Sleep and Neurodegenerative Disorders. Disclosures

10/5/2015 Sleep and Neurodegenerative  Disorders Rama Maganti, MD Professor Department of Neurology University of Wisconsin School of  Medicine and P...
8 downloads 2 Views 3MB Size
10/5/2015

Sleep and Neurodegenerative  Disorders Rama Maganti, MD Professor Department of Neurology University of Wisconsin School of  Medicine and Public Health Bellin Health Sleep conference Nov 6 2015

Disclosures • None

1

10/5/2015

Outline • • • •

Sleep in normal aging  Sleep in Alzheimer’s disease Sleep problems in PD and related disorders REM sleep behavior disorder

Sleep in aging

2

10/5/2015

Dementia is a growing problem • More than 25 million  people worldwide with  Dementia • Increasing incidence of  AD and other  Neurodegenerative  diseases

Neurodegenerative disorders • • • • • • • • •

Disease Lesion component Alzheimer’s disease  α‐synuclein Fronto‐temporal dementia tau and TDP‐43 Vascular dementia microangiopathy Parkinson's disease  α‐synuclein Dementia of Lewy body type     α‐synuclein CBD α‐synuclein Multiple system atrophy α‐synuclein Huntington’s disease CTG repeats

3

10/5/2015

Sleep disturbances in  Neurodegenerative disease • Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized  by disruption in both circadian rhythm and  sleep architecture • Other sleep disorders: OSA RLS/PLMS REM sleep behavior disorder Hypersomnias

4

10/5/2015

Sleep disturbances are a common  feature of AD Polysomnogram in AD  patients: ‐ Reduced sleep efficiency ‐ Increased Wake time  after sleep onset ‐ Reduced time spent in  N2; N3 and REM sleep ‐ Increased stage 1 ‐ Increased latency to  sleep and REM Kunerman et al, 2011

Sleep disturbances in Mouse  models:  Increased time awake and  aberrant circadian rhythms

Wisor et al, 2005

Aberrant rhythms seen in both  humans and animal models

5

10/5/2015

A vicious cycle

Sleep improves clearance of  metabolites and A β

Sleep clears CSF metabolites and reduced  clearance seen when animals are forced to stay  awake

Reduced Amyloid beta  clearance with awake Xie et al Science, 2013

6

10/5/2015

Sleep disturbances may predict  dementia and Aβ pathology • In community dwelling  older adults, shorter  sleep was associated  with greater beta  amyloid burden • Findings suggest poor  sleep may accelerate  AD

Spria et al, JAMA, 2013

A β levels controlled by sleep wake  cycle

Amyloid beta has a normal circadian  rhythm, increases with awake and  reduced with sleep. SD worsens Abeta levels Kang et al, Science, 2009

7

10/5/2015

OSA exacerbates A β pathology

OSA patients have more amyloid beta and tau burden

Bu et al, Sci Rep, 2015 

CPAP improves cognitive function  and sleep quality among patients  with AD Cook, et al, J Clin Sleep Med, 2009

Sleep in Huntington’s disease Sleep problems pre‐date Huntington’s  disease. Increased arousals, increased  WASO and shifts between different  stages

Lazar et al, Ann of Neurology, 2015

8

10/5/2015

Sleep problems in PD and related  disorders • Daytime Hypersomnia • Circadian rhythm dysfunction, especially  phase advancement • Sleep fragmentation • RLS and PLMS • REM sleep behavior disorder • Nocturnal Hallucinations • Obstructive sleep apnea

Levodopa improves sleep only  marginally

9

10/5/2015

REM behavior disorder • RBD is a Disorder of  abnormal motor activity  during dream sleep • Abnormal motor activity: Simple: Talk, shout, laugh, irregular jerk/s Complex: swearing, gesturing, punching,  kicking, leaping from bed, running

Epidemiology • Prevalence rates of 0.3 to 0.5%1 • More often effects adults over age of 50, but  can be seen as early as age 10‐12 • More common in men than women (85% in  men)2 • With antidepressant use, seen more often in  younger patients and women (45% in one  sample) • •

1. Ohayon et al, 1997 2. Schenck and Mahowald, 1996

10

10/5/2015

Idiopathic RBD • RBD present alone without concomitant  medical/neurological disorders‐ IRBD • IRBD accounts for up to 60% of cases • Association with Synucleinopathies and  Tauopathies • IRBD is often a harbinger of future  neurodegenerative disease • However, RBD may follow onset of  neurodegenerative disease

Secondary or symptomatic RBD • Sporadic manifestation of other neurological  disease ‐ ALS; Limbic encephalitis; Brain stem strokes;  MS; Epilepsy; Autism; Tourette’s syndrome ‐ Drug induced:  Tricyclics; SSRIs; Bisoprolol‐ either during treatment or withdrawal ‐ ETOH withdrawal

11

10/5/2015

RBD in Neurodegenerative disorders Synucleinopathies: Parkinson's disease Multiple System Atrophy Dementia of Lewy Body Type

Tauopathies: Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Alzheimer’s disease Corticobasal Degeneration Pick’s disease

RBD in Parkinson's disease • RBD is seen in up to 35% of Parkinson’s  disease patients1 • When patients with IRBD are followed: 65% eventually developed Parkinsonism in one  study2 48% of cases with Parkinsonism had preexisting RBD  in another study3

• REM sleep without atonia and motor  behavior seen in up to 60% of patients 1. Comella et al., Neurology 1998;   2.Schenck et al., Neurology 1998;  3. Olson et al, Brain 2000

12

10/5/2015

RBD in MSA • RBD is much more closely associated with  MSA than Parkinson’s disease • Nearly all patients with MSA have RBD1,2 • Pontine atrophy in MSA with involvement of  structures generating REM atonia may be a  reason • •

1. Olson et al, Brain 2000 2. Vetrugno et al, Sleep Med 2004

RBD and DLB • Clear association between the 2 not studied  • RBD is considered a supportive feature in diagnosis  of DLB • RBD and cognitive decline precede Parkinsonism and  Hallucinations • Path studies show that predominance of RBD  patients that later develop Dementia have Neuronal  loss in Substantia Nigra and Locus Coeruleus along  with Lewy bodies1,2 • •

1. Boeve et al, Mov Disorders, 2001 2.Turner., J Geria Psych Neurology, 2002

13

10/5/2015

RBD in Tauopathies • RBD is much less common in Tauopathies • 10‐20% of cases of PSP may have REM without  atonia1 • 5% of AD patients may have symptoms of  RBD2 • Much more rare in CBD and Picks • •

1. Arnulf et al, Sleep 2005 2. Gagnon et al, Sleep 2005

Periodic Leg Movements (PLM) • Periodic flexion of ankle, knee and thighs with fanning of toes • Pathological PLMS occur >5 times per hour/sleep • Polysomnography is required to quantify PLMS • 80‐85% of RLS patients have a PLMS index >5 • PLMS also occur in a variety of sleep and neurological  disorders

14

10/5/2015

Clinical Features • Simplex or complex motor behavior during sleep • Often present with injuries to self or bed partner due  to violent behavior during sleep • Dreams often involve attack by animals or humans • Behavior mirrors dream content • Most recall the dream content • Normal levels of aggressiveness during daytime

Clinical features Very often co‐exist with other sleep disorders such as: – Obstructive Sleep apnea – Narcolepsy – Restless legs/Periodic limb movements of sleep Co‐existing Sleep disorders worsen underlying RBD Note: RBD‐like behavior in OSA during apnea related  arousals1 1. Iranzo et al, Sleep 2005

15

10/5/2015

Atonia in REM sleep • REM Sleep “on” neurons in  LDT and PPN (Cholinergic  neurons) • REM atonia is induced by  complex mechanism  involving LDT, LC and  subceruleus regions which  stimulate medial medulla‐ NMC&NGC. • NMC&NGC inhibit spinal  motor neurons via  reticulospinal tract causing  atonia

Mechanisms of REM atonia

Boeve et al, Mental and behavioral dysfunction in Mov Disorders; 2003

16

10/5/2015

Loss of REM atonia in RBD

Boeve et al, Mental and behavioral dysfunction in Mov Disorders; 2003

Pathology of RBD Pathology of IRBD  represents a continuum  with involvement  starting in brain stem  and ascending cranially. Clinically patients express  RBD, followed by  Parkinsonism and finally  Dementia

17

10/5/2015

Diagnostic Criteria A. Violent or injurious behavior during sleep B. Limb or body movement during dream C. At least one of the following: 1. Potentially harmful sleep behaviors 2. Dreams appear to be “acted out” 3. Sleep discontinuity D. PSG demonstrates following in REM sleep 1. Augmented Chin EMG 2. Simple or complex motor behaviors 3. Absence of epileptic activity  E. Symptoms not associated with other psych disorders F. Other sleep disorders may be present but not the cause of  behavior

PSG in RBD

18

10/5/2015

PSG in RBD

PSG In RBD

19

10/5/2015

RBD in Lab

Summary • Sleep dwindles with aging • Sleep disturbances are a common feature of  neurodegenerative diseases • Sleep disturbances can pre‐date onset of  dementia • RBD is common and can predict onset of  neurodegenerative disease • Treating sleep disorders can prevent  progression of dementia

20

Suggest Documents