Sheep & Goats Survey January 2017

Sheep & Goats Survey January 2017 Presented By: Benjamin Weber / Ty Kalaus Survey Secondary: James Collom November 10, 2016 Agenda What are we goin...
Author: Milton Lloyd
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Sheep & Goats Survey January 2017

Presented By: Benjamin Weber / Ty Kalaus Survey Secondary: James Collom November 10, 2016

Agenda What are we going to cover?



Objectives



Due Dates & Sample Size



Survey Purpose



Questionnaire Overview



Wrap-up

Objectives What are we trying to accomplish?



Provide Necessary Tools and Resources



Reduce Respondent Burden



Collect High Quality Data



Improve Response Rates

Due Dates



Mail Date - December 16, 2016



Phone & Field Dates – December 31 through January 16



Last Day to Enter in CAPI – January 16, 2017 COB



Release Date – January 31, 2017 3:00 pm

Sample Data A glance at the numbers...... Response Rates State

2015

2016

Michigan

76.0%

62.5%

Indiana

69.1%

62.9%

Ohio

64.4%

51.6%

United States

70.7%

62.9%

Sample 2017 Michigan

718

Indiana

653

Ohio

1034

Survey Purpose Why is this important?



Only Sheep & Goats Report That NASS Does



Producers/Industry Use Information To Determine Production & Marketing Strategies



Suppliers, Packers, & Government Agencies Use The Data To Determine Slaughter Volume & Export Potential



Universities Use The Data For Research & Extension Purposes



All Of These Data Users Expect The Annual Report

Introduction/Screening

Introduction/Screening What do we want to know?



Is the operation still in Business?



Verify Name and Address



Presence of Sheep and/or Goats on January 1, at any time during 2016, or expected in 2017?



Operation Structure 

Individual, Partners, Hired Manager?

Section 1 Sheep & Lambs: Current Inventory 

Sheep and lambs for breeding 

Ewes (female) 1 year old and older



Rams (male) 1 year old and older





May also be referred to as “bucks”



Typically 1 ram per 25-50 ewes

Replacement lambs less than 1 year old 

Includes both males and females intended for the breeding flock



Include unweaned lambs for breeding

Section 1 Sheep & Lambs: Current Inventory 

Sheep and lambs for market 

Lambs under 65 pounds



Lambs 65 to 84 pounds



Lambs 85 to 105 pounds



Lambs over 105 pounds 





Typically around 50-80 lbs when placed on feed; slaughtered around 100-120 lbs

Sheep 1 year old and older (not used for breeding)

Total sheep and lambs 

Confirm what they reported adds back to their total!

Section 1 – Sheep & Lambs 2016 Production and Disposition 





Lamb Crop 

How many lambs born (exclude those born dead)



Lambs/Ewe Rate Typically Ranges from 1.1-1.5

Death and Losses During 2016 

How many lambs died



How many sheep died

Around 1-10% for sheep; 2-15% for lamb crop 

Varies geographically

Section 1 – Sheep & Lambs 2016 Production and Disposition 

Wool Production & Price in 2016 

How many head shorn (both sheep and lambs)



How many pounds of wool shorn (include tags) 



What was average price received 



Total pounds OR average fleece weight (nearest tenth)

Price per pound OR total dollars received

Average wool price (2015): $1.45 per pound

Section 1 – Sheep & Lambs





Inventory Value (for inventory items reported) 

Breeding ewes 1 year and older



Breeding rams 1 year and older



Breeding replacement lambs less than 1 year old



Market lambs less than 1 year old



Market sheep 1 year old and older

Slaughter for consumption by this operation 

Lambs and sheep slaughtered at commercial establishments



Lambs and sheep slaughtered on this operation

Section 2 – Goats & Kids: Current Inventory 

Inventories broken out by Angora; Milk; Meat & Other 

All breeds are based on utilization



On January 1, how many (regardless of ownership):



Goats & Kids for Breeding 

Does (female) 1 year old and older



Bucks (males) 1 year old and older 



May also be referred to as “billies”

Replacement kids less than 1 year old 

Includes both males and females intended for the breeding herd

Section 2 – Goats & Kids: Current Inventory 

Goats & Kids for Market 

Market kids less than 1 year old 



Market goats 1 year old and older 



Include kids that will not be kept for breeding

Include goats not used for breeding

Confirm Total Goats & Kids 

By types: Angora; Milk; Meat & Other 

Again to make sure their total equals what they’ve reported

Section 2 – Goats & Kids: 2016 Production and Disposition 

Kid Crop for 2016 



How many kids born (exclude kids born dead)

Death and Losses During 2016 

How many kids died before weaning (exclude kids born dead)



How many kids died after weaning (exclude kids born dead)



How many goats died

Section 2 – Goats & Kids





Inventory Value (for inventory items reported) 

Breeding does 1 year and older



Breeding bucks 1 year and older



Breeding replacement kids less than 1 year old



Market kids less than 1 year old



Market goats 1 year old and older

Slaughter for consumption by this operation 

Kids and goats slaughtered at commercial establishments



Kids and goats slaughtered on this operation

Section 2 – Goats & Kids



Mohair Production and Price in 2016 

How many Angora goats and kids clipped



How many pounds of mohair clipped 



What was average price received 



Total pounds OR average fleece weight (nearest tenth)

Price per pound OR total dollars received

Average value of Mohair production: $5.30 per pound (2015)

Things to Remember…..



No Sheep or Goats? 



May very well still be in business

Out of business? 

Be sure to work through the screening questions



And determine what happened/current status 



Capture as much new operator information as possible

Encounter something odd? 

Be sure to leave a detailed comment about the situation



Your field office staff really appreciate that extra information

In Summary



Asking about now AND anytime in 2016 

Current inventory vs. 2016 production info



Know the different “parts” of the inventory



Be aware of the inventory “sum of parts”



Anything odd or unexpected leave a good comment



If you have a question give us a call

Reluctant Responses



Small farmer/operation 

I’m glad you brought that up. All operations are important, big or small. The management practices of a smaller operation are different from the larger ones, and this is your chance to let your voice be heard. Information you provide can help others become aware of the challenges facing small operators.

Reluctant Responses (2)



Prices are not good, we want more money. 

I understand your concern about prices. Others have expressed that same feeling. That’s why it’s so important to share your information. Accurate information from producers like yourself lets everyone know the true condition of the current markets and can be valuable in helping to address those price concerns.

Reluctant Responses (3)



Why should I report? What’s in it for me? 

That’s a great question. Your report, along with those from other farmers selected, is the basis for unbiased information that tells the true state of American agriculture. Accurate information helps reduce uncertainty about output and supplies. Without this information, farmers would be at the mercy of large businesses that make their own estimates.