Spring 2004

Semester Book

Contents

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Letter from Semester Book Elective Teacher • Credits Semester Book Elective Class Where CELOP Students Come From CELOP Pizza Party Student Profiles

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Butsakorn Chevathamanon • Seung-hee “Cristina” Kang • David Trasend • Chia-Pei “Etta” Chou • Melinda Barbaràs • Violeta Bentolila Guahmich • Veli Marie Chabebe • Anabel Castro Miranda • Eid Salek • Taku Takayama

Start of Semester Get-Togethers: Jillian’s & Trolley Tour Birthday Parties CELOP Alumni

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Hiroka Shinokawa • Keitaro Yoshioka • Susumu Uematsu

Joanne Fox’s Class in Providence and Newport Class Pictures: Core Classes Class Pictures: Elective Classes Photo Contest Winners New England Patriots’ Superbowl Parade by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur & Rawya Husain Go Go Celtics! by Rawya Husain All About Boston by Marco Negroni What I Love About Brazil by Taissa Amaral dos Santos What I Love About Nepal by Subarna Basnet St. Patrick’s Day by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur Interview: Lesley Andrews by Jeong-Seok “Jason” Lee & Khalid “Hilali” Al-Ghamdi Jokes & Riddles compiled by Rawya Husain Valentine’s Day by Natasha Amendola April Fool’s Day by Rawya Husain Becoming Parents: A Conversation by Santiago Machicado Major News Events of the Semester Holidays—A Survey by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee and Natasha Amendola Friday Movie Club at CELOP by Jenn Kay Kosch The Simpsons: Sitcom Club by Jenn Kay Kosch Language Through Laughter by Natasha Amendola Conversation Partners Program by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur Boston Photo Quiz Movie Reviews To Kill a Mockingbird by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee and Hwa Young “Jennifer” Yoon Pirates of the Caribbean by Rawya Husain Under the Tuscan Sun by Marco Negroni Theater Review Blue Man Group by Hwa Young “Jennifer” Yoon and Hee Yun “Angela” Hur Restaurant Reviews Cafè Belo by Rawya Husain China Pearl by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee

Marco’s Italian Recipes by Marco Negroni More CELOP Pizza Party Building at BU: Constructing Student Village/Athletic Facility Crossword Puzzle by Lesley Andrews Spring 2004 CELOP Faculty CELOP Staff

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Letter from Semester Book Elective Teacher • Credits

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Dear CELOP students, As another semester draws to a close and pathways diverge, good-byes always seem to be a mixture of the sorrowful with the sweet. It goes without saying, how sad we feel to part from new friendships and acquaintances forged over the past few months. However, the sweetness lies in the moments we’ve shared and the memories we’ve created that will remain with us for a lifetime. A round of congratulations is in order for all the CELOP students who braved the unusually bitter cold temperatures this winter and oftentimes unreliable “T” in order to come to class and successfully complete their studies here. A microcosm of the world at large, the students at CELOP come here to learn English, but end up teaching one another much about their respective cultures and life philosophies. In time, they leave here with a greater understanding, tolerance and respect for others who may be very different from themselves, and the world is infinitely richer because of this. This Semester Book is a reflection of just who the Spring 2004 CELOP students are. It is a record not only of your impressions, your dreams, your playfulness, your accomplishments and aspirations, but also of the mark you have left upon each other, CELOP, Boston and ultimately the world. We thank you for coming to CELOP and sharing your adventurous spirit. We hope you will always fondly remember your special time here at CELOP. Be sure to stay in touch, and do come back to visit if you ever get the chance. Doreen Miller, SBE teacher and editor COVER: Headshots by Khalid “Hilali” Al-Ghamdi; concept by Semester Book class.

ILLUSTRATION PAGE 7: Andreina De Lamo, Fall 2002. Send correspondence regarding the Semester Book to John de Szendeffy, [email protected]

www.bu.edu/celop/alumni All material ©Center for English Language and Orientation Programs, Boston University, 2004. [v. XII.0]

CELOP SPRING 2004 SEMESTER BOOK Editors Design Production Assistance Photographers Distribution Contributors

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John de Szendeffy, Doreen Miller John de Szendeffy Lesley Andrews, Jonathan White Lesley Andrews, Jonathan White Gabriella Campozano Jenn Kay Kosch, Lesley Andrews, Jonathan White also Judy Di Leo, Marcella Framondi

This is the 12th edition of the CELOP Semester Book. It is published every semester and available at the Front Desk free of charge to all current students. All Semester Books can be downloaded from the CELOP Alumni Web site as Adobe Acrobat (PDF) documents, www.bu.edu/celop.

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Semester Book Elective Class

The Semester Book Class

Spring 2004

with

@ WORK

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Doreen Miller

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Semester Book Elective Class

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We Are the Semester Book Class

by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur

We angela jennifer

rawya

create the Semester Book! It is an exciting experience. Students can experience totally different things in this class, such as interviewing other students, soliciting ads at area restaurants, going to the movies, going to Blue Man Group, going to the Patriots’ Parade, etc. We had so many awesome and new experiences while in the Semester Book class. Actually, the book depends on teamwork, and we did an exellent job. I’m proud of all my Semester Book team members! If I could come back to CELOP, I’d choose the Semester Book elective without hesitating.

natasha

jason marco

hilali doreen

HEE YUN “ANGELA” HUR: cute, baby face, good first impression, pretty and friendly HWA YOUNG “JENNIFER” YOON: nice smile, long hair, hyper, friendly, pretty RAWYA HUSAIN: clever, like Julia Roberts (haha), kind, curious NATASHA AMENDOLA: nice, active, responsible, a good person JONG-SEOK “JASON” LEE: red face, extremely polite, wondrous, nice guy, hard worker MARCO NEGRONI: tall, humorous, loves himself, reticent KHALID “HILALI” AL-GHAMDI: shy but tough guy, mysterious, soft-spoken, a very kind person, cute DOREEN MILLER: one of the best teachers in CELOP, always smiling, generous We hope you enjoy our Spring 2004 Semester Book and remember CELOP!

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Illustration: Andreina De Lamo, Fall 2002

Where CELOP Students come from

Bolivia Brazil China Colombia Germany France Greece Hong Kong Hungary Indonesia Iran

Italy Japan South Korea Kuwait Mexico Oman Peru Poland Portugal Russia Saudi Arabia

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Spain Switzerland Taiwan Thailand Turkey United Arab Emirates Puerto Rico Venezuela Yemen

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23 JANUARY 2004

CELOP PIZZA PARTY

Pizza Party

Pizza Party

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Pizza Party

Pizza Party

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Student Profiles

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P ROFILES Students bring an amazing variety of experience and interests to CELOP. The Semester Book class students interviewed a few students to get a sense of that experience and their ambitions as well.

but she thinks the weather is terrible in winter.

Butsakorn Chevathamanon Thailand

by Angela Hur

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utsakorn Chevathamanon I think is a very hard name. She said that her full name is so difficult and long to remember, that her Japanese friend gave her a nickname “Yosuke.” So she is usually called “Yoske” at CELOP. Actually, before I met her, I guessed she was Arabic because her name sounded Arabic. However, she is from Pataya, Thailand. She is 26 years old. She already graduated from a university in Thailand where she majored in law. She will apply to B.U. Law School next year for her Masters Degree.

Her hobbies are taking photos and reading. Also, she likes science fiction, mystery and horror movies. However, she has been so busy lately that her last movie was Pirates of The Caribbean. After that movie, she couldn’t go to any movies until now because her major is law and she has to study hard. Poor girl! Her favorite actor is Johnny Depp, and her favorite actress is Julia Roberts. She also likes music, especially pop music, and her favorite musicians are Britney Spears and Michael Bolton. If her house were on fire, she would grab her wallet and camera. Also, if she had just 24 hours to live, she would call her family if she were in Boston, or she would drive to a beach and walk along the shore with someone she loves if she were in Thailand. In her country, there are a lot of beaches, and especially there is a beach near her house. Her favorite place to be in Thailand is at the beach which is only 15-20 minutes away. She loves the beach because it is the only place where she can relax, feel comfortable and relieve stress. She also likes the spa!

Unfortunately, when she was in Thailand, she couldn’t travel abroad because her family owns its own business and everyone works almost 24 hours a day, so they have no free time. Actually, Boston is the first city in a foreign country she has ever traveled to.

There are six members in her family: mother, father, three younger brothers and herself. She is the eldest sister in her family. Also, she has four dogs in her country; all dogs are Cocker Spaniel. She lives alone off-campus. She chose Boston because her father studied in Boston a long time ago, so her father recommended she come here. Before coming to CELOP, she studied at Northeastern University, but she wanted to change schools, so she came to CELOP. Actually, this is her second semester at CELOP. She has been in Boston for six months. She likes Boston because of the historical atmosphere of Boston,

Unfortunately, when she was in Thailand, she couldn’t travel abroad because her family owns its own business and everyone works almost 24 hours a day, so they have no free time. Actually, Boston is the first city in a foreign country she has ever traveled to. She wants to travel to Venice, Italy because she thinks it’s beautiful. However, she doesn’t like Italian food which might be a bit of a problem. In addition to liking American food, she likes to try new types of food. I hope she can find more free time for herself and have some fun in Boston while she is still here!

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Student Profiles

Cristina Kang Spain

by Jennifer Yoon & Natasha Amendola

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n the CELOP lobby, we met a girl who looked jolly. Her name is Kang, Seung-hee, and she is 20 years old. She was born in Korea, but she moved to Madrid, Spain when she was 5 years old. In Spanish, her other name is Cristina. She has been studying medicine at a Spanish university. However, last year she stopped her studies in Spain and came to California to attend an English program for 6 months. She has good memories of California because she was able to meet tolerant and friendly people and enjoy sunny weather. Also, she said if you go there, you will discover many cultures and be able to learn more about them. She told me about a funny episode there. She went to a birthday party, but she didn’t know the person who was having the birthday. After the party, she and her friends decided to go somewhere to watch the sunrise. A friend recommended San Francisco Beach because it has such a beautiful view of the sunrise. Then, they took the car and went to San Francisco, and they returned three days later. However, she still didn’t know who was having the birthday. It was only after a long time that she realized whom the party was for. She has been in Boston now since January. When she first came here, she hadn’t any special impressions because she already knew about this city and the American life style. Now, she is studying at CELOP to improve her English skills. In addition, she wants to transfer to an university in the U.S. if given the chance. Now, she has passed her first exam for Stanford, Harvard, and Columbia universities. During CELOP’s spring break in March, she plans to go to Florida with her friends. She wants to take a rest gazing out to sea at Miami Beach. She likes to do things. Especially, when she has extra time, she watches movies—regardless of genre, plays soccer, or listens to Punk music. In addition, she likes to travel, so she has visited many countries: Italy, France, England, and Korea. Of them all, she would like to visit Italy again because it has many grand and spectacular sights. To the question, “If you had only 24 hours to live, what

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She was born in Korea, but she moved to Madrid, Spain when she was 5 years old. In Spanish, her other name is Christina. She has been studying medicine at a Spanish university. would you do?” she answered she would like to call everybody she met in her life because she would not want to die with any bad feelings. As we ended the interview, she wished to give some words of advice to foreign students, “Do not be scared!”

David Trasend Venezuela

by Angela Hur

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avid Trasend is from Caracas, Venezuela. I choose to interview him because he is so humorous and active in my core class that he makes my class energetic. He is 19 years old. His family has five members: mother, father, two older brothers and himself. His family is in Venezuela now, and he is living in a dorm with a roommate on west campus. He doesn’t like living in a dorm because he doesn’t have any privacy. He’s been in the U.S. for a year. Before he came to CELOP, he had studied English in Florida. He arrived in Boston before CELOP started. His hobbies are playing soccer, singing, playing golf and dancing. He likes almost every sport, especially soccer, so he’s on the B.U. soccer team and goes to training 3 times a week. During this spring break, he’ll go to Miami alone. After spring break, his team will have a match. He likes every kind of music, especially salsa and merengue because he likes dancing, and that music is related to dance. His favorite musician is David Bisbal. He also likes

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Student Profiles

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typical Spanish food and action movies. If he could act in some movie, he would like to act with Julia Roberts and Nicolas Cage. If someone told him that he had only 24 hours to live, he would stay with his family. If his house were on fire and he could save only one thing, he said he would grab his wallet. He has traveled to many countries of which his favorites are Spain and Belgium. Some day he hopes to visit Dubai because he heard it’s very good, safe and modern. He is planning to apply to Boston University to study Business Administration. B.U is especially famous for its business program, and that’s the main reason he choose Boston and CELOP. He thinks Boston is a very cold, but beautiful and good city. After this semester, he hopes to start at B.U.

Chia-Pei “Etta” Chou Taiwan

by Angela Hur

a university in Taiwan where her major was International Business. Also, she studied at Northeastern a long time ago but thought its programs were terrible, so she chose CELOP because it has better programs than Northeastern. She wants to study Finance at BU graduate school. Right now she is waiting for her TOEFL score. After CELOP, she hopes to begin graduate school this summer or fall. Her hobbies are reading, especially science fiction and fashion magazines, and shopping. Her favorite food is Korean food, especially Bulgogi and Kimchi, but these dishes are too expensive in Boston. Also, she likes horror movies, and her favorite actress is Ashley Judd. The last movies that she watched were The Last Samurai and The Lord of the Rings. She has visited many Asian countries: Japan, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia and Hong Kong, China. Among those, her favorite was Japan. Her hobby is shopping, for which she thinks Japan is great for shopping. This spring break, she wants to go to New York, but she has to study for the TOEFL exam. She would also like to visit Paris, France. If someone told her that she had only 24 hours to live, she would rob Tiffany’s! If her house were on fire, and she could save only one thing, she would save her passport because it’s the most important document for her to have in the U.S.A. She is a little shy and quiet, but she is kind and nice. I wanted to know her better, and that’s the reason I chose to interview her. I hope she is able to begin studying at BU as soon as possible.

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er full name is Chia-Pei Chou, but it’s too hard for foreigners to remember, so she took the nickname Etta. She is from Taiwan, and she is 23 years old. Her family has five members: father, mother, two older sisters and herself. One of her older sisters is 24 years old, and the other is 26 years old. Both her older sisters are now working in Taiwan. In fact, all of her family is in Taiwan. Etta lives in an apartment with her Taiwanese roommate. Actually, this semester is her second semester at CELOP. For her first semester, she lived in a dorm, but she moved to an apartment this semester. She found her roommate through the internet, and she has lived with her for two months, but she thinks her roommate is a little strange. She has been in Boston since last September. She chose Boston because she has relatives here, and her cousin recommended Boston. She thinks Boston is very cold, and she has had some bad experiences in Boston, so actually, she doesn’t like Boston. Before she came to Boston, she graduated from

Melinda Barbarás Hungary

by Rawya Husain

Tell me about your family. There are three members in my family: mother, step-father and me, but I also have a half-sister. I am here in Boston alone living on campus with a sweet roommate who’s from New York.

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Student Profiles

Why did you choose CELOP? I chose it for no specific reason, actually. I had visited the U.S before and was interested in it, so I decided to come and study English here. I chose Boston by accident. What’s good about it is that there are a lot of young people here. It seemed like a student city, so I came here. I finished high school last summer, and then I came to CELOP in September, so this is my second semester.

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Favorite country? Hungary. I want to go back home to be with my family and friends. Favorite country? Hungary. I want to go back home to be with my family and friends.

Have you got any plans for the spring break? I have no plans yet. What will you do after CELOP? In April I will go back to Hungary to major in Business Communication at a university. What are your hobbies?

What would you grab on your way out if a fire started? A pillow because I know I’d have to sleep on the street, so a pillow would be comfortable. What would you do if you had 24 hrs. to live? Be with friends and family and talk as long as possible with them, eat my favorite food and get drunk—stuff that makes me happy.

Going to the cinema, going out with friends, partying, reading (historical books), spending time with my friends, listening to music (everything that sounds good), and playing tennis (I’ve played professionally for 5 years). Favorite actress/actor? Julia Roberts, Jennifer Aniston, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon.

Violeta Bentolila Guahmich

Favorite type of movie?

Venezuela

Drama, historical movies, psychological movies. by Rawya Husain

What kind of food do you like? Italian food (pasta), and traditional Hungarian food. How many members in your family? What are your plans for the future?

One brother from my mother, and three brothers from my father.

I don’t know what I want to be yet, but I’m interested in Media and advertising, but nothing specific. First, I’ll start at a university then take it from there and think carefully of what I want to do or be.

Are they here with you or are they back in your country?

Favorite countries visited?

Do you live on or off-campus?

France, Barbados, San Francisco (the sea, the view, the beach, the harbor were all nice).

I live in a dorm on campus with a roommate from Massachusetts.

No, they’re back in my country. I’m here alone.

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What were you doing before coming to CELOP?

What will you do in the spring break?

I graduated from high school.

I’m going to stay in Boston. My dad’s coming here, and he wants me to show him around the city, so I’m going to be a tour guide!

Why did you choose CELOP? In Venezuela, my friends used to come to the programs, and they said it was the best place to learn English. My friend recommended CELOP. When did you arrive in Boston? I came a week before CELOP started. What do you think of Boston? It’s a big city! The weather is really cold, and I’m not used to it. I go shopping sometimes because there’s nothing you can do in the cold weather. What will you do after CELOP? I’ll go back to my country and start applying to U.S. universities, most probably universities in New York or Boston.

Which countries have you visited before? And which of them would you like to visit again? I’ve visited a lot of countries, but the ones I liked most were Spain, Italy, Mexico and the U.S. If your house were on fire, what would you grab on your way out? I’d take my homework, and some jewelry. If someone told you that you have 24 more hours to live, what would be the first thing you’d want to do? I’d be with the ones I love as much as possible, and I’d like to talk about my desires and share my opinions and theories with them!

What are your hobbies? Well, I enjoy swimming and dancing. I’m a choreographer. I enjoy watching TV. I love most sports like soccer, and I like playing pool.

Veli Marie Chabebe IN HER OWN WORDS

Do you like movies? And who’s your favorite actor/actress?

Dominican Republic

Oh yeah, I love movies, mostly comedy and action. My favorite actor is Hugh Grant, and Sandra Bullock’s my favorite actress.

by Marco Negroni

What kind of music do you listen to? I love every type! Especially merengue, I like dancing to that. What’s your favorite food? I love to eat every type of food, especially sushi! What do you want to be in the future? Umm . . . No idea! I like a lot of stuff, so maybe an architect, a lawyer, or a genetic engineer. It’s really hard to decide.

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hen I was planning to come to the United States, I was only thinking about studying for one semester at CELOP, and the funny thing is that I am still here in Boston. A year has already passed, and I am not planning to go back to my country at the moment. Even though I never thought that my staying here would mean more than improving my English skills, I now have the opportunity to participate in an internship program with a U.S. company. By the way, I am able to apply the previous knowledge in marketing that I obtained in the Dominican

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Student Profiles

I am enjoying the experience of getting to know people from all over the world, and the opportunity to compare so many different cultures. I have learned so many interesting things about each one. Republic upgraded by my Boston University experience. Also, one of the things that I am currently enjoying here is the experience of getting to know people from all over the world, and the opportunity to compare so many different cultures. I have learned so many interesting things about each one. All the places I have been able to visit throughout the world, including Mexico, Italy and Asia, have been a great benefit to me. If asked to share my feelings to somebody about my experience here in the U.S., I would say that I appreciate the knowledge I have gained from the Diploma Program that I am currently taking. The real value of my life here derives from the challenges I have faced in moving to a foreign country with a different language and with such different people. This has truly been “the experience” of my life that I will never forget. All that I want to say is that I really encourage people to come here and enjoy their stay as I am doing right now!

In Boston, she thinks the cold restricts people from going out. The cold makes Anabel miss Cancun, a city that she describes as the only place in the world with the most beautiful beaches and white sun—“Living there is like being on vacation forever!” On the other hand, she says the people are so busy there, and sometimes they forget that they live in a “paradise” and do not enjoy the city. However, the feeling that all that beauty is near makes them feel better. In her spare time, Anabel likes swimming, staying with friends, going out to movies, dancing, and singing karaoke. In Cancun, she likes to go to an island called Woman Island to swim in crystalline water and to visit Xcaret, an echo park and wonderful place to practice sports. These places are interesting to visit if you go to Cancun. After CELOP, she will return to Mexico to pursue business, which is her profession, to get more experience. Maybe in the future, she would like to open her own business to give quality support to other companies. Working in a restaurant together with her family is in her plans, too. To those people who would like to come to Boston she says, “Be ready to experience the cold weather and enjoy everything you can. This is an unforgettable opportunity!”

Eid Salek

Mexico

Venezuela

by Natasha and Jennifer

nabel Castro Miranda, 23 years old, is from Cancun, Mexico. Doing everything in the best way possible to reach her objectives is her characteristic. Therefore, she intends to enjoy and learn very much from her time at CELOP.

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Anabel has been in Boston since September 2003. Before she came to the United States, she was afraid of a foreign experience, but to dissipate this bad feeling she started to think about the great experience that she was going to have and all the new people that she would meet. Fortunately, she thinks Boston is a student city. “If you want to study, you must come to Boston!” A lot of people come here with this objective.

Anabel Castro Miranda

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by Jason & Hilali

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n March 18, we met Eid in the CELOP lobby. Our first impression of him was that of very busy person because it was so hard to arrange a meeting with him. Before we had our interview, we had tried to connect with him more than five times. Fortunately, we have now been successful.

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Student Writing

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“I’ll never forget you who occupy a place in my memory and my heart.” Eid Salek was born in Venezuela, and he is 17 years old. His family lives in Venezuela. He currently is at CELOP to learn English because he wants to earn a Ph.D. in international business at Boston University. Before coming to CELOP, he studied in the Harvard University extension program for 1 year. When we asked him why he chose B.U., he said that Boston had a lot of universities and was city of education, and that was the main reason he chose Boston. He loves this place because of its atmosphere and educational diversity. He feels that CELOP has a lot to offer, of course, which is one of the advantages of studying at CELOP. His hobbies are playing the violin, listening to romantic and classical music, and going on trips. He has already been to Panama, Mexico, Syria and Holland. He said if he has enough time, he would like to go to Europe. Considering his age, he can go to lots of places before he settles down in a job. From his answers to a few more questions, we could see that he really respects and loves his father. For example, when we asked him a funny question, “If you had to go an uninhabited island, what would be the most helpful to you,” he didn’t hesitate to answer that talking to his father would be most helpful. In closing, he would like to leave a message for all CELOP students : “I`ll never forget you who occupy a place in my memory and my heart.”

escape from poverty. Actually, he went to Indonsia and had meetings with government officials and people working for private banks and the poor. Now he is an employee at an international trading company called Itochu Corporation. In that company, he handles pulp, which is a material for making paper. After he had worked in that company for two years, his company sent him to Boston University in order to improve his English skills.

He said there are many differences between America and Japan. For example, Americans are very noisy in subways and buses. In fact, it is prohibited to use cell phones in public areas in Japan. In addition, in America cars drive on the right, but in Japan they drive on the left side of the road. Not only to progress in English but also to learn about American culture, he is currently living with a host family and doing very well. However, there is one problem: it is very far from CELOP. It takes him more than one hour to get to class. Sometimes he has to wait more than one hour in terribly cold temperatures. It is really hard for him because in Tokyo, trains come every five or ten minutes. He said there are many differences between America and Japan. For example, Americans are very noisy in subways and buses. In fact, it is prohibited to use cell phones in public areas in Japan. In addition, in America cars drive on the right, but in Japan they drive on the left side of the road.

Taku Takayama Japan

by Jennifer Yoon

After this semester, he will go to New York because his company has a NY branch and he is often in contact with the workers there when he works in Japan. Therefore, he will go to NY just to introduce himself and say hello. Then he will return to Japan. We hope he will use his improving skills which he learned from CELOP at his company in Japan!

I

met a Japanese man named Takuya Takayama. He is 24 years old and lives in Tokyo. He graduated from Keio University, and his major was economics. He learned about developing countries and focused on the poor in Indonesia in order to find out why they were poor and how they could

SB

Starbucks at 874 Commonwealth Avenue and the Allston Star Market proudly support Boston University and the students of CELOP.

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JILLIAN’S & TROLLEY TOUR

START OF SEMESTER GET TOGETHERS

Student Photos

Student Writing

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Class party

BY ANGELA HUR

BIRTHDAY PARTY

Steeves and all students in our P am class. February 28th was Khalid’s

birthday, but in our class we have many students whose birthdays are in January, February and March. We celebrated all those birthdays, too!

What a beautiful cake! It’s inscribed “Hilali Forever! Khalid and Mohamed danced to merringue. What a lovely couple!

David brought Spanish songs for the party. Actually, he likes dancing, so he brought dance music, and he danced the meringue. He was the DJ at the party!

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Class party

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All our female classmates. What gorgeous gals they are!

The paparazzi Mohamed (left) bought a beautiful birthday cake for Khalid (right). Also, Laila brought a traditional Arabic snack and Arabic coffee.

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@ KIYONARI YAMASAKI’S HOUSE, 15 MARCH

BIRTHDAY PARTY

“Best Friends” Sung Il “Hakseng” Park and Kiyonari. A birthday feast prepared by Mrs. Yamasaki.

Class party

The birthday boy, Kiyonari Yamasaki, at left, makes a wish. Seated next to him, Ana (Spain), Thioro (Senegal), Alexander (Switzerland).

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Class party

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With Jenn Kay, Student Life Coordinator.

The Yamasaki family: (left to right) Maria (sister studying at Brookline High School), Kazuko (mother), Kiyonari, and Tomonari (CELOP student). Kazuko, Kiyonari, and Andrew, an American student from Brookline High School. Tomonari and his American conversation partner, Laura.

Scott, Jenn Kay’s husband, with Som (from Thailand) and Kiyonari.

Beginning a University Program?

CELOP Part-Time Day & Evening Courses

Why not continue improving your English while you pursue your degree?

www.bu.edu/celop/part-time IMPORTANT! Students studying part-time are not eligible for a CELOP I-20. To remain in the U.S. on your F-1 Student Visa, you must be enrolled full-time at CELOP, Boston University, or another qualified institution. See Marcella Framondi in office #238 for more information.

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CELOP Alumni

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CELOP ALUMNI Jenn Kay Kay Kosch, Kosch, CELOP’s CELOP’s Student Activities Coordinator Coordinator,, keeps in touch with many many of our former former students, especially especially the ones that miss CELOP the most.

Hiroka Shinokawa

CELOP Friends are Forever Two former CELOP students get married

I AM A CELOP ALUMNUS from Sum- and how they are different from the friends that mer and Fall of 2000. I am so grateful to have a chance to write about my CELOP experience four years after I left. In that time, I have moved to three other cities and attended graduate school in California. Last summer, I moved to New Jersey, which is where I am currently living.

I made at other American schools. First, most CELOP friends used to be my dormitory (oncampus housing) friends. Second, in CELOP I could meet many friends through activities outside my class. Finally, my CELOP friends are a variety of nationalities and ages, and they all have many different personalities and interests. I believe these things make our friendships stay strong.

CELOP was my first American school and also the place where I made In Summer the most friends of 2000, many any other schools I CELOP stuwent to in the U.S. dents lived in Many friends from the same my first session, dorm. NatuSummer 2000, the way moving from California to New Jersey, July, 2003. Delirally, we became my lifelong On cate Arch, Arches National Park, Utah. knew each friends. We still eother and mail each other and sometimes visit. Recently, two CELOP friends spent a lot of time together. Honestly, there were visited my home for their winter vacation. More- a lot of things I did not like about dorm life, over, my husband and I went to Hawaii this past including sharing a bathroom with three other January to see a CELOP friend studying at the roommates, not being alone all the time, eating American food at the same dining room every University of Hawaii. day, etc. So, in the Fall session, I decided to move Four years later, I have just realized why I have out of my dorm. However, despite all the bad kept in touch with CELOP friends for so long

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have decided to continue studying in America without my CELOP experience and the support of the friends I made there. That was as important to me as my family support. All I want to tell my CELOP friends is “thank you for keeping in touch with me and cheers to Sometimes I think it was my destiny to go to our friendCELOP in Summer 2000, because I would not ships.”

parts, I am glad that I was able to make a lot of close friends with my dormmates. We still have a lot of common memories and when we remember things we did at the dorm, we laugh with each other and long for that happy time.

I have never seen ESL schools that have more have decided to continue studying in America In addiactivities than without my CELOP experience and the support tion, the CELOP. At of the friends I made there. That was as imporgreatest thing lunchtime, is that one of after classes, tant to me as my family support. All I want to my great and on week- tell my CELOP friends is “thank you for keeping friends from ends, I could in touch with me and cheers to our friendships.” C E L O P meet new became my friends outside my classroom through CELOP activities. One husband. Now you understand why that sumday I attended a discussion about cultural differ- mer 2000 is unforgettable to me, don’t you? ences and met a person who was in an advanced CELOP class and expressed brilliant ideas in fluent English. After the discussion, she and I began to talk with each other at the dorm and at school and we have been keeping in touch ever since. Of course, having friends from different countries is a great thing in ESL, but another great thing is having friends from different jobs and specialties, no matter what countries they are from or how old they are. I think that we usually do not have many chances to actually become “friends” with people from different jobs and generations, once we choose to study or work in a particular area. However, none of my CELOP friends have the same job. There is an accountant, lawyer, nurse, writer, TV producer, musician, government officer, educator, and many other professions. Sometimes I think it was my destiny to go to CELOP in Summer 2000, because I would not

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Keitaro Yoshioka CELOP Alumnus from 1982

CELOP Alumni

by Hwa Young “Jennifer” Yoon & Rawya Husain

WE MET A JAPANESE MAN who giving, he also saw a parade with them. He liked works eagerly in his profession. Now, I’ll tell you about his story. He was in CELOP in 1982 for 2 1/2 semesters taking courses during the Spring and Summer semesters. His teachers were Jill, Nancy, and Shelley. He still remembers them as good teachers. At that time, the average CELOP class contained 15–20 students. There weren’t many international students. The most common nationalities were Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. Many people came from Venezuela and South America as well. In addition, there were a few Europeans. When he was in CELOP, it was very rare to use PCs. There weren’t any computers during class time, and certainly no computers for student use. He said CELOP decided to use computers because the students needed them. There was always something going on such as activities or tours in CELOP that were reasonably priced. Once he went to NY with a group of CELOP students, and another time over Thanks-

CELOP because he could practice his English as well as do something outside of class. During his first semester, he lived in Warren Towers on the 13th floor with a roommate from Venezuela. While living there, he found it difficult to speak with American students. He described his dorm as an animal house. Also, Warren Towers didn’t have bath tubs, only showers, so when he went to NY with CELOP students, he filled the tubs in his hotel, took baths and relaxed. In NY, he also ate Japanese food because NY did have some Japanese restaurants at that time. It was a great experience. There were many things in NY that you couldn’t get in Boston in the early 80s. For his second semester, he took part in an American homestay program to experience something different. He loved American food, but he had to eat rice with his meal because that’s what he was used to in Japan. He wanted to speak English more, so after living with an American family, he realized he wanted to live with

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American students. One day he picked up a Boston but since he didn’t like that field, he decided to Herald newspaper, found a house in Brighton with lie to them about what he was going to study in 3 other American students, and moved in with the U.S just so he could come here to learn. them. They were all studying at Northeastern While studying at CELOP, he took a course at University. He said they took care of him by help- the Art Institute of Boston. This was his first ing him with his stuff. He experienced and discov- opportunity to study with U.S. students. That’s ered both good and bad also where he put things about Ameritogether his portfolio He found a house in Brighton with cans and about Boston to apply to the in general. three other American students. They Museum of Fine Arts

were all studying at Northeastern School. At the age of 17, he University. He said they took care of came to Boston alone After CELOP, he and took a Greyhound him by helping him with his stuff. enrolled in the bus from Boston to all He experienced and discovered both Museum of Fine Arts the different states. School and studied good and bad things about AmeriAfter seeing all the photography, so he cans and about Boston in general. states, he liked the really needed to know cities of New York, English. This was a 4 Boston, Chicago and LA the most. The tour, -year program, but he managed to finish in three which he called a “crazy trip,” took 1 month. It years. He reaped good experiences there. When was a good way to practice his English as he he was a student, he participated in Boston Globe talked with different people on the tour bus. photo contests and won several competitions. He After that, he started thinking about his life. also had shows in France, New York, and Boston After going back to Japan, he went to college and majored in economics and politics. He also experienced working in a major movie company in Japan called TOI. He was basically working in the editing section of the film department. As soon as he finished college, he came to CELOP to study English. Then he thought of becoming a movie film maker, but after noticing that it has everything to do with politics and that you can’t really do it by yourself, he realized it was not what he wanted to do. As a result, he decided to work by himself because he likes doing things his way. Eventually, he went to study photography at the Museum of Fine Arts. He did all this behind his parents’ backs because they allowed him to come to the states only if he studied business. They wanted their son to be a businessman,

where his personal photography was exhibited. After graduating, he received a job offer, which he accepted, from the Museum of Fine Arts to work as a photographer. He sells some of his artistic photographs through his art dealer and galleries. He has his own gallery, Keiko

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Gallery, on Charles St. near Beacon St. As part of his activities as an artist, he has shown his work in Boston and NY. Now he focuses more on abstract photography. He met an American girl at a B.U. party who later became his girlfriend. She helped him with most of his school work, and they became close friends. After graduating from the Museum of Fine Arts school, they got married in America, and now they have five children: triplets (two boys, one girl) and another son and daughter. The main language spoken in his family is English although his wife learned Japanese after going out with Keiko. His children speak a bit of Japanese. They lived in a house in Newton but moved to another place two years ago. He bought a house in a place called Hopedale, which is 30 minutes from Newton.

Susumu Uematsu

CELOP Alumni

After working at the Museum of Fine Arts for ten years, he traveled all over the world and looked at different galleries. Just seven years ago, he went on his own by opening his own studio doing commercial work. He started teaching four years ago at Massachusetts College of Art when they asked him to teach a course. He still teaches there as well as at the Boston Architectural Center. In the early 80s, not many Japanese restaurants were present in Boston. All he missed then and still misses about Japan is the food! He said, “You can’t get everything in one place, there’s always good and bad.” Although Boston has plenty of Japanese restaurants now, the food that is served is still not as good as the food in Japan. His final quote was, “Going to B.U. was a very good thing for me. I have no regrets!”

by Hwa Young “Jennifer” Yoon & Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee

WHEN WE MET Susumu in the lobby at

ago, and Jennifer and I are currently in her class.

CELOP, we felt a kind of shrewd charisma about him. Before our meeting, we already knew he was a CELOP alumnus. Therefore, before we began to interview him, he began greeting lots of CELOP teachers and staff. Coincidentally, Marsha Dean, a teacher at CELOP, was his core class teacher nine years

Susumu is from Japan, and he is 45 years old. When he was 35, he came to Boston to get his Master’s degree at Boston University. His major was computer engineering, and he had already worked for Toshiba and Lion Bridge, both famous computer companies. Now, he is trying to start his own franchise restau-

CELOP Alumni

rant, a sushi bar. Also, he has another job as an internship representative who tries to find jobs for foreigners.

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ing his work. Generally, he is satisfied with his job and wants to earn more money for his future. He recommended us some good places to visit near Boston, such as the White Mountains in New Hampshire, Cape Cod, and Vermont.

He has lived in Boston for a long time. When we asked him about Boston, he said it was too In response to an small, and many interesting question, people were too He has lived in Boston for a long time. “If you were born young, but he found When we asked him about Boston, he again, what kind of it exciting nonethesaid it was too small, and many people person would you less. Now, he is were too young, but he found it exciting want to be?” he said working very hard nonetheless. . . . His parting words of he has never regretand is very busy, so advice to CELOP students are, “Just go ted his life up to he doesn’t have enough time to outside and try to talk with Americans.” now. Therefore, if he were born again, he enjoy his life or even think about marriage. We asked him if he would want to be the same person he is now. At wanted to live alone for his whole life, and he the moment, his main hope is for his business to said he wanted to get married if he found his flourish. Accordingly, he shows much passion for ideal type—someone who is smart, understand- his work. His parting words of advice to CELOP ing, and has a sense of humor. Just as we began students are, “Just go outside and try to talk with to feel that he was somewhat sensitive about find- Americans.” SB ing a partner, he added, “That’s why I have lived alone for such a long time.” He enjoys his life as it is, and he is accustomed to living alone. Sometimes, he makes meals from scratch, such as Japanese food, pasta, and spaghetti. In addition, he is used to going to the gym for his health no matter how busy he is. He hasn’t visited his country for ten years, so if he has enough time, first of all, he wants to go to Japan. Also, if possible, he wants to go to Thailand, Germany, France, Canada, and even Eastern Europe after finish-

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Class trip

IN

PROVIDENCE

PHOTOS BY OZGE KELLECI & DICLE ABAN

JOANNE FOX’S CLASS

In front of the Rhode Island state capitol building in Providence.

At a Newport, Rhode Island, mansion with the the Narraganssett Bay in back.

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Class trip

The Breakers Mansion On the bus Lunch in Newport

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CLASS PICTURES

CORE CLASSES

Jill Brand’s core class: (front row, left to right) Parichat Tanchavanich (Bo), Denise Ortiz, Jill Brand, Byung Joo Ahn, (back row, left to right) Mio Osumi, Seon Seo, Faisal Bin Madaeya, Megumi Hisaoka, Tugba Kardaslar, Emel Birsin, Julia Baranova, Tiptida Kangwarnjit (Vicky), Young Lee, Jose Camilo Alonso, Rachel Klimmer (student teacher), Shota Hatama. (Absent: Takashi Horie, Carolina Montes.)

Ron Clark and Cynthia Flamm’s core class: (front row, left to right) Hsin-Wei Wu (Wallace), Jun Iriyama, Pei-Yi Sun, Daniela Acconcia, Bo Kyung Park, Patricia Vivanco; (back row, left to right) Marzia Brumat, Sascha Kumin, Tsung-Nan Wang (Tommy), Emilio Arakindji, Efrain Cepeda (Fincho), Ana Gutierrez Colina, Qiang Wang (David), Ron Clark. (Absent: Yu-Fen Chuang (Jade), Masayo Shimizu (Maya), Maad Al Busaid; not shown: Cynthia Flamm.)

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Marsha Dean and Joe Pettigrew‘s core class: (front row, left to right) Ji Hyun Park, Seung Hee Seo, Myung-Hee Son, Ching-Wen Yang; (back row, left to right) Jong-Seok Lee (Jason), Hwa Young Yoon (Jennifer), Dicle Aban, Hye Kyeong Yun, Seong Jae Kim, Damla Ocak, Anabel Castro Miranda, Aurelie Letellier,Tae Ho Yoon, Pei-Ju Liu, Dmitry Zaychenko, Marsha Dean. (Absent: Ji Eon Lee; not shown: Joe Pettigrew.)

Jamie Beaton and Renee Delatizky’s core class: (front row, left to right) Saleh Al-Subari, Hee Won Yang, Karina Malec, Sun Mi Park, Butsakorn Chevathamanon (Yosuke); (back row, left to right) Jin Won Choi, Esam Al-Subari, Andrey Shlyakhovoy, Humoud Alrasheedi, Mehmet Cibikci, Renee Delatizky, Sin Hang Chiu (Christy), Ahmad Al Frayan. (Absent: Alaa Al Khereiji, Shatha Al-Ghamdi; not shown: Jamie Beaton.)

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Core Class Photos

Michael Feldman’s class (004): Shuhei Fujita, Kei Kamikubo, Sultan Khayat, Sasikarn Nirantranon, Angelo Oh, Sung Eun Park, Aya Segawa, Kachatorn Tongsri.

Shelley Fishman’s class: (left to right) Sung Il Park, Yu-Chi Lee, Nicole Duerrschmidt, A-Young Ryu, Karina Quiroz Pantoja, Seunghee Kang (Christina), Shelley Fishman, Antonio Barrios Di Pascuale, Natasha Amendola, Abdul Al Muhana, Alexandre Bonnard, Deny Soebagio, Edward Saavedra Mendizabal (Danilo), Liliana Tavares.

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Joanne Fox and Roselyn Frank’s core class: (front row, left to right) Ozge Kelleci, Bo-Rah Na, Kyung Min Kim (Jerry), Jong Min Shin (Min), Paulina Ayala, Mi-Young Lee, Guadalupe Fernandez (Daniela), Vanessa Coto; (back row, left to right) Kazuhiko Matsumura, Takuya Kodera, Santiago Machicado, Pablo Alonso, Hyun Kyu Lee, Bo Hyun Kim, Roselyn Frank. (Absent: Taelang Bae, Masayo Shimizu; not shown: Joanne Fox.)

Doug Kohn and Carol Pineiro‘s core class: (front row, left to right) Ismail Marulcu, Hamed Alenezi, Melinda Barabas, Violeta Bentolila Guahmich, Carolina Simosa; (back row, left to right) Doug Kohn, Abdullaziz Bushihri, Ramin Ketabi, Sang Ho Lee, Han-Ting Chuang, Rossella Caterisano, Rawya Husain; (inset) I-Ling Lin, Esther Orr. (Not shown: Carol Piñeiro.)

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Core Class Photos

John Kopec’s core class: (front row, left to right) Jin Young Oh (Jiny), Kazuyuki Okada (Kazu), Jarunee Nincila, Ji Young Kim; (back row, left to right) Chi Hun Kim, Carlo Genovese (Filippo), John Kopec, Bandar Kaki (BK). (Absent: Myung Kang Chung (Akie).)

George Krikorian’s core class: (front row, left to right) Lok Kam Yuen, Chantima Larpchivashitti, Yukiko Sugawara, Pei-Ling Tsai, Nida Chanthavanich, George Krikorian; (back row, left to right) Min Sung Kim, Shamlan Al Rifai, Tomoni Kanayama, Hee Jin Jung, Ji Yeong Lee, Koichi Miyazaki, Harim Choi. (Not shown: Mohammed Al-Awadhi.)

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Jacquie LoConte’s core class: (front row, left to right) Isabel Espona Meseguer, Yeon Joo Seo (Judy), Chia-Li Lin; (middle row, left to right) Eid Salek, Emilie Ducorps, Takuya Takayama, Adriana Penagos, Adriana Felix Caballero, Jacquie LoConte, Maria Chacharone (student teacher); (back row, left to right) Sang Ki Lee, Hyun Kook Seong (Eric), Keisuke Shimizu, Marco Negroni, Masahiko Tsurumi (Matt), Ju Youn Yoon, Min Jae.

Bob Maguire and Margo Miller’s core class: (left to right) Zaymar Ramirez Ramirez, Carlos Garcia Villasenor, Hyon Kyong Sim, Maher Taresh Al Alili, Miryam Vargas Rodriguez, Young-Ah Ha, Ji Won Bang. (Absent: Gina Patino Cabarcas; not shown: Margo Miller.)

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Core Class Photos

Gregg Singer’s core class: (front row, left to right) Santi Singhawangcha, Yun Jung Cho, Min-Young Hwang, Min-Jung Kim, Carolina Salinas, Eun-Jin Park, Min Paik; (back row, left to right) Ke-Fan Wu, Gregg Singer, Soo Nyung Yoon, Saud Al-Saud, Seong Hyun Park, Se Yon Choi. (Absent: Chan Hee Yi, Yen-Tai Su, Jose Herrera Gonzalez, Emi Fujita.)

Sammi Eckstut and Pam Steeves’ core class: (front row, left to right) Adrien Vola, Jae Moo Kim; (back row, left to right) David Tasende, Khalid Al-Ghamdi, Chia-Pei Chou (Etta), Mohamed Al Mubarak, Hee Yun Hur (Angela), Highnoosh Abedians, Chariya Apisithamorngul, Sang Park, Badileshi Mpanda Mabwe (Augustin), Laila Ghurab, Pam Steeves; (Absent: Ali Alhashimi, Adrian Dibildox, Joseph Dum, Su Kyung Kim, Longino Tsourus; not shown: Sammi Eckstut.)

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Maria Tomeho-Palermino’s class:(front row left to right) Fuad Al-Ghamdi, Maria Tomeho-Palermino; (back row left to right) Ling Zou, Chi Nae Kim (Leanne), Olga Baranova, Yen-Ling Shen, Sunyong Kim (Sam), Hui-Fen Luo (Anne), Tomonari Yamasaki (Tomo), Kadriye Aksoy (Kadish), Naoto Koga, Haruka Urayama, Mohamed Aal Ali, Abdulkarim Almaayouf (Karim), Yen-Lin Lai, Hao-Jen Wang (Howard). (Absent: Enrique Zunzunegui.)

The Turkish women of CELOP. On the Empire State Building in New York City.

CLASS PICTURES

ELECTIVE CLASSES

Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation Chris Antonellis’ class: (left to right) Kyung Min Kim (Jerry), Dicle Aban, Shamlan Al Rifai, Chris Antonellis, Anabel Castro Miranda, Emel Birsin, Damla Ocak, Chia-Li Lin, Augustine Mpanda Mabwe, Elba Del Castillo-Jimenez.

Introduction to the TOEFL Shelley Bertolino’s class: (front row left to right) Manita Bunnagitarn, Sin Hang Chiu, Sun Mi Park, Mi-Young Lee, Yukiko Sugawara, Eun-Hye Park, Bo Hyun Kim; (back row, left to right) Santiago Machicado, Shelley Bartolino, Shamlan Al Rifai, Esam Al-Subari, Saleh Al-Subari, Jin Won Choi, Karina Malec, Hanrim Choi, Ahmad Al Frayan. (Absent: Taelang Bae, Kyung Min Kim, Kazuhiko Matsumura.)

Elective Class Photos

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English Communication Skills: Listening, Speaking and Vocabulary Meredith Clark’s class: (left to right) Ji Hyun Park, Masahiko Tsurumi, Melinda Barabas, Alexandre Bonnard, Adriana Penagos, Takuya Takayama, Keisuke Shimizu, Shuiko Tanizawa, Meredith Clark. (Absent: Tomonari Yamasaki.)

Active English Ron Clark’s class: (left to right) Hyon Kyong Sim, Gina Patino Cabarcas, Maher Taresh Al Alili, Ron Clark, Carlos Garcia Villasenor, Miryam Vargas Rodriguez, Ji Won Bang, Young-Ah Ha.

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Elective Class Photos

Academic and Professional Writing Betty D’Angelo’s class: (front row left to right) Myung Kang Chung, Denise Ortiz, Byung Joo Ahn; (middle row left to right) Ozge Kelleci, Haruka Urayama, Nicole Duerrschmidt, Kazuyuki Okada, Sang Park, Su Kyung Kim, Carolina Montes; (back row left to right) Ali Alhashimi, Mohamed Al Mubarak, Laila Ghurab, Betty D’Angelo, Young Lee, David Tasende. (Absent: Carlo Genovese (Filippo).)

English Communication Skills: Listening, Speaking and Vocabulary Judith Dan’s class: (front row, left to right) Sachiko Ono, Seung Hee Seo, Seong Jae Kim; (back row left to right) Young Shin Ahn, Parichat Tanchavanich, Judith Dan, Natasha Amendola, Nazan Kizilca, Anabel Castro Miranda, Hwa Young Yoon, Hye Kyeong Yun. (Absent: Emel Birsin, Megumi Fujita, Megumi Hisaoka, A-Young Ryu.)

Elective Class Photos

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2004

Pronunciation, Listening, and Speaking Marsha Dean’s class: (left to right) Marsha Dean, Soo Nyung Yoon, Misa Tani, Longinos Tsourous, ZuanKai Wang, Seong Hyun Park, Attila Becskei, Satoshi Niimura. (Absent: Ke-Fan Wu.)

Pronunciation, Listening, and Speaking Jeff DiIuglio’s class:(left to right) Yasuo Hirota, Katsuhiro Tamura, Kan Chen, Savath Sath, Tatsuya Yoneda, Jeff DiIuglio. (Absent: Carlos Mucha.)

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Elective Class Photos

Pronunciation, Listening, and Speaking Margo Downey’s class: (left to right) Santiago Machicado, Pablo Alonso, Margo Downey, Koichi Miyazaki, Pei-Ling Tsai, Min Sung Kim, Ouafae Rafie, Takuya Kodera, Paulina Ayala, Taelang Bae, Guadalupe Fernandez.

Legal English Cynthia Flamm’s class: (left to right) Ju Youn Yoon, Sascha Kumin, Min-Young Hwang, Adrian Dibildox, Jarunee Nincila, Cynthia Flamm, Nuria Alcaraz-Bataller, Hyun Kook Seong (Eric), Adrien Vola. (Absent: Satoshi Agatsuma.)

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English Communication Skills: Listening, Speaking and Vocabulary Joyce Ho’s class: (front row, left to right) Bo-Rah Na, Hee Won Yang, Pei-Ling Tsai, Vanessa Coto, Chantima Larpchivashitti (Cin), Nida Chanthavanich; (back row, left to right) Min Sung Kim, Mehmet Cibikci, Joyce Ho, Pablo Alonso, Ji Young Lee, Hee Jin Jung, Hyun Kyu Lee, Koichi Miyazaki.

TOEFL Preparation Jim Kaplan’s class: (front row, left to right) Ching-Wen Yang (Wendy), Chariya Apisithamorngul, Parichat Tanchavanich (Bo), Adriana Felix Caballero, Ozge Kelleci, Olga Baranova, Jim Kaplan; (back row, left to right) Mohammed Al-Awadhi (Bu Jassem), Nazan Kizilca, Hamed Alenezi, Highnoosh Abedians, Abdul Al Muhana, Melinda Barabas, Mohamed Al Mubarak, Dicle Aban, Mohamed Aal Ali. (Absent: Ali Alhashimi, Edward Saaveddra Mendizabal.)

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Elective Class Photos

Pronunciation, Listening, and Speaking John Kopec’s class: (left to right) Teruo Ono, Roumen Hristov, Toshiki Takenouchi, John Kopec, Maritza Jasmin Romero-Westcott, Maria Herrera.

Academic and Professional Writing Lori Lubeski’s class: (left to right) Bo Guo, Jarunee Nincila, Maria Augusta Armijos, Lori Lubeski, Subarna Basnet, Jessica Schmidt, Taissa Santos. (Absent: Satoshi Niimura.)

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English Communication Skills: Reading, Speaking, and Vocabulary Dorothy Lynde’s class: (front row, left to right) Li Chen, Chi Hun Kim, Hyun Kook Seong, Doroty Lynde, Myung-Hee Son (Meiki), Seon Seo, Yu Fang Wang (Catherine); (back row, left to right) Saud Al-Saud, Abdulkarim Almaayouf (Karim), Angelo Oh, Haruka Urayama, Mohamed Aal Ali, Olga Baranova, Andrea Schoeniger. (Absent: Santi Singhawangcha.)

Academic and Professional Writing Bob Maguire’s class: (left to right) Jade Chuang, Wallers Wu, In-go Suh, Zhao Peng Ding, I-Ling Lin, Efrain Cepeda, Violeta Bentolila Guahmich, Abdullaziz Bushihri, Mina Kuraoka, Ling Zou, Yun Jung Cho, Adhika Andrayudha Bakrie, Bob Maguire. (Absent: Jung Gook Seo; not shown: Min Paik.)

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Elective Class Photos

Professional English Seminar Irene Maksymjuk’s class: (left to right) Toshiki Takenouchi, Ling Zou, Sunyong Kim, Irene Maksymjuk, Masayo Shimizu (Maya), Esther Orr, Rosella Caterisano. (Absent: Efrain Cepeda, Jessica Schmidt.)

TOEFL Preparation Joe Pettigrew’s class: (front row, left to right) Longinos Tsourous, Enrique Zunzunegui, Damla Ocak, Tugba Kardaslar, Eid Salek, Tiptida Kangwarnjit, Chia-Li Lin, Joe Pettigrew; (back row, left to right) Su Kyung Kim, Jae Moo Kim, Sang Park, Young Lee, Tomomi Kanayama, Adrian Dibildox, Takashi Horie, Min Jae Yoo. (Absent: Julia Baranova, David Tasende.)

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Media / News Carol Pineiro’s class: (front row, left to right) Hee Yun Hur, Carol Pineiro, Nuria Alcaraz-Bataller, Mina Kuraoka, Jun Iriyama; (back row, left to right) Min-Young Hwang, Eri Washida, Marco Negroni, Chiawen Liu (Claire), Pei-Yi Sun. (Absent: Rawya Husain.)

Business Communications Adrianne Saltz’ class: (front row, left to right) Adrianne Saltz, Yeon Joo Seo (Judy), Yasuko Iwai, Adriana Felix Caballero, Gerardo Quintana, Pei-Yi Sun, Daijin Ahn; (back row, left to right) Jin Young Oh (Jiny), Sang Ki Lee, Masahiko Tsurumi (Matt), Maria Lago, Takuya Takayama (Taku), Marzia Brumat, Keisuke Shimizu (Kei), Emilio Arakindji. (Absent: Faisal Bin Madaeya.)

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Elective Class Photos

English Communication Skills: Listening, Speaking and Vocabulary Nora Smith's class: (left to right) Nora Smith, Takehisa Ogasawara, Ying Sun, Nadege Andreus, Valencia The, Luz Maria Cueva, Aide Sepulveda, Patricia Mosquera, Erika Aguiar, Claudio Pereira, Daijin Ahn, Will Cole-French (student teacher), Tatiana Barreto, Daniella Gutierrez Rigo. (Absent: Lucelene Martins.)

TOEFL Preparation Ramon Valenzuela’s class: (front row, left to right) Sang Ho Lee, You Jin Walsh (Jinna), Patricia Vivanco, Emi Fujita,Yun Jung Cho, Se Yon Choi; (back row, left to right) Ramon Valenzuela, Maad Al Busaid (Moad), Emilio Arakindji, Masayo Shimizu (Maya), Sunyong Kim (Sam), Chan Hee Yi (Chani).

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American Culture through Movies Ramon Valenzuela’s class: (front row, left to right) Jong Min Shin, Chariya Apisithamorngul (Lin), Seon Seo, Tiptida Kangwarnjit (Vicky), Sung Il Park (Hakseng); (back row, left to right) Ramon Valenzuela, Highnoosh Abedians, Julia Baranova, Jose Alonso (Camilo), Alexandre Bonnard, Tae Ho Yoon, Ji Eon Lee. (Absent: Eun-Jin Park.)

Listening, Speaking and Pronunciation Susan Vik’s class: (left to right) Humoud Alrasheedi, Ahmad Al Frayan, Mehmet Cibikci, Bo-Rah Na, Susan Vik, Monica Yoshii, Sin Hang “Christy” Chiu, Karina Malec, Alaa Al Khereiji.

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Elective Class Photos

English Communication Skills: Reading, Speaking, and Vocabulary Ellen Yaniv’s class: (left to right) Humoud Alrasheedi, Maria Lago, Ching-Wen Yang (Wendy), Lok Kam Yuen (Alison), Mio Osumi, Jong Min Shin, Ellen Yaniv, Butsakorn Chevathamanon, Takuya Kodera. (Absent: Andrey Shlyakhovoy.)

The Boston University campus, showing the towers that frame Marsh Chapel in the center, the CAS observatory to the right, and Back Bay highrises, including the John Hancock Tower, at far right.

Photo Contest Winners

Spring

2004

Photo Contest Winners

Prize winner! Butsakorn “Yosuke” Chevathamanon (from Thailand), in Renee 1stDelatizky’s core class. Friend Mike (left) and Yosuke on a river near Belmont.

Runner Up winner! Eid Salek (Venezuela), in Jacquie LoConte’s class. Having a good time with Carolina and Adriana at a party.

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Patriots Parade

2004

New England Patriot’s Superbowl Parade by Rawya Husain Semester Book Elective

by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur Semester Book Elective

T

he New England Patriots won the Super Bowl! It was their second time in three years, so there was a big victory parade on February 3rd.

I went to the parade with Rawya. The parade started at 12:00 pm at Copley Square and went to Government Center. We went to Government Center at 12:15 pm. When we arrived at Government Center, we were so surprised because there were so many people there. I’d never seen such crowd. I think there was almost one million people who were really excited and proud of the New England Patriots. Actually, I didn’t watch the Super Bowl because football is not popular in Korea. I don’t even know the football rules, but I felt the passion at the parade, so I was very excited. Everybody cheered the Patriots on, and so did I! We met one woman and her son who were also celebrating the Patriots’ victory. They had made a poster at home by themselves and brought it to cheer on the Patriots. She said, “Actually that idea was my son’s.” We introduced ourselves, and she was so kind to us. She took a picture of us and also let us hold the poster. I promised to send her pictures by e-mail, so I got her e-mail address. The Patriots’ parade was a very good experience for me. I got to meet many different Americans and share their feelings. Also, I was so excited that I was able to throw away my cares.

T

riumph yet again! Tons of people came to watch the Patriots’ Parade that took place on February 3, 2004, in celebration of the victory of New England Patriots football team. The last time the Patriots won the Super Bowl was two years ago, so this wasn’t a surprise. Still, a large number of people showed up and expressed their joy by doing all kinds of crazy things! The parade took place from Copley Square all the way down to Government Center. We took the T and got off at the last stop. As soon as we walked out into the streets, we saw millions of people occupying the area, all in wait of the Patriots’ Parade. Eventually the T station was closed due to the incredible amount of people that were present in anticipation. Everyone had cameras, and people were snapping photos of each other. Many were shouting, “WOOHOO” and “GO PATRIOTS.” Some mates went topless, painted themselves blue and wrote a comment on their backs! One of the guys had “YANKEES SUCK” painted on him! Many other football fans came in Patriots shirts, especially Brady and Bruschi ones. Others wore Patriots hats and carried Patriots helium balloons. Each individual expressed his pride and joy in his own different way. We waited for about 45 minutes, and then we heard the crowd shouting abruptly, “WHOOOAAA!’the team had arrived! Cameras went up, and people seemed so excited, cheering at the top of their lungs, waving and punching their fists in the air while shouting, “GO PATS!” The team members were in a number of vehicles, one after another, surrounded by security. The players were waving to their wild fans, and they raised the trophy in pride of their success. They were followed by cheerleaders who had their pom poms up and going! It was a great experience for me and for others who come to participate for the first time. The atmosphere was so lively and amusing it just pulled you in to start cheering along, too!

Spring

Patriots Parade

The scene at Government Center.

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Patriots Parade

2004

The Patriots Parade crowd at Fanueil Hall.

Margot, Jill, and Gabriella lined up to pose with Tom Brady, Patriots quarterback, in the CELOP lobby.

Spring

Celtics

Go Go Celtics! by Rawya Husain, S.B.E.

O

n March 31, 2004 at 7:00pm, several CELOP students went to watch the Boston Celtics versus Portland Trailblazers’ basketball game at the Fleet Center in Boston. The weather was dreary, non-stop rain, but that didn’t change anyone’s mood for the game!

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most of the game, but in the last two quarters I guess they just got tired, which is when the Trailblazers took over. The final score was 105–98 for the Trailblazers which disappointed most of the Celtics fans. However, the important thing in the end is that everyone had a great time. I’d say watching a live NBA game is one of the best ways to spend an evening!

We were all excited and waited in anticipation for the match to start. A vast number of people occupied the hall, from adults to kids, even though it was a weekday. Most of them dressed in green to support the Celtics, and a lot of the kids had shamrocks (clover leaves) painted on their faces. We bought some food to enjoy while we watched the game, and then we took our seats which were up high in the balcony. Although we were so far away from the actual court, the view was clear as we could see everything that was going on down there. At last, the players for both teams were announced, and out they came. Everybody was cheering and dancing in front of the cameras that were recording different angles of the fans who were then displayed on the Celtics’ monitor (JUMBOTRON). At the same time, the two teams were warming up. After about 10 minutes, the game finally began! We all cheered when the Celtics scored and booed when the Trailblazers scored. There were quartertime performances with guys jumping on a trampoline doing great tricks up in the air. This way the audience was never calm, always cheering at the top of their lungs. Unfortunately, the Celtics did not win this game although it was a close competition. They were leading through

2004

Marco enjoying the view from a GREAT seat at the Fleet Center.

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Boston

2004

All about Boston by Marco Negroni Semester Book Elective

City of Boston

W

ith many of the city’s premier hotspots and attractions spread over an area of just five miles, Boston in the state of Massachusetts, is one of the most compact and walkable cities in the United States. Unlike many other cities, Boston has managed to keep its historic beauty and charm while simultaneously welcoming innovation and economic growth.

Boston Climate

The seasonal change from summer to fall can produce spectacular walls of color throughout the whole of New England. These are invariably replaced in the winter by blankets of snow. Spring is generally pleasant with temperatures rising steadily making Boston summers warm and sunny.

Affectionately known as “The Cradle of Modern America,” Boston is rich not only in industrial and economic terms but also culturally, spiritually and historically. The area has over fifty colleges and universities, Harvard and MIT in neighboring Cambridge being the most illustrious, and is a hotbed of sports, arts, entertainment and a place for those who love life. Sources: Time Magazine, ANSA, Boston Globe

Boston City Facts Boston Population:

2,915,000

(UN Population Division 2000 estim.)

US Population:

277,825,000

(UN Population Division 2000 estim.)

CELOP population:

276

Currency:

US Dollar ($)

= 100 cents

Language:

English

(not always at CELOP)

Time zone:

GMT - 5 hours

(Daylight Saving Time is observed—some CELOP students say it is not always correct when they are late in the morning.)

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www.intlguesthouse.com

Your Home in Boston

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We provide clean, complete, economical housing in single person or shared rooms: all rooms have private or semi-private bathrooms. All rooms are completely furnished: towel and bed linens, in-room direct-line telephone, microwave oven, refrigerator, television, air-conditioning or heating, as needed, are all included. Breakfast and dinner, everyday, are also included. Personal laundry facilities, a washer and drier are available.

All payments must be made in U.S. dollars. We accept cash, bank checks, and bank transfers. We accept credit cards (Visa, Master Card, American Express, and Discovery). When we receive payment, we immediately confirm receipt and guarantee the reservation. Reservations can be cancelled at no cost to you up to 16 days prior to your scheduled arrival date. After that, Cancellation Fees will apply.

CALL FOR PRICES! 617-437-1975

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2004

What I Love about Brazil by Taissa Amaral dos Santos

B

razil is an amazing place to live or to go on vacation. The people are friendly and happy, always dancing and singing. The weather is perfect; it is warm, humid, and the sun shines almost every day. Brazil has incredible cities and beaches. In fact, Brazil has attractions for everybody and for all ages. When you arrive in Brazil by plane you can see one of the most beautiful views in the world. Mountains and the sea together make a remarkable painting. It doesn’t matter where you are going to stay, from Lapoque (north) to Chuí (south), all the cities have their particularities. Brazil has 7,491km of tropical beach coast. Each region has its own history, agriculture, dances, animals and special food. Brazilian people are spontaneous and talkative. We are interested in helping foreigners. We love our local parties. Usually tourists only know about the Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, but we have other cultural celebrations, like “Bumba meu Boi” and “Maracatu.” We also have numerous dances, like the frevo, samba, and forró. All that cultural variety in a big country like Brazil gives it many faces. Brazil can be rich and poor at the same time. The social differences are large and scary. While some cities look like any big city from a rich country complete with services, industry, and machines, others don’t even have fresh water. In those locations, people die of hunger. Social differences also bring problems for tourism. In big cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, violence is a risk. Although, if you are paying enough attention, and if you go only to tourist places, nothing bad will happen to you. Just don’t be in the wrong place, at the wrong time. A good guide will tell you about those details. If you like to be in touch with the environment, go to Fernando de Noronha Island, a marine turtle preservation island, or to Bonito, in Mato Grosso do Sul, a place that has

Brazil

Most Brazilian women are beautiful. Just go to the beach, look around. I know about an American bank that makes its employees sign a contract saying they will not have any love affairs in Brazil. Before that contract, many employees fell in love with Brazilian woman and decided not to return home. caves with internal blue lagoons full of fish. If you like virgin beaches, go to Lençois Maranhenses in northern Brazil. In that place you will see mobile dunes facing the ocean. It is a mix of desert and beach. If you like to party at night, to eat in good restaurants and to watch plays, go to São Paulo, one of biggest cities in the world. However, if you would like to have all of that together, go to Rio de Janeiro. Another interesting attraction in Brazil is the women. Most Brazilian women are beautiful. Just go to the beach, look around, and you will understand what I’m talking about. I know about an American bank that makes its employees sign a contract saying they will not have any love affairs in Brazil. It happened because before that contract, many employees fell in love with Brazilian woman and decided not to return home. Brazil has all those attractions I described and many more. Delicious food, like feijoada, and incredible songs, like “Girl from Ipanema” are waiting for you, too. Going to Brazil will be an amazing and unforgettable trip. The experience of being with Brazilian people will forever change your life for the better! The writer is in Lori Lubeski’s Academic and Professional Writing Elective.

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Nepal

What I Love about Nepal by Subarna Basnet

O

n a Saturday afternoon in January, David Muir, a former Ph. D. student from MIT, was showing the slides about Nepalese people and mountains from the trip he had taken to Mt. Everest the previous year. “These are the Himalayas,” he said, pointing to the gorgeous green and snow-clad mountains that soared into the sky behind the smiling Sherpa boy with a yak herd before him. The sight of these images took me back to the days when I used to hike in Shivapuri, a mountain north of Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. I could still feel the fresh breeze blowing on my face when I reached the summit of Shivapuri, and the happiness I felt as I watched the sun set behind the western mountains. Oh, how I missed those days in my country. “This is Harimaya and her ten-year-old daughter,” David said, interrupting my daydream, “who gave us her own bed and food on that cold day when we were lost in the mountains.” What David said again reminded me of that day when my companion and I were lost on a wintry day on our way to my father’s friend’s house, which was several hours walk away. We had to find shelter, and one old lady offered to make us some food and let us spend the night in her house.

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I used to hike in Shivapuri, a mountain north of Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. I could still feel the fresh breeze blowing on my face when I reached the summit of Shivapuri, and the happiness I felt as I watched the sun set behind the western mountains. Oh, how I missed those days in my country. “I have been to Nepal more than ten times. Every time, I am amazed by the mountains and the friendliness and hospitality of Nepalese people,” David exclaimed at the end of the slide session. I left feeling nostalgic about those days in my home country when I hiked up those slopes, chatting with the locals I had never met before; as Robin Young, a commentator in National Public Radio says, “Locals that were no strangers, just friends yet to meet.” The writer is in Lori Lubeski’s Academic and Professional Writing Elective.

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2004

St. Patrick’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur Semester Book Elective

S

ome time during the fifth century, the missionary St. Patrick came to Ireland to convert the Irish to Christianity. According to legend, he used the shamrock with its three-leaf clover as a symbol of the Christian trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

St. Patrick allegedly drove all the snakes out of Ireland and into the sea, where they drowned. This is viewed by the Irish as a symbol of driving away evil. The American tradition of celebrating a day honoring St. Patrick began in Boston in 1737. Before coming to Ireland he was a slave who shepherded cows and horses. St. Patrick allegedly drove all the snakes out of Ireland and into the sea, where they drowned. This is viewed by the Irish as a symbol of driving away evil. The American tradition of celebrating a day honoring St. Patrick began in Boston in 1737. Today, every March 17th, towns worldwide honor him with parades and festivities. Green is the color traditionally associated with St. Patrick’s Day. Wearing green, drinking green, displaying shamrocks and kissing the Blarney Stone are all considered good-luck rituals on St. Patrick’s Day. For example, people will have green shots of some kind and green beer. They also decorate their windows with three-leaf clovers and other holiday decorations. Also, there are many different kinds of events such as the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. In fact, the very first parade was held not in Ireland but in New York. In celebration of this day in Ireland, there are symposiums, music concerts, markets, games, etc. lasting 1 month. Each state prepares many different and interesting performances. On St. Patrick’s Day, many people prepare and eat Irish

food, such as a meal of corned beef and cabbage, an IrishAmerican tradition. Green food coloring is a very popular way to make your meals reflect the holiday. You can use green food coloring in pancake batter or any type of drink (especially beer!). Mix a small amount into cream cheese and have a St. Patty’s Day bagel with cream cheese. I think St. Patrick’s Day is quite a huge and interesting holiday. Actually, I’d never heard of St. Patrick’s Day before, but now, I have been introduced to it, and I’m looking forward to St. Patrick’s Day, especially green beer!

St. Patrick’s Day

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Check Your Knowledge of Irish Culture 1 . When is St. Patrick’s Day celebrated every year? a. Third Sunday in March b. Second Wednesday in March c. March 17th t d. April 1s 2. Legend states St. Patrick used what to illustrate the trinity to his followers? a. A rose b. A maple leaf c. A shamrock d. A daisy 3. A “traditional” Irish meal consists of corned beef and which vegetable? a. Beans b. Cabbage c. Beets d. Corn

4. St. Patrick shepherded which animals while he was a slave? a. Cows or horses b. Pigs or sheep c. Horses or dogs d. Cats or Zebras 5. Where was the world’s first St. Patrick’s Day parade held? a. Toronto b. Dublin c. London d. New York 6. Which colour is traditionally associated with St. Patrick’s Day? a. Red b. Green c. Yellow d. Blue Answer key: 1 c, 2 c, 3 b, 4 a, 5 d, 6 b

This business is owned by a CELOP alumnus from Turkey, Cengiz Hocaoglu.

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Staff Interview

2004

INTERVIEW: Lesley Andrews by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee & Khalid “Hilali” Al-Ghamdi Semester Book Elective

D

o you know Lesley? She is a most unusual, charming gal who is a wiz with computers. She was born in Boston, and when she was young, she lived in Minnesota for fifteen years. She got her undergraduate and graduate degrees there.

As we interviewed with her, we asked her some interesting questions. “If you had one million dollars, what would you like to do?” She said, “I want to pay back the money I have borrowed from my parents and buy a house for myself and my two cats.” In fact, before we gave the interview, we anticipated a funny answer. However, Lesley`s answer was unexpected and somewhat old-fashioned. She is interested in baseball and has been to games at Fenway Park both when she was young and since returning to Boston. Also, she likes to watch movies and listen to music. Especially, she recommended we listen to her favorite singers, who are John Mayer, Dave Matthews, and Sarah McLachlan.

She has great skills in that she can speak four languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Japanese. Of these languages, her second language is Spanish, so, when she lived in Japan, she was a teacher who taught English and Spanish. Now, she is working in Boston at CELOP as a Lab Assistant in the computer labs. She loves her job, but now, her job is shrinking. She hopes that more students will return to CELOP when the situation improves between the U.S. and other countries.

In closing, she shared her motto with us, which is, “Try to enjoy every day.” It was a pleasure talking with her and we hope that she someday reaches her goals.

SPRING 2004

SAMPLE CELOP ACTIVITIES Orientation Welcome to CELOP Pizza Party Phone Workshop E-mail Account Workshop Computer Lab Orientation Banking Workshop Transportation and Shopping Workshop Safety Workshop Geddes Language Lab Tour

Clubs,Weekly Events Sitcom Club Free Friday Movies Academic Workshops

Trips & Tours Jillian’s Billiards Party Museum of Fine Arts Old Town Trolley Bus Tour

Shows (discount tickets) Blue Man Group Movin’ Out Celtics basketball games

comfortable chairs and . . . photos by Lesley Andrews

The Multimedia Language Lab

The MLL Web site

|

www.bu.edu/celop/mll

Use it after leaving CELOP to access to English language and research resources as well as future ESL content programs produced by the MLL.

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Spring

Jokes

2004

JOKES

& Riddles

Compiled by Rawya Husain, SBE

Jokes

The bartender quickly replies, “The closest one is in the gas station three blocks down the street.”

Visit to the Doctor An old man visits his doctor and after a thorough examination the doctor tells him, “I have good news and bad news, what would you like to hear first?” Patient: “Well, give me the bad news first.” Doctor: “You have cancer, I estimate that you have about two years left.” Patient: “OH NO! That’s awful! In two years my life will be over! What kind of good news could you probably tell me after this?” Doctor: “You also have Alzheimer’s. In about three months you are going to forget everything I told you.”

Leave It To Kids A three year old walked over to a pregnant lady while waiting with his mother in the doctor’s office. He inquisitively asks the lady, “Why is your stomach so big?” She replied, “I’m having a baby.” With big eyes, he asked, “Is the baby in your stomach?” She said, “He sure is.” Then the little boy, with a puzzled look, asked, “Is it a good baby?” She said, “Oh, yes. It’s a real good baby.”

Bartender Help An armless man walked into a bar which was empty except for the bartender.

With an even more surprised and shocked look, he asked, “Then why did you eat him?”

from www.jokesgalore.com

He ordered a drink and when he was served asked the bartender if he would get the money from his wallet in his pocket, since he has no arms. The bartender obliged him. He then asked if the bartender would tip the glass to his lips. The bartender did this until the man finished his drink. He then asked if the bartender would get a hanky from his pocket and wipe the foam from his lips. The bartender did it and commented it must be very difficult not to have arms and have to ask someone to do nearly everything for him. The man said, “Yes, it is a bit embarrassing at times. By the way, where is your restroom?”

Valentine’s Day Surprise A woman awoke excitedly on Valentine’s Day and announced enthusiastically to her husband, “I just dreamed that you gave me a pearl necklace for Valentine’s day! What do you think it means?” With certainty in his voice, the man said, “You’ll know tonight.” That evening the man came home with a small package and handed it to his wife. With anxious anticipation the woman quickly opened the package to find . . . a book entitled The Meaning of Dreams.

Spring

Riddles

2004

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Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson went on a camping trip. After a good meal and a bottle of wine they lay down for the night, and went to sleep. Some hours later, Holmes awoke and nudged his faithful friend awake. “Watson, look up at the sky and tell me what you see.”

tells me that there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, I observe that Saturn is in Leo. Horologically, I deduce that the time is approximately a quarter past three. Theologically, I can see that God is all powerful and that we are small and insignificant. Meteorologically, I suspect that we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. What does it tell you?”

Watson replied, “I see millions and millions of stars.”

Holmes was silent for a minute, then spoke. “Watson, you idiot. Someone has stolen our tent.”

Sherlock Holmes and Watson

“What does that tell you?” Holmes questioned. Watson pondered for a minute. “Astronomically, it

Riddles 1. There is a common English word that is nine letters long. Each time you remove a letter from it, it still remains an English word—from nine letters right down to a single letter. What is the original word, and what are the words that it becomes after removing one letter at a time? 2. I soar without wings, I see without eyes. I’ve traveled the universe to and fro. I’ve conquered the world, yet I’ve never been anywhere but home. Who am I? 3. A woman shoots her husband. Then she holds him under water for over 5 minutes. Finally, she hangs him. But 5 minutes later they both go out together and enjoy a wonderful dinner together. How can this be? 4. What is black when you buy it, red when you use it, and gray when you throw it away? 5. Can you name three consecutive days without using the words Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, or Sunday? 6. I can sizzle like bacon, I am made with an egg, I have plenty of backbone, but lack a good leg, I peel layers like onions, but still remain whole, I can be long, like a flagpole, yet fit in a hole, What am I? 7. A man had 12 sheep. All but 9 died. How many sheep did he have left?

from www.johnnysjokes.com

8. Gaze at this sentence for just about sixty seconds and then explain what makes it quite different from the average sentence. Quick! What is it? 9. You are standing in front of a room with one light bulb inside of it. You cannot see if it is on or off. Outside the room there are 3 switches in the off positions. You may turn the switches any way you want to. You stop turning the switches, enter the room and know which switch controls the light bulb. How? 10. A man was found murdered on Sunday morning. His wife immediately called the police. The police questioned the wife and staff and got these alibis: The Wife said she was sleeping. The Cook was cooking breakfast. The Gardener was picking vegetables. The Maid was getting the mail. The Butler was cleaning the closet. The police instantly arrested the murderer. Who did it and how did they know? 11. On the way to a water hole a zebra met 6 giraffes. Each giraffe had 3 monkeys hanging from its neck. Each monkey had 2 birds on its tail. How many animals were going to the water hole?

From www.brainteaser-world.com

Answers on next page

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Spring

Valentine’s Day

2004

Valentine’s Day by Natasha Amendola Semester Book Elective

Every February 14th across the country, flowers, candy, and gifts are exchanged between loved ones, all in the name of St.Valentine.

secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that the priest be killed for his disobedience.

The history of Valentine’s Day and its patron is a mystery. Actually, St. Valentine’s Day contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman traditions. However, people do not know very much about this saint and the reason why they celebrate this holiday.

Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for helping Christians escape from Roman prisons where they were tortured.

One legend maintains that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. At that time, Emperor Claudius II decided to prohibit marriage for young men because he thought that single men would be better soldiers than men with a wife and family. Valentine realized it was an injustice and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in

Answers to the Riddles on previous page 1. The base word is Startling – starting – staring – string – sting – sing – sin – in – I 2. I’m your imagination 3. The woman was a photographer. She shot a picture of her husband, developed it, and hung it up to dry. 4. The answer is Charcoal. 5. Sure you can: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow! 6. I’m a snake.

According to another legend, Valentine sent the first “valentine” letter. While in prison, he was in love with a young girl who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is believed that he wrote her a love letter, which he signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is uncertain, we still are allowed to think of him as a sympathetic, heroic and romantic figure.

7. 9. 8. It contains all of the letters of the alphabet. 9. You turn 2 switches “on” and leave 1 switch “off” and wait about a minute. Then enter the room, but just before you enter, turn 1 switch from “on” to “off”. Once in the room, feel the light bulb – if it is warm, but off, it has to be the last switch you turned off. If it is on, it has to be the switch left on. If it is cold and is off, it has to be the switch you left in the off position. 10. It was the Maid. She said she was getting the mail. There is no mail on Sunday! 11. Only the zebra. All the rest were coming back from the hole.

Spring

April Fool’s Day

April Fool’s Day by Rawya Husain Semester Book Elective

T

he history of April Fool’s Day, sometimes called All Fool’s Day, is not totally clear. There wasn’t an actual holiday for this day that you could see on a calendar. Some believe it sort of evolved simultaneously in several countries at the same time, from celebrations involving the first day of spring. The tradition began as far back as 1582 in France. Prior to that year, the new year was celebrated for eight days, starting on March 25. With the reform of the calendar under Charles IX, the Gregorian Calendar was introduced, and New Year’s Day was moved to January 1. Many people did not receive the news for several years as communications in those days were not as easy or swift as nowadays. Others refused to accept this change and continued to celebrate the new year on April 1. These folks were labeled as “fools” by the general public. They were ridiculed, and people played practical jokes on them. This pestering evolved over time and developed into a tradition of prank-playing on the first day of April. The tra-

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dition eventually became common in the UK in the eighteenth century, and later in American colonies of both the English and French. April Fool’s day, therefore, became an international fun festival held by friends and family. Pranks performed on April Fool’s Day vary from the simplest pranks such as saying, “Your shoe’s untied!” to the exaggerated pranks such as setting a roommate’s alarm clock back an hour. Whatever the gimmick, the prankster usually ends it by yelling to his victim, “April Fool!” April Fool’s Day is a “for-fun-only” observance. It’s not a public holiday or an occasion to go out and eat in a fancy restaurant. It’s simply a holiday on which one must remain vigilant, for he or she may be the next April Fool!

Grammar Challenge from CELOP’s Grammarian Emeritus, Ramon Valenzuela

1. He said that that that that man did was wrong. Question:Which “that” may be omitted? 2. She didn’t marry him because she loved him. Question: Did she marry him or not? 3.What is the difference between “a Spanish French teacher” and “a French Spanish teacher”?

Visit CELOP’s Ask the Grammarian on the MLL Web site: www.bu.edu/celop/mll/students

4. Of the 300 languages that were once spoken by Native Americans, an estimated 150 exist today. (This is a correct sentence.) Question:Why is there a singular article “an” when “150” is plural and “exist” is plural? Find the answers on the CELOP Alumni Web site

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Santiago Machicado

2004

Becoming Parents: A Conversation by Santiago Machicado

Jack: Carla. You don’t understand. I’m dying to have a baby. I swear to you. But . . . Carla:

Are you through?

Jack: No Carla. What I wanna say to you is that we shouldn’t have a baby yet.

Jack:

Honey.

Carla:

Yeah?

Jack: Do you remember what we talked about yesterday? Carla: What about sugar? We talked about a lot of topics yesterday. I can’t remember. Jack:

About having a baby, honey.

Carla: Oh, come on Jack! Are you getting cold feet again? Jack: Honey. I don’t know. Having a baby is for good. Do you think we are ready for do it? I’m not talking about affording all the cost that having a baby brings. I’m talking about . . . Carla: Jack:

Jack, you’re a %$&*ª\& chicken. Carla, honey. Let me exp . . .

Carla: Jack, shut up. I don’t wanna hear any apologizing from you. Jack:

Carla, babe. Come on. Let me explain to you.

Carla: Grrr., Ok Jack. Shoot! Say all that to need to say in order to justify your fear of having a responsibility. Jack:

Honey. It isn’t that. I really am . . .

Carla: Jack. Since we got married you have had second thoughts about everything. In fact, I actually don’t understand how you decided to get married to me. You always wanted to go out with your friends, drink, “have fun,” come home late, etc. You aren’t a single man anymore, Jack. So behave like a married man. Cut out all those ideas of supposed freedom and play the role you have to play.

Carla: Do you know something? You really take after Sam. You are always saying that your brother Sam is a loser. But you have a lot in common. In fact, I could say that both of you are losers. I know you want to have a baby deep down, but you don’t admit it because you don’t wanna leave your youth yet. But you’re wrong. You don’t know the difference between youth and immaturity. Jack: Carla. I’m gonna explain to you right now, but let me speak. Carla:

Ok. Let’s begin.

Jack: I’m waiting for something. My boss is thinking about transferring me to California. Do you know what it means? We could have all that we have ever dreamed of. Because the company is gonna increase my salary by 200%. I am finally going to reach the place that I have always wanted. Carla:

Are you serious?

Jack: I am, Carla. That’s the reason why I want to postpone the baby’s coming. We may need to turn all our concentration toward the move to California. Carla:

I see, sugar.

Jack: Carla. All the times I missed opportunities I lost a lot. You know, history repeats itself. I don’t wanna miss this game. Carla: Ok, sugar. I understand you. You’re right. Excuse me for having been so inconsiderate. Jack: Oh Carla, I knew you were going to understand it. Carla: Of course, I was pretty inconsiderate, babe. (Kisses) However, there‘s a final little problem. Jack: Carla:

What’s wrong honey? I’m pregnant. The writer, from Colombia, is in Joanne Fox’s intermediate-level core class.

Spring

M a jo r N e w s E ve n ts o f th e S e m e st e r In th e World . . .

2004

Compiled by

Khalid “H i” Al• Train wreck in Iran kil Ghamdi and Jonathanilal ls hundreds. White • Haitian President Ar istide flees Haiti in the face of unrest on the Ca • Russian President Pu ribbean island. tin dismisses and recon sti tut es Ru ssi an • Protests continue in Ve government. nezuela. Ambassador to the UN resigns in prote • Unification negotiatio st. ns contiue in Cyprus un der UN guidance. • The U.S. continues oc pation and recon uctio 2004. Protests arouncu n of Iraq, planning for d the globe mark firstr self-rule by July 1, st anniversary of milit • In Madrid, Spain, al Qu ary action. aeda-linked terrorist bo mbings kill nearly 200 people on trains.

In the U.S. . . .

• John Kerry, Senator fro m Massachusetts, secures the Democratic presidenti • “Domestic Diva” Mart al nomination. ha Stewart found guilty ing false statements in of ob str uc tio n of justice, conspiracy, an relation to her sale of Im d givClone stock. • New nickel coin desig n honors Louisiana Pu rchase and Lewis and Cl • At the Academy Award ark’s expedition. s, Oscars go to Lord of (set in Boston), and M the Ri ng s: Re tur n of the aster & Commander: Th e Far Side of the World.King (11), Mystic River • At the Grammy award s, winning songs were Clock Speakerboxx/The Lo low by OutKast (A m s by Coldplay (Record of the Year), Richard Marx & LuvethBe of the Year), Da With er Vandross (Song oflbu My Father by the Year), Evanescencence • George Harrison, me (Best New Artist). mber of The Beatles, wa s inducted into the Rock • Movies playing this sem `n Roll Hall of Fame. Hidalgo, 50 First Dates,ester: The Passion of the Christ, Dawn of the Secret Window. Dead, Starsky & Hutch, • Famous Obituaries: Al ist air Cooke, BBC Radio perso America" was the lon nality for 58 years. His st-running speech ser "Letters fro Gray committed suicige ies in broadcast histor de , Pr y. Playright Spalding m esident Bush’s dog Spot, most popular grammar an d Di ane Hacker, author of th and usage handbook for e American college stu • President Bush announ dents. ces ambitious space explo ration plans to send me n to Mars.

In Boston . . . • Coldest January since 1888. Brrrrr! • New England Patriots football team win Supe r Bowl again; parade dr • Boston gears up to ho aws 1.5 million. st the 2004 Democratic National Convention th • MBTA raises fares on is summer. busses, subways, and tra ins. • Museum of Fine Arts offers extensive and po pular Gauguin exhibit. • Boston celebrates St. Patrick’s Day with parad e in South Boston. • The above-ground ex pr ess wa y cu tti ng through Boston (“Centra replaced by a tunnel—op l Arter ening up a great swath of land in Boston. y”) is dismantled— • Bank of America comp leted its $47 billion acqu nation's No. 3 bank wi isition of FleetBoston Fi th assets estimated at $9 nancial, creating the 66 billion.

At Boston University an d CELOP . . .

• BU loses the Beanpo t in the finals to Boston College. • BU advances in the Ho ckey East tournament. • Holidays observed th semester: Martin Luther Groundhog Day, Vaislen King, Jr. Day, Chinese New Year, the Boston Marathon), tine’s Day, St Patrick’s Day, Passover, Ea ster, Patriot’s Day (day the Muslim Hajj, Eid ul of Adha, and Muharram.

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Holidays—A Survey

We asked 20 CELOP students about their knowledge of America`s holidays.The following graphs depict their answers. by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee & Natasha Amendola, S.B.E.

1. Do you know what Valentine’s Day is? 20 yes / 0 no

2. Does your country celebrate a similar sort of day? 18 yes / 2 no

3. Do you know what President’s Day is? 9 yes / 11 no

4. Does your country celebrate a similar kind of holiday? 2 yes/ 18 no

Survey

5. Do you know what St. Patrick’s Day is? 3 yes / 17 no

6. Does your country celebrate a similar kind of day? 2 yes / 18 no

7. Do you know what April Fool’s Day is? 18 yes / 2 no

8. Does your country celebrate a similar kind of day? 13 yes / 7 no

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2004

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Movie Club

2004

Friday Movie Club @ CELOP by Jenn Kay Kosch

Friday Movies provide students with a fun way to relax after a week of studying hard in their classes. Popular movies are shown (with closed captioning), projected onto a widescreen from DVD, to help CELOP students practice their English skills while learning about American culture through film. It is a great way for students to increase their vocabulary and improve their listening skills! All students in all levels are welcome to enjoy the movies and free refreshments every Friday!

Free

MOVIES SHOWN IN SPRING 2004 Bruce Almighty Seabiscuit Pirates of the Caribbean S.W.A.T. Radio Under the Tuscan Sun Lost in Translation Runaway Jury Finding Nemo Mona Lisa Smile Matrix Revolutions

Lesley Andrews (left), who brought our Friday Movies to widescreen, at the projector controls.

Spring

Movie Club

2004

Pre-show snacks.

Boning up on the vocab.

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Sitcom Club

2004

The Simpsons: Sitcom Club

What is the Sitcom Club?

great prizes, and there are always delicious refreshments. It’s a great way for students to practice their speaking and listening skills!

this club CELOP students watch a new episode

In of The Simpsons, one of the most popular television shows in America, every week. Afterwards, we discuss such things as vocabulary, slang and cultural references. For example, after seeing an episode titled “Bart Gets Hit By a Car,” we had a great discussion about the American court system. During a discussion of another episode, “Bart Gets an F,” we talked about school systems and teaching methods in the U.S. and abroad. We also have different activities to enrich each meeting, such as trivia contests, vocabulary challenges, crossword puzzles and more! Sometimes students can even win

—Jenn Kay Kosch

Sitcom Club Trivia Contest winners. Each winner received a Simpsons Desk Calendar.

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Sitcom Club

2004

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Language through Laughter by Natasha Amendola Semester Book Elective

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enjoyed my first time at the Sitcom Club very much. We watched The Simpsons, and based on the episode we talked about American customs and the different ways the program portrays them. The Sitcom Club is a good opportunity to practice English, learn more about American culture and exchange experiences. Jenn Kay, who coordinates the club, is very nice. She brings all kinds of information about the episode that we are about to watch, such as new vocabulary, expressions, and newspaper articles. In addition, she tries to answer all our questions and clear up any confusion we might have. It is an informal club, so it is a very good chance to make friends. Sitcom Club: Room 269 12:30–1:30

CELOP Short Story Reading Club Once a week, students meet to discuss the assigned story. Every week we read a different author and try to have a variety of topics and genres so there is something for everyone! This semester we read satires, mysteries, romances and more! Students discuss the stories, learn new vocabulary and watch accompanying movies. Some of the authors we read are Shirley Jackson, Ernest Hemingway and Dorothy Parker. Each session begins with student questions about vocabulary, followed by a discussion of the story, and ending with some type of activity. For example, after reading “The Redheaded League” (a Sherlock Holmes Mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle) students were given their own short mysteries to solve. Every student who solved the case they were given won a great new mystery novel to help further improve their skills. This is a great way to get to know popular short stories and practice your English skills! —Jenn Kay Kosch

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Spring

2004

Conversation Partners Program by Hee Yun “Angela” Hur Semester Book Elective

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o you want to learn more about American culture or practice your English with a native speaker? Then the conversaton partner program is for you!

It’s a free service from CELOP which matches international students with native English speakers. You can meet your partner in any location as often as you choose. In other words, you can control when and where you meet. Usually conversation partners meet for one hour a week. However, if you and your partner decide that you would like to meet more often than that, you can. The program is unstructured, so you and your partner are free to take part in any activity that interests you both. For example, you can go out for coffee, have dinner, watch a movie, etc. Usually conversation partners become good friends and keep in touch with each other forever. Sometimes they have dates and become a couple. A few years ago, one Japanese CELOP student and her conversation partner, who was Japanese-American, got married. What a nice program! Actually, I, too, have a conversation partner. She is a 20-year-old BU student, and her major is math education. She was born in Korea, but she and her family moved to America when she was two years old, so she can’t speak Korean. It’s good for me! She is attending Korean class this semester, so she knows a little Korean. Her mother is Korean, but her father is American. Her father is in the Army. Her parents met when her father was working in Korea. We meet every Tuesday and eat lunch together. Her major is math education, so she works as a tutor in high

Conversation Partners Program

She is so nice and kind. We meet once a week. . . . Mostly we talk about the differences between Korea and America. She was born in Korea, but she and her family moved to America when she was two years old, so she can’t speak Korean. It’s good for me! She is attending Korean class this semester, so she knows a little Korean. school as a part-time job, and she participates in many other activities. I also participate in two volunteer activities, so we decided to eat lunch together. She is so nice and kind. We meet once a week, talk about the preceding week, and share some fun experiences. Mostly we talk about the differences between Korea and America. She was born in Korea and her mother is Korean. She will go to Korea this summer for vacation, so she is very curious about Korea. I recommended many good places for her to travel to in Korea. At CELOP, there are lots of students from many different countries, but we have few opportunities to meet native friends, so I think the conversation partner program is a very good opportunity to make native friends and improve one’s English ability. Join the conversation partner program! It will be a new, exciting and worthwhile experience for you.

Spring

Academic Workshops

2004

Information session at CELOP for students interested in B.U. Global programs. Judy Di Leo organizes this and other academic advising workshops.

Earn your Diploma In just FOUR MONTHS of study at

Boston University A M E R I C A’ S M O S T I N T E R N AT I O N A L U N I V E R S I T Y TM

• Learn more about financial services, information technology, and marketing than is offered in most MBA programs • Study at one of America’s leading universities in a city that’s at the center of global commerce • Benefit from a rigorous academic program that includes corporate visits and internships in premier institutions 755 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE, ROOM B-5 BOSTON, MA 02215

617-353-8429 •

[email protected]

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N VISIT OUR WEBSITE:

www.bu.edu/global

GLOBAL An equal opportunity, affirmative action institution.

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Academic Workshops

Judy Di Leo, CELOP’s Academic Advisor, holds one of her weekly advising workshops for students.

Dorothy Lynde’s elective class, “Reading, Speaking, and Vocabulary,” had a party to bid farewell to two 6-week program students who were returning home. Students all brought the food for this “pot luck pahdee.”

Spring

Boston Photo Quiz

WHERE ARE THESE

DETAILS IN

BOSTON?

ANSWERS

ON PAGE

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YOU’VE PROBABLY WALKED BY EACH OF THEM MANY TIMES

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Movie Review

2004

widower father, Attorney Amasa Lee, played therein. This was Lee’s first and only novel, and it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1960.

To Kill a Mockingbird

Reviewed by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee & Hwa Young “Jennifer” Yoon, SBE

The Wang Center classic movie series 9 February

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o you know the Wang Center? This place is located in Chinatown. It is very grand and splendid, unlike any other movie theater. Here, last February 9, To Kill a Mockingbird was shown as part of the Museum of Fine Arts classic movie series.

This movie deals with the problem of discrimination between white and black people. The main character is “Atticus Finch,” played by Gregory Peck who won a well-deserved Best Actor Award. In fact, he was honored with three awards.

The opulent Wang Center lobby.

In the time period portrayed in this movie, it was a great disadvantage to live as a black person. The poor southern town of deteriorating homes was authentically re-created on a Universial Studio set. Released in the early 60s, this film reflected the state of deep racial problems and social injustice that existed in the South. The main character (or protagonist) is Atticus Finch, a lawyer who tried to change this problem of racism, but failed. He defends a black man falsely accused of rape. However, the white townspeople had already decided he was guilty even before his trial, solely because of the color of his skin. At the same time, Finch`s children, a tomboyish six-year-old girl and her ten-year-old brother, explain this situation by offering their own perception of their widower attorney father. So, I thought that this added viewpoint made the movie more interesting than other movies of its kind. If you are interested in finding an original movie, I really recommend this movie, even if you`re not a movie fanatic.

This movie is an original based on Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel. She had written a semi-autobiographical account of her small-town southern life in Monroeville, Alabama, with its setting of racial unrest and the role her

Spring

Movie Review

2004

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Pirates of the Caribbean Reviewed by Rawya Husain, SBE

Not a typical pirate movie Released: June 28, 2003 Starring: Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow Orlando Bloom as Will Turner Kiera Knightley as Elizabeth Swann

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ohnny Depp played the role of a pirate (Jack) who once captained a ship called the Black Pearl, but was thrown onto an island by his own mate (Barbossa). The reason for this was because Barbossa wanted to be the Captain of the Black Pearl, a goal he did achieve after eliminating Jack Sparrow off the ship. Eventually, Jack sailed his way off the island on a small boat he built, and ended up in an unwelcoming city whose people tried to kill him because they considered pirates as cursed and evil. As he escaped, he ran into a young man called Will Turner who made swords. Upon hearing the name “Turner,” Jack immediately recognized that this man was the son of a pirate, too. Jack was locked up after the palace’s body guards had caught him, but meanwhile the cursed pirates had come and attacked the city, captured Elizabeth Swann (who carried a gold medallion the pirates wanted) and took off. This made Will determined to get her back because she was the love of his life. He decided to team up with Jack as he understood how pirates thought. They were going to battle the most treacherous pirates lead by the cursed Captain Barbossa.

They formed a crew, then set sail and went on the hunt for the Black Pearl. This part of the movie contained THE MOST ACTION! It went on for about 45minutes if not longer. They fought endlessly, and all the secrets and confusions of the movie were revealed in this part. It turned out that Jack Sparrow was also cursed, and that was why he needed Will to help him out (that was their deal previously). Will had to shed some of his own blood on the last piece of gold in order to remove the curse from Jack. Oh, by the way, the curse was that the pirates appeared as ghosts (viewing only their skeletons) underneath the moonlight. As most stories end, Pirates of the Caribbean finished with the victory of Jack and Will, in destroying the pirates that ruled the Black Pearl, in saving Elizabeth, and in curing Jack from the curse. Thus, everything unsurprisingly ended well. I have to say this was one of the best movies I’ve ever watched in my life! From the actors to the acting and the story, it’s all perfectly laid out and organized. It contains a lot of different genres including, Adventure/Comedy/Fantasy/ Action, but it is mainly an action-adventure film. Johnny Depp has become one of my favorite actors because of this movie. The way he acted made it even more enjoyable to watch. As for the plot, it’s worth five stars. It’s pretty solid, and since it wasn’t a usual movie you’d see, that made it all the more interesting.

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Movie Review

her quiet moments, she is fearful that her ambitions for her new life “and new family” may not be realized, until a chance encounter in Rome throws Frances into the arms of an intriguing Portobello antique dealer named Marcello. Even as she stumbles forward on her uncertain journey, one thing becomes clear: in life, there are second chances.

Under the Tuscan Sun Reviewed by Marco Negroni, SBE

Starring:

Diane Lane, Sandra Oh, Lindsay Duncan, Raoul Bova, Vincent Riotta, Mario Monicelli

Director:

Audrey Wells

Screenwriters: Frances Mayes,Audrey Wells Based on:

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The novel by Frances Mayes

he protagonist Frances Mayes, played by Diane Lane, is a reticent 35-year-old San Francisco writer whose perfect life has just taken an unexpected turn. Her recent divorce has left her suffering from extreme depression with terminal writer's block. Her best friend, Patti, is beginning to think that she might never recover. Dr. Patti's prescription: 10 days in Tuscany, Italy. It's there, on a whim, that Frances purchases a villa named Bramasole (literally in Italian: “something that yearns for the sun”). The home needs much restoration, but what better place for a new beginning than a model home of the Renaissance? As she flings herself into her new life at the villa in the Italian countryside, Frances meets new friends among her neighbors; but in

I personally consider this as a romantic story for people who want to escape the routine of daily American life. Besides, the details show the realistic life style of a peaceful village in one of the most natural Italian regions . The movie shows that the the long search for ourselves always ends in the realization that happiness is not located in a beautiful place or in a distant and unknown region, but just inside ourselves.

Spring

Theater Review

2004

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Theater Review Blue Man Group by Hwa Young “Jennifer” Yoon & Hee Yun “Angela” Hur, S.B.E.

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hat has six arms, six legs, and is blue all over? That’s the three blue men. They are a very famous group in America creating an especially exciting and passionate atmosphere. Their performance certainly did not disappoint us. Their entrance onto the stage was very funny. The place was very dark, so we couldn’t see anything. Suddenly, three shadows appeared on the upper stage. One of them was chewing gum, drinking, and smoking while playing a drum. The spectators laughed whenever he acted out something. The curtain which hid their faces opened, and finally they came out. Because of their blue faces, blue hands, and black clothes, I could just see their white eyes on that dark stage. Their first impression was like that of a very horrible monster. When they started, one was still playing the drum uniquely while the other two blue men on either side poured a pink and yellow colored liquid onto the drum of the middle person. The view was very splendid. What a nice sight! They acted out comical situations while performing. For example, one blue man threw his chewing gum, and the another blue man caught it with his mouth. However, they weren’t yet finished. He caught almost twelve pieces of gum, and then it all up. It looked like a mountain. “Ha ha.” In addition, their group was very close to the audience. Sometimes, they went among the people and picked one to play

with. It was very thrilling when they came to us and picked someone. In addition, they went out onto the street outside where they also performed a comical situation. Every time their funny actions made us laugh, but only because while they were performing, they appeared so serious. That process was enough to be a big attraction to people. They played a unique instrument which was made with a lot of connected pipes. That sounded so great. In fact, I was mesmerized by this instrument. In the performance, the most perfect sight was the last scene. Suddenly, they ran to the second floor and unraveled the rolls of paper which hung loosely on the wall and delivered them to people who passed it along to those in front of them. In a brief instant, the whole performance place was covered with paper. Meanwhile, the blue men group played more enthusiastically until the performance was over. After this act, the Blue Men director collected all the paper up front on stage into a huge mountain. After the performance was finished, my inspiration was so strong that I didn’t want to leave. We were very fortunate to experience such a marvelous performance!

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Restaurant Reviews

2004

Restaurant Reviews Café Belo

China Pearl by Jong-Seok “Jason” Lee, SBE

by Rawya Husain, SBE

Web site: 2nite.com/chinapearl/home.htm Address: 9 Tyler Street, Boston Phone: 617-426-4338

Web site: www.cafebelo.com Address : 1243 Commonwealth Ave. Allston, MA

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t was my first time trying Brazilian food, and I’ve got to tell you it was AWESOME! Yummmm is not enough to describe the deliciousness of the food they had. It’s an open buffet type café where you serve youself to whatever you’re interested in, weigh your plate, and then the waiter writes up a receipt for you to pay later after you’re done eating.

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We were around 12 people, and everyone agreed the food was succulent. There was so much to choose from, and everything to me looked magnificent! It’s a great place to go if you’re a meat lover. They have all kinds of grilled meat like beef, pork, sausages, chicken, even chicken hearts! I tried a bit of almost everything, but I wished my stomach were larger because the food was so tasty; I just wanted to have more and more, hehe. The quality of the food was perfect—not too oily, and it seemed fresh! Even the bread was good, very soft.

One of the most interesting points was each waitress served foods on a small, wheeled snack cart, loaded with a variety of foods. I was very impressed. This place is easy to find and attracts many foreigners and Americans. I think it proves this restaurant`s food is equally appealing to everyone. If you visit this place, you will have a refreshing experience. If you are interested in this restaurant, you have to get off at the Boylston “T” station on the Green Line. You can find Chinatown easily. Just ask any pedestrian, you can’t miss this place.

I tried one of the desserts, chocolate pudding to be specific, and that too, was tasty, very chocolatey, but good after a great meal! The dessert menu changes from day to day though. I know this because I loved the food so much the first time, that I went again for lunch the next day! My appetite desired Brazilian food, still does, but I can’t keep eating the same food over and over again. As for the atmosphere, the music was really good and relaxing, the environment wasn’t noisy, and it wasn’t too crowded, so we enjoyed our meal peacefully. My advice is that if you’ve never tried Brazilian food and you’re really hungy, go eat at Café Belo . . . it’ll do the job in appeasing your hunger! You’ll keep wanting more and more of the appealing taste of its food.

hina Pearl was recommended to me by my Chinese classmate. She said, “This place is a good place to enjoy Chinese food in Boston.” It was true. When I visited there, I could try lots of interesting foods. No matter what I saw, all the food looked appetizing, colorful, and tasteful. The atmosphere was also very nice.

Spring

Boston Photo Quiz Answers

2004

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The tortoise and hare represent a children’s tale about pace and determination, placed in Copley Plaza in front of Trinity Church in tribute to the Boston Marathon, whose finish line is a few yards away.

Pedestrian bridge connecting the Westin Hotel with Copley Place.

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Two lions stand guard in front of the Fairmont Copley Plaza hotel, the “Grande Dame” of Boston.

“Quest Eternal” statue, by Donald DeLue, in front of the Prudential Center (Tower in back), from Boylston Street.

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The roof dormers on the New Old South Church, built in High Victorian Gothic style (1874), across from the Boston Public Library on Boylston St.

Horse statues in front of Copley Place, on Dartmouth St.

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2004

Marco’s Italian Recipes by Marco Negroni Semester Book Elective

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s my name suggests, I come from Italy, a country with an excellent lifestyle. Italy is famous all around the world for its art, history, cities, soccer, etc., but also for exactly what you are thinking . . . the excellent food. When you come to Italy, you expect not only to see spectacular paintings and sculptures, but also to walk through amazing cities and smell the amazing aromas of extraordinary dishes. My enormous experience in the culinary art is going to bring you, readers, inside the secret world of authentic Italian recipes. Let’s start by talking about “Bruschetta” and “Tiramisù,” two of the most successful and recognized dishes all around the world. The first dish is easy and simple to prepare, but at the same time it offers an awesome mixture of taste enjoyed by millions worldwide. Bruschetta, like pizza, can be very substantial if prepared with a large quantity of nutritious ingredients. On the other hand, if served in small portions with few ingredients, it can also be appreciated and recognized as an appetizer. While bruschetta comes from Tuscany, a region in central Italy famous for wine, the city of Florence and a lot of historical, cultural and artistic scenarios, Tiramisù comes from the beautiful city in the northern part of Italy where I was born, Treviso (just 30 km from Venice). The story behind the recipe for Tiramisù tells of some Italian soldiers during World War II who, early in the morning after they had enjoyed the night with women and before going back to the barracks, went to a pastry shop in the center of the city of Treviso to get some food. The kind pastry maker, even through the shop was closed while he was preparing his wares, used to sell the soldiers some pastries at a cheap price. One morning one of the soldiers had spent all his money, but he was so tired that he went to the pastry shop inquiring and asking the owner for a sweet. When the pastry chef heard the guy calling, “Ti prego,

Marco’s Recipes

The story behind the recipe for Tiramisù tells of some Italian soldiers during World War II who, early in the morning after they had enjoyed the night with women and before going back to the barracks, went to a pastry shop in the center of the city of Treviso to get some food. tiramisù, tiramisù!” he decided to prepare him something for free. In English it means “Please, pick me up, pick me up” (tira: pick, mi: me, su: up). He immersed some broken and dry biscuits in a cup of coffee and mixed them with some cream left over from the preparation of the other sweets. Once he completed that, he went to the guy saying, “Here is your Tiramisù, it’s free. “That night something magical happened in the pastry shop, and the result of that recipe was so good that everyone, who later went to the same pastry shop early in the morning, asked for the same sweet. As a result, he started to prepare the same pastry every day because it was something truly delicious that really picked one up, capable of raising up perhaps the deepest morning zoombie sleepers. He dedicated it to that guy who gave him the inspiration, and he called it “Tiramisù.” Today, a McDonalds is now located where that same pastry shop was, so it is not possible to relive this historical place. Fortunately, however, the recipe, like the tradition, has not been lost, and if you walk through my city at 4 or 5am, you can see at two or three pastry shops some guys of a new generation, perhaps the grandsons of the original soldiers, knocking on the doors of these pastry shops, hoping to receive some sweets, saying: “Tiramisù, tiramisù.”

Spring

Marco’s Recipes

Tiramisù

2004

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Bruschetta

Tiramisu in Italian means, “pick me up.” If you are feeling down, maybe this famous Italian dessert will do the trick.

serves: 12 wine: Moscato d’Asti

preparation time: 45 min. origin:Treviso (Italy)

Ingredients: 6 eggs 1 lb. mascarpone cheese, don’t use substitutes 36 Savoiardi (lady fingers) 2-1/2 cups strong Italian coffee 13 Tbsp. sugar 3 Tbsp. un-sweetened cocoa Instructions 1. In a large bowl use an electric hand mixer to beat the egg yolks together with the sugar until fluffy. 2. Add the mascarpone cheese and mix it in with a spoon until well combined. 3. Now whip the egg whites until stiff peaks form and then fold them gently into the mascarpone mixture using a spoon. Fold it in by gently lifting the mixture from the bottom to the top. 4. Spread a quarter of the mascarpone mixture onto the bottom of the cake dish (11-3/4” x 8-3/4” and 2-1/2” deep). 5. Quickly dip both sides of the lady fingers into the espresso coffee and place them over the mascarpone cream. 6. Cover this layer with another quarter of mascarpone cream and repeat the operation of the lady fingers (step 5), 3 times. Place them over the mascarpone cream and top with the remaining mascarpone cream. 7. Sprinkle the top with cocoa powder through a fine mesh strainer. 8. Refrigerate for 24 hours. Note: Some like to add half a cup of dry Marsala wine to the coffee during the preparation.

serves: 4 preparation time: 15 min. wine: Bianco di Custoza origin:Tuscany

Ingredients 4 slices of Toscano bread (1/2 inch thick & about 10 inches long) tomatoes garlic cloves fresh basil extra virgin olive oil Instructions 1. Cut in tomatoes, garlic and basil after, put them all in a bowl and salt to taste. 2. Mix together tomatoes, garlic, basil & 4 tea spoons of extra virgin olive oil. 3. Toast the slices of bread on a grill or in the oven. 4. When ready rub each slice with a clove of garlic and brush with olive oil. 5. Serve hot. Note: Toscano bread is a relatively hard, salt-free bread. If you don’t find it, try Pugliese bread or whatever is available in your store that has similar characteristics.

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Spring

Pizza Party

2004

MORE CELOP PIZZA PARTY

Pizza Party

Spring

2004

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CONSTRUCTING STUDENT VILLAGE/ATHLETIC FACILITY

Spring 2004

BUILDING @ B.U.

BU Contruction

Photos by Jonathan White

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BU Contruction

2004

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A view from CELOP

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ajor construction projects continued throughout the BU Charles River campus, including • John Hancock Student Village: housing, sports and recreation facility • Graduate student housing on Commonwealth Avenue • Science and Engineering building on Cummington Street • Hillel House on Bay State Road At left, artist’s rendering of the aquatic center across from CELOP and, below, the completed John Hancock complex. See details at www.bu.edu/construction.

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Spring

Scenes of BU

2004

SCENES OF BU

The CELOP building at the corner of Comm. Ave. and St. Paul St.

The brownstone student apartments along Bay State Road.

An arial view of Comm. Ave looking down at the east campus toward Kenmore Square and Back Bay. (Photo: Steve Dunwell, from Boston University: A Pictorial Commentary, Boston University, 1989.)

Visit the CELOP Alumni Web site and see all 12 Semester Books. Check out the Alumni database and other features under “Quick Links,” too, such as the Boston Trivia Quiz, photo albums, and upcoming lessons. www.bu.edu/celop/alumni

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Spring

Crossword Puzzle

2004

rossword Puzzle C E L O P

by Lesley Andrews

Solutions to this and other Semester Book puzzles can be found on the CELOP Alumni Web site, www.bu.edu/celop/alumni

Spring

Crossword Puzzle

2004

99

ACROSS 2. 6. 8. 9.

An earthquake _____ everything off the shelves. I laughed so hard I nearly _____ off my chair. A fan _____ the ball and the Cubs lost the game. If I had _____ she was leaving I would have arranged a party. 13. I hope the check arrives soon, I haven’t _____ my rent. 15.The pitcher has _____ mostly fastballs in this game. 16. He’s really tired because he hasn’t _____ well for several days. 18.The sun was still shining when it _____ to rain. 21. She thought he had _____ her birthday, but then he surprised her with a party. 23. My favorite shirt _____ when I washed it in hot water by mistake. 25. He _____ the bat too hard and missed the ball completely. 27. She _____ her keys but found them again the next day. 29.They _____ sweaters in case it gets cold later. 32. Has your family _____ to visit you recently? 35. My jacket got _____ when a dog tried to bite me. 36.They _____ their house and moved away. 37.They rented a car and _____ to New York for the weekend. 39. Have you _____ the new movie with Johnny Depp? 40.The sun has gone down, but the moon hasn’t _____ yet. 41. I _____ that the weather will be nice this weekend. 42. Our class _____ to the Museum of Fine Arts last week. 43. She _____ me her book, but I forgot to give it back. 44. Have you _____ lunch yet? Would you like to go get something?

DOWN 1. My cat _____ me up at five o’clock in the morning.

2. We had a great time but _____ too much money. 3. She _____ English at CELOP for many years. 4. Two students started a small business and _____ very successful. 5. Have you _____ which schools to apply to yet? 7. Have you _____ an answer from the admissions office? 10. I haven’t _____ a letter in a long time because I use e-mail all the time now. 11.We _____ in the ocean every day on our vacation. 12. Have you _____ to your brother lately? 14. Have you _____ your homework yet? 17. I bought some new shoes last week but I haven’t _____ them yet. 19.The witness has already _____ his statement. 20. She _____ a new jacket because the one she had wasn’t warm enough. 22.We wouldn’t have gotten lost if you hadn’t _____ that wrong turn. 24.We jumped when the phone _____ in the middle of the movie. 25. I wish I could have _____ you more places, but we didn’t have time. 26. She _____ me you were not feeling well. 27. I _____ my cell phone in the computer lab. 28. He _____ he would meet us here at six. 30. My nephew has _____ so much. He’s walking now. 31.We _____ the test was really hard but we all passed. 33. He loves to ski but he goes too fast. He has _____ his leg twice. 34. Have you ever _____ to Maine? 36.The witness _____ to tell the truth in court. 38. Someone left a bottle of soda outside and it _____ solid in the cold. 39.The ship _____ in a terrible storm. 42. If I _____ a U.S. citizen, I’d vote for a new president.

These are the verbs you should use to complete the puzzle, but BE CAREFUL! You will have to change the forms to either the past or present perfect according to the sentences given as clues, and ALL of the verbs are irregular. GOOD LUCK! be (2 times) become begin buy break bring catch choose come

do drive eat fall forget freeze get give go

grow hear know leave lend lose pay ring rise

say see sell shake show shrink sink sleep speak

spend swear swim swing take teach think throw tear tell wake wear write

100

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Spring

Faculty

2004

SPRING 2004 CELOP FACULTY Chris Antonellis Jamie Beaton Shelley Bertolino Barbara Bliss Jill Brand Meredith Clark Ron Clark Judith Dan Betty D’Angelo Marsha Dean Renee Delatizky Jeff DiIuglio Margo Downey Ginny Drislane

Sammi Eckstut Michael Feldman Shelley Fishman Cynthia Flamm Joanne Fox Roselyn Frank Joyce Ho James Kaplan Doug Kohn John Kopec George Krikorian Jacquie LoConte Lori Lubeski Dorothy Lynde

|| Bob Maguire Irene Maksymjuk Doreen Miller Margo Miller Joe Pettigrew Carol Piñeiro Adrianne Saltz Gregg Singer Nora Smith Pam Steeves Maria Tomeho-Palermino Ramon Valenzuela Susan Vik Ellen Yaniv

For E-mail addresses of faculty, go to the Faculty & Staff section of the CELOP Web site:

www.bu.edu/celop

Spring

Staff

Miriam Fawcett

Lesley Andrews

Assistant Director, Administration

Lab Assistant

2004

101

Alicia Radl Staff Coodinator





Helen Reynolds

Fabiola Framondi

Gabriella Campozano

Senior Staff Assistant

Program Coordinator





John Szendeffy Multimedia Language Lab Coordinator de

Marcella Framondi Admissions Officer





Lara Gordon

Judy Di Leo

Marketing & Admissions Manager

Academic Advisor



Michelle Smith



Bruce Rindler Associate Director, Academic Programs

Margot Valdivia Director of CELOP

Jenn Kay Kosch

Jonathan White

Student Life Coordinator

Technical Coordinator



Designated Substitute Teacher

Administrative Assistant





Liyang”Riki” Zhang

Interns . . . Eri Washida

Wan-Fang “Shirley” Yeh

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Spring

Ambassadors Abroad Program

2004

CELOP Ambassadors Abroad Each semester, CELOP looks for students who would like to participate in the Ambassadors Abroad Program. In the past, the CELOP Ambassadors have taken on the job of spreading the word about CELOP back in their home countries. They have done this by taking CELOP brochures and applications back home and talking about CELOP to people at their schools or workplaces. We hear from the CELOP Ambassadors from time to time, and have learned that some of them get together with other CELOP Alumni in their area. This gave us at CELOP ideas for some additional things that CELOP Ambassadors might do: • CELOP Ambassadors could give us news updates on what CELOP Alumni in their country have been doing. We could publish this alumni news in the Semester Book, which is available on our website www.bu.edu/celop (Click on Alumni and then on link to Semester Book for past issues). And we have plans for an Alumni e-newsletter in the future. • CELOP Ambassadors could invite potential CELOP students to attend their CELOP Alumni get-togethers to hear about what it’s like to study at CELOP, live in Boston, etc.

If you’re someone who would enjoy helping us to strengthen our network of CELOP alumni and tell people in your home country about CELOP, please let your teacher or me know that you would like to be a CELOP Ambassador. This kind of network can be useful to all of us and fun as well!

Judy Di Leo Academic Advisor 0ffice #242 [email protected]

The Semester Book team is al wa ys looking f or ne w ideas f or content. We w ould lik e to hear fr om f ormer CELOP students (alumni) about lif e after CELOP. Contact us after y ou lea v e CELOP this semester, whether y ou r eturn to y our countr y or sta y in Boston or some wher e else in the U .S. Tell us what y ou’r e doing and send pictur es, if possible . We’ll tr y to include y our experience in the next Semester Book. E-mail J ohn de Szendeffy at .

What can I do after Spring 2004? You have 60 days after the last day of class to complete these procedures!

April 16, 2004 + 60 days = June 15, 2004

The Spring 2004 program is drawing to a close and many of you are thinking about life after CELOP. When making plans for the future, you must remember some important details and procedures related to your visa and your SEVIS I-20. Here are answers to your most urgent questions: I am returning to CELOP. What should I do? Complete the following steps by April 16, 2004: • You must complete a Summer 2004 Continuing Student Application form. • Make sure that your passport is valid at least 6 months into the future. • If you will exit the U.S. after the Spring semester and you plan to come back for the Summer semester, make sure that your F-1 visa is still valid and that you have a valid signature from Marcella (#238) on page 3 of your SEVIS I-20.

I am leaving CELOP and transferring to another school. What should I do? You must submit to CELOP a Transfer Report for the school you wish to attend so that we can release you for transfer in SEVIS. Your new school will be responsible for preparing a new SEVIS I-20. Please remember that it takes CELOP 24 hours to process a transfer, so make sure to do this with time. The SEVIS transfer release date will be April 16, 2004 when the Spring 2004 session ends. I am leaving CELOP and transferring into an academic program at BU. What should I do? You must make sure that you check-in with the International Student & Scholars Office at BU if you will continue your studies in an academic program this Spring. The BU International Students & Scholars Office (ISSO) can assist you with this process and you should plan on visiting them in August. They are located at 19 Deerfield St., 2nd Floor. Make sure that you bring your SEVIS I-20, BU ID card, passport and I-94 card to the ISSO office. If you are conditionally admitted to BU but have not started your academic program, the summertime is not considered a vacation period. I am staying inside the U.S. to relax and travel before returning to my home country. What should I do? Remember, whenever you stop studying, you may remain inside the U.S. for only 60 days while preparing for your return trip home. By day 60 (June 15, 2004), you must exit the U.S. If you stay more than 60 days and do not resume full-time studies and do not have an I-20 from the school you are attending, you may be considered to be inside the U.S. unlawfully. Please note that CELOP will report you to SEVIS as having completed your program on April 16, 2004. I have no idea what I’m doing after this semester. What should I do? You only have 60 days after your last class at CELOP to: • transfer to another school • go home • OR, you can apply to continue at CELOP for the next available sessions starting in May, EN 055 or EN 045, no later than April 16, 2004!

Visit CELOP on the Web www.bu.edu/celop

T HE E NGLISH YOU N EED

FOR THE

F UTURE YOU WANT

Study English at Boston University Center for English Language and Orientation Programs Tel: 617.353.4870 • Fax: 617.353.6195 • E-mail: [email protected] • Web: www.bu.edu/celop

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890 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA