorism strategies in relation to the viability and resurgence of al-Qaeda.

Terrorism: Trends, Causes and Responses.

University Peace Studies Division, School of Social and International Studies, University of Bradford.

Location Heaton Mount, Bradford, West Yorkshire.

Duration

23-27 February 2015

Times Mon (24 Feb) 14.00–18.30; Tues–Thurs (25-27 Feb) 09.00–17.30;

Intended Student Population

Fri (28 Feb) 09.00–16.00.

Open Entry: The course is designed to appeal both to those coming new to the subject and those already working in related fields but looking for significant professional development.

Course Director(s) Dr Owen Greene

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Course Objectives

Joining Instructions, pre-course reading list and training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

The course will provide an introduction to the different definitions, forms and trends of contemporary terrorism, counter-terrorism and terrorism prevention, exploring the depth and subtlety of the issues involved. It will explore issues of political violence and use of terror in the local and national contexts (in relation to both liberal democratic states and authoritarian, fragile or and conflict affected states) and also the development and characteristics of transnational terrorist networks. Drawing on case studies, the course aim to explore strategies and experiences for preventing and combating terrorism, and their interrelationships with issues of tackling complex conflcit and transaiotnal criminal networks. It will aim to: •

Enhance the students’ capacities for critical analysis of the issues;



Examine and understand the wide range of strategies employed in international terrorism and counter-terrorism; and



Allow the students to explore a range of informed opinion and sources of information and analysis.

Additional Information The Course Director (Dr Owen Greene) and his team of international experts on terrorism and political violence in a range of context, including Europe, Africa, Middle East and Asia. Speakers- A combination of University of Bradford ‘in-house’ speakers with relevant specialist academic and policy/practitioner experience, combined with selected external academic, policy and practitioner speakers with excellent specialist expertise. The speakers will vary from year to year, but will include for example: Paul Rogers, John Russell, Afshin Shahi, Yunas Samud, Valetina Bartellucci, and experts from relevant UK agencies and institutes,and specialists on specific sub-regional terrorist and political violence contexts.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT)

General Description

Participants have the opportunity to register with the University of Bradford to use this course as a basis for pursuing an post-graduate level module on Terrorism: trends, causes, consequences, which is accredited by the University of Bradford (20 credits). Those wishing to take this option will be required to undertake further guided academic study for some 12 weeks after the course ends on 28 February and also to prepare and submit course work for assessment. This option will be introduced to all participants on day one of the the course.

The course will consider the nature and forms of current ‘terrorism’ encompassing different forms of non-state terrorism (transnational, local, etc.) and also state terrorism through lectures and desktop exercises. The current context for terrorist action will be examined through a range of case studies, including al-Qaeda; the experience of ‘Global War on Terror’ and recent developments in counter-terrorism; and complex terrorist/political violence in relation to the Pakistan/Afghanistan; Sahara Sahel; West Africa, Somalia; and Syria/Lebanon/Iraq.. Participants will examine the causes of terrorism, why some actors resort to extremism, political violence and catastrophic attacks, and strategies for preventing and combatting terrorism . Specialised topics will include a selection from:

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

It is assumed participants to the course have an understanding of military operations but perhaps limited understanding of its resource implications journalism.

The Business of War and Terrorism

University

Additional Information

Staffordshire

Delivery Mode - The module will be delivered in a workshop format. The intention is to deliver information and explain the context of the material in lecture format with discussion points built into the lecture material. Power Point will be used and will include images and additional video materials. The provided notes will be detailed and participants can follow these while the lecture sections are given.

Location Stoke Campus.

Duration 3 days

09.00 – 17.30

Participants will, in sub-groups, be asked to look at selected questions and in their groups to come to conclusions after a period of discussion. They will then report back to the full-group and further full-group discussion will take place. This format is particularly effective for groups with differing levels of prior knowledge and perhaps different levels of ability.

Course Director(s)

Certificate of Attendance

Date 04-06 November 2014

Times

Dr. Ian Jackson and David Golby

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Course Objectives •

An understanding of the relationship between the Business of War and Terrorism



An Evaluation of the impact of resource constraints in situations of conflict



An understanding of how the changing nature of war has impacted on force deployment



An understanding of the changing nature of terrorism, use of the peace dividend and military financing.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students who wish to gain accreditation for this module can do a 6 week follow-up course by distance learning, taught at Masters level, and submit an assignment - 1 x 3000 word essay, marked at Level 6. Successful completion, will gain 15 Masters level credits. Information on this option will be made available during the course. In addition to the 21 hours of the workshop they will undertake a further 20 hours of study organised though the Blackboard virtual learning environment, which will include directed reading and engagement within discussion forums around focused questions.

General Description

Accredited course work will be fully supported by the University Blackboard Site ‘ The Business of War and Terrorism. This contains comprehensive material and links to key websites/ think tanks.

The Economic Impact of War - Good wars World Wars I & II Public Goods: NATO Weapons Procurement I -

PFI Privatisation : How the US Army Protects its Trucks

Weapons Procurement II -

Major Defence Platforms Case Studies: Aircraft Carriers JSF

The Economics of Security -

Defence Futures Entente Cordiale

Terrorism I -

The Nature of Terrorism: The Perception of Risk

Terrorism II -

Principal-Agent Theory and Conflict - Case Studies: Afghanistan/ Pakistan Sri Lanka

Intended Student Population All ranks with and interest in the subject.

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. Students will be provided with a course handbook which outlines key aspects of the subjects to be investigated. This will be available both on a CD and in print form. The handbook contains a number of references to key websites: these are linked to the University Blackboard Site ‘the Business of War and Terrorism’ to which it is expected students will have access.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Cambridge Campus

the role of domestic criminal justice systems in preventing, investigating and responding to acts of terror will be examined and the punishment and consequences of punishment will be critically analysed. Running throughout the module will be the theme of peace-making and peacekeeping – we will explore and critically evaluate successful initiatives throughout the world with the aim of applying such programmes to selected countries who are currently mobilised in the ‘war against terror’.

Duration

Intended Student Population

Terror as Crime

University Anglia Ruskin University

Location

This course is open to all ranks and will appeal equally to those with previous experience or an interest in this field of study. The course will draw upon delegates’ previous and current experiences.

3 days

Date 8–10 April 2015

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Times

Joining Instructions and pre-course materials will be forwarded to you by email between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences. A course handbook will be provided on arrival.

0900 - 1730

Course Director(s)

Additional Information

Colleen Moore, MPhil

The course will have a blend of practice and theory incorporating current events, latest thinking and practice. Sessions will be interactive and participative and designed to engage participants in lively debate. A variety of delivery approaches will be employed, from critique and debate, and case studies videos and guest lecturers where appropriate.

Course Objectives •

Demonstrate a thorough and critical understanding of a range of national and international strategies that combat terrorism



Critically evaluate the paradigms through which conflict resolution and peace initiatives have been successfully implemented









This course will be led by our university academics who have rich organisational and consulting experience, as well as varied research interests.

Demonstrate conceptual and critical awareness of traditional and contemporary methods of terror-mongering and its underlying causes

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Identify, distinguish and critically appraise the broad sociopolitical and cultural approaches to mobilising societies in response to serious threats

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Students may be able to undertake additional study and assessment to gain 15 Postgraduate credits if they reach the required standard.

Engage analytically with the complex debates concerning the impact of terrorism and converging and diverging responses to it

Study support and online learning resources may be available to these participants during this period. In addition to the course handbook additional handouts and materials may be distributed as relevant.

Demonstrate confidence and competency in the presentation and discussion of ideas and strategies to respond effectively to terror and moral panic, in written and oral form.

General Description Criminology has sought to understand and explain many crimes and criminal behaviours, but despite an increasingly media-fuelled culture of fear and fear-mongering, little academic attention has been paid to the impact of ‘terror’ as opposed to ‘fear’ of crime. Words such as terror, terrorism, terrorist and the ‘war on terror’ are now a part of our everyday language, but what do these terms really mean? The notion of mobilising a nation through terror-information will be evaluated in relation to the recent adoption and acceptance of regular risk assessment and analysis measures, as well as propaganda. In addition, the ‘war on terror’ will be contrasted with the notion that ‘war is terror’. The shift from ‘old’ terrorism to ‘new’ terrorism will be investigated and cases of domestic and international terror attacks will be studied in conjunction with ‘ordinary’ criminal offences associated with terrorism, such as drugtrafficking, arms-dealing and identity manipulation. Additionally,

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Intended Student Population

Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

This course will be suitable for those with a professional and/or academic interest in terrorism and counter-terrorism. Professional counter-terrorism experience is not required, and neither is it essential that students should be familiar with theoretical and critical debates concerning terrorism.

University Exeter

Location Streatham Campus, Exeter

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Duration 3 days

Joining Instructions, Handouts and Training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachments between 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Date

Additional Information

03 - 05 February 2015

The UK National Security Strategy lists Cyber and Terrorism as the most pressing threats whilst the risks of international conflict in failed or fragile states has not receded.

Times 0845 - 1700

This course stands alone but will be particularly effective in conjunction with “Cyber Security: National Resilience and International Governance” course and “Counter-Insurgency: Conventional War of the Twenty-First Century”.

Course Director(s) Prof Paul Cornish

Course Objectives

Certificate of Attendance

The causes and manifestations of international terrorism, together with governmental and public responses to terrorism, are at the heart of the international security policy debate. The goal of this Course is to provide students with a close understanding of the principal features both of the academic and policy debates on international terrorism and of anti-/counter-terrorism responses. The Course will cover, in outline, the history of terrorism and the problems in definition, analysis and response. The Course will focus on UK approaches to Counter Terrorism, making comparison with other governments’ approaches and in the context of the work of relevant international organisations.

A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course. Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Participants will gain 15 credits towards a postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or Master if they undertake the post course assignment and reach the required standard.

By the end of this Short Course students will have increased their knowledge and understanding of the complexity of international terrorism and counter-terrorism and will have tested their ideas and opinions in open forum and debate.

General Description This Short Course is largely, but not exclusively focused on terrorism as a problem of public policy in the United Kingdom. The course will be based on a series of lectures and presentations, together with seminar discussions in which students will be required to take the lead. •

Day 1 of the Course will serve as an introduction to the subject, with a discussion of the history of international terrorism and an account of the problems which attend the definition, analysis and response to terrorism.



Day 2 of the Course will examine ‘Terrorism in Practice’ in three areas, covering actual and potential terrorist use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Weapons (CBRN), and the terrorist use of cyber space.



Day 3 of the Course will be concerned with CounterTerrorism, focusing largely on the UK approach. The final day of the Course will examine three aspects of counterterrorism: ‘Problems and Principles’ in counter-terrorism; followed by an examination of ‘Policy and Practice’ and an assessment of ‘Technology and Counter-Terrorism’.

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Regional and Strategic Studies Course Title

Prior Knowledge

Themes in the Global Politics of Energy

Specialised interest in international affairs

University

Prior Experience None

Westminster

Joining Instructions and Pre-Course Work

Location

Joining instructions, handouts and pre-course training materials will be forwarded to you by email attachment 4 – 5 weeks before the course commences.

Central London

Duration 3.5 days

Additional Information

Date

Pre-course delivery will include: Access to and use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment with additional material delivered by e-mail where required; delegates will also have access to an asynchronous communication environment in which to communicate with each other and with the course tutor. The residential element of delivery will include: The physical learning environment of the University, including the standard IT specification for all teaching rooms; formal teaching processes, exercises and simulations; and, access to specialist facilities at the University, such as language laboratories and subject-specific journal collections in the relevant library.

02-05 February 2015

Times Days 1-3:

09:00 to 17:00

Day 4:

09:00 to 12:30

Course Director(s) Mr Paul Robertson

Course Objectives: The aims of the course are to develop participants’ understanding of the global politics of energy and its relevance to the contemporary debates in political sciences and international relations; to explore the evolution of the global politics of energy and the key historical stages; to develop familiarity with the wide actors that have shaped and reshaped the politics of energy such as sovereign states, violent and non-violent movements, National Oil Companies, International Oil/Gas Companies, and major sub-constructing companies; to understand, on the one hand, how the international system has shaped the politics of energy and on the other, what role the politics of energy have played in shaping the international system in the 20th and early 21st centuries; and to gain knowledge of some regional cases that are vital for understanding the global politics of oil: Middle East, ex-Soviet Union, sub-Saharan Africa, and South America.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

Credit Accumulation Transfer Points (CAT) Subject to satisfactory completion of the formal assessment requirements, this course will provide 15 credits at Level 6 and, subject to the relevant course and university regulations, can contribute to the modular structure of undergraduate single and combined honours awards in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities.

General Description: The course introduces participants to the key themes in the global politics of energy and seeks to develop participants’ familiarity with the wide range of actors that have shaped the politics of energy on the international, regional and local level. The course examines the main approaches to the study of energy and demonstrates their relevance to today’s world. The course takes a long term historical perspective to the study of energy. It starts with the end of the coal era, imperialism, western domination and finishes with the rise of new actors on the world stage that are set to redefine the politics of energy as we know it.

Intended Student Population Access to Course Open to all Ranks

Academic Level Year 3 − Undergraduate

Key Concepts Globalisation and the politics of energy

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Languages Course Title

the residential. Phase 2 (residential) is an intensive workshop in which participants are engaged primarily in practical exercises and analysis of their own linguistic performance. The role of the instructor is to encourage participants to reflect on their own language skills and their ability to develop strategies relevant to them through engagement with the experience and expertise held by the group. Phase 3, the post-course phase, provides delegates with an opportunity to submit an 800-word written report and receive feedback.

Intensive Language Workshops

University Westminster

Location Central London

Duration 3.5 days

Intended Student Population

Date:

Access to Course

Arabic

Open to all Ranks

2 – 5 June 2015

Academic Level

Farsi

Broadly equivalent to Year 3 Undergraduate

2 - 5 June 2015

Key Concepts

French

Refer to NATO STANAG 6001 (edition 4)

6 – 9 January 2015 and 2 – 5 June 2015

Key Skills Refer to NATO STANAG 6001 (edition 4)

German

Prior Knowledge

2 – 5 June 2015

Level of linguistic competence appropriate to the level of study — assessed by a diagnostic test prior to acceptance on the course. (Minimum SLP 2/B1 equivalent)

Russian 2 – 5 June 2015

Spanish

Prior Experience

6 – 9 January 2015

Relevant linguistic training

Times Days 1-3:

09:00 to 17:00

Day 4:

09:00 to 14:00

Course Handbook and Pre-Course Work You will normally receive the course handbook 5 weeks in advance of the residential course. Pre-course training materials will be forwarded to you 3 weeks before the residential course commences.

Course Director(s) Maryse Bray, Head of Westminster Professional Language Centre

Additional Information

Course Objectives

Pre-course delivery will include access to and use of the University’s Virtual Learning Environment with additional material delivered by e-mail where required. Delegates will also have access to an asynchronous communication environment in which they can communicate with each other and with the course tutors. The residential element of delivery will include: the physical learning environment of the University (including the standard IT specification for all teaching rooms); formal teaching processes; exercises and simulations; access to specialist facilities at the University such as subject-specific journal collections in the relevant library when appropriate.

The aim of the course is to provide delegates (minimum entry language level SLP 2/B1 equivalent) with systematic and intensive language enhancement in all 4 skills. Delegates will also develop strategies to improve their general linguistic competence on this theme-based course. All delegates will be provided with a diagnostic of their post-course performance identifying strengths and areas for improvement.

General Description The content of the course will derive from the pre-course diagnostic of each cohort and will seek to balance the specific needs of individual participants against those of the group as a whole. The course consists of 3 phases: •

Phase 1 is a 3-week pre-course phase.



Phase 2 is the 3.5-day residential course.



Phase 3 is an optional 4-week post-course phase.

Certificate of Attendance A Certificate of Attendance will be awarded upon completion of the course.

During Phase 1 delegates have access to listening and reading materials aligned to the themes that will be addressed during

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University Short Course Programme (USCP)

Is any priority given to senior ranks?

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I apply?

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No. We do however, try to include a spread of ranks/rates in the selection, dependant on the range of ranks that have applied and sift criteria. Check that the course is the one for you by reading the course descriptions in the USCP Prospectus available from your Education Co-ordinator or visit www.raf.mod.uk/raflearningforces

What is the USCP? The USCP has been running since 1953 and is now encompassed by the Lifelong Learning initiative for the Armed Forces. It is a tri-Service Programme which was set up to provide personal and professional development in an academic environment. It is not designed to assist with job related training.

Complete the Application Form which is available from your Education Co-ordinator on Station or from the above website address. Once you have completed the form you should send it to your Education Co-ordinator on Station for them to forward it to the appropriate Service desk. (see contact details on page 4)

Who can attend these courses?

When will I know if I have been given a place on the course?

All Service personnel can apply to attend these courses.

Selection takes place 6 weeks prior to the start of the course however this may vary to take into consideration public holidays. Students should receive notification regardless of whether their application has been successful or not through their Service USCP Co-ordinator (See Page 4).

Can MOD civilians attend these courses? Civilians will only be allocated a place on these courses if no Service personnel are available. Therefore, as the USCP is very popular across the 3 Services, a civilian is unlikely to be allocated a place.

Students who have been unsuccessful will be notified by email 4 – 5 weeks prior to the start of the course. Alternatively, you can call USCP Co-ordinator after the 6 week point and you will be informed whether you have been successful or not.

How much will it cost? All tuition, food and accommodation costs for the duration of the course are paid under a central contract arrangement by the parent Service. Travel costs are not included and are to be paid by either their parent unit or student. Prospective students must check that their own units are able to meet travel costs before applying for a course. Students who need to travel over a long distance should seek unit authorisation prior to the course for any overnight subsistence allowance required either before or after the course.

What do I do if I am unsuccessful? If you have not been selected for a course you will be placed on the reserve list. If you are unable to take a place at short notice you should cancel your place on the reserve list. If someone who has been selected for a course has to cancel, your relevant contact point (see page 4) will telephone you to offer you a short notice place.

What if I need an extra night’s accommodation? If you need extra accommodation this is at the cost of your unit. To book extra accommodation contact the Hotel Booking Service who will do it for you. If the course is being held in a hotel try to book into the same hotel using the Hotel Booking Service. Some of the universities provide accommodation the evening before the start of the course, but this is not the case for all courses. If you have not received your joining instructions for the course and you are not sure of the start time, please call your relevant contact point details of which are on page 4 of this brochure.

Why was I unsuccessful? There could be a number of reasons why you have been unsuccessful and the most common are listed below: 1. The number of applications. There are a set number of places allocated per course, and, on average, twice the number of applications to the number of places available are received. There will, therefore be a number of applicants that are suitable to attend the course but unsuccessful because of course place availablity.

How do you select the people who will be attending? The programme has a tri-Service selection criteria, the basics are as follows:

2. You require the course to assist you in your primary duty. If this is the case then the training should be supplied by your Trade/Branch Sponsor.

1. Application Form. Correctly completed with all * boxes filled in.

3. You are due to leave the Service in the next 2 years.

2. Reasons for Study. Make sure your reasons for study are as strong as possible. Remember that these courses are for personal development, not for job related training. If you are currently studying in your own time make sure you include it in this area. If you have never attended a USCP course before then priority will be given to your application. See the current USCP DIN.

4. Your application was not received in time to be included in the initial selection (6 weeks prior to the start of the course). However, if possible, you will still be placed on the reserve list.

Can I apply for more than one course Multiple applications will be accepted. Although it will not guarantee you will be selected.

CATs

3. Date of Discharge/Exit. If you are due out in the next 2 years your chances of selection are lower than someone with more than 2 years to serve. However, you will be on the reserve list and if a cancellation is received USCP Co-ordinator will telephone you to see if you are still able to take a place. If you insert N/A or leave blank it will be assumed that you are in your last 2 years.

The extra assignment for the credits is elective. The agreement is between you and the University which may include an additional fee.

Priority Passage

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By completing the extra assignment does not give personnel a priority passage on to another USCP course.

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RP OR G O R G A RM AM ME M

Application to Attend a University Short Course

FED 1011

(Please note application will not be processed if unauthorised by Ship/Establishment/Unit/Personal Learning Advisor/Station Learning Centres and personal details & backgrounds are not typed)

* Must be completed * 1. Course Details Title: Dates:

Applicants Service RN Army RAF

Location:

Can you accept a place at short notice? Yes/No 2. Personal Details (use block letters) * Rank/Rate:

* Full Name:

* Service Number:

* Regiment/Corps/Branch/Trade:

* Section/Department:

* Ship/Establishment/Unit/Station (Full Postal Address, including Rm No. - Bldg No./Name)

* Parent Unit (if applicable):

* Type of Engagement: * Tour Expiry Date: * Service Exit Date:

* Military Telephone Number: Mobile Number: * Work Email:

Background * Most recent educational qualifications: Title:

Date:

For Language Courses please enter present grade: * Other relevant experience

* University Short Courses attended in the last 2 years Title: Date:

Location:

* Reasons for wishing to attend the course:

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* 3. Certification of attendance by applicant I am applying to attend the course named overleaf and certify that the information I have given on this application is to the best of my knowledge correct. I understand that once I have been selected that I may not withdraw without the prior approval of my Commanding Officer/Line Manager. Also that I must inform all relevant personnel including my service desk, without delay if for any reason I am unable to attend the course. I undertake to attend all course sessions punctually and to conform to the domestic arrangements made by my service desk on my behalf. Signature:

Date:

NB: By signing this form I confirm I have read and understood the current USCP DIN.

* 4. Authorisation Application approved by Divisional Officer/HOD/ Section/Department Commander (Line Manager of Minimum SO3 Level). I certify that the applicant will be allowed to attend the course named overleaf. Signature:

Date:

Name in block letters:

Rank:

Appointment:

Ext:

Other remarks: NB: In the event of a cancellation the relevant Service Desk should be informed without delay so that a replacement can be found. Only when, either the exigency of Service duty, or a Service recognised compassionate case, prevents attendance on a course will cancellation fees be waived. In all other instances of non-attendance, cancellation fees may be recovered from the applicant’s parent unit, or the individual. (Please see DIN for details).

5. Forward to: Ship / Establishment/Unit / *Personal Learning Advisor (RAF Personnel) Date forwarded to Service Desk/Education Centre: Name

Education Centre Stamp Required

Rank/Grade

Signature Telephone Number Email Please send applications to applicants own service desk as detailed below: Naval Service Applications: NETS Coord, Education & Resettlement Centre (Waterfront), Building 1/154, PP89, HM Naval Base, Portsmouth. PO1 3NH Fax 9380 24498 or 02392 724498 Army Applications: USCP Coord, Army Headquarters, IDL 430, Marlborough Lines, Andover, Hants. SP11 8HJ Fax 94391 2039 or 01264 382039 RAF Applications: USCP Coord, Accreditation, Room 227, Trenchard Hall, RAF Cranwell, Sleaford, Lincs. NG34 8HB Fax 95751 8180 or 01400 268180

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