Secondary Course Catalog

Secondary Course Catalog 2013-2014 Richardson Independent School District Table of Contents Table of Contents ........................................
Author: Clifton Green
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Secondary Course Catalog 2013-2014

Richardson Independent School District

Table of Contents Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................................... 1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 5 RISD GRADUATION PROGRAM OVERVIEW ............................................................................................... 7 DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM (DAP ..................................................................................... 8 RECOMMENDED PROGRAM ................................................................................................................... 10 HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM ....................................................................................................................... 11 DESCRIPTION OF JUNIOR HIGH COURSE OFFERINGS ................................................................................. 12 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS ...................................................................................................................... 12 ENGLISH COURSES .................................................................................................................................. 12 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) COURSES................................................................................ 13 READING COURSES ................................................................................................................................. 13 SPEECH COURSES .................................................................................................................................... 15 MATHEMATICS ........................................................................................................................................ 16 SCIENCE ................................................................................................................................................... 18 SOCIAL STUDIES ...................................................................................................................................... 19 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE) ........................................................................................... 21 FINE ARTS ................................................................................................................................................ 22 C=Core Component; E=Elective Component .......................................................................................... 22 ART COURSES .......................................................................................................................................... 22 MUSIC COURSES...................................................................................................................................... 24 THEATRE ARTS COURSES......................................................................................................................... 27 PHYSICAL EDUCATION............................................................................................................................. 27 PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES............................................................................................................. 27 HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES ............................................................................................................... 28 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION .................................................................................................... 29 C=Core Component; E=Elective Component .......................................................................................... 30 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION COURSES .................................................................................... 30 OTHER ELECTIVES .................................................................................................................................... 34 AVID (ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION) COURSES .................................................... 34 SPECIAL EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................... 34 DESCRIPTION OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OFFERINGS ................................................................................ 37 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS ...................................................................................................................... 37 ENGLISH COURSES .................................................................................................................................. 37 1

ESL COURSES ........................................................................................................................................... 40 READING COURSES ................................................................................................................................. 41 SPEECH COURSES .................................................................................................................................... 43 MATHEMATICS ........................................................................................................................................ 45 MATHEMATICS COURSES ........................................................................................................................ 46 SCIENCE ................................................................................................................................................... 49 SCIENCE COURSES ................................................................................................................................... 51 SOCIAL STUDIES ...................................................................................................................................... 57 SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES ...................................................................................................................... 58 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE) ........................................................................................... 62 LOTE COURSES ........................................................................................................................................ 63 FINE ARTS ................................................................................................................................................ 66 ART COURSES .......................................................................................................................................... 66 CTE COURSE ............................................................................................................................................ 73 DANCE COURSES ..................................................................................................................................... 73 MUSIC COURSES...................................................................................................................................... 75 THEATRE ARTS COURSES......................................................................................................................... 85 PHYSICAL EDUCATION............................................................................................................................. 87 HEALTH COURSES.................................................................................................................................... 87 PE COURSES ............................................................................................................................................ 88 CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION .................................................................................................... 97 Agricultural Food and Natural Resources ............................................................................................... 97 Agricultural Food and Natural Resources Courses ................................................................................. 98 Architecture and Construction ............................................................................................................. 101 Architecture and Construction Courses ................................................................................................ 101 Arts, AV Technology, and Communications .......................................................................................... 104 Arts, AV Technology, and Communications Courses ............................................................................ 104 Business, Management, and Administration ........................................................................................ 108 Business, Management, and Administration Courses .......................................................................... 108 Education and Training ......................................................................................................................... 111 Education and Training Courses............................................................................................................ 111 Finance .................................................................................................................................................. 113 Finance Courses .................................................................................................................................... 113 Government and Public Administration ............................................................................................... 115 Government and Public Administration Courses.................................................................................. 115 2

Health Science....................................................................................................................................... 116 Health Science Courses ......................................................................................................................... 116 Hospitality and Tourism ........................................................................................................................ 119 Hospitality and Tourism Courses .......................................................................................................... 119 Human Services..................................................................................................................................... 123 Human Services Courses ....................................................................................................................... 123 Information Technology........................................................................................................................ 126 Information Technology Courses .......................................................................................................... 126 Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security ....................................................................................... 131 Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Courses ......................................................................... 131 Manufacturing ...................................................................................................................................... 134 Manufacturing Courses ......................................................................................................................... 134 Marketing .............................................................................................................................................. 136 Marketing Courses ................................................................................................................................ 136 Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics ............................................................................ 138 Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Courses .............................................................. 139 Project Lead the Way ............................................................................................................................ 143 Transportation, Distribution and Logistics............................................................................................ 144 Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Courses .............................................................................. 144 OTHER ELECTIVES .................................................................................................................................. 147 AVID PROGRAM (ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION) COURSES ................................ 147 INTERNSHIP COURSES ........................................................................................................................... 147 JOURNALISM COURSES ......................................................................................................................... 147 COLLEGE TRANSITION COURSES ........................................................................................................... 150 ROTC COURSES...................................................................................................................................... 151 LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS COURSES....................................................................................................... 151 LIFE SKILLS FOR PARENTING STUDENTS................................................................................................ 151 PEER HELPING EDUCATION COURSES ................................................................................................... 152 SPECIAL EDUCATION ............................................................................................................................. 153 NON-CREDIT COURSES GRADES 9-12 ................................................................................................... 158 INDEX .................................................................................................................................................... 159

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INTRODUCTION The RISD Secondary Course Catalog is an annual publication distributed through the Department of Guidance and Counseling and the Division of Curriculum and Instruction to support each of the District’s vision and goals; Vision RISD – Where all students learn, grow, and succeed. Mission To serve and prepare all students for their global future Values Integrity * Inspiration * Inclusiveness * Innovation RISD Focus Students are the primary focus of RISD. And Staff is the primary focus of administration. 2020 Vision Goals Students are highly engaged in their educational life Profound curriculum is the foundation for learning. RISD has high performing, student focused teachers. RISD ensures excellence in operations. This catalog includes descriptions of secondary course offerings in RISD, as well as course sequence suggestions and graduation requirements. If you require specific descriptions of graduation requirements, instructional programs, grading guidelines, and other academically-related district policies and guidelines, please refer to the RISD Secondary Program of Studies. Although primarily tools for student pre-registration, we strongly encourage you to refer to both the Course Catalog and Program of Studies (click on the “Parents” tab on the RISD website – www.risd.org to view both handbooks) throughout the school year as a resource for other questions you may have concerning instructional issues. RISD maintains a strict policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity in all programs. You will notice that the secondary course offering descriptions employ two course identifiers, “Standard” or “Optional”. “Standard” courses are offered on all campuses if enough students indicate interest. The “Optional” courses may be offered at the campus based on teacher staffing, finance, classroom need, etc. Whenever possible, based on minimum enrollment counts, RISD provides instruction through a teacher in the classroom. However, if enrollment is insufficient, instruction options to consider may include: 1) distance learning/teleconferencing; 2) correspondence course (student fee required); 3) dual credit (student fee may be required and student must provide transportation, if off-campus); and 4) travel to another campus (student must provide transportation). 5

If none of these options is suitable to the student, other course offerings should be discussed with the guidance counselor. Please see your guidance counselor, teacher(s), and/or principal(s) concerning additional questions or explanation of information.

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RISD GRADUATION PROGRAM OVERVIEW FOR STUDENTS ENTERING 9TH GRADE IN 2007-2008 AND THEREAFTER TEXAS GRADUATES MUST COMPLETE RECOMMENDED PROGRAM (19 TAC §74.61) Each student entering the ninth grade in the 2007-2008 school year and thereafter, must enroll in the courses necessary to complete the curriculum requirements for the Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP) or Recommended Program unless the student, the student’s parent/guardian, and a school counselor or school administrator agree in writing signed by each party that the student should be permitted to complete the High School Program or another individualized graduation program, and the student: Is at least 16 years old; and Has completed two credits required for graduation in each subject of the foundations curriculum; OR Has failed to be promoted to Grade 10 one or more times Any student receiving special education services will be automatically placed on the RISD High School Program if an admission, review and dismissal (ARD) committee determined the student is to receive modified curriculum in a subject area.

RISD Graduation Plans for students entering 9th grade in 2007-2008 and thereafter

Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP) Recommended Program High School Program

Students first entering ninth grade in the 2011-2012 school year and thereafter: refer to the RISD Program of Studies for additional testing required for graduation.

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RISD Graduation Plan DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM (DAP (ENTERING 9TH GRADE IN 2007-2008 AND THEREAFTER) Fulfills Texas Recommended Program Seal / Fulfills TEXAS Grant Academic Requirements. ACADEMIC CORE COMPONENT All course requirements may be satisfied through completion of regular, Pre-AP, AP, honors, and/or dual credit courses. No course substitutions are allowed in the Distinguished Achievement Program except as specified below.

ENGLISH

4.0

1.0 credit in English 1, 1.0 credit in English 2, 1.0 credit in English 3, 1.0 credit in English 4 (English 1 for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL 1) and English 2 for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL 2) may be substituted for English 1 and 2 for students with limited English proficiency who are at the beginning or intermediate level of English language proficiency.) Note: Some colleges and universities may not accept ESOL 1&2 as a substitute for English 1&2. Students are responsible for verifying specific college admission requirements.

MATHEMATICS

4.0

1.0 credit Algebra 1, 1.0 credit Geometry, 1.0 credit Algebra 2 AND 1.0 Additional credit in a state approved mathematic course (see GRADUATION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS in RISD Program of Studies for course sequence)

SCIENCE

4.0

1.0 credit Biology, 1.0 credit Chemistry, 1.0 credit Physics AND 1.0 Additional credit in a state approved lab-based Science course* (see GRADUATION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS in RISD Program of Studies for course sequence)

SOCIAL STUDIES

4.0

1.0 credit World Geography, 1.0 credit World History, 1.0 credit U.S. History, .5 credit U.S. Government, and .5 credit Economics HEALTH - .5 credit in Health

.5

SPEECH - .5 credit in Communication Applications

.5

FINE ARTS – 1.0 credit of Fine Arts*

1.0

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

1.0

1.0 credits in Physical Education*

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE)

3.0

3.0 credits in the same LOTE* ELECTIVE COMPONENT

Elective Courses

4.0

Elective selections may be made from all state-approved courses. Elective course choices will reflect the student’s individual needs, interests, and/or aptitudes.

26.0

TOTAL UNITS of CREDIT

+ Advanced Measures

*See course options in RISD Secondary Program of Studies Students first entering ninth grade in the 2011-2012 school year and thereafter: refer to the Program of Studies for additional testing required for graduation.

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Distinguished Achievement Program Advanced Measure Requirements All students who complete the course requirements for Distinguished Achievement program (DAP) may earn the Distinguished Achievement Program Seal by completing advanced measures at the college or professional level that are assessed by an external review process. In order to achieve this distinguished recognition, students must complete required coursework AND complete any combination of four of the advanced measures listed below and provide necessary documentation to their counselor as follows: Distinguished Achievement Program Advanced Measure Requirements A score of 3 or above on a College Board AP exam (each exam can count as one measure). A score on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) that qualifies a student for recognition as a commended scholar, or higher by the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation; as part of the National Hispanic Recognition program of the College Board; or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program. The PSAT/NMSQT score shall count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors received by the student. A grade of 80 (3.0) or higher on academic college courses that count for college credit and advanced technical credit courses, including locally articulated courses. Complete original research, project, or approved Project Based Learning (PBL) project judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of the project; or conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience, and related to the required curriculum set forth in §74.1 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills). Original research/projects may not be counted as more than two measures. No substitutions are allowed in the Distinguished Achievement Program. Note: A single course can only count for one advanced measure. For example: a student enrolled in AP English 3 for Dual Credit who earns 3 or above on the AP Exam meets the criteria for one advanced measure based on the AP English 3 course. Students graduating on the DAP will have to achieve Level III: Advanced Academic Performance on English III Reading, English III Writing and Algebra II EOC Assessments.

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RISD Graduation Plan RECOMMENDED PROGRAM (ENTERING 9TH GRADE IN 2007-2008 AND THEREAFTER) Fulfills Texas Recommended Program Seal / Fulfills TEXAS Grant Academic Requirements. ACADEMIC CORE COMPONENT All course requirements may be satisfied through completion of regular, Pre-AP, AP, honors, and/or dual credit courses. No course substitutions are allowed in the Recommended High School Program except as specified below.

ENGLISH

4.0

1.0 credit in English 1, 1.0 credit in English 2, 1.0 credit in English 3, 1.0 credit in English 4 (English 1 for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL 1) and English 2 for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL 2) may be substituted for English 1 and 2 for students with limited English proficiency who are at the beginning or intermediate level of English language proficiency.) Note: Some colleges and universities may not accept ESOL 1&2 as a substitute for English 1&2. Students are responsible for verifying specific college admission requirements.

MATHEMATICS

4.0

1.0 credit Algebra 1, 1.0 credit Geometry, 1.0 credit Algebra 2 AND 1.0 Additional Credit in a state approved mathematic course*

SCIENCE

4.0

1.0 credit Biology, 1.0 credit Chemistry, 1.0 credit Physics (Principles of Technology may be substituted for Physics) AND 1.0 Additional credit state approved Science course* (see GRADUATION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS in RISD Program of Studies for course sequence) OR 1.0 credit Biology, 1.0 credit IPC, 1.0 credit Chemistry and 1.0 credit Physics** (Principles of Technology may be substituted for Physics)

SOCIAL STUDIES

4.0

1.0 credit World Geography, 1.0 credit World History, 1.0 credit U.S. History, .5 credit U.S. Government, and .5 credit Economics

HEALTH - .5 credit in Health

.5

SPEECH - .5 credit in Communication Applications

.5

FINE ARTS – 1.0 credit of Fine Arts*

1.0

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

1.0

1.0 credits in Physical Education*

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE)

2.0

2.0 credits in the same LOTE* ELECTIVE COMPONENT

Elective Courses

5.0

Elective selections may be made from all state-approved courses. Elective course choices will reflect the student’s individual needs, interests, and/or aptitudes.

TOTAL UNITS of CREDIT

26.0

*See course options in RISD Secondary Program of Studies **Students who completed IPC prior to 2010-2011 school year may take 1.0 credit Biology, 1.0 credit IPC, 1.0 credit chemistry or Physics and 1.0 additional credit state approved science course. Students first entering ninth grade in the 2011-2012 school year and thereafter: refer to the Program of Studies for additional testing required for graduation.

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RISD Graduation Plan HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (ENTERING 9TH GRADE IN 2007-2008 AND THEREAFTER) Does not fulfill Texas Recommended Program Seal, or TEXAS Grant Academic Requirements. May not meet eligibility requirements for entrance to some colleges and programs. ACADEMIC CORE COMPONENT All course requirements may be satisfied through completion of regular, Pre-AP, honors, and/or AP courses.

ENGLISH

4.0

1.0 credit in English 1, 1.0 credit in English 2, 1.0 credit in English 3, 1.0 credit in English 4 (English 1 for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL 1) and English 2 for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL 2) may be substituted for English 1 and 2 for students with limited English proficiency who are at the beginning or intermediate level of English language proficiency.) Note: Some colleges and universities may not accept ESOL 1&2 as a substitute for English 1&2. Students are responsible for verifying specific college admission requirements.

MATHEMATICS

3.0

1.0 credit Algebra 1, 1.0 credit Geometry, 1.0 credit Algebra 2 or an additional 1.0 credit in math

SCIENCE

3.0

1.0 credit Biology, 1.0 unit IPC and 1.0 credit additional science in any state-approved science course OR 1.0 credit Biology, 1.0 credit Chemistry, 1.0 credit Physics

SOCIAL STUDIES

4.0

1.0 credit World Geography, 1.0 credit World History, 1.0 credit U.S. History, .5 credit U.S. Government, .5 credit Economics

HEALTH - .5 credit in Health

.5

SPEECH - .5 credit in Communication Applications

.5

FINE ARTS

1.0

1.0 credit of Fine Arts on this program (The Fine Arts requirement for students who entered 9th grade prior to 2010-2011 may be met with 1.0 credit of Fine Arts or an additional state approved Speech course.)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

1.0

1.0 credits in Physical Education*

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE) or ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES

2.0

2.0 credit in the same LOTE* or 2.0 additional state-approved electives ELECTIVE COMPONENT

Elective Courses

5.0

Elective selections may be made from all state-approved courses. Elective course choices will reflect the student’s individual needs, interests, and/or aptitudes.

TOTAL UNITS of CREDIT

24.0

*See course options in RISD Secondary Program of Studies Students first entering ninth grade in the 2011-2012 school year and thereafter: refer to the Program of Studies for additional testing required for graduation.

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DESCRIPTION OF JUNIOR HIGH COURSE OFFERINGS “Standard” courses are offered on all campuses if enough students indicate interest and “Optional” courses may be offered at the campus based on teacher staffing, finance, classroom need, etc. Whenever possible, based on minimum enrollment counts, RISD provides instruction through a teacher in the classroom. However, if enrollment is insufficient, instruction options to consider may include: 1) distance learning/teleconferencing; 2) correspondence course (student fee required); 3) dual credit (student fee required); or travel to another campus (student must provide transportation). If none of these options is suitable, the student should discuss another course offering with the guidance counselor.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Students enrolled in Language Arts 7 and 8 regular and PreAP courses are expected to continue to increase and refine their communication skills. Students are expected to write in a variety of genres. Students plan, draft, and complete written compositions based on the analysis of contemporary, multicultural, and classical literature. Students write in response to expository texts and create procedural text. Students locate, synthesize and organize valid research. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

ENGLISH COURSES 1002 LANGUAGE ARTS – 7th (STANDARD) 1002M/1002MI/1002MS LANGUAGE ARTS MODIFIED* – 7th (STANDARD) 1002A LANGUAGE ARTS ALTERNATE* – 7th (STANDARD Students analyze a speaker’s persuasive techniques and evaluate the content, credibility, and delivery. Students recognize how tone, style, and mood contribute to text. Students select and use forms of writing for specific purposes. Students draw data from primary and secondary sources for research. Students read widely in multiple genres. Students write in a variety of genres. 1113 LANGUAGE ARTS – PreAP – 7th (STANDARD) Students participate in all of the content of Language Arts 7 while emphasizing the analysis and synthesis of various texts. Through rigorous instruction and engaging learning activities, students work with the core skills of the PreAP/AP program. The course work involves: reading and writing multiple genres, acquiring apt academic vocabulary, honing composition and grammar skills, developing critical thinking skills, working in teams, creating multiple projects, and experiencing a challenging curriculum that includes embedded technological applications. This course offers expansion through academic opportunities to students who are self-starters, who like academic stimulation, who relish active discussions, and who carry through with responsibilities.

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1005 LANGUAGE ARTS – 8th (STANDARD) 1005M/1005MI/1005MS LANGUAGE ARTS MODIFIED* - 8th (STANDARD) 1005A LANGUAGE ARTS ALTERNATE* - 8th (STANDARD) Students read widely in classical, contemporary, and informational texts. They identify characteristics of literary forms. Students use different forms of writing for specific purposes, producing multi-paragraph compositions. Students use citations and follow accepted forms for research reports. Students present oral/written reports, including presentations strengthened by visuals and media. Students employ appropriate oral and written conventions. 1116 LANGUAGE ARTS – PreAP – 8th (STANDARD) Students participate in all of the content of Language Arts 8 while emphasizing a deep analysis and synthesis of multiple texts. The nature of this college readiness course is one of rigorous instruction and engaging learning activities, providing students opportunities to work with the core skills of the PreAP/AP program. Continuing with a demanding instruction of reading and writing in multiple genres, acquiring apt academic vocabulary, honing composition and grammar skills, enhancing critical thinking skills, and building on teamwork, this course is well-rounded. Students experience a challenging curriculum that includes embedded technological applications. This course brings appropriate academic opportunities to students who are self-motivated, who meet deadlines, who relish poignant/informed discussions, and who carry through with responsibilities. 1021 WRITING LAB – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Writing Lab is a course designed to develop and enhance student writing skills in 7th grade. Students explore different writing genres and techniques, and they apply conventional grammar rules.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) COURSES 1061 ESL 1 – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Entrance determined by Campus Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) No credit; full year course Students with limited English proficiency develop literacy skills in English through intensive instruction provided by ESL certified teachers trained in language acquisition and strategies for English Language Learners. 1063 ESL 2 – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Entrance determined by Campus Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) No credit; full year course Students with limited English proficiency develop literacy skills in English through intensive instruction by ESL certified teachers trained in language acquisition and strategies for English Language Learners.  For additional information, contact the Director for Secondary ESL Programs.

READING COURSES 1501 ACADEMIC READING – 7th (North, Parkhill, Apollo, and Westwood Jr. Highs ONLY) 1501MS ACADEMIC READING MODIFIED* - 7th (STANDARD all Jr. High campuses) 1501A ACADEMIC READING ALTERNATE – 7th (STANDARD all Jr. High campuses) Prerequisite – None No credit – full year 13

(Required for all students who failed grade 6 STAAR Reading at selected campuses) This course is an intensive, accelerated intervention in the areas of reading comprehension and phonemic awareness with a structured, research-based reading program. It is intended for struggling students who need support in attaining grade-level reading skills. 1509 7th GRADE STRATEGIC READING (Liberty, Lake Highlands, Forest Meadow, and West Jr. Highs ONLY) (Reading/Writing Connection) Prerequisite – None No credit: two semesters. (Required for all students who have failed grade 6 STAAR Reading at selected campuses) This course is an intensive, accelerated intervention in the area of reading comprehension with a structured, research-based reading program. It is intended for struggling students who need support in attaining grade-level reading skills and uses the Read 180 program. The goal of the program is to raise student reading ability to grade level or higher and to apply reading strategies across the curriculum. 1520 READING SUCCESS 7 – 7th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – Passed Grade 6 STAAR Reading No credit; two semesters This course is for students who demonstrate grade level comprehension and fluency skills and who benefit from additional enhancement of reading skills through guided practice. This course provides scaffolding opportunities for strengthening basic reading skills through working with reading-writing connections. 1503 ACADEMIC READING – 8th (North, Parkhill, Apollo, and Westwood Jr. Highs ONLY) 1503MS ACADEMIC READING MODIFIED* - 8th (STANDARD all Jr. High campuses) 1053A ACADEMIC READING ALTERNATE* - 8th (STANDARD all Jr. High campuses) Prerequisite – None No credit; two semesters. (Required for all students who failed grade 7 STAAR Reading at selected campuses) This course is an intensive, accelerated intervention in the areas of reading comprehension and phonemic awareness with a structured, research-based reading program. It is intended for struggling students who need support in attaining grade-level reading skills. 1510 8th GRADE STRATEGIC READING (Liberty, Lake Highlands, Forest Meadow, and West Jr. Highs ONLY) (Reading/Writing Connection) Prerequisite – None No credit: two semesters. (Required for all students who failed grade 7 STAAR Reading at selected campuses) This course is an intensive accelerated intervention in the area of reading comprehension with a structured research based reading program. It is intended for struggling students who need support in attaining grade-level reading skills and uses the Read 180 program. The goal of the program is to raise student reading ability to grade level or higher and to apply reading strategies across the curriculum.

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1505 CRITICAL THINKING/READING SKILLS – 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester The course is designed for students who read on or above grade level, are self-motivated, and desire to improve critical thinking and reading strategies. It is mentally challenging, fosters creativity, and includes structured reading. Emphasis is placed on problem solving, creative thinking, logic, decision-making, investigations/research, writing, and other thinking processes. 1521 READING SUCCESS 8 – 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – Passed Grade 7 STAAR Reading No credit; two semesters This course is for students who demonstrate reading comprehension and fluency skills with minimal scaffolding. This course provides opportunities for strengthening critical thinking skills and intermediate literacy skills. Engaging lessons provide practice with reading and writing in varied genres. 1561 ESL READING – 7th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit – full year All ESL students are required to be enrolled in a reading class (either an ESL reading or a regular reading class). This course offers instruction in word recognition, vocabulary development, fluency, comprehension strategies, text organization and critical thinking skills. The course is designed for ESL students with limited English proficiency. 1563 ESL READING – 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit – full year All ESL students are required to be enrolled in a reading class (either an ESL reading or a regular reading class). This course offers instruction in word recognition, vocabulary development, fluency, comprehension strategies, text organization and critical thinking skills. The course is designed for ESL students with limited English proficiency.

SPEECH COURSES 1601 SPEECH A – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester The course provides opportunities for students to examine the basic communication process. Students will also prepare, organize, deliver, and evaluate various speeches. 1602 SPEECH B – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester The course emphasizes performing speech opportunities, including interpretive reading, reading of prose and poetry, and duet acting. Interpersonal and group communication skills are also course goals.

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1617 COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS – 8th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester Students enrolled in this class will identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in interpersonal situations, group interactions, and personal and professional presentation. 1600 LEADERSHIP – 7th, 8th (Westwood Jr. High: Math, Science, Leadership Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E One credit; full year course Students learn life-long leadership skills in a hands-on, application setting. The initial focus is on the individual; this is followed with team-building, goal setting, planning, motivation, organizational skills, self-awareness and decision making. Seventh graders apply leadership theory on school, local, and state issues. Eighth graders expand to national and global issues, while integrating speech communication strategies into the public sphere of leadership. Service projects enhance the hands-on approach to learning leadership theory. 1613/1809 LEADERSHIP – 8th (Student registers for both course numbers) DAP-C and E; Rec-C and E; HS-C and E One credit (1613 is .5 elective credit fall semester/1809 is .5 Communications Applications credit spring semester); full year course Students learn life-long leadership skills in a hands-on, application setting. The initial focus is on the individual; team-building, goal setting, planning, motivation, organizational skills, self-awareness and decision making. Seventh graders apply leadership theory on school, local, and state issues. Eighth graders expand to national and global issues, while integrating speech communication strategies into the public sphere of leadership. Service projects enhance the hands-on approach to learning leadership theory.

MATHEMATICS Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

3002 MATHEMATICS – 7th (STANDARD) 3002M/3002MI/3002MS MATHEMATICS MODIFIED* - 7th (STANDARD) 3002A MATHEMATICS ALTERNATE* - 7th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course The primary focal points at Grade 7 are using proportional relationships in number, geometry, measurement, and probability; applying addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of decimals, fractions, and integers; and using statistical measures to describe data.

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3003 MATHEMATICS – PreAP – 7th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Recommend PreAP RISD Summer Math Camp for 6th graders going into 7th grade PreAP. No credit; full year course PreAP 7 Mathematics is an accelerated program designed to prepare the student to study algebra in the 8th grade. The goals and content of the course are the same as Mathematics 8, but with more in-depth problem solving experiences. The primary focal points in Mathematics 8 are using basic principles of algebra to analyze and represent proportional and non-proportional relationships and using probability to describe data and make predictions. 3006 ALGEBRA 1 - PreAP – 7th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Score of 90 or above on accelerated assessment. One credit; full year course This course is the same as PreAP Algebra 1-8, the first course in Algebra. It is designed for the student who demonstrates mastery of 7th and 8th grade concepts and is prepared to study algebra in the seventh grade. The goals and content of this course are the same as those for Algebra 1, but with more in-depth problem solving experiences. Students receive Algebra 1 credit for graduation; grades earned in PreAP Algebra 1 for 7th graders are not included in GPA calculations. 3037 MATH LAB – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) 3037M/3037MI MATH LAB MODIFIED* - 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course A mathematical course designed to strengthen and reinforce mathematical concepts with a focus on problem solving, applications, and critical thinking skills. A strong emphasis will be placed on instructional strategies designed to reinforce the curriculum. This course will be blocked with a grade appropriate math course. 3005 MATHEMATICS – 8th (STANDARD) 3005M/3005MI/3005MS MATHEMATICS MODIFIED* - 8th (STANDARD) 3005A MATHEMATICS ALTERNATE* - 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Mathematics 7 No credit; full year course The primary focal points for Mathematics 8 are using basic principles of algebra to analyze and represent proportional and non-proportional relationships and using probability to describe data and make predictions. 3006 ALGEBRA 1- 8 – PreAP – 8th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – PreAP Mathematics 7 or Recommend RISD Summer Math Camp if coming from regular 7th grade Mathematics. One credit; full year course PreAP Algebra 1 8 is a first course in algebra. This course is designed for the student who has participated in the PreAP Mathematics 7 accelerated program and is prepared to study algebra in the 8th grade. The goals and content of this course are the same as those for Algebra 1, but with more indepth problem solving experiences. Students receive Algebra 1 credit for graduation; grades earned in PreAP Algebra 1 8 are not included in GPA calculations.

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SCIENCE For most standard courses, regular and Pre-Advanced Placement (PreAP) course offerings are available for students, and both course options fully address the state-mandated essential knowledge and skills. PreAP courses are designed to provide enhanced academic challenge and extensive enrichment at each grade level in preparation for students’ enrollment in College Board Advanced Placement courses in high school. PreAP courses emphasize cognitive concepts and processes using higher-level skills, independent studies, and analytical and communication skills that are consistent with the structure of the science disciplines. A minimum of 40% of instructional time is committed to laboratory/field experiences in Integrated Physics and Chemistry, and Biology. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

4001 SCIENCE – 7th (STANDARD) 4001M/4001MI SCIENCE MODIFIED* - 7th (STANDARD) 4001A SCIENCE ALTERNATE* - 7th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course In grade 7, the study of science includes conducting field and laboratory investigations using scientific process skills, traditional lab equipment, and current technology. As students improve their science skills through inquiry-based investigations and experiences, they increase their understandings through integration of these topics: matter and energy; force, motion, and energy; earth and space; and organisms and environments. 4002 SCIENCE – 7th –PreAP (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course In grade 7, the study of science includes conducting field and laboratory investigations using scientific process skills, traditional lab equipment, and current technology including computers, Internet resources, hand-held data collectors, and related probes. As students improve their science skills through inquiry-based investigations and experiences, they increase their understandings through integration of these topics: biology (human systems, sexual and asexual reproduction, genetics, ecology); geology (violent weather, earth systems); astronomy (moon phases, lunar and solar systems); chemistry (physical and chemical properties, periodic table); and, physics (gravity, energy, forces and motion, simple machines). 4003 SCIENCE – 8th (STANDARD) 4003M/4003MI SCIENCE MODIFIED* - 8th (STANDARD) 4003A SCIENCE ALTERNATE* - 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course In grade 8, the study of science includes conducting field and laboratory investigations using scientific process skills, traditional lab equipment, and current technology. As students improve their science skills through inquiry-based investigations and experiences, they increase their understandings through integration of these topics: matter and energy; force, motion, and energy; earth and space; and organisms and environments. 18

4004 SCIENCE – 8th – PreAP (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course In grade 8, the study of science includes laboratory and field investigations using scientific process skills, traditional lab equipment, and current technology including computers, Internet resources, hand-held data collectors, and related probes. As students improve their science skills through inquiry-based investigations and experiences, they increase their understandings through integration of these topics: biology (genetics, ecology); geology (earth cycles including rock cycle, climate); astronomy (lunar cycle, stars and galaxies, scientific theories on the origins of the universe); chemistry (chemical properties, chemical reactions and energy, periodic table); and, physics (waves, forces and motion). 4031 MATH-BASED SCIENCE EXPLORATION – 7th, 8th (Westwood Jr. High: Math, Science, Leadership Magnet Only) Prerequisite – None No Credit; full year course This course introduces and supports advanced math concepts used in the science and engineering field. SMU’s Infinity Project provides a framework to demonstrate the processes of creativity, critical-thinking, and problem-solving skills in the context of engineering design, robotics, rocketry, machines, sound/environmental/biomedical engineering, digital imaging, structures and power. The NASA Connect program is an added on-line resource to Infinity’s specialized classroom technologies. The approach: learning math, science and engineering through lab applications and hands-on activities. 5532 INTEGRATED HEALTH SCIENCE – 8th (Westwood Jr. High: Math, Science, Leadership Magnet Only) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit Health Education; full year This course includes the same curriculum as Health Education. Instruction extends over two semesters, utilizing applied science techniques. Enriched with lab experiments and research in respiration and heart rate, blood pressure, lung capacity, DNA extraction, blood typing, nutrition, affects of space and solar radiation on the human body, cell structure, genetics, diseases, and vaccines. While studying health of the human body students dissect the heart, lung, eye, kidney, and brain. Students also learn Latin root words used in science and medical terminology.

SOCIAL STUDIES The junior high school social studies curriculum incorporates three major instructional goals: acquiring knowledge, developing attitudes and values, and developing skills and processes. Essential knowledge and skills in social studies at the junior high school grade levels continue to build upon the foundation established during the elementary school learning experiences. Eight content strands are integrated for instructional purposes and include history, geography, government, citizenship, economics, culture, science, technology, society, and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, to understand the function of our free enterprise society, and to appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation. Throughout their study of social studies, students use problem-solving and decision making skills to answer questions as well as use a variety of primary and secondary source materials. 19

For each course, regular and Pre-Advanced Placement (PreAP) course offerings are available for students, and both course options fully address the state-mandated essential knowledge and skills. PreAP courses are designed to provide academic challenge and extensive enrichment at each grade level in preparation for students’ enrollment in College Board Advanced Placement courses in high school. PreAP courses emphasize cognitive concepts and processes using higher level skills, independent studies, and analytical and communication skills that are consistent with the structure of the social science disciplines. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

2001 SOCIAL STUDIES – 7th (STANDARD) 2001M/2001MI SOCIAL STUDIES MODIFIED* - 7th (STANDARD) 2001A SOCIAL STUDIES ALTERNATE* - 7th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course Grade 7 students study the history of Texas, the full scope of Texas history, including the cultures of Native Americans living in Texas prior to European exploration, the eras of mission-building, colonization, revolution, republic, and statehood, focusing on key individuals, events, and issues and their impact. Students identify regions of Texas and the distribution of population within and among the regions; the structure and functions of municipal, county, and state governments; the influence of the U.S. Constitution on the Texas Constitution; and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Students identify the different racial and ethnic groups that settled in Texas to build a republic and then a state; students analyze the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the development of Texas. 2101 SOCIAL STUDIES – 7th –PreAP – (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course Grade 7 students study the history of Texas, the full scope of Texas history, including the cultures of Native Americans living in Texas prior to European exploration, the eras of mission-building, colonization, revolution, republic, and statehood, focusing on key individuals, events, and issues and their impact. Students identify regions of Texas and the distribution of population within and among the regions; the structure and functions of municipal, county, and state governments; the influence of the U.S. Constitution on the Texas Constitution; and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Students identify the different racial and ethnic groups that settled in Texas to build a republic and then a state; students analyze the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the development of Texas. 2002 SOCIAL STUDIES – 8th (STANDARD) 2002M/2002MI SOCIAL STUDIES MODIFIED* - 8th (STANDARD) 2002A SOCIAL STUDIES ALTERNATE* - 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course Grade 8 students study the history of the United States from the early colonial period through Reconstruction. Content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to the colonial and revolutionary eras, the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the challenges of 20

the early Republic, westward expansion, sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Throughout the course, students focus on the impact of geography on settlement patterns, the development of the political and economic systems, the rights and responsibilities of its citizens, and the scientific and technological innovations that created the uniqueness of the United States. 2102 SOCIAL STUDIES – 8th – PreAP – (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; full year course Grade 8 students study the history of the United States from the early colonial period through Reconstruction. Content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to the colonial and revolutionary eras, the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the challenges of the early Republic, westward expansion, sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Throughout the course, students focus on the impact of geography on settlement patterns, the development of the political and economic systems, the rights and responsibilities of its citizens, and the scientific and technological innovations that created the uniqueness of the United States.

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE) For parents and students to consider when selecting which language to study: historically, languages come and go in popularity; history suggests that we do not know today which languages will be important in the future. We do know that acquiring any second language makes it easier to acquire a third and a fourth, so the most important requirement is that there is motivation. If a student is interested in a language, continuing to improve her/his proficiency in that language will become an intrinsic endeavor and improve her/his ability to learn more languages. In the end, students must be ready to work in a highly competitive international economic environment. At least 2.0 units of credit gathered from the study of a language other than English should be in the same language. A concentration in an additional second language may be considered a specialization component. Credit for courses in languages other than English taken in grades 6, 7, and 8 count toward graduation credit, but does not affect the student’s Grade Point Average (GPA). Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

PREPARATORY A-6103 FRENCH; 6211 GERMAN; 6711 JAPANESE; 6302 LATIN; 6003 SPANISH – 7th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; full year course The primary focus of Preparatory A classes is to develop listening and reading comprehension in students. Approximately 80% of the entire year is focused on strategies that develop these interpretive skills. To meet this end, 80%-100% of the class must be conducted in the target language. Students will produce very basic language. (Students studying a classical language will primarily focus on reading and understanding the influence of one language and culture on another.)

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PREPARATORY B- 6104 FRENCH; 6212 GERMAN; 6712 JAPANESE; 6303 LATIN; 6004 SPANISH –8th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite –Preparatory A of the same language One-half credit; full year course The primary focus of Preparatory B classes is to continue developing listening and reading comprehension in students. Approximately 80% of the entire year is focused on strategies that develop these interpretive skills. To meet this end, 80%-100% of the class must be conducted in the target language. Students will speak and write very basic language. (Students studying a classical language will primarily focus on reading and understanding the influence of one language and culture on another.) 6021 LEVEL 3 PreAP SPANISH –7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite—Level 2 Verification of Credit Exam, teacher recommendation One credit; full year course The primary focus of the Level III PreAP class is to bring all students to an intermediate-low level of proficiency. Students begin exploring literary themes via target language TV commercials, Web-Quests, and readers with plentiful teacher guidance. Students continue refining their ear for the language with 90%-100% of the class conducted in the target language. Both (in)formal speaking and writing become more process-oriented. Students begin to practice and prepare for the AP exam. 6022 SPANISH LANGUAGE AP – 8th (Lake Highlands Jr. High, Liberty Jr. High, North Jr. High, Parkhill Jr. High, West Jr. High Arts & Technology Magnet, and Westwood Jr. High ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Spanish 3 PreAP, teacher recommendation One credit; full year course AP Language courses emphasize the use of language for active communication. Students develop the ability to understand spoken language in various contexts, ample vocabulary for reading authentic texts, and the ability to express themselves with reasonable accuracy, fluency, and coherence in both written and spoken language. AP Language students prepare for the AP Spanish Language Exam.

FINE ARTS Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

ART COURSES The junior high art program offers students opportunities for creative growth and expression through various methods of study and exploration. Students are encouraged to exhibit their work during the school year. A fee may be charged to cover costs of materials for optional art projects beyond the minimum requirements for each course.

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The following are courses that CANNOT be taken in the same semester. Course # 8101 8104

Course Name Introductory Art 7/8 Ceramics 7/8

Course # 8100 8101

Course Name Introduction to Three-Dimensional Design 7/8 Drawing and Painting 7/8

8101 ART – 7th, 8th – INTRODUCTORY ART (STANDARD) Prerequisite – none No credit; one semester Drawing, painting, printmaking ceramics, sculpture, fibers, photographic imagery and electronic media are the processes used to express personal thoughts and ideas creatively in this survey course. Students will learn through study of perception, art methods, cultural/historical relationships and evaluation. This course provides the foundation for all other junior high art courses and is recommended for those students who plan to take art for their required fine arts course in high school. (This course cannot be taken in the same semester with Ceramics 7/8). 8102 ART – 7th, 8th – DRAWING AND PAINTING (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Introductory Art No credit; one semester More advanced techniques in drawing and painting give students an opportunity to explore a variety of visual effects. Personal expression, technical skill development, and understanding artists’ styles and techniques from the past and present, careers, and critical evaluation are integrated into each unit of study. (This course cannot be taken in the same semester with Introduction to 3D Design 7/8). 8100 ART – 7th, 8th – INTRODUCTION TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCULPTURE DESIGN (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester Three-dimensional design involved creating sculptural art forms by modeling, carving, and assembling materials. Students may use a variety of materials including paper, clay wood, metal, and found objects to learn about the processes. In addition, students will study the historical and cultural significance of selected artists and will learn to make informed judgments about their won work and the work of other artists. (This course cannot be taken in the same semester with Drawing and Painting 7/8). 8104 ART – 7th, 8th – CERAMICS (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester Ceramics includes study in clay modeling and hand building techniques to form more advanced ceramic art objects. Planning, creative design and problem solving are emphasized. Students will study the historical and cultural significance of ceramic art forms from around the world. (This course cannot be taken in the same semester with Introductory Art 7/8).

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8135 ART I – PreAP – 8th (West Jr. High Arts & Technology Magnet ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – One full year in 7th grade Art at West Magnet Jr. High One credit; full year course Art 1 is the first course in the high school art sequence. It is an exploration of the basic techniques in design, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture, with emphasis on creative problem solving. Students will develop an understanding of the creative process by examining and discussing works of art from various cultures and periods. Career opportunities are introduced.

MUSIC COURSES Band Courses 8201 BEGINNING – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Approval by the director No credit; full year course Beginning band will concentrate on the basic fundamentals of reading music and learning to play a band instrument. This class is accelerated in that it combines material covered in sixth grade beginning classes and the seventh grade intermediate classes. The selection of an instrument will be made through mutual agreement between the student and director. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8202 INTERMEDIATE BRASS – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course Intermediate Brass will introduce and refine methods and techniques of performance on all brass instruments to prepare a student for a performing band. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8203 INTERMEDIATE WOODWINDS – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course Intermediate Woodwinds will introduce and refine methods and techniques of performance on all woodwind instruments to prepare a student for a performing band. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8208 INTERMEDIATE PERCUSSION – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course Intermediate Percussion will introduce and refine methods and techniques of performance on all percussion instruments to prepare a student for a performing band. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8204 INTERMEDIATE – ADVANCED – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course Advanced Intermediate will introduce and refine individual performance skills on brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments and introduce techniques of ensemble playing. This class is an accelerated class 24

for students who show advanced ability on their instruments as determined by the director. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8205 CADET – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course Junior High Cadet Band is a class (not a performing organization) that will concentrate on continued development of the fundamentals of playing individual instruments not fully grasped by the student at the intermediate level. A student will need an appropriate level of fundamental knowledge and musicianship. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8206 CONCERT – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course Junior High Concert Band will emphasize the development of ensemble playing and rehearsal techniques. The student needs to demonstrate an appropriate level of knowledge of fundamentals and musicianship on the student’s instrument. There will be continued emphasis on individual and group musical development. This group may attend UIL contest and other competitions and performance activities. Students are encouraged to participate in RISD All-Star Band and RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8207 SYMPHONIC – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course The emphasis of the Junior High Symphonic Band will be the development and refinement of individual and ensemble playing skills for brass, woodwind and percussion players who exhibit refined performance skills on their individual instruments. The students must demonstrate superior knowledge of fundamentals and musicianship on their instruments. Participation will include group, individual and small ensemble performances. This group will attend UIL contest and other competitions and performance activities. Students must participate in the RISD All-Star Band and RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances.

Choir Courses 8401 TREBLE – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Interest in singing No credit; full year course This is a beginning choral group with emphasis on teaching the basic fundamentals of music reading, choral techniques, and producing a good treble choir sound. Students may participate in RISD Vocal Music Festival and other appropriate activities. This course involves some outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8402 TENOR-BASS – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Interest in singing No credit; full year course This is a beginning group with attention given to the changing voice. Emphasis of the course will be in teaching the basic fundamentals of music reading, choral techniques, and production of a good choral 25

sound. Students will learn to sing in two, three, and possibly four parts by the end of the year. Students may participate in RISD Vocal Music Festival and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8405 CONCERT –8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course This is an 8th grade treble choir at the junior high. It is for students who have had limited choral experience. Students may participate in RISD Vocal Music Festival and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8406 CHORALE (MIXED or TREBLE) – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course This group is the top junior high choir. This group is performance oriented with emphasis on developing large ensemble performances as well as small ensembles such as madrigals, quartets, trios, and solos. Sight-reading techniques will be emphasized. The choir will perform SATB or SSA music with gradual development of each of the voices. Repertoire will consist of more advanced literature. Overall emphasis will be the development of good choral sound. This group will attend UIL contest and other competitions and performance activities. Students may participate in the RISD Vocal Music Festival and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances.

Orchestra Courses 8501 BEGINNING – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Interest in orchestra and approval by the director No credit; full year course The emphasis of this class will be in learning the fundamentals for playing a string instrument and reading music to prepare the student for a performing organization. Students should participate in RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8502 INTERMEDIATE – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director No credit; full year course This class will emphasize continued development of basic skills of orchestral performance and musicianship with increasing emphasis upon performance experience. Students should participate in RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 8503 ADVANCED – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. Wind and percussion students must have concurrent membership in the school band program No credit; full year course The Advanced Orchestra is the main orchestral performing group at the junior high. The students must demonstrate above average knowledge, ability, and musicianship on their instruments. The emphasis of the group will be on the development and refinement of individual and ensemble playing skills. Students must participate in the RISD Chamber Music Festival and are encouraged to audition for All Region Orchestra. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. 26

THEATRE ARTS COURSES 8320 THEATRE ARTS – 7th (West Jr. High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Instructor Approval One credit; full year Emphasis is placed on the development of imagination and creativity, body and voice control, knowledge of dramatic structure and plot, comfort and confidence in performance, an introduction to technical theatre, basic understanding of theatrical styles and history, and various aspects of the communication process. Students will have opportunities to study improvisation, vocal technique, readers’ theatre, storytelling, and to engage in two classroom productions throughout the year. 8321 THEATRE ARTS – 8th (fall semester) (West Jr. High School ONLY) DAP-E, Rec-E, HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Arts – 7th One-half credit; one semester 8322 THEATRE ARTS – 8th (spring semester) (West Jr. High School ONLY) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Theatre Arts – 7th and Theatre Arts – 8th (fall semester) One-half credit (Comm. App.) upon completion of 2 year program (7th and 8th) Emphasis is placed on the development of imagination and creativity, body and voice control, knowledge of dramatic structure and plot, comfort and confidence in performance, an introduction to technical theatre, basic understanding of theatrical styles and history, and various aspects of the communication process. Students will have opportunities to study improvisation, vocal technique, readers’ theatre, storytelling, and to engage in two classroom productions throughout the year.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES Students are required to take two semesters of Physical Education during 7th and 8th grade. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

5003 PHYSICAL EDUCATION A – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to increase skill level in cooperative and field games, volleyball, basketball, flag football, soccer, recreational games, hockey, dance and rhythms/tumbling, track and field, golf/racquet sports and softball. Aerobic conditioning using fitness circuits, jump rope, heart rate monitors and health-related fitness concepts will be taught throughout the semester in order to increase the student’s personal fitness level.

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5004 PHYSICAL EDUCATION B – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to increase skill level in recreational games, hockey, dance and rhythms/tumbling, track and field, golf/racquet sports, softball, cooperative and field games, volleyball, basketball, flag football, and soccer. Aerobic conditioning using fitness circuits, jump rope, and heart rate monitors along with introductory strength and conditioning training will be taught in order to increase the student’s personal fitness level. Health-related fitness concepts and activities will be included throughout the semester. 5030 PARTNERS TRAINING PROGRAM – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Approval of course instructor. No credit; full year Able bodied students learn about students with disabilities in order to better understand their conditions. Students will be trained the first few weeks of school and then proceed to physical education class where they practice making modifications to skills and games to help their friends with disabilities be more successful.

Physical Education Substitution 5015 OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Central Administration approval (See counselor). No credit; one semester or full year course This program is a cooperative arrangement between the school district, the student, and an off-campus facility. Activities available through the off-campus program are limited to ballet and Olympic activities approved by the Texas Education Agency that are not offered comprehensively through the physical education or athletic departments. A tuition fee will be charged. 5112 ATHLETICS/BOYS – 7th (STANDARD) 5113 ATHLETICS/BOYS –8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Coach’s approval, Physical required No credit; full year course 5115 ATHLETICS/GIRLS – 7th (STANDARD) 5116 ATHLETICS/GIRLS – 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Coach’s approval, Physical required No credit; full year course

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES One-half (.5) unit of credit is required for graduation from senior high school. 5531 HEALTH EDUCATION 1 – 8th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course includes instruction in wellness, mental health, substance abuse, diseases, family living including human sexuality along with community and world health. 28

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION Touch System Data Entry th th 7 and 8 Grades One-half credit; one semester

Career Portals th th 7 and 8 Grades No credit; one semester courses Exploring Arts, Audio Video Technology and Communications (West Magnet Only) Exploring Business/Marketing Exploring Construction/Manufacturing Exploring Engineering/Robotics Exploring Hospitality/Culinary Arts and Tourism Exploring Human Services Exploring Information Technology Exploring Transportation (Liberty Only)

Exploring Careers th th 7 and 8 Grades No Credit; one semester

Business, Management and Administration Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance th 8 Grade 1 credit; full-year course

Information Technology

Principles of Human Services th 8 Grade 1 credit; full-year course

Arts, AV Technology Elements of Arts, Audio, Video Technology and Communications th 7 Grade West Magnet only No credit; full-year course

Human Services

Transportation Principles of Transportation th 8 Grade Liberty Only 1 credit; full-year course

Arts, AV Technology Principles of Arts, Audio Video Technology, and Communications th 8 Grade West Magnet Only 1 credit; full-year course

STEM

Manufacturing

Project Lead the Way Gateway to Technology th 8 Grade Apollo and Liberty Only ½ credit; one semester course

Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering and Robotics th 7 Grade West Magnet th 8 Grade all Campuses 1 credit; full-year course

Information Technology Web Design th 8 Grade West Magnet only 1 credit; full-year course

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Principles of Information Technology th 8 Grade 1 credit; full-year course

STEM Concepts of Engineering, Robotics, and Technology th 8 Grade West Magnet only 1 credit; full-year course

Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION COURSES CT7020 TOUCH SYSTEM DATA ENTRY – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) CT7020A TOUCH SYSTEM DATA ENTRY ALTERNATE* - 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester The purpose of this class is to teach the “touch” keyboarding skills to address business applications in various emerging real life technologies. Components of the course include keyboarding accuracy and speed, document formatting, preparing business documents, word processing and developing social skill in an office environment CT7010 EXPLORING ARTS, AUDIO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS – 7th, 8th (West Jr. High Magnet ONLY) Prerequisites – None No credit; one semester Students will be able to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in the Arts, Audio, Video Technology and communications cluster and the introductory knowledge, skill and educational requirements for those opportunities. Components include research in the areas of career opportunities, elements of art, history and evolution of the industry, communication skills, basic introduction to hardware components of the industry, software programs, basic editing, writing, publishing techniques, along with storylines, artwork, and set introduction design and layout. CT7001 EXPLORING BUSINESS/MARKETING – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester This course introduces students to the role of business in the lives of individuals, consumers, workers, and citizens. It will provide an overview of the business world and how it affects everyone. Components include general business functions, management, money issues, credit, banking systems and services, and entrepreneurship. CT7002 EXPLORING CONSTRUCTION/MANUFACTURING – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester This is an exploratory course designed for students to investigate types of activities performed in the construction and manufacturing industry. Components of the course include Computer Aided Design software, safety for the industry, hands on construction and manufacturing projects, teamwork activities, and technology related career explorations. CT7003 EXPLORING ENGINEERING/ROBOTICS – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester

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This course is an introductory and exploration level course in pre engineering and technology manufacturing systems. Students will utilize various software packages to design a basic robotics platform, manufacture, assemble, and demonstrate finished product. CT7004 EXPLORING HOSPITALITY/CULINARY ARTS AND TOURISM – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) CT7004A EXPLORING HOSPITALITY/CULINARY ARTS AND TOURISM ALTERNATE* – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester Students in this exploratory course experience introductory skills and information in the hospitality/culinary art and tourism career cluster. The student explores roles in each area, customer service, job safety, food service preparation and presentation, creates professional documents, family and leisure activities, featuring team working skills and activities. CT7005 EXPLORING HUMAN SERVICES – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) CT7005A EXPLORING HUMAN SERVICES ALTERNATE* – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester This exploratory course will introduce students to various components of the human service career field. Components of this course include introductions to healthy food selection and preparations, household management, general safety, clothing selection maintenance and repair skills, family and community services, and personal care services. CT7006 EXPLORING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester Students explore and develop computer literacy skills to adapt to emerging technologies and opportunities in the information technology careers. Students are introduced to various software programs in the areas of word processing, spread sheets, data base, presentation and web publishing techniques. CT7007 EXPLORING TRANSPORTATION – 7th, 8th (Liberty Junior High ONLY) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester An exploratory course designed for students interested in the transportation industry. Students will explore the skills and technologies of power and transportation industry. Students will explore the basics fundamentals of transportation platforms such as transportation components ie drive trains, electrical systems, cooling systems, exhaust systems, along with safety and standards for the industry, and career opportunities. CT7009 EXPLORING CAREERS – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) CT7009A EXPLORING CAREERS ALTERNATE* – 7th, 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None No credit; one semester An exploratory course allowing students to investigate the many careers under the 16 career clusters. Also, the student will be able to identify interests and aptitudes, complete job applications, prepare resumes and will be introduced to interviewing skill and techniques. Students will use various software programs as Kuder, Microsoft Office Package to advance knowledge and assist in future career goals and opportunities. 31

CT7008 ELEMENTS OF ARTS, AUDIO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY, AND COMMUNICATIONS – 7th (Richardson West Jr. High Magnet ONLY) Prerequisite – None No credit; full-year course A beginning year long exploration course for students interested in the multi-component cluster of Arts, Audio-Video Technology and the Communications Industry. Students will have the opportunity to experience in a laboratory setting the following career components; history and evolution of the industry, career exploration activities, communication activities, software for the industry, writing, editing, presentation, basic introduction and basic usage of A/V hardware equipment, safety, teamwork activities and presentations, and art components required by the industry. CT7024 PRINCIPLES OF ARTS, AUDIO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS – 8th (Richardson West Jr. High Magnet ONLY) Prerequisite – Elements of Arts, Audio Video Technology, and Communications One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses This course is an introductory course that gives students a general overview of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in the arts, audio/video and communications industry. Students will be provided experience in the following areas of instruction: Communications strategies, technology applications (email, writing, publishing, presentation, spreadsheet, database), safety regulations, ethical conduct, leadership, career opportunities, group/teamwork activities, equipment usage, formal and informal professional video presentations by identifying key elements in audio scripts and video scripts, knowledge of video cables, connectors, operation of video cameras, focusing techniques, pre production processes, and identify equipment , crew, and cast requirements for presentations. CT7021 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS/MARKETING AND FINANCE – 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses Students gain knowledge and skill in the different aspects of the business world. Components include the role of business in a global society, business ethics, economic systems, organized labor, costs and profits in finance, sales process, advertising, personal finance, and career opportunities. CT7022 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES – 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses This course will enable students to develop skills in the human services field in areas including counseling, mental health, family and community, personal care services as grooming, personal wellness, clothing selection, consumerism, child needs and development, family services, foods, nutrition, and career opportunities in the human service field. CT7023 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY – 8th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses This course prepares students to apply information technology skill to personal/workplace environments focusing on identification of hardware components, various software platforms, network 32

systems, word processing, spread sheet and data base technology and presentation management technology along with web publishing techniques. CT7025 PRINCIPLES OF MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING AND ROBOTICS – 8th (OPTIONAL) (7th Grade West Jr. High Magnet ONLY) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses This course provides an overview and beginning insight to the various fields of science, technology, manufacturing, engineering, and mathematics and their interrelationships. Students will be provided hands on lab activities utilizing a variety of engineering to manufacture robotics platforms, using physical and mechanical systems. The student will also participate in a team-based culminating robotic project while maintaining an engineering notebook including design processes, development and testing, project end presentation and demonstration. CT7026 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION -- 8th (Liberty Junior High ONLY) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses Students will learn the basic knowledge and skills in the application, design, and production of technology as it relates to the transportation, distribution, and logistics industries. Components of the course include all aspects of transportation careers, concepts of marketing factors, history of the industry, structure of the transportation industry, world transportation concerns, workplace ethics, safe work practices, and the utilization of information technology tools specific with the transportation industry. CT7027 PROJECT LEAD THE WAY GATEWAY TO TECHNOLOGY – 8th (Apollo and Liberty Junior High ONLY) Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses This course is the introductory course for the Project Lead the Way Pre Engineering Program located at Berkner High School. Students will utilize the PLTW national curriculum to develop skills in the areas of engineering, math, science, and technology. CT7028 CONCEPTS OF ENGINEERING, ROBOTICS, AND TECHNOLOGY – 8th (Richardson West Jr. High Magnet ONLY) Prerequisites – Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering and Robotics One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses This course provides students with an introductory overview into the various fields of science, engineering, mathematics, as related to engineering robotics, and technology. Major components of the course include the use of several robot platforms utilizing wood, metal, and plastic, advanced design software (AutoCAD), safety, tool identification and usage, teamwork, system modeling, and controls, basic automation systems, application and relationships in physical and mechanical systems. Students have access to a full manufacturing center to construct end of course products for evaluations, display, and competitions. Competitions include BEST, and VEX robotics.

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7823 WEB DESIGN – 8th (Richardson West Jr. High Magnet ONLY) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E for all CTE credit bearing courses Students in this course will build interactive websites using current professional web development software. They will design and develop these websites featuring rich internet applications, XHTML coding, cascading style sheets, JavaScript, internet protocols, legal and ethical responsibilities, interactive multimedia animation and sound design, and alternate navigation techniques. Extensive website projects will include implementation of industry standards and code validation.

OTHER ELECTIVES AVID (ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION) COURSES 9100 AVID – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Application and acceptance into the program, simultaneous enrollment in at least one pre-AP class No credit; full year course The AVID class addresses key elements in college preparation: academic survival skills, college entry skills, tutorials, motivational activities, and career and college exploration. Additionally students will improve their oral communication skills through presentation and Socratic Seminar, participate in writing to learn activities, including note taking, learning logs, and essay writing, prepare for college entrance examinations, including the SAT and ACT, and complete and present a multi-grade level portfolio of their work.

SPECIAL EDUCATION Placement in any Special Education class is dependent on eligibility and the decision of the Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee. Placement and course selections are reviewed, at a minimum, on an annual basis. Specific goals and objectives are developed based on the student’s present levels of academic and functional performance Modified Courses Modified courses are aligned with general education curriculum in the corresponding grade levels. Students are exposed to the same Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as their general education peers with changes to student expectations and levels of mastery. Modified coursework differs from non-modified coursework in instructional delivery, pacing, and assessment. It is the responsibility of the ARD committee to determine student placement in modified coursework, as well as determination of the appropriate state assessment in each specific subject area. High School modified courses prepare students for success in the corresponding Modified End of Course Exam (EOC) and/or to satisfy Minimum High School Program (MHSP) requirements per a student’s IEP. Alternate Courses Alternate courses are locally developed courses that reflect the prerequisite skills appropriate to the student’s current academic functioning along with alignment to grade level standards in each subject area. Coursework within the alternate class reflects individual student needs. Alternate coursework 34

differs from non-modified and modified coursework in instructional delivery, and focuses on prerequisite skill content based on the student’s goals and objectives within the IEP. It is the responsibility of the ARD committee to determine student placement in alternate coursework, as well as determination of the appropriate state assessment for the student. High School alternate courses prepare students for success in the corresponding Alternate End of Course Exam (EOC) and/or to satisfy Minimum High School program (MHSP) requirements per a student’s IEP. 8151 ART– 7th (STANDARD) 8152 ART – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester Through activity based learning, students will gain an appreciation of the fine arts and may explore career interests.* 8251 MUSIC – 7th (STANDARD) 8252 MUSIC – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; full year course Through activity based learning, students will gain an appreciation of music and may explore career interests.* 1651 COMMUNICATION – 7th (STANDARD) 1652 COMMUNICATION – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester Students will integrate language in order to understand oral, written and/or communication. Through activity based learning students will learn social appropriateness, environmental cues and prompts, understanding generalizations in a real life context and the responsibilities of independent living and skills directly related to employment.* 5051 RECREATION AND LEISURE – 7th (STANDARD) 5052 RECREATION AND LEISURE – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester The Recreation and Leisure course is designed to help the student recognize a variety of individual interests, hobbies and abilities. Students will develop leisure activities that foster continued personal growth.* 7351 JOB SKILLS – 7th (STANDARD) 7352 JOB SKILLS – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester or one full year Job Skills prepares students to enter the job market through a study of employment issues including: recognizing what skills define particular jobs; the application processes; recognizing interests, individual attributes to enhance employability, ways to locate jobs, using community services/recourses to aid employment.* 9051 LIFE SKILLS – 7th (STANDARD) 9052 LIFE SKILLS – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester or one full year The areas of instruction include vocational, social and independent living skills.*

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9031 SOCIAL SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester or full-year The areas of instruction include self-awareness and confidence, socially responsible behavior, interpersonal skills, independence, problem solving and communication. Emphasis is placed on daily living and skills and school to career skills. * 1530 PRINCIPLES OF READING – 7th, 8th (STANDARD) No credit; full year Through an assessment process, students are placed in Principles of Reading, which is a one year, intensive course for students who are non-readers. Utilizing the BOOST Phonics program, students spend the year completing extensive lessons that work through the basics of phonics and phonemic awareness. 1530 PRINCIPLES OF READING PLUS – 8th (STANDARD) No credit; one semester Principles of Reading Plus is a one semester course designed for students who have previously taken the Principles of Reading course and require additional time working within a phonics based program. Throughout the semester, teachers consistently monitor the progress of students to determine what their specific needs are in the areas of phonics and phonemic awareness. Each teacher will reteach concepts in those specific area of need utilizing the extended lessons of the BOOST Plus program.

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DESCRIPTION OF HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OFFERINGS “Standard” courses are offered on all campuses if enough students indicate interest and “Optional” courses may be offered at the campus based on teacher staffing, finance, classroom need, etc. Whenever possible, based on minimum enrollment counts, RISD provides instruction through a teacher in the classroom. However, if enrollment is insufficient, instruction options to consider may include: 1) distance learning/teleconferencing; 2) correspondence course (student fee required); 3) dual credit (student fee required) or travel to another campus (student must provide transportation). If none of these options is suitable, the student should discuss another course offering with the guidance counselor.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Students enrolled in English 1, 2, 3 and 4 - both on-level and PreAP/AP courses - are expected to continue to increase and refine their communication skills. Students are expected to write analytical essays of different types of texts, to analyze media, to synthesize research, and to create a multimedia project. Students read and write in a variety of genres. NOTE: Each high school offers on-level and PreAP courses at grades 9 and 10. Advanced Placement English is offered at grades 11 and 12. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

ENGLISH COURSE SEQUENCE SUGGESTIONS DAP, RECOMMENDED PROGRAM & RISD HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM  Students must complete 4.0 units including: English 1, 2, 3, and 4. Grade 9 English 1 PreAP English 1

Grade 10

→ →

Grade 11

English 2 PreAP English 2

→ →

English 3 AP English 3

Grade 12

→ →

English 4 AP English 4

*The grade level sequences are suggested only and individual student academic skill level and course prerequisites must be considered. See specific graduation plans for course requirements for graduation.

ENGLISH COURSES 1008 ENGLISH 1 – 9th (STANDARD) 1008M/1008MI/1008MS ENGLISH 1 MODIFIED* - 9th (STANDARD) 1008A ENGLISH 1 ALTERNATE* - 9th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course This course presents students with grade appropriate reading and writing challenges. Students learn and practice various modes of writing, with an emphasis on appropriate text structures, purpose, grammar and mechanics. Analyses of multiple reading genres result in the development of critical thinking skills. Academic and technical vocabulary acquisition is a goal of this course, as well. Reading and writing

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connections serve as roots of oral and written production; active, insightful discussions result to yield practice in effective expression of thought. 1119 ENGLISH 1 – PreAP – 9th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Students participate in all of the content of English 1 with an overlay of engaging learning activities intended to emphasize the analysis and synthesis of literature and of expository texts through classroom discourses and through multiple writing modes. Students continue to work with the core skills of the PreAP/AP program, working with higher level texts and rigorous writing/multimedia requirements. 1011 ENGLISH 2 – 10th (STANDARD) 1011M/1011MI/1011MS ENGLISH 2 MODIFIED* – 10th (STANDARD) 1011A ENGLISH 2 ALTERNATE* – 10th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – English 1 or PreAP English 1 One credit; full year course This course presents students with reading and writing instruction appropriate for the second year of high school. Students work equally with expository/informational and literary reading and writing, students practice 21st century skills necessary for post-graduation achievement. Students work in and practice with a variety of modes of writing; there is an emphasis on grammar and mechanics, as well as text organization. Oral and written analyses of texts, accompanied by active, informed discussions, result in the development of critical thinking skills. Academic and technical vocabulary acquisition is a must. 1120 ENGLISH 2 – PreAP – 10th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – English 1 or English 1 PreAP One credit; full year course Students study all elements of the English 2 content with rigorous overlays to that content. The overlays prepare students with college readiness through appropriately challenging and engaging projects and learning activities which are intended to emphasize the analysis and synthesis of literature and of expository texts through classroom discussions and presentations. Students continue to work with the core skills of the PreAP/AP program, working with texts and writing assignments that offer differentiated choice for individual achievement in a teamwork setting. 1014 ENGLISH 3 – 11th (STANDARD) 1014M/1014MI/1014MS ENGLISH 3 MODIFIED* – 11th (STANDARD) 1014A ENGLISH 3 ALTERNATE* – 11th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – English 2 or PreAP English 2 One credit; full year course Students practice all forms of writing (i.e. argumentative essay, resume, proposals, business forms, procedural text, summary /abstract). Students read extensively in multiple genres from expository texts and American literature. Academic vocabulary development continues as part of College and Career Readiness. Students identify valid sources for research and synthesize the gathered information.

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1016 ENGLISH 3 – AP – 11th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – English 2 or English 2 PreAP One credit; full year course Students participate in all of the content of the English 3 curriculum while emphasizing the analysis and synthesis of literature through multiple forms of writing and classroom discussion. Students continue to work with the core skills of the PreAP/AP program while reading multiple genres of literature extensively. Focus is given to language and composition skills. 1017 ENGLISH 4 – 12th (STANDARD) 1017M/1017MI/1017MS ENGLISH 4 MODIFIED* – 12th (STANDARD) 1017A ENGLISH 4 ALTERNATE* – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – English 3 or English 3 AP One credit; full year course Students continue to practice all forms of writing including persuasive, literary, and procedural/workrelated texts. Students read extensively in multiple genres from British literature including Old English, Medieval, English Renaissance, 17th Century, 18th Century, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern/Post Modern Periods. Students research reliable, valid sources, evaluating and synthesizing the collected information. Authentic learning with real-world connections is a goal. 1019 ENGLISH 4 – AP – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – English 3 or English 3 AP One credit; full year course Students participate in all of the content of the English 4 curriculum while emphasizing the analysis and synthesis of literature through multiple forms of writing and classroom discussion. Students continue to work with the core skills of the PreAP/AP program while reading multiple genres of literature. Literary analysis skills are developed through critical thinking application. 1029 CREATIVE/IMAGINATIVE WRITING – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – English 2 One-half elective credit; one semester Students explore the principles of creative writing. Opportunities are provided for students to produce original works. 1605 VISUAL MEDIA ANALYSIS AND PRODUCTION – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course will include principles and techniques of the visual media as an artistic and informative medium. Students will interpret various media forms, criticizing and analyzing the significance of visual representations. Students will learn to produce effective, engaging media messages that communicate with other individuals and groups.

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1620 CONTEMPORARY MEDIA – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Students enrolled in Contemporary Media will understand how media influence our tastes, our behavior, our purchasing, and our voting decisions. Students who are media literate understand television, radio, film, and other visual images and auditory messages, preparing them to be informed citizens in their chosen post-graduation paths. 1030 WRITING LAB – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None Non-credit; one semester; will not count toward graduation This one semester course is designed to meet the needs of students who have not mastered basic writing skills. Because traditional methods have not succeeded with these students, this laboratory course emphasizes the special skills and strategies needed for effective writing, for test-taking, and for problem solving. ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES COURSE SEQUENCE SUGGESTIONS Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Beginning

ESOL 1 - 1066 and ESL Reading 1 1560



ESOL 2 - 1067 And ESL Reading 2 - 1562



English 3 and/or ESL Reading 2 1562



English 4 and Reading 3

Intermediate

ESOL 1-1066 and ESL Reading 1 – 1560 and/or ESL 3 (PWS) – 1068



ESOL 2 – 1067 and ESL Reading 2 – 1562



English 3 and/or Reading 3



English 4 and Reading 3*

Advanced

English 1 and Reading 1 and/or ESL 3 (PWS) – 1068



English 2 and/or Reading 2



English 3 and/or Reading 3



English 4 and Reading 3*

Advanced High **

English 1 and Reading 1 and/or ESL 3 (PWS) – 1068



English 2 and/or Reading 2



English 3 and/or Reading 3



English 4 and Reading 3*

**Students must pass the reading and writing portion of the state assessment to be exited from ESL. Students who are not successful on the assessment but score Advanced High on TELPAS should follow this sequence. ***English Language Learners who are at the beginning or intermediate level of English language proficiency may take ESOL 1 and ESOL 2 to satisfy the English 1 and English 2 requirement. See your counselor for current requirements. All English Language Learners students must complete English 3 and 4 in order to meet graduation requirements. Some colleges and universities may not accept ESOL 1 and 2 as a substitute for English 1 and 2. It is the student’s responsibility to check with potential colleges to determine whether ESOL credit can be used to satisfy regular English course credit. The counselor may assist the student with options if ESOL credit does not suffice, but the student must plan early.

ESL COURSES 1066 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL) 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Immigrant status – Entrance determined by Campus Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) One credit; full year course – Fulfills English 1 graduation requirements 40

Immigrant students develop literacy skills in English through intensive instruction provided by ESL certified teachers trained in language acquisition and strategies for English Language Learners. (Student should verify college admission course requirements.) 1067 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL) 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Immigrant status – Entrance determined by Campus Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) One credit; full year course – Fulfills English 2 graduation requirements Immigrant students develop literacy skills in English through intensive instruction provided by ESL certified teachers trained in language acquisition and strategies for English Language Learners. (Student should verify college admission course requirements.) 1068 ESL 3: PRACTICAL WRITING SKILLS (PWS) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course This course does not count as a required English course. State-approved graduation elective credit for immigrant or non-immigrant Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students. This course provides LEP students the opportunity to practice all forms of writing. Material from content areas and areas of personal interest are utilized. Students are instructed in the appropriate writing styles for various forms of written communication. This course is strongly recommended for 9th grade English Language Learners and 10th or 11th grade English Language Learners who did not meet passing standard on STAAR English 1 EOC Writing. 1560 ESL READING 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course ESL Reading 1 offers English Language Learners intensive instruction in reading, writing skills, word recognition and oral language development. This course addresses individual needs through adaptive software, literature and direct instruction. (Required for Beginner and Intermediate ESL students.) 1562 ESL READING 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course English Language Learners develop and apply reading fluency, reading comprehension strategies and master vocabulary. (Required for intermediate ESL Students.)  For additional information, contact the Director of Secondary ESL.

READING COURSES The secondary reading program is based on the assumption that all students can profit from continued instruction in reading. All courses are elective credit. Program emphasis is on bettering all reading skills,

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including opportunities for reinforcement, extension, and application. Advanced courses hone the skills of students planning to go to college. 1507 READING 1 – 9th (STANDARD) 1507M READING 1 MODIFIED* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 1507A READING 1 ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course (Required for all students who have failed grade 8 STAAR Reading) Reading 1 offers instruction in word recognition, vocabulary development, and comprehension strategies for reading with competence, confidence, and understanding. The course is designed for the student who is reading below grade level. Emphasis is on individual improvement in comprehension, fluency, higher order thinking, vocabulary development, writing, study skills, and academic reading. Nonfiction texts are the hub of the course. 1512 READING 2 – 10th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course (Strongly recommended for all students who failed grade 9 STAAR EOC English 1) The course is designed to enhance reading and vocabulary skills by applying skills primarily to expository texts and to accompanying literary texts. Focus is on various text organizations in both fiction and nonfiction materials. Reading and writing connections in several genres/modes are utilized to develop critical thinking skills. 1517 READING 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course (Strongly recommended for students who failed grade 10 STAAR EOC English II) The course is designed to enhance a student’s reading skills and content material comprehension. Emphasis is on individual improvement in reading comprehension, content area reading, vocabulary development, writing, study skills, problem solving, critical thinking, and test taking. 1511 READING APPLICATIONS & STUDY SKILLS: COLLEGE READING – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course is designed for the student who seeks development in college readiness. College study skills, vocabulary improvement, rate building techniques, and critical thinking enhancement are course goals. Test preparation (SAT, ACT) provides additional emphasis on test-taking strategies. 9073 LEARNING POWER: STRATEGIES FOR STUDENT SUCCESS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None Non-credit only; full year course (will not count toward graduation) A step-by-step process of building students’ academic abilities to study and take tests, to take notes, to organize assignments, and to manage time effectively. 42

1530 READING LAB – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) Prerequisite – None Non-credit only; one semester (will not count toward graduation) This is designed to meet the needs of students who have not mastered basic reading comprehension skills. Because traditional methods have not been successful with these students, this laboratory enrichment course emphasizes the special skills needed for reading comprehension, problem solving, critical thinking, and test-taking.

SPEECH COURSES 1609 COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester Students enrolled in this class will identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in interpersonal situations, group interactions, and personal and professional presentation. 1606 ORAL INTERPRETATION 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Instruction and practice are provided in the analysis, adaptation, presentation, and aesthetic appreciation of literature. 1607 DEBATE 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Students are offered instruction and practice in standard and alternative types of debate. Critical thinking instruction is an integral part of debating. 1611 DEBATE 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Debate 1 One credit; full year course The advanced debate course offers students the opportunity to continue to apply and extend debate skills and participate in competitive activities. Development of critical and logical thinking skills continues. 1612 DEBATE 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Debate 2 One credit; full year course The advanced debate course offers students the opportunity to continue to apply and extend debate skills and to participate in competitive activities.

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1608 PUBLIC SPEAKING 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course The course surveys various facets of speech experiences such as concepts of rhetoric, topic selection and development, organization of ideas, selection of language, and preparation and presentation of speeches. Evaluation of public addresses also receives attention. 1610 PUBLIC SPEAKING 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Public Speaking 1 One credit; full year course The course is an extension and expansion of Public Speaking 1. It is designed for students who wish to study the preparation and delivery of public speeches in depth. 2070 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEECH: ACADEMIC DECATHLON – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 2170 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEECH: ACADEMIC DECATHLON 2 – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Member of Academic Decathlon Study Team Full year course with one-half elective credit toward graduation for the fall semester; (Non-credit only—spring semester) This course provides training in the competitive areas of the Academic Decathlon. Students study extensively in mathematics, micro and macroeconomics, science, literature, social studies, and the fine arts. In addition, skills are developed in speech preparation and presentation, essay writing, and interview techniques. (Note: This course is a one-half elective and is not a state-approved speech course for graduation requirements.) 2017 HUMANITIES – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit – full year course Humanities is an interdisciplinary course in which students study major historical and cultural movements and their relationships to literature and other fine arts. Humanities students respond to aesthetic elements in texts and other art forms through outlets such as discussions, journals, oral interpretations and dramatizations. Students read widely and use written composition to show an indepth understanding of creative achievements in the arts and literature. Classroom discussions and presentations aid in the understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of critical and creative achievements throughout history. Student participation is an expectation in the Humanities classroom.

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MATHEMATICS Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

Course Sequence Suggestions* (see specific graduation plans for course requirements). DAP Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Algebra 1 PreAP



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP



Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP



Algebra 1 PreAP



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 3



Algebra 1 (Reg or PreAP)



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP



AP Cal AP Stat Engineering Mathematics AP Computer Science Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP) Engineering Mathematics AP Computer Science Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP) AP Stat Engineering Mathematics AP Computer Science

RECOMMENDED Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Algebra 1 PreAP



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 1 PreAP



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 3



Algebra 1 (Reg or PreAP)



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 1 (Reg or PreAP)



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Math Models with Applications Mathematical Apps. in Agriculture



AP Cal AP Stat Engineering Mathematics AP Computer Science Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP) AP Stat Engineering Mathematics AP Computer Science Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP) AP Stat Engineering Mathematics AP Computer Science Algebra 2

RISD HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Algebra 1 PreAP



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Pre Cal (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 1 PreAP



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)





Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 1



Math Models with Applications Mathematical Apps. in Agriculture Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)



Algebra 1



Geometry (Reg or PreAP)



Math Models with Applications Mathematical Apps. in Agriculture



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Grade 12 AP Cal** AP Stat** Engineering Mathematics** AP Computer Science** Algebra 3** AP Computer Science**

Pre Cal** (Reg or PreAP) Engineering Mathematics** AP Computer Science** Algebra 2 (Reg or PreAP)**

*The grade level sequences are suggested only and individual student academic skill level and course prerequisites must be considered. th **If student does not pass the Exit Level Mathematics Exam in the 11 grade, the student must enroll in a mathematics course th in the 12 grade. Note: All students are required to take a math class every year through 11th grade. We strongly recommend that math be taken through the senior year.

MATHEMATICS COURSES 3009 ALGEBRA 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 3009M/3009MI/3009MS ALGEBRA 1 MODIFIED* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 3009A ALGEBRA 1 ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Algebra 1 is designed to develop a foundation to solve problems using functions, symbolic reasoning and mathematical modeling. The student will investigate real numbers, linear equations and inequalities as well as quadratic and other non-linear functions. The primary focal points for Algebra 1 are algebraic thinking; function concepts; relationship between equations and functions; and the use of tools for algebraic thinking. 3016 ALGEBRA 1 – PreAP – 9th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C One credit; full year course Prerequisite – None (not open to students with credit in Mathematics PreAP-8th grade) The goals and content of PreAP Algebra 1 are the same as those for Algebra 1, but with more in-depth problem solving experiences. 3012 GEOMETRY – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 3012M/3012MI/3012MS GEOMETRY MODIFIED* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 3012A GEOMETRY ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Algebra 1 One credit; full year course Geometry is designed to develop an understanding of plane and solid geometry, coordinate geometry, and transformational geometry. It provides for the study of formal and informal proofs and the ability to apply problem solving techniques to geometric models. The primary focal points for Geometry are geometric structure; geometric patterns; dimensionality and the geometry of location; congruence and the geometry of size; and similarity and the geometry of shapes. 3010 GEOMETRY – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Algebra 1 or PreAP Algebra 1 One credit; full year course PreAP Geometry is designed for students who have completed their first year of Algebra 1. The goals and content of this course are the same as those for Geometry but with more in-depth problem-solving experiences.

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3015 MATHEMATIC MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS – 11th (STANDARD) 3015M/3015MI/3015MS MATHEMATIC MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS MODIFIED* – 11th (STANDARD) 3015A MATHEMATIC MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS ALTERNATE* – 11th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Algebra 1 and Geometry; Students may not take MMA concurrently with Algebra 2. This course is not open for students with Algebra 2 credit. One credit; full year course The focal points for this course is to use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, to models information, and to solve problems from various disciplines. Students also use mathematical methods to model and solve real-life applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design and science. 3013 ALGEBRA 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 3013M ALGEBRA 2 MODIFIED* – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 3013A ALGEBRA 2 ALTERNATE* – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Algebra 1 and Geometry One credit; full year course Algebra 2 is designed to extend the concept and skills developed in Algebra 1. The students will investigate quadratic, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. The primary focal points of Algebra 2 are algebraic thinking, function concepts; symbolic reasoning; relationship between algebra and geometry; and the use of tools for algebraic thinking. 3014 ALGEBRA 2 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – PreAP Algebra 1, PreAP Geometry or Algebra 1, Geometry One credit; full year course PreAP Algebra 2 is designed for students who completed the first course of PreAP Algebra 1 and PreAP Geometry. PreAP Algebra 2 includes all of the topics of Algebra 2 but with more in-depth problem solving experiences, including advanced Algebra topics. 3029 ALGEBRA 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Algebra 2 (This course is not open to students with credit in Pre-Calculus) One credit; full year course This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra 2 but who need to strengthen their algebra skills before taking Pre-Calculus or College Algebra. Students will extend their mathematical understanding beyond the Algebra 2 level in a study of various types of functions and their behaviors, including linear, quadratic, square root, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic. Inequalities and systems of equations will also be studied. The course concludes with a brief unit of study on geometry and trigonometry. 3035 PRECALCULUS – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Algebra 2 One credit; full year course Precalculus is an in-depth study of relations and functions, unifying the concepts from Trigonometry, Elementary Analysis, and Analytic Geometry.

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3026 PRECALCULUS – PreAP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – PreAP Algebra 2 One credit; full year course PreAP Pre-Calculus is the course in the PreAP sequence which serves as the prerequisite for Advanced Placement Calculus BC. This course stresses a rigorous analysis of functions and unifies concepts from Trigonometry, Elementary Analysis, and Analytic Geometry. 3027 AP STATISTICS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Algebra 2 (This course may be taken in 11th grade if taken concurrently with Pre-Calculus) One credit; full year course The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns; Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure; Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability and simulation; and Statistical Inference: Confirming models. 3024 CALCULUS AB – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Pre-Calculus or PreAP Pre-Calculus One credit; full year course Advanced Placement Calculus AB is designed for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Elementary Analysis. The course includes a study of elementary functions, properties of limits, the derivative and applications, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral. 3025 CALCULUS BC – AP – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – PreAP Pre-Calculus One credit; full year course Advanced Placement Calculus BC is considerably more extensive than Calculus AB. The Calculus BC course includes a more in-depth study of the topics of Calculus AB as well as a study of sequences and series and elementary differential equations. 3030 MATH LAB – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – None Non-credit elective; will not count toward graduation. A mathematical course designed to strengthen and reinforce mathematical concepts with a focus on problem solving, applications, and critical thinking skills. A strong emphasis will be placed on instructional strategies designed to reinforce the curriculum. This course will be blocked with another math course. 7810 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 – AP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP- E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Geometry or concurrent enrollment in Geometry. One credit; full year course

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First year course in a two-year AP sequence and is designed to prepare the student for the “A-Level” AP Computer Science Examination. The course includes problem-solving techniques, programming methodology, data types, data structures, algorithms, and introduction to Object Oriented Programming. JAVA is the programming language used, as required by the AP Board. CT3401 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES – 10th, 11th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Algebra I, Geometry (Students may not take this course concurrently with Algebra 2. This course is not open to students with Algebra 2 credit.) One credit; full-year course This course is designed to provide students mathematic, including algebra, geometry, and data analysis in the field of agriculture, food and natural resources. Components of this course include statistics, data analysis, charting, percentages, graphs, algebraic applications, and geometric principles to solve real world agriculture related problems as lumber volume, grain drying requirements, plant growth data, energy and construction costs, gear ratio, fuel efficiency, heating efficiencies, and engine performance. CT3403 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS – 12th (Berkner High School STEM ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – 3 credits in math One credit; full-year course This is a course whereby students use a variety of mathematical methods and models to analyze problems involving data acquisition, spatial applications, electrical measurement, manufacturing processes, materials engineering, mechanical drives, pneumatics, process control systems, quality control, and robotics with computer programming. Other components include structural design, trigonometry in spatial engineering, tensile strength analysis, compression testing, air volumes, mass and volumetric flow rate, precision measurement tools, safety for the industry, and use of engineering methodologies to build prototypes.

SCIENCE For most standard courses for graduation, regular as well as Pre-Advanced Placement (PreAP) or Advanced Placement (AP) course offerings may be available for students. All course options fully address the state-mandated essential knowledge and skills. PreAP courses are designed to provide academic challenge and extensive enrichment at each grade level in preparation for students’ enrollment in College Board Advanced Placement courses in their junior and senior years. PreAP and AP courses emphasize cognitive concepts and processes using higher-level skills, independent studies, mathematical applications, and analytical and communication skills that are consistent with the structure of the science disciplines. A minimum of 40% of instructional time is committed to laboratory/field experiences in all 9-12 science courses. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

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Course Sequence Suggestions* (see specific graduation plans for course requirements). DAP Grade 9 Biology Biology PreAP

Grade 10

→ →

Chemistry Chemistry PreAP

Grade 11

→ →

Physics AP Physics B

Grade 12

→ →

AP Science Courses* Aquatic Science Astronomy Earth and Space Science Environmental Systems The following may be taken after successful completion of biology and chemistry and either after successful completion of or concurrently with physics: Advanced Plant and Soil Science Anatomy & Physiology Honors Engineering Design and Problem Solving Food Science Forensic Science Medical Microbiology Pathophysiology Scientific Research and Design

*AP Biology, AP Chemistry, or AP Physics B or C.

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Biology



Chemistry



Physics or Principles of Technology



Biology PreAP



Chemistry PreAP



AP Physics B





IPC**



Chemistry

Biology

*AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Physics B or C, or AP Environmental Science **IPC is not recommended for most students.

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Grade 12



AP Science Courses* Aquatic Science Astronomy Earth and Space Science Environmental Systems The following may be taken after successful completion of biology and chemistry and either after successful completion of or concurrently with physics: Advanced Plant and Soil Science Anatomy & Physiology Honors Engineering Design and Problem Solving Food Science Forensic Science Medical Microbiology Pathophysiology Scientific Research and Design Physics Principles of Technology

RISD HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM Grade 9

Grade 10

Biology (Reg or PreAP)

IPC (Integrated Physics & Chemistry)

Grade 11

Grade 12

Advanced Plant and Soil Science → → Anatomy & Physiology-Honors Aquatic Science Astronomy Chemistry Environmental Systems Food Science Forensic Science Medical Microbiology Pathyphysiology Physics Principles of Technology Biology Chemistry Physics /Principles of Science Course*** → → → Technology *The grade level sequences are suggested only and individual student academic skill level and course prerequisites must be considered. **Beginning with the 2001-2002 9th grade class, if a student does not take Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC), then the student must take Chemistry and Physics. ***If student does not pass Exit-Level Science in 11th grade, student must enroll in science course in 12th grade.

Note: We strongly recommend that science be taken through the senior year.

SCIENCE COURSES 4007 BIOLOGY – 9th (Recommended), 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4007M/4007MI BIOLOGY MODIFIED* – 9th (Recommended), 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4007A BIOLOGY ALTERNATE* – 9th (Recommended), 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course In Biology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Biology study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of cells and viruses; growth and development of organisms; cells, tissues, and organs; nucleic acids and genetics; biological evolution, taxonomy; metabolism and energy transfers in living organisms; living systems; homeostasis; and ecosystems and the environment. 4006 BIOLOGY PreAP – 9th (Recommended), 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One Credit; full year course PreAP Biology includes topics taught in regular Biology but covered in greater detail. 4013 BIOLOGY – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Regular or PreAP Biology; Regular or PreAP Chemistry (or concurrent enrollment); consultation with course instructor. One credit; full year course Biology AP is a laboratory-oriented course which includes the study of basic concepts and principles of specific life processes. It is designed to be the equivalent of the general biology course often taken during the first college year, making it possible for the student to receive advanced standing as a college

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freshman. This course will have the equivalent of three class meetings and three laboratory hours per week. 4005 INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY – 9th, 10th (STANDARD) 4005M/4005MI INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY MODIFIED* – 9th, 10th (STANDARD) 4005A INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-C; HS-C Integrated Physics and Chemistry is no longer the suggested science core component for most students. Integrated Physics and Chemistry is not a core component for the DAP. 4008 CHEMISTRY – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4008M CHEMISTRY MODIFIED* – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4008A CHEMISTRY ALTERNATE* – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Algebra 1 and one credit of science. One credit; full year course In Chemistry, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: characteristics of matter, use of the Periodic Table, development of atomic theory and chemical bonding, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students will investigate how chemistry is an integral part of our daily lives. 4009 CHEMISTRY – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Algebra 1 and one credit of science; recommended: Algebra 2 (or concurrent enrollment). One credit; full year course The PreAP chemistry course offers students extensive inquiry experiences in which the major concepts involving chemical changes of matter are developed through experiments and classroom discussion. Experiments and their results are the central aspects of the curriculum. Advanced level research of selected chemistry topics is conducted as independent study under the supervision of the instructor. This course includes topics taught in the regular course but covered in greater detail. Mathematical applications are emphasized. 4014 CHEMISTRY – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Regular or PreAP Chemistry, Algebra 2; consultation with course instructor; recommended: Regular or PreAP Biology and Regular or AP-B Physics, Precalculus (or concurrent enrollment). One credit; full year course Chemistry AP course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year, making it possible for the student to receive advanced standing as a college freshman. The student in such a course will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and competence in dealing with chemical problems. This course will have the equivalent of three class meetings and three laboratory hours per week.

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4010 PHYSICS – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4010M PHYSICS MODIFIED* – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4010A PHYSICS ALTERNATE* – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None; recommended: Algebra 1or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 1. One credit; full year course In Physics, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: laws of motion; changes within physical systems and conservation of energy and momentum; forces; thermodynamics; characteristics and behavior of waves; and atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. Students who successfully complete Physics will acquire factual knowledge within a conceptual framework, practice experimental design and interpretation, work collaboratively with colleagues, and develop critical thinking skills. 4020 PHYSICS – B – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Algebra 2 (or concurrent enrollment); Precalculus (or concurrent enrollment) is recommended One credit; full year course The Physics “B” AP course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for non-physics majors (such as students majoring in life science or the arts) and the introductory course for physics/engineering majors. The AP physics course offers students extensive inquiry experiences in which the major concepts involving the physical interactions of matter are developed through lab experiences and classroom discussions. Experiments and their results are the central aspects of the curriculum. The expectation is that the student takes the Physics “B” AP test at the end of the course. 4015 PHYSICS – C – AP – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite—Regular or AP B Physics, Calculus (or concurrent enrollment); consultation with course instructor One credit; full year course The course will have the equivalent of three class meetings and three laboratory hours per week. The Physics AP course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. This sequence is paralleled or preceded by mathematics courses that include calculus. 4016 AQUATIC SCIENCE – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) 4016M/4016MI AQUATIC SCIENCE MODIFIED* – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) 4016A AQUATIC SCIENCE ALTERNATE* – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in the third year. One credit; full year course In Aquatic Science, students study the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in aquatic environments, including impacts on aquatic systems. Investigations and field work in this course may emphasize fresh water or marine aspects of aquatic science depending primarily upon the natural resources available for study near the school. Students who successfully complete Aquatic Science will 53

acquire knowledge about a variety of aquatic systems, conduct investigations and observations of aquatic environments, work collaboratively with peers, and develop critical-thinking and problemsolving skills. CT4401 ADVANCED PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE – 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Three units of Science One credit; full-year course This course is designed to prepare students for careers in the food and fiber industry. Components of the course include; soil science, relationships between resources and environmental systems, water systems, components of plant science in relation to crop production, basic plant makeup, genetics, plant chemistry at the cellular level, and resources needed for producing domesticated plants. Practical application include ecosystems, soil fertility, irrigation, use of fossil fuels, alternate energy, crop species by area, food crop genetics and variations, and fertilizer analysis. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. 4030 ASTRONOMY – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in the third year. One credit; full year course In Astronomy, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study the following topics: astronomy in civilization, patterns and objects in the sky, our place in space, the moon, reasons for the seasons, planets, the sun, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and space exploration. Students who successfully complete Astronomy will acquire knowledge within a conceptual framework, conduct observations of the sky, work collaboratively, and develop critical-thinking skills. 4032 EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 4032M/4032MI EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE MODIFIED – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science and Math core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in the third year. One credit; full year course Earth and Space Science is a capstone course designed to build on students’ prior scientific and academic knowledge and skills to develop understanding of Earth’s system in space and time. Students will use an Earth systems approach to studying the three themes of Earth in space and time, solid Earth, and fluid Earth. CT4405 ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PROBLEM SOLVING – 12th (Berkner High School STEM ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Geometry, Algebra II, Chemistry, Physics. One credit, full-year course This course is designed to stimulate students’ ingenuity, intellectual talents, and practical skills in devising solution to engineering design problems. Students use the engineering design process cycle to investigate, design, plan, create, and evaluate solutions. Components of the course include; engineering design problem and solutions, critical thinking skills, engineering careers, implications of technology, 54

math models to develop solutions, relevant chemical, biological, mechanical, electrical and physical properties of materials, open and closed loop systems, culminating in an engineering design project. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. 4018 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) 4018M/4018MI ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS MODIFIED* – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) 4018A ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ALTERNATE* – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in the third year. One credit; full year course In Environmental Systems, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats; ecosystems and biomes; interrelationships among resources and an environmental system; sources and flow of energy through an environmental system; relationship between carrying capacity and changes in populations and ecosystems; and changes in environments. 4019 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment; consultation with course instructor. One credit; full year course AP Environmental Science is a course providing students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the inter-relationships of the natural world. In addition, it will offer students opportunities to identify and analyze environmental problems, to evaluate risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions. CT4403 FOOD SCIENCE – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Three Units of Science (Prerequisite – Principles of Hospitality and Tourism). One credit; full-year course This course is the study of the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public with 40 percent of instruction laboratory based. Components of the course include scientific methods and inquiry, food safety and microbiology, food chemical properties, food enzymes and properties, food additives, food basic nutrients, food groups, USDA guidelines, and food preservation. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. CT4404 FORENSIC SCIENCE – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite: Science academic core components or concurrent enrollment in third year. One credit; full-year course Forensic Science uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse, neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Components of this course include; critical thinking skills, safety, systematic investigations, laboratory 55

procedures, fingerprinting, DNA testing, ballistic and bullet marks, anthropology, decomposition, serology and toxicology tests. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. CT4407 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY-HONORS – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in third year. One credit; full year course In Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students will study a variety of topics that includes: structures and functions of organs and systems and their interactions with each other and their environment, and body processes that maintain homeostasis. CT4407 PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Two credits of Science (Regular/PreAP Biology, and IPC or Regular/PreAP Chemistry), Algebra 1. One credit; full year course In Principles of Technology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Various systems will be described in terms of space, time, energy, and matter. Students will study a variety of topics that include laws of motion, conservation of energy, momentum, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and characteristics and behavior of waves. Students will apply physics concepts and perform laboratory experimentations for at least 40% of instructional time using safe practices. CT4408 SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH & DESIGN – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite—Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in third year. One credit; full year course In Scientific Research and Design, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students will study a variety of topics that include: formulating hypotheses to guide experiments; analyzing published research; collecting, organizing and evaluating data; synthesizing valid conclusions; and communicating conclusions to an audience of professionals. CT4409 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in third year. One-half credit; one semester In Medical Microbiology, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that includes: the relationship between microbes and health maintenance, and the role of microbes in infectious diseases. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program.

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CT4410 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP- C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Science academic core component requirements or concurrent enrollment in third year. One-half credit; one semester In Pathophysiology, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: mechanisms of pathology; process of pathogenesis; study of human diseases; and effects of disease prevention and control. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program.

SOCIAL STUDIES The high school social studies curriculum incorporates three major instructional goals: acquiring knowledge, developing attitudes and values, and developing skills and processes. Essential knowledge and skills in social studies at high school grade levels continue to build upon the foundation established during the elementary and junior high school learning experiences. Eight content strands are integrated for instructional purposes and include history; geography; government; citizenship; economics; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. Each course enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, and the function of our free enterprise society, and to appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation. For every course, students use problem-solving and decision making skills to answer questions as well as use a variety of primary and secondary source materials. For each social studies course required for graduation, regular as well as Advanced Placement (AP) course offerings may be available for students. AP courses are taught at the college level using college texts. Three elective Advanced Placement courses are offered in; European History, Psychology, and Human Geography. All course options address the state-mandated essential knowledge and skills (TEKS). AP courses place greater emphasis on cognitive concepts and processes using higher-level skills, independent studies and analytical and communication skills that are consistent with the structure of the social science disciplines. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

Course Sequence Suggestions *(see specific graduation plans for course requirements). DAP, RECOMMENDED, AND RISD HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS Grade 9 W. Geography OR Human Geography (AP)

Grade 10



W. History (reg. or AP)

Grade 11



US History (reg. or AP)

Grade 12



Elective Options: Any other Social Studies (reg. or AP) electives

W. Geography



W. History (reg. or AP)



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US history (reg. or AP) US Gove. (reg. or AP) and Economics (reg. or AP)



US Govt. (reg. or AP) and Economics (reg. or AP) Elective Options: Any other Social Studies (reg. or AP) electives Elective Options: Any other Social Studies (reg. or AP) electives

SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES 2006 WORLD GEOGRAPHY STUDIES – 9th (STANDARD) 2006M/2006MI WORLD GEOGRAPHY STUDIES MODIFIED* – 9th (STANDARD) 2006A WORLD GEOGRAPHY STUDIES ALTERNATE* – 9th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course This course describes the influence of geography on events of the past and present. A significant portion of the course centers around the physical processes; the characteristics of major land forms, climates, and ecosystems and their relationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution and movement of world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of region. 2106 HUMAN GEOGRAPHY – AP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course AP Human Geography introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Combined with the TEKS for World Geography, this one year course satisfies the state requirement while preparing students for the AP Human Geography exam in May. 2004 WORLD HISTORY STUDIES – 10th (STANDARD) 2004M/2004MI WORLD HISTORY STUDIES MODIFIED* – 10th (STANDARD) 2004A WORLD HISTORY STUDIES ALTERNATE* – 10th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – World Geography One credit; full year course This course offers students an overview of the entire history of humankind, its significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world. Students analyze the process by which democraticrepublican governments evolved as well as the ideas from historic documents that influenced that process, and the history and impact of major religious and philosophical traditions. 2105 WORLD HISTORY STUDIES – AP – 10th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – World Geography One credit; full year course This course is taught at college level, using college texts, and is designed to develop greater understanding of the development of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies and advanced through a combination of factual knowledge with an emphasis on analytical skills. Focused primarily on the past thousand years, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that set the human stage prior to 1000 C.E. The AP exam is offered in May. 58

2003 U.S. HISTORY STUDIES SINCE RECONSTRUCTION – 11th (STANDARD)* 2003M/2003MI U.S. HISTORY STUDIES SINCE RECONSTRUCTION MODIFIED* – 11th (STANDARD) 2003A U.S. HISTORY STUDIES SINCE RECONSTRUCTION ALTERNATE* – 11th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – World Geography and World History One credit; full year course In this course, students study U.S. history from 1876 to the present. Historical content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to industrialization, urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies of the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, and reform movements including civil rights. Students examine the impact of constitutional issues on American society, evaluate the dynamic relationships of the federal government, analyze efforts to expand the democratic process, and describe the relationships between the arts and the times during which they were created. 2015 U.S. HISTORY – AP – 11th (STANDARD)* DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – World Geography and World History One credit; full year course This survey course is taught at college level, using college texts, and addresses the historical span from discovery and exploration to the present. Elements of geography that are essential for full understanding of historical events and issues are included and are designed to build geographic skills. Instructional strategies emphasize higher level thinking skills and creative thought processes. Students use a variety of rich primary and secondary source materials such as biographies and autobiographies and landmark Supreme Court cases. Research using analytical and communication skills is required consistent with historical methodology. The AP exam is offered in May. *Students may fulfill the graduation requirement in United States History Studies Since Reconstruction by taking either United States History Studies Since Reconstruction or Advanced Placement (AP) United States History. Students who have earned 1.0 unit of credit in United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (regular or PreAP) may enroll in Advanced Placement (AP) United States History for state elective credit. 2007 U.S. GOVERNMENT – 11th, 12th (STANDARD)** 2007M/2007MI U.S. GOVERNMENT MODIFIED* – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 2007A U.S. GOVERNMENT ALTERNATE* – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester The focus of this course is on the principles and beliefs upon which the U.S. was founded and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels, culminating the civic and governmental content and concepts studied from Kindergarten through required secondary courses. A significant focus is on the U.S. Constitution, its underlying principles and ideas, and the form of government it created, the role of government in the U.S. free enterprise system, and the relationship between governmental policies and the culture of the United States.

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2008 U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) ** DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – U.S. History Studies since Reconstruction recommended One-half credit; one semester This college level course uses college texts. Students study the same content and concepts of U.S. Government (Standard) with a stronger emphasis on higher level thinking skills and creative thought processes. Research using analytical and communication skills is required. The exam is offered in May to determine if students are recommended for college credit in Government. 2010 ECONOMICS WITH EMPHASIS ON THE FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM AND ITS BENEFITS – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) **** 2010M/2010MI ECONOMICS WITH EMPHASIS ON THE FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM AND ITS BENEFITS MODIFIED* – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 2010A ECONOMICS WITH EMPHASIS ON THE FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM AND ITS BENEFITS ALTERNATE* – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course focuses on the basic principles concerning production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the U.S. and a comparison with those in other countries around the world. Students examine the rights and responsibilities of consumers and businesses, types of business ownership and market structures and the basic concepts of consumer economics. Students create economic models and evaluate economic-activity patterns. 2011 MACROECONOMICS – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) **** DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – U.S. History Studies Since Reconstruction recommended One-half credit; one semester Course content is designed to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Emphasis is placed on the study of national income and price determination, economic performance measures, economic growth, and international economics; the study of basic principles of production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services through a theoretical framework, the American free enterprise system, the role of government, and consumer economics. The AP Exam is offered in May. ****Students may fulfill the graduation requirement in economics by taking either Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits or Advanced Placement (AP) Macroeconomics. 2016 EUROPEAN HISTORY – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – World History Studies and/or World Geo. Studies One credit; full year course In this elective college-level course using college texts, students examine the history of Europe through the twentieth century. Students explore and analyze various aspects of European history including intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history. Research using analytical and communication skills consistent with historical methodology is required. The AP Exam is offered in May.

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2012 PSYCHOLOGY – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) ***** DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester In this elective course students consider the development of the individual and the personality and how the knowledge, methods, and theories of this discipline are applied to the explanation of human behavior. The study of psychology is based on an historical framework and relies on effective collection and analysis of data. Content emphases are human development, elements of learning, motivation, bases of behavior, personality, social psychology, and careers in psychology. 2013 PSYCHOLOGY – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) ***** DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This elective course introduces students to the scientific basis of psychology and how the knowledge, methods, and theories of this discipline are applied to the explanation of human behavior. Content emphases include theoretical approaches and research methods, biological bases of behavior, human development, personality, abnormal psychology, and social psychology. The AP Exam is offered in May. *****Students may earn only one-half (.5) unit of state elective credit in a regular or Advanced Placement psychology course. If students take both psychology courses, one course must count for local non-credit only. 2009 SOCIOLOGY – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester In this elective course students study dynamics and models of individual and group relationships as well as basic institutions. Students study topics such as the history and systems of sociology, cultural and social norms, social institutions, mass communication, and contemporary problems. 2019 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES: STREET LAW – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) *** W2019 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES: STREET LAW – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – U. S. Government recommended One-half credit; one semester In this elective course students study the American legal system, its development, and how it works today. Students apply the knowledge and skills of the social sciences to their study of the legal system and investigate law-related careers. Critical-thinking, problem solving and decision making skills are important elements of the course as is the communication of information in written, oral, and visual forms. ***Students may earn a maximum of two state elective credits in a course with the prefix, Special Topics in Social Studies. W2008 LAW 1: AP Government – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Recommendation of course instructor and Magnet Coordinator 61

One-half credit; one semester course This course is designed for students entering the RHS Magnet’s Law program. Students are enrolled in US Government and Politics-AP, during the fall semester. Law 1: AP Government is taught with an emphasis in jurisprudence. W2010 LAW 1: ECONOMICS – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – Recommendation of course instructor and Magnet Coordinator One-half credit; one semester course This course is the second semester of Law 1. Students are enrolled in Economics with Emphasis on Free Enterprise System and its Benefits for the spring semester. Law 1: Economics is taught with an emphasis on jurisprudence. W2014 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES: LAW 2 – 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) *** DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Law 1: AP Government and Law1: Economics One credit; full year course Through the understanding of jurisprudence, students will gain knowledge of the two aspects of practicing law – civil and criminal. Areas of study include but are not limited to Procedural law, Tort law, Contract law, Property law, Homicide, Crimes against the Person, Theft, Robbery, and more. W2031 SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED STUDIES: LAW INTERNSHIP – 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Special Topics in Social Studies: Law 1 and 2; Special Topics in Social Studies: Texas Criminal Law or Business Law; and recommendation of course instructor. One credit; one semester; two hour class This course is designed as a culminating experience for those students in the District High School’s Law program. Students are placed in the offices of law professionals (attorneys, judges, police officers) in the Dallas/Richardson area in order to explore firsthand the fields of law. Students will intern on a non-paid basis for 50 hours for one-half credit or 100 hours for one credit. Students conduct in-depth research, prepare a product of professional quality, and present their findings to appropriate audiences.

LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH (LOTE) For parents and students to consider when selecting which language to study: historically, languages come and go in popularity. History suggests that we do not know today which languages will be important in the future. We do know that acquiring any second language makes it easier to acquire a third and a fourth, so the most important requirement is that there is motivation. If a student is interested in a language, continuing to improve her/his proficiency in that language will become an intrinsic endeavor and improve her/his ability to learn more languages. In the end, students must be ready to work in a highly competitive international economic environment. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

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Course Sequence Suggestions* (see specific graduation plans for course requirements) Students must complete the LOTE requirement in the same language. Note: Some colleges require a minimum 3 years of foreign language. DAP, RECOMMENDED PROGRAM & RISD HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM FRENCH/GERMAN/JAPANESE/LATIN/SPANISH Grade 7 Preparatory A

Grade 8



Grade 9

Grade 12



Level II



Level III PreAP



AP Language



Preparatory A



Preparatory B

→ → →

Level II

→ → →

Level III

→ → →



AP Language or Literature or Honors Language Enrichment



New LOTE Level I

Level I



Grade 11

Preparatory B

Delayed Track Level III PreAP (Native and Near-Native Speaker of Spanish Tracks)

Grade 10

AP Language



Level III PreAP



Honors Language Enrichment AP Language or Literature

Level II AP Literature

Level III PreAP New LOTE Level I



AP Lit. or Honors Lang. Enrichment AP Language AP Language New LOTE Level II New LOTE Level II

Note: We strongly recommend that a LOTE be taken as early as possible and continued through senior year. District data indicates that the longer students wait to enroll in a LOTE, the more difficulty they may experience in the successful completion of the class.

LOTE COURSES LEVEL 1 6102 FRENCH; 6201 GERMAN; 6701 JAPANESE; 6301 LATIN; 6002 SPANISH – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course The primary focus of a Level 1 class is to develop listening and reading comprehension in students. Approximately 80% of the entire year is focused on strategies that develop these interpretive skills. To meet this end, 80%-100% of the class must be conducted in the target language. Students will speak and write using very basic language. (Students studying a classical language will primarily focus on reading and understanding the influence of one language and culture on another and will write using very basic language.) LEVEL 2 6106 FRENCH; 6202 GERMAN; 6702 JAPANESE; 6305 LATIN; 6006 SPANISH – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Level 1 or Preparatory B or Spanish Credit Exam One credit; full year course The primary focus of Level II classes is to bring all students to a novice-high level of proficiency. A large portion of the curriculum is focused on strategies that develop interpretive skills, with an additional focus on output. To meet this end, 85%-100% of the class must be conducted in the target language. (Students studying a classical language will primarily focus on developing translation skills in order to promote comprehension of the language, as well as understanding the influence of one language and culture on another.)

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LEVEL 3 – PreAP – 6110 FRENCH; 6204 GERMAN; 6703 JAPANESE; 6306 LATIN; 6011 SPANISH – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite—Level 2 or Credit Exam One credit; full year course The primary focus of the Level III PreAP class is to bring all students to an intermediate-low level of proficiency, and to begin preparation for the AP Language course and exam. Students begin exploring literary themes via target language TV commercials, Web-Quests, and readings with plentiful teacher guidance. Students continue refining their ear for the language with 90%-100% of the class conducted in the target language. Formal and informal speaking and writing become more process oriented. (Students studying a classical language will be introduced to authentic Latin texts with an emphasis on literary style. The primary focus is on reading and translation.) Students begin to practice and prepare for the AP exam. LEVEL 3 – 6109 FRENCH; 6010 SPANISH – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-E; Rec-E Prerequisite-French/Spanish Level 2 One credit; full year course The primary focus of the Level III class is to bring all students to an intermediate-low level of proficiency. Students begin exploring literary themes via target language TV commercials, Web-Quests, and readers with plentiful teacher guidance. Students continue refining their ear for the language with 90%-100% of the class conducted in the target language. Both formal and informal speaking and writing become more process oriented. AP – 6111 FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE; 6205 GERMAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE; 6013 SPANISH LANGUAGE – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Level 3 PreAP/Regular or Credit Exam One credit; full year course AP Language and Culture courses emphasize the use of language for active communication. Students develop the ability to understand spoken language in various contexts, ample vocabulary for reading authentic texts, and the ability to express themselves with reasonable accuracy, fluency, and coherence in both written and spoken language. AP Language and Culture students prepare for the AP Spanish, French, or German Language and Culture Exam. 6012 LEVEL 4 – SPANISH – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Spanish 3 One credit; full year course The primary focus of the Level IV class is to bring all students to an intermediate-high level of proficiency. Students continue reading novels and exploring cultural topics with plentiful teacher guidance. Students continue refining their ear for the language with 95%-100% of the class conducted in the target language. Speaking and writing fluctuate between informal and formal presentations. 6014 AP –SPANISH LITERATURE – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Level 3 PreAP or Spanish Credit Exam One credit; full year course 64

AP Literature courses are comparable to a third-year college introduction to target-language literature. They are based on required reading lists provided by The College Board. These works are of literary significance and represent various historical periods, literary movements, genres, geographical areas, and population groups within the Spanish-speaking world. Students will interpret and analyze literature in the target language, in preparation for the AP Literature Exam. 6320 LATIN CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC TOPICS – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course This course is a one-semester intensive study of the Latin and Greek roots, prefixes, and their derivatives that are relevant to legal, medical, and scientific education and professions. Students will increase their verbal comprehension and vocabulary skills through knowledge of the Greek and Latin elements. 6704 AP JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Japanese 3H/3 PreAP One credit; full year course This course supports students who have completed the equivalent of approximately 300 hours of college-level classroom instruction as they develop the productive, receptive, and cultural skills necessary to communicate with coherence, relative fluency, and cultural appropriateness with native speakers of Japanese. Students are expected to reach the Intermediate Low to Intermediate Mid range of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines, as they prepare for the AP Japanese Language and Culture Exam. HONORS 6115 FRENCH; 6206 GERMAN; 6705 JAPANESE; 6015 SPANISH LANGUAGE ENRICHMENT – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – AP French, German or Spanish Language One credit; full year course The Honors French, German, Japanese or Spanish Language courses are a continuation of the AP Language and Culture courses, designed to give the students an additional year of advanced language study to help them acquire greater proficiency in all aspects of the target language and to prepare for college language courses and/or the AP French, German, Japanese or Spanish Language and Culture exam. The course content is similar to the AP Language or Language and Culture course. 6311 AP LATIN – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Level 3 PreAP One credit; full year course AP Latin is designed to provide advanced high school students with a rich and rigorous Latin course, approximately equivalent to an upper-intermediate (typically fourth or fifth semester) college or university Latin course. Students who successfully complete the course are able to read, understand, translate, and analyze Latin poetry and prose. The syllabus of required readings includes poetry selections from the Aeneid by Vergil and prose selections from Caesar’s Gallic Wars. AP Latin students prepare and practice for the AP Latin Exam.

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FINE ARTS Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

ART COURSES The high school art program offers students opportunities for creative growth and expression through various methods of study and exploration. Students are encouraged to exhibit their work during the school year. A fee may be charged to cover costs of materials for optional art projects beyond the minimum requirements for each course. FA8105 ART 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Art 1 is the first course in the high school art sequence. It is an exploration of the basic techniques in design, drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture, with emphasis on creative problem solving. Students will develop an understanding of the creative process by examining and discussing works of art from various cultures and periods. Career opportunities are introduced. FA8106 ART 1 – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Art 1 PreAP is an accelerated course for students who are preparing for more rigorous, higher- level art courses. The goals and content of this course are similar to those of regular Art 1 but students are expected to move more quickly through concepts and assignments in order to develop their own variations and experimental approaches. Students are required to maintain a journal/sketchbook documenting the development of ideas and approaches to solving a problem, noting research about artists, styles, cultures, and images. FA8107 DRAWING 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 – 9th Grade course is offered only at Richardson High School; 10th, 11th, and 12th grade is offered at all other high school campuses. One credit; full year course This studio course offers the student opportunities for in-depth study of various drawing media and techniques with emphasis on creative and critical thinking. FA8108 DRAWING 2 – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course Drawing 2 PreAP is an accelerated course designed to prepare students for more rigorous higher-level courses. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or 66

College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. Students will be expected to move more quickly through drawing assignments than in regular Drawing 2 and to keep a journal/sketchbook of outside assignments. FA8109 DRAWING 3 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1, Drawing 2 One credit; full year course This course is an expansion of the understanding of techniques and skills developed in Drawing 2. The student will have the opportunity to gain greater depth of experience in techniques and processes of their choice. Specialization will be encouraged. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. This course does not carry Advanced Placement quality points. FA8110 DRAWING 3 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 and Drawing 2 One credit; full year course Drawing 3 PreAP is an accelerated course designed to prepare students for the higher-level course Art 4 Advanced Placement. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. Students will be expected to develop independent learning skills, use experimental approaches and to collect work for portfolio review. FA8111 ART 4 – DRAWING – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1, any Art level 2 course One credit; full year course Art 4 Drawing is for students who want to continue to develop their drawing skills within the expectations of a regular course. While learning new techniques, students will keep a workbook/sketchbook record complete with the preparatory drawings and planning notes. Completed artworks will reflect the technical skills as well as thoughtful research into visual culture. FA8112 ART – DRAWING – AP – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1, any Art level 2 course One credit; full year course Advanced Placement Art 4 Drawing is individualized and continues the development of the student’s technical skills, creative thinking, and art knowledge. In consultation with the teacher, each student initiates challenging creative projects and research which will develop greater depth of experience and under-standing. Each student will compile a portfolio of creative work for presentation, keep a workbook/sketchbook record complete with preparatory drawings and planning notes which support the portfolio presentation, and prepare research projects in art history and art appreciation. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations in Drawing.

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FA8113 ELECTRONIC MEDIA 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course Electronic Media 2 offers students their first in-depth experiences in a variety of methods and techniques involving producing original visual images using technology. The technical aspects including the draw and paint applications, animation, video, and photography will be examined through demonstration, discussion, experimentation, and problem solutions. Styles and the history of art as reflected in technology will be analyzed as students explore the traditions and contributions of various cultures. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. This course counts as [Part B] 1.0 technology applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. FA8114 ELECTRONIC MEDIA 2 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) WF8114 ELECTRONIC MEDIA 2 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-C; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course Electronic Media 2 PreAP offers students their first in-depth experiences involving producing original visual images using technology. Computers, digital tablets, scanners, and digital cameras will be used to design, edit, and manipulate original works of art. The commercial and career applications of this media are discussed and researched. This course counts as [Part B] 1.0 technology applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. This course is also recommended for students who plan to take AP Art in preparation for the AP 2 Dimensional Portfolio or the AP Drawing Examination. FA8115 PAINTING 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course Painting 2 offers students their first in-depth experiences in a variety of painting methods and techniques. The technical aspects of painting including the vehicles, pigments, finishes, brush effects and related mediums will be examined through demonstration, discussion, experimentation, and problem solutions. Styles and the history of art as reflected in paintings will be analyzed as students explore the traditions and contributions of various cultures. FA8116 PAINTING 2 – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 Regular or PreAP One credit; full year course This is an accelerated course in more advanced painting techniques. Students are expected to develop independent work habits and responsibility so that they may successfully complete more rigorous design problems of this course. While the content of regular painting is included, development of a series or collection of pieces with a central theme will be the goal. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations.

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FA8121 PHOTOGRAPHY 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course This course will introduce students to the basic elements of photography which includes technical skills of camera operations, pictorial composition, lighting, developing, printing, digital imaging & editing, mounting, and display through traditional (analog) and digital photographic practices. Students will be encouraged to develop artistic expression and aesthetics through use of the photography medium. Students will also investigate the historical development, styles, and trends of photography through discussion, critique, demonstration, and reading. The course will also cover career opportunities and the basic principles of design as applied to photography. FA8122 PHOTOGRAPHY 2 – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course This course is an accelerated laboratory course for students who desire a more rigorous challenge in traditional and digital photography. The techniques and methods of regular photography will be covered with a focus toward developing a personal theme or idea. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. FA8123 PHOTOGRAPHY 3 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 and Photography 2 One credit; full year course Photography 3 is the second year of study in this medium. Advanced work in camera techniques, digital and darkroom techniques, portraiture, commercial photography, architectural photography, print presentation, video commercials, and on-the-job experiences are emphasized. Career opportunities are further explored in this advanced course. FA8124 PHOTOGRAPHY 3 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) WF8124 PHOTOGRAPHY 3 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 and Photography 2 Regular or PreAP One credit; full year course This course is an accelerated laboratory course in advanced camera techniques, digital and darkroom methods, and combinations of approaches. The techniques and methods of regular photography will be covered with a focus toward developing a personal theme or idea. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. FA8127 PRINTMAKING 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course Printmaking 2 offers students their first in-depth experiences in a variety of printmaking methods and techniques. The technical aspects of printing including the processes, tools and equipment, use of inks, 69

solvents, and papers will be examined through demonstrations, discussion, experimentation, and problem solutions. Styles and the history of art as reflected in printmaking will be analyzed as students explore the traditions and contributions of various cultures. This course is recommended for students who plan to take AP Art in preparation for the Two Dimensional Design portfolio Examination. FA8128 PRINTMAKING 2 PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 Regular or PreAP Art 1 This is an accelerated course in more advanced printmaking techniques. Students are expected to develop independent work habits and responsibility so that they may successfully complete more rigorous design problems in this course. While the content of regular printmaking is included, the development of a series or collection of pieces with a central theme will be the goal. Students will become familiar with basic two-dimensional principles and will be able to apply those principles effectively. How effective or efficient the student’s design turns out will depend on the thoroughness of his/her original problem definition, analysis of the problem solutions, and the craftsmanship of the finished piece. This course may prepare the student to receive college credit through the Advanced Placement Examination in Two Dimensional Design Portfolio. FA8133 TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1, any Art level 2 course in Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, or Electronic Media One credit; full year course This course is intended to assist students in preparing for the College Board examination in 2Dimensional Design. This type of design involves purposeful decision-making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. For this portfolio, students are asked to demonstrate proficiency in 2-D design using a variety of art forms. These could include, but are not limited to, graphic design, typography, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, drawing, and other forms of art. FA8134 ART 2 – SCULPTURE – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course This studio course, devoted to 3-dimensional art forms, will offer the student opportunities to become more proficient in modeling and constructing original creations by working in clay, wire, plaster, wood, and metal. It will be concerned with the creation and manipulation of 3-dimensional space; real space as opposed to illusionary space. The student may use illusionary devices to enhance his/her work, but the essential qualities of production should be height, width, and depth. This course may prepare the student to receive college credit through the Advanced Placement Examination in 3-Dimensional Design. However, this course does not carry Advanced Placement quality points. FA8135 ART 2 – SCULPTURE – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course This accelerated course in 3-dimensional sculpture techniques will address the history of sculpture, the use of a variety of materials and tools for modeling, molding, casting, carving, construction, and 70

assemblage. Exhibition, portfolio development, and development of a series or collection of sculpture related to a central concept will be a goal. This course may prepare the student to receive college credit through the Advanced Placement Examination in 3-Dimensional Design and it carries Advanced Placement quality points. FA8140 CERAMICS 2 – BASIC TECHNIQUES – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course Ceramics 2 Basic Techniques provides students experiences using various methods and equipment to create original works from clay. Studies will include hands-on experiences in modeling, hand building, throwing on the wheel, and glazing. The historical and cultural importance of ceramics will be explored. FA8141 ART 2 – CERAMICS – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course This accelerated course in ceramics techniques will address the history of ceramics, modeling, molding, casting, carving, construction and assemblage, throwing on the wheel, kiln firing and primitive firing, glaze chemistry, and surface design. Exhibition, portfolio development, and development of a series or collection of ceramic work related to a central concept will be a goal. This course may prepare the student to receive college credit through the Advanced Placement Examination in 3-Dimensional Design and it carries Advanced Placement quality points. FA8142 CERAMICS 3 – ADV. TECHNIQUES – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 and Ceramics 2-Basic Techniques One credit; full year course Ceramics 3-Advanced Techniques is the second year of study in this medium. The course offers an indepth study of design principles as applied to more sophisticated creative ceramic productions. There is further opportunity for problem solving in terms of personal expression and exploring a variety of techniques. Students will increase their awareness of ceramics as an avocation as well as a career. FA8144 JEWELRY 2 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course The jewelry course provides students the opportunity to design and construct objects and to develop an understanding of skills and craftsmanship. The history and evolution of jewelry design and construction will be studied as related to different cultures. Students will study the characteristics of metals as well as the two construction processes, lost wax and fabrication. Evaluation of work will be based on craftsmanship, function, and design. Safe working procedures are stressed while students work with saws, files, polishing machines, vacuum casting equipment, burn out kilns, and torches. FA8145 JEWELRY 2 – PreAP – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 One credit; full year course 71

This is an accelerated course in designing and making fabricated and cast metal jewelry of exceptional quality. Students are expected to develop independent learning habits so that they may successfully complete this course. While the content of regular jewelry is included, development of a series or collection of pieces with a central theme will be the goal. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. FA8146 JEWELRY 3 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1, Jewelry 2 Design One credit; full year course This studio course provides in-depth exploration of the basic jewelry techniques learned in Jewelry 2 Design. The student will learn advanced processes and techniques including setting opaque stones, setting pearls in fabricated and cast pieces, combining metals with other materials, copper enameling, etching, reticulation, die-forming, and riveting. Each student will develop a greater depth of experience in creating original designs in jewelry and will work in more complex applications of forming, sinking, forging, and casting. FA8147 JEWELRY 3 – PreAP – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1 and Jewelry 2 Regular or PreAP One credit; full year course This is an accelerated course in more advanced methods of designing and making fabricated and cast metal jewelry of exceptional quality. Students are expected to develop independent work habits and responsibility so that they may successfully complete more rigorous design problems of this course. While the content of regular jewelry is included, development of a series or collection of pieces with a central theme will be the goal. This course is recommended for students preparing for scholarship competitions and/or College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. FA8150 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO – AP – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Art 1, any Art level 2 course; Ceramics, Sculpture, or Jewelry One credit; full year course This course is intended to assist students in preparing for the College Board examination in 3Dimensional Design. A variety of approaches to representation, abstraction, and expression may be part of the student’s experience. These might include traditional sculpture in a variety of materials, architectural models, apparel, ceramics, 3-D fiber arts or metal work, among others. FA8151 ART HISTORY – ANCIENT THROUGH MODERN – AP – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Approval of course instructor One credit; full year course This survey course examines the painting, sculpture, and architecture from prehistory through the 20th century. The first semester begins with Paleolithic cave art, continues through ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, classical Greece and Rome, and ends with European Medieval and Renaissance art and architecture. The second semester covers the major European movements from Baroque through Neoclassical, Romantic, Impressionism, Cubism, and Neo-Realism. Nonwestern art and architecture with cross-cultural connections is also studied. The course is a college-level class which prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Exam in Art History. 72

FA8152 GRAPHIC DESIGN 3 – 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) WF8152 GRAPHIC DESIGN 3 – 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP- E; Rec- E; HS- E Prerequisite – Art 1 and any Art level 2 course One credit; full year course Graphic Design 3 offers the students their first in-depth experiences in a visual communication using a combination of forms, words, and images. The commercial applications of graphic design and career preparation are a key focus of the course. Logo design, typography, corporate identity, and product package design will be explored.

CTE COURSE CT7100 PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTS OF FLORAL DESIGN – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Recommended prerequisite: None One credit; full-year course This course is designed to develop students’ ability to identify and demonstrate the principles and techniques related to floral design, as well as develop an understanding of the management of floral enterprises. In a laboratory setting students will identify techniques in floral art, interiorscape design principles and techniques. Students will prepare corsages, boutonnieres, and flower arrangements for various occasions. Students will utilize skills for trimming, cutting, fertilizing, pruning, regular and tropical flowering plants. The student will also learn the employability skills for a successful employee and by identifying entrepreneurship, career development opportunities in the field of floral design and interior landscape development.

DANCE COURSES FA8029 DANCE 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course This is a co-ed course which introduces students to concepts and techniques of one or more dance forms. The forms of dance may include modern, classical ballet, tap, jazz, and folk/ethnic (i.e., country western). Dimensions of creativity, choreography, and artistic judgment will be explored. Health-related fitness activities will also be included. FA8030 DANCE 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Dance 1 One credit; full year course Dance 2 continues to develop the concepts and techniques which are included in Dance 1. FA8020 DRILL TEAM PREP (DANCE) – 9th, 10th, 11th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One-half credit for fall semester

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Students will learn dance techniques, drill team techniques, flexibility, high kicks and other skills needed to prepare for drill team auditions which are held in December of each year. After auditions, students who make drill team enroll in FA8021. Those who do not make drill team enroll in FA8029 for the spring semester. FA8021 PRE DRILL TEAM (DANCE 1) – 9th, 10th, 11th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Selection through Audition One-half credit for spring semester FA8022 DRILL TEAM 2 (DANCE 2) – 10th (STANDARD) FA8023 DRILL TEAM 3 (DANCE 3) – 11th (STANDARD) FA8024 DRILL TEAM 4 (DANCE 4) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Selection through Audition One credit; full year course This course is the drill team class. Students learn various forms of dance including modern, classical ballet, tap, jazz, and folk/ethnic (i.e., country western). Dimensions of creativity, choreography, and artistic judgment will be explored. Routines for performances are learned and perfected. Students may also earn up to one credit of PE substitution for the fall semester based on the drill team activity. (see P.E. Substitution: Drill Team for more information.) FA8025 C&W DANCE TEAM PREP (DANCE 1) – 9th, 10th, 11th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – none One-half credit spring semester Students will learn dance techniques including Country and Western dance flexibility and other skills needed to prepare for country & western dance team auditions. FA8035 C&W DANCE TEAM PREP (DANCE 1) – 9th, 10th, 11th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – none One credit; full year course Students will learn dance techniques including Country and Western dance flexibility and other skills needed to prepare for country & western dance team auditions. FA8026 C&W TEAM 2 (DANCE 2) – 10th (STANDARD) FA8027 C&W TEAM 3 (DANCE 3) – 11th (STANDARD) FA8028 C&W TEAM 4 (DANCE 4) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Selection through Audition One credit; full year course This course is the Country/Western performance team. Students learn various forms of dance. Dimensions of creativity, choreography, and artistic judgment will be explored. Routines for performances are learned and perfected. Students may also earn up to one credit of PE Substitution credit for the spring semester based on the performance activity. (See P.E. Substitutions: Drill Team for more information.)

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MUSIC COURSES Band Courses FA8209 CONCERT 2 – 9th (STANDARD) FA8210 CONCERT 2 –10th (STANDARD) FA8211 CONCERT 2 –11th (STANDARD) FA8212 CONCERT 2 –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This is a performing group of brass, woodwind, and percussion players who exhibit moderate performance skills. This course will emphasize the continued development of ensemble playing and rehearsal techniques. It will emphasize individual and group musical development. The band will usually attend UIL contest and possibly other contests in the spring. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students may be required to participate in RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8213 CONCERT 1 – 9th (STANDARD) FA8214 CONCERT 1 –10th (STANDARD) FA8215 CONCERT 1 –11th (STANDARD) FA8216 CONCERT 1 –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This course is a performing group of brass, woodwind, and percussion players who exhibit moderate performance skills. This course will emphasize the continued development of ensemble playing and rehearsal techniques. It will emphasize individual and group musical development. The band will usually attend UIL contest and possibly other contests in the spring. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students may be required to participate in RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8217 CONCERT 1 – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8218 CONCERT 1 – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8219 CONCERT 1 – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8220 CONCERT 1 – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Open to Concert 1 band students who have made an A or B in previous band courses, demonstrate by audition sufficient instrumental and musical proficiency and are recommended for the course by the Director of Bands. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course 75

This course is for band students who wish to broaden their Concert 1 musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Concert 1 expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument’s repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8250 SYMPHONIC 3 – 9th (STANDARD) FA8251 SYMPHONIC 3 – 10th (STANDARD) FA8252 SYMPHONIC 3 – 11th (STANDARD) FA8253 SYMPHONIC 3 – 12th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This course is a performing group of brass, woodwind, and percussion players who exhibit above average performance skills. This group will participate in UIL contests and other appropriate contests throughout the year. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students may be required to participate in All-Region auditions and RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8254 SYMPHONIC 3 HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8255 SYMPHONIC 3 HONORS – 10th (STANDARD) FA8256 SYMPHONIC 3 HONORS – 11th (STANDARD) FA8257 SYMPHONIC 3 HONORS – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Open to Symphonic 3 band students who have made an A or B in previous band courses, demonstrate by audition sufficient instrumental and musical proficiency and are recommended for the course by the Director of Bands. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This course is for band students who wish to broaden their Symphonic 3 musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Symphonic 3 expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument's repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8221 SYMPHONIC 2 – 9th (STANDARD) FA8222 SYMPHONIC 2 –10th (STANDARD) FA8223 SYMPHONIC 2 –11th (STANDARD) FA8224 SYMPHONIC 2 –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E 76

Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This course is a performing group of brass, woodwind, and percussion players who exhibit above average performance skills. This group will participate in UIL contests and other appropriate contests throughout the year. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students may be required to participate in All-Region auditions and RISD Chamber Music Festival. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8225 SYMPHONIC 2 – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8226 SYMPHONIC 2 – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8227 SYMPHONIC 2 – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8228 SYMPHONIC 2 – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Open to Symphonic 2 band students who have made an A or B in previous band courses, demonstrate by audition sufficient instrumental and musical proficiency and are recommended for the course by the Director of Bands. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This course is for band students who wish to broaden their Symphonic 2 musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Symphonic 2 expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument's repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8229 SYMPHONIC 1 – 9th (STANDARD) FA8230 SYMPHONIC 1 –10th (STANDARD) FA8231 SYMPHONIC 1 –11th (STANDARD) FA8232 SYMPHONIC 1 –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course A performing group of brass, woodwind, and percussion players who exhibit refined performance skills on their individual instruments. Participation will include group, individual and small ensemble performance. The group will attend UIL and other appropriate contests throughout the year. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8233 SYMPHONIC 1 – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8234 SYMPHONIC 1 – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8235 SYMPHONIC 1 – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8236 SYMPHONIC 1 – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) 77

DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Open to Symphonic 1 band students who have made an A or B in previous band courses, demonstrate by audition sufficient instrumental and musical proficiency and are recommended for the course by the Director of Bands. Students must be enrolled for first semester and be a member of the marching band. One credit; full year course This course is for band students who wish to broaden their Symphonic 1 musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements Symphonic 1 expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument’s repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Course enrollment requires participation in the marching band. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8237 STAGE/JAZZ – 9th (STANDARD) FA8238 STAGE/JAZZ –10th (STANDARD) FA8239 STAGE/JAZZ –11th (STANDARD) FA8240 STAGE/JAZZ –12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the Stage/Jazz Band Director. Music students (band, choir orchestra) must have concurrent membership in their parent organization. Exception may be made only for those who play piano, organ, guitar, bass, or vocalists with the approval of the Director of Bands, the Director of Fine Arts, and the campus Principal. Music students who elect to drop their parent organization and audition for Stage/Jazz Band for one of the listed music exceptions may not audition until one year has elapsed from the time they dropped their parent organization. Priority placement for exceptions will be given to music students participating in one of the school parent organizations. One credit; full year course Stage/Jazz band offers students the opportunity to develop performance skills in the various stage/jazz styles. Improvisation and basic arranging techniques will be an integral part of the course objectives. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. PE5325 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5026 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 9th (STANDARD) PE5327 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5028 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 10th (STANDARD) PE5329 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5030 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 11th (STANDARD) PE5331 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5032 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval of the band director. Students must be enrolled for the first semester and be a member of the marching band. Band students who elect to drop band may audition for Color Guard, only with the band director’s permission. One-half credit fall semester for Color Guard; No credit spring semester for Winter Guard This is a course for participation in Color Guard associated with the marching band in the fall semester. Students enrolled receive a .5 PE substitution credit for fall semester. PE5325 and PE5327 earn credit for PE Substitution: Marching Band. PE5329 and PE5331 earn credit for PE Substitution: Drill Team The Winter Guard meets during the spring semester and prepares students for participation in Winter Guard performances and competitions. Students enrolled receive local credit only for Winter Guard in 78

the spring semester. Local credit does not count toward high school graduation. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel.

Choir Courses FA8308 TREBLE – 9th (STANDARD) FA8309 TREBLE –10th (STANDARD) FA8310 TREBLE –11th (STANDARD) FA8311 TREBLE –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Interest in singing. One credit; full year course This choir is primarily for study of basic music skills through the performance of treble music. This group will attend UIL contest. Students may participate in Solo and Ensemble and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8312 TREBLE – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8313 TREBLE – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8314 TREBLE – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8315 TREBLE – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This course is for choir students who wish to broaden their Treble musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Treble Choir expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or ensembles, research music and composers, and study styles. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and Solo and Ensemble materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8316 TENOR/BASS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8317 TENOR/BASS – 10th (STANDARD) FA8318TENOR/BASS – 11th (STANDARD) FA8319 TENOR/BASS – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Interest in singing. One credit; full year course This choir is primarily for study of basic music skills through the performance of tenor-bass music. Students may participate in Solo and Ensemble Contest and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances FA8320 TENOR/BASS – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8321 TENOR/BASS – HONORS – 10th (STANDARD) FA8322 TENOR/BASS – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8323 TENOR/BASS – HONORS – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E 79

Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This course is for choir students who wish to broaden their Tenor-Bass musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Tenor-Bass Choir expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or ensembles, research music and composers, and study styles. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and Solo and Ensemble materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8324 CONCERT – 9th (STANDARD) FA8325 CONCERT –10th (STANDARD) FA8326 CONCERT –11th (STANDARD) FA8327 CONCERT –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Interest in singing. One credit; full year course This is a training choir at the high school level and is available when A Cappella and Junior Varsity courses already exist. Students may participate in Solo and Ensemble and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8328 CONCERT – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8329 CONCERT – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8330 CONCERT – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8331 CONCERT – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This course is for choir students who wish to broaden their Concert musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Concert Choir expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or ensembles, research music and composers, and study styles. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and Solo and Ensemble materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8332 JUNIOR VARSITY – 9th (STANDARD) FA8333 JUNIOR VARSITY –10th (STANDARD) FA8334 JUNIOR VARSITY –11th (STANDARD) FA8335 JUNIOR VARSITY –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This course is a preparatory choir for the A Cappella Choir. The emphasis will be on the study of basic choral concepts and sight singing. This group will prepare music for UIL contest. Students may participate in Solo and Ensemble and other appropriate activities. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances.

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FA8336 JUNIOR VARSITY – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8337 JUNIOR VARSITY – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8338 JUNIOR VARSITY – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8339 JUNIOR VARSITY – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This course is for choir students who wish to broaden their Junior Varsity musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Junior Varsity Choir expectations, and provide students with the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works, research music and composers, and study styles. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and Solo and Ensemble materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8348 A CAPPELLA – 9th (STANDARD) FA8349 A CAPPELLA –10th (STANDARD) FA8350 A CAPPELLA –11th (STANDARD) FA8351 A CAPPELLA –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This is the select mixed choir at the high school. It is performance-oriented with emphasis on developing group performances and small ensemble performances such as madrigals, quartets, trios and solos. The fundamentals of singing will be stressed through advanced literature. This group will attend UIL contest and other appropriate contests throughout the year. Students may participate in All-Region auditions, Solo and Ensemble activities, and others deemed appropriate by the director. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances. FA8352 A CAPPELLA – HONORS – 9th (STANDARD) FA8353 A CAPPELLA – HONORS –10th (STANDARD) FA8354 A CAPPELLA – HONORS –11th (STANDARD) FA8355 A CAPPELLA – HONORS –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This course is for choir students who wish to broaden their A Cappella musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and A Cappella Choir expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their research music and composers, and study styles. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and Solo and Ensemble materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances.

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FA8357 VOCAL ENSEMBLE – 10th (OPTIONAL) FA8358 VOCAL ENSEMBLE –11th (OPTIONAL) FA8359 VOCAL ENSEMBLE –12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisites – Audition and approval by the director. To participate in vocal ensemble (pop choir), a student must have concurrent membership in the school choir program. Exceptions may be made only for instrumentalists with the approval of the choir director, the Director of Fine Arts, and the campus principal. One credit; full year course This is a special interest course for outstanding choir students. Opportunities include small groups such as madrigal choir, show choir, pop choir, etc. This course involves outside of school rehearsals and performances.

Music Theory FA8365 MUSIC THEORY – AP – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisites – Basic music knowledge and interest in learning about the theory of music. One credit; full year course A student in grade 11 or 12 may receive one fine arts credit by taking Music Theory. (Enrollment is through Music Department Staff approval.) This course requires previous music training and is primarily designed for students planning to major in music in college. This is a rigorous course emphasizing the study of music notation, harmony, sightreading, sight-singing, basic keyboard knowledge, ear training, composition, arranging, and style analysis.

Orchestra Courses FA8408 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Varsity) – 9th (STANDARD) FA8409 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Varsity) –10th (STANDARD) FA8410 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Varsity) –11th (STANDARD) FA8411 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Varsity) –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One credit; full year course This GROUP is a performing group for orchestra students who exhibit an appropriate level of performance skills on their individual instruments. Performance of concert music as assigned by the director is expected. Students are expected to continue to develop individual skills and ensemble skills. Students are expected to prepare All-Region music during the fall; auditioning for All-Region Orchestra is encouraged. Students are encouraged to perform a solo in the Richardson Chamber Music Festival or UIL Solo-Ensemble Contest. This course involved outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel.

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FA8412 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA HONORS (Varsity) – 9th (STANDARD) FA8413 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA HONORS (Varsity) –10th (STANDARD) FA8414 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA HONORS (Varsity) –11th (STANDARD) FA8415 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA HONORS (Varsity) –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course This course is for string orchestra students who wish to broaden their Symphony musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Symphony expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument’s repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8416 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) – 9th (STANDARD) FA8417 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) – 10th (STANDARD) FA8418 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) – 11th (STANDARD) FA8419 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; HS-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course This group is a performing group for orchestra students who exhibit an appropriate level of performance skills on their individual instruments. Performance of concert music as assigned by the director is expected. Students are expected to continue to develop individual skills and ensemble skills. Students are expected to prepare All-Region music during the fall; auditioning for All-Region Orchestra is encouraged. Students are encouraged to perform a solo in the Richardson Chamber Music Festival or UIL Solo-Ensemble Contest. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8420 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) – 9th (STANDARD) FA8421 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) – 10th (STANDARD) FA8422 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) – 11th (STANDARD) FA8423 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course This course is for string orchestra students who wish to broaden their Philharmonic Orchestra musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Philharmonic Orchestra expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument’s repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. 83

FA8424 CONCERT ORCHESTRA – 9th (STANDARD) FA8425 CONCERT ORCHESTRA –10th (STANDARD) FA8426 CONCERT ORCHESTRA –11th (STANDARD) FA8427 CONCERT ORCHESTRA –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course Performance of concert music as assigned by the director is expected. This course focuses on development of individual skills and ensemble skills. Performance of concert music as assigned by the director is expected. Students are encouraged to participate in the Richardson Chamber Music Festival. Students will attend sectional rehearsals and/or joint rehearsals before or after school. This group may perform at UIL Concert and Sight Reading Contest. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8428 CONCERT ORCHESTRA HONORS - 9th (STANDARD) FA8429 CONCERT ORCHESTRA HONORS - 10th (STANDARD) FA8430 CONCERT ORCHESTRA HONORS - 11th (STANDARD) FA8431 CONCERT ORCHESTRA HONORS - 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course This course is for string orchestra students who wish to broaden their Concert Orchestra musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Concert Orchestra expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument’s repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. FA8432 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) – 9th (STANDARD) FA8433 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) –10th (STANDARD) FA 8434 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) –11th (STANDARD) FA8435 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) –12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course This group is a performing group for orchestra students who exhibit an appropriate level of performance skills on their individual instruments. Performance of concert music as assigned by the director is expected. Students are expected to continue to develop individual skills and ensemble skills. Students are expected to prepare All-Region music during the fall; auditioning for All-Region Orchestra is encouraged. Students are encouraged to perform a solo in the Richardson Chamber Music Festival or UIL Solo-Ensemble Contest. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel.

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FA8436 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) - 9th (STANDARD) FA8437 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) - 10th (STANDARD) FA8438 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) - 11th (STANDARD) FA8439 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) - 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval by the director. One Credit; full year course This course is for string orchestra students who wish to broaden their Freshmen Orchestra musical experiences. The course will emphasize an expansion of the essential elements and Freshmen Orchestra expectations, and provide students the opportunity to develop qualities of independent musicianship. Students will be required to perform solos or other appropriate works from their instrument’s repertoire, research music and composers, and study styles relative to their instrument. They will also attend and critique concerts as well as explore other appropriate learning experiences as directed by the teacher. Students are required to prepare All-Region audition materials and RISD Chamber Music Festival materials. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel.

THEATRE ARTS COURSES FA8506 THEATRE ARTS 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Emphasis is placed on character development, voice training, and practical execution on the performance level. Students will have opportunities to study mime, pantomime, improvisation, production elements, and theatrical styles, and theatre history. FA8510 THEATRE ARTS 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Arts 1 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course Techniques receive continued emphasis with performance at an independent level showing a higher degree of proficiency. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based on demonstrated ability. FA8513 THEATRE ARTS 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Arts 2 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course Activities are designed with emphasis on research, production of original work, and/or performance using skills of specific areas of study. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based upon demonstrated ability. FA8515 THEATRE ARTS 4 – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Arts 3 and teacher approval One credit; full year course 85

Advanced activities are designed with emphasis on research, production of original work, and/or performance using skills of specific areas of study. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based upon demonstrated ability. FA8516 TECHNICAL THEATRE 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Theatre Arts and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course Technical Theatre 1 is a practical laboratory course including all elements of technical theatre that is employed in play production. FA8520 TECHNICAL THEATRE 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Technical Theatre 1 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course The course is a practical laboratory course extending the concepts introduced in Technical Theatre 1. Students work on projects necessary for play production. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based upon demonstrated ability. FA8523 TECHNICAL THEATRE 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Technical Theatre 2 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course The course is a practical laboratory course extending the concepts introduced in Technical Theatre 2. Students work on projects necessary for play production. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based upon demonstrated ability. FA8525 TECHNICAL THEATRE 4 – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Technical Theatre 3 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course The course is a practical laboratory course extending the concepts introduced in Technical Theatre 3. Students work on projects necessary for play production. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based upon demonstrated ability. FA8526 THEATRE PRODUCTION 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – teacher approval One credit; full year course Students refine skills in production techniques, participate in major productions, and study and observe professional acting. FA8530 THEATRE PRODUCTION 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Production 1 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course

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The course is designed as a co-curricular laboratory for the exploration, development, and synthesis of all the elements of theatre. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based upon demonstrated ability. FA8533 THEATRE PRODUCTION 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) WF8533 THEATRE PRODUCTION 3 – 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Production 2 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course The course provides an advanced laboratory setting, synthesizing all elements of theatre. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based on demonstrated ability. FA8535 THEATRE PRODUCTION 4 – 12th (STANDARD) WF8535 THEATRE PRODUCTION 4 – 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Production 3 and/or teacher approval One credit; full year course The course continues to provide an advanced laboratory setting synthesizing all elements of theatre. Class placement may be determined by the teacher based on demonstrated ability. WF8536 STAGE COMBAT – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Teacher Approval One credit; full year course Students will learn a variety of techniques to make them more confident stage performers. These techniques include: pantomime, character movement, hand-to-hand stage combat, and combat with sabers as well as modern, jazz, ballroom, and tap dancing. WF8537 DIRECTING FOR STAGE – 11th, 12th (Richardson High School Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Theatre Arts 1 and/or Teacher Approval One credit; full year course Students will study theory and techniques used to bring a dramatic text to life on the state. This include drama and artistic design theory, translating text to the stage, working with actors, and auditioning techniques; all students are required to produce a published 20-30 minute stage play.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

HEALTH COURSES One-half (.5) unit of credit is required for graduation from high school. 5530 HEALTH EDUCATION 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C 87

Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course includes instruction in wellness, mental health, substance abuse, diseases, family living including human sexuality instruction along with community and world health.

PE COURSES DAP, RECOMMENDED PROGRAM, & RISD HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM One (1.0) credit in P.E. or P.E. substitution is required for graduation. A student may earn up to four (4.0) credits in P.E. and/or P.E. substitutions toward graduation. P.E. Courses: Foundations of Personal Fitness (.5 credit)* Adventure/Outdoor Education (.5 credit) * Aerobic Activities* o Dance Aerobics (.5 credit) o Personal Development (.5 credit) Individual or Team Sports* o Individual Sports (.5 credit) o Team Sports (.5 credit) o Partners Training Program (.5 credit) P.E. Substitutions: Athletics (.5 to 1.0 credit) Off-Campus P.E. (.5 to 1.0 credit) JROTC 1* (1.0 credit) Marching Band (.5 credit fall semester)* Cheerleading (.5 credit fall semester)* Drill Team (.5 credit fall semester)*

(Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 9-12) (Grades 10-12) (Grades 9-12)

All numeric grades earned in P.E. classes or P.E. substitutions will be used in calculating GPA/Rank. Students may earn up to four (4.0) credits of P.E. and/or P.E. substitution courses for graduation credit. *P.E. courses and some substitution courses have a maximum number of times they may be taken. See individual course descriptions.

Physical Education Courses PE5020 FOUNDATIONS OF PERSONAL FITNESS A – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) PE5021 FOUNDATIONS OF PERSONAL FITNESS B – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester Required textbook and physical activity lab course includes principles of exercise, health and skill-related fitness, nutrition, stress and consumer management. Students will learn to develop, evaluate and maintain their own personal exercise program. Students use both the classroom and gymnasium to master these skills. PE5028 ADVENTURE/OUTDOOR EDUCATION – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 88

DAP-C; Rec-C; HS-C Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course allows a student to participate in adventure/outdoor education activities that provide enjoyment and challenge and that can be pursued for a lifetime. Units include personal fitness, lifetime sports, water activities, camping and hiking, orienteering and map skills. This course may be repeated to earn a total of (1.0) credit in Adventure/Outdoor Education. AEROBIC ACTIVITIES: The following courses earn credit for Aerobic Activities. A student may earn only one (1.0) credit for any combination of the following courses: PE5022 DANCE/AEROBIC ACTIVITIES A (fall semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) PE5023 DANCE/AEROBIC ACTIVITIES B (spring semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This is a co-ed course which introduces students to concepts and techniques of one or more dance forms. The forms of dance may include modern, classical ballet, tap, jazz, and folk/ethnic (i.e., country western). Dimensions of creativity, choreography, and artistic judgment will be explored. Health-related fitness activities and testing will also be included. PE5024 PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT/AEROBIC ACTIVITIES A (fall semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) PE5025 PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT/AEROBIC ACTIVITIES B (spring semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course provides the opportunity for personal assessment and goal-setting in strength and resistance training, and aerobic fitness and conditioning. Health-related fitness concepts and activities will be included throughout the semester.

INDIVIDUAL AND TEAM SPORTS: The following courses earn credit for Individual and Team Sports. A student may earn only one (1.0) credit for any combination of the following courses: PE5026 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS A (fall semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) PE5027 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS B (spring semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course provides the opportunity to participate in and develop skills in lifetime sports such as, but not limited to: tennis, table tennis, badminton, archery, golf, and aerobic conditioning using heart rate monitors. Health-related fitness concepts and activities will be included throughout the semester. PE5030 PARTNERS TRAINING PROGRAM A (fall semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) PE5031 PARTNERS TRAINING PROGRAM B (spring semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E 89

Prerequisite – Approval of course instructor. One-half credit; one semester Able bodied students learn about students with disabilities in order to better understand their conditions. Students will be trained the first few weeks of school and then proceed to physical education class where they practice making modifications to skills and games to help their friends with disabilities be more successful. NOTE: in schools where the number of special students exceeds the number of available partners, a combined program will be offered. PE5034 TEAM SPORTS A (fall semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) PE5035 TEAM SPORTS B (spring semester) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester This course provides the opportunity to participate in and develop more advanced skills in team sports such as, but not limited to: soccer, basketball, volleyball and softball. Health-related fitness concepts, activities, and testing will be included throughout the semester. P.E. Substitution: Athletics *All Athletics—DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E PE5122 ATHLETICS/FOOTBALL (fall semester); PE5222 (spring semester) – 9th (STANDARD)* PE5123 ATHLETICS/FOOTBALL (fall semester); PE5223 (spring semester) – 10th (STANDARD)* PE5124 ATHLETICS/FOOTBALL (fall semester); PE5224 (spring semester) – 11th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5125 ATHLETICS/FOOTBALL – 12th (STANDARD)* One-half credit; fall semester only PE5126 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5226 (spring semester) - 9th PE5127 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5227 (spring semester) - 10th PE5128 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5228 (spring semester) - 11th PE5129 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5229 (spring semester) - 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5142 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5242 (spring semester) - 9th PE5143ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5243 (spring semester) - 10th PE5144 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5244 (spring semester) - 11th PE5145 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5245 (spring semester) - 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5174 ATHLETICS/GOLF – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5274 (spring semester) - 9th PE5175 ATHLETICS/GOLF – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5275 (spring semester) - 10th PE5176 ATHLETICS/GOLF – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5276 (spring semester) - 11th 90

PE5177 ATHLETICS/GOLF – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5277 (spring semester) - 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course Parents/students are responsible for daily transportation to and from practice. PE5178 ATHLETICS/TENNIS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5278 (spring semester) - 9th PE5179 ATHLETICS/TENNIS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5279 (spring semester) - 10th PE5180 ATHLETICS/TENNIS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5280 (spring semester) - 11th PE5181 ATHLETICS/TENNIS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5281 (spring semester) - 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5146 ATHLETICS/VOLLEYBALL (fall semester); PE5246 (spring semester) – 9th PE5147 ATHLETICS/VOLLEYBALL (fall semester); PE5247 (spring semester) – 10th PE5148 ATHLETICS/VOLLEYBALL (fall semester); PE5248 (spring semester) – 11th PE5149 ATHLETICS/VOLLEYBALL (fall semester); PE5249 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5134 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – BOYS (fall semester); PE5234 (spring semester) – 9th PE5135 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – BOYS (fall semester); PE5235 (spring semester) – 10th PE5136 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – BOYS (fall semester); PE5236 (spring semester) – 11th PE5137 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – BOYS (fall semester); PE5237 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5164 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5264 (spring semester) – 9th PE5165 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5265 (spring semester) – 10th PE5166 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5266 (spring semester) – 11th PE5167 ATHLETICS/SOCCER – GIRLS (fall semester); PE5267 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5182 ATHLETICS/GYMNASTICS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5282 (spring semester) – 9th PE5183 ATHLETICS/GYMNASTICS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5283 (spring semester) – 10th PE5184 ATHLETICS/GYMNASTICS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5284 (spring semester) – 11th PE5185 ATHLETICS/GYMNASTICS – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5285 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course Parents/student responsible for daily transportation to and from practice located at MST.

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PE5344 ATHLETICS/WRESTLING (fall semester); PE5444 (spring semester) – 9th PE5345 ATHLETICS/WRESTLING (fall semester); PE5445 (spring semester) – 10th PE5346 ATHLETICS/WRESTLING (fall semester); PE5446 (spring semester) – 11th PE5347 ATHLETICS/WRESTLING (fall semester); PE5447 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5186 ATHLETICS/SWIMMING – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5286 (spring semester) – 9th PE5187 ATHLETICS/SWIMMING – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5287 (spring semester) – 10th PE5188 ATHLETICS/SWIMMING – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5288 (spring semester) – 11th PE5189 ATHLETICS/SWIMMING – BOYS/GIRLS (fall semester); PE5289 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5238 ATHLETICS/TRACK – BOYS (spring semester) – 9th (STANDARD)* PE5239 ATHLETICS/TRACK – BOYS (spring semester) – 10th (STANDARD)* PE5240 ATHLETICS/TRACK – BOYS (spring semester) – 11th (STANDARD)* PE5241 ATHLETICS/TRACK – BOYS (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One-half credit; spring semester only PE5270 ATHLETICS/TRACK (spring semester) – GIRLS – 9th (STANDARD)* PE5271 ATHLETICS/TRACK (spring semester) – GIRLS – 10th (STANDARD)* PE5272 ATHLETICS/TRACK (spring semester) – GIRLS – 11th (STANDARD)* PE5273 ATHLETICS/TRACK (spring semester) – GIRLS – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One-half credit; spring semester only PE5130 ATHLETICS/BASEBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5230 (spring semester) – 9th PE5131 ATHLETICS/BASEBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5231 (spring semester) – 10th PE5132 ATHLETICS/BASEBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5232 (spring semester) – 11th PE5133 ATHLETICS/BASEBALL – BOYS (fall semester); PE5233 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course PE5160 ATHLETICS/SOFTBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE 5260 (spring semester) – 9th PE5161 ATHLETICS/SOFTBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE 5261 (spring semester) – 10th PE5162 ATHLETICS/SOFTBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE 5262 (spring semester) – 11th PE5163 ATHLETICS/SOFTBALL – GIRLS (fall semester); PE 5263 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One credit; full year course

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PE5138 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – BOYS (fall semester) – 9th (STANDARD)* PE5139 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – BOYS (fall semester) – 10th (STANDARD)* PE5140 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – BOYS (fall semester) – 11th (STANDARD)* PE5141 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – BOYS (fall semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One-half credit; fall semester only PE5170 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – GIRLS (fall semester) – 9th (STANDARD)* PE5171 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – GIRLS (fall semester) – 10th (STANDARD)* PE5172 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – GIRLS (fall semester) – 11th (STANDARD)* PE5173 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY – GIRLS (fall semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One-half credit; fall semester only PE5360 ATHLETICS TRAINER (fall semester); PE5460 (spring semester) – 9th (STANDARD)* PE5361 ATHLETICS TRAINER (fall semester); PE5461 (spring semester) – 10th (STANDARD)* PE5362 ATHLETICS TRAINER (fall semester); PE5462 (spring semester) – 11th (STANDARD)* PE5363 ATHLETICS TRAINER (fall semester); PE5463 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD)* Prerequisite – Coach’s approval One-half credit per semester P.E. Substitution: Off-Campus P.E. PE5305 OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION (fall semester); PE5306 (spring semester) – 9th PE5307 OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION (fall semester); PE5308 (spring semester) – 10th PE5309 OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION (fall semester); PE5310 (spring semester) – 11th PE5311 OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION (fall semester); PE5312 (spring semester) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Central Administration approval (See counselor) One-half credit; one semester This program is a cooperative arrangement between the school district, the student, and an off-campus facility. Activities available through the Off-Campus Program are limited to ballet and Olympic type activities approved by the Texas Education Agency that are not offered comprehensively through the physical education or athletic departments. (Grades earned for Off-Campus PE are included in the GPA.) A tuition fee will be charged. P.E. Substitution: ROTC PE5337 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Berkner High School ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Army JROTC focuses on the development of better citizens and leaders in an interactive environment. Students learn to appreciate ethical values, develop leadership potential, think logically and 93

communicate effectively both orally and in writing. While learning to be members of a team, the student also learns about the importance of physical fitness and will develop mental management abilities. NOTE: Only JROTC 1 earns P.E. Substitution credit. JROTC 2, JROTC 3 and JROTC 4 are described in the “Other Electives” section of the high school course descriptions and earn elective credit towards graduation. P.E. Substitution: Activities The following activities earn up to one (1.0) P.E. Substitution credit based on the moderate to vigorous physical activity involved. P.E. SUBSTITUTION: CHEERLEADING A student may earn only one (1.0) credit for any combination of the following courses: PE5340 JV CHEERLEADER (fall semester); PE5341 (spring semester) - 10th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C; E Prerequisite – Elected One-half credit of PE Substitution: Cheerleading in the fall semester. One-half local credit for spring semester. Local credit does not count toward high school graduation. PE5317 VARSITY CHEERLEADER (fall semester); PE5318 (spring semester) - 10th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Elected One-half credit of PE substitution: Cheerleading in the fall semester. One-half local credit for spring semester. Local credit does not count toward high school graduation PE5319 VARSITY CHEERLEADER (fall semester); PE5320 (spring semester) - 11th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Elected One-half credit of PE substitution: Cheerleading in the fall semester. One-half local credit for spring semester. Local credit does not count toward high school graduation PE5321 VARSITY CHEERLEADER (fall semester); PE5322 (spring semester) - 12th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Elected One-half credit of Aerobic Activities in the fall semester, unless the student has previously earned the maximum of one (1.0) credit for Aerobic Activities in other classes. One-half local credit for spring semester. Local credit does not count toward high school graduation. DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C; E A student may earn a maximum of one (1.0) credit of Cheerleading and a maximum of one (1.0) credit of Aerobic Activities. P.E. SUBSTITUTION: MARCHING BAND PE5333 MARCHING BAND – 1st semester of fall marching season (STANDARD) PE5334 MARCHING BAND – 2nd semester of fall marching season (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E 94

Prerequisite – Audition One-half P.E. Substitution Credit for participation in the marching season Students are not enrolled in this course. Band members are enrolled in Fine Arts: Band (See Fine Art – Music) The P.E. Substitution is added to Academic History at the end of the semester with a grade of pass/fail. This grade does not count in GPA/Rank. COLORGUARD PE5325 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5026 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 9th PE5327 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5028 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 10th PE5329 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5030 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 11th PE5331 COLOR GUARD (fall semester); PE5032 WINTER GUARD (spring semester) – 12th DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition and approval of the band director. Students must be enrolled for the first semester and be a member of the marching band. Band students who elect to drop band may audition for Color Guard, only with the band director’s permission. One-half credit fall semester for Color Guard; No credit spring semester for Winter Guard This is a course for participation in Color Guard associated with the marching band in the fall semester. Students enrolled receive a .5 PE substitution credit for fall semester. PE5325 and PE5327 earn credit for PE Substitution: Marching Band. PE5329 and PE5331 earn credit for PE Substitution: Drill Team The Winter Guard meets during the spring semester and prepares students for participation in Winter Guard performances and competitions. Students enrolled receive local credit only for Winter Guard in the spring semester. Local credit does not count toward high school graduation. This course involves outside of school rehearsals, performances, and travel. PE SUBSTITUITION: DRILL TEAM DRILL TEAM PE5335 PE SUBSTITUTION CREDIT FOR DRILL TEAM – 1st fall semester drill team (STANDARD) PE5336 PE SUBSTITUTION CREDIT FOR DRILL TEAM – 2nd fall semester drill team (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition One-half P.E. Substitution Credit for participation in the fall drill team activity. This course does not appear on the students’ schedule. Drill Team members are enrolled in Fine Arts: FA8022, FA8023 or FA8024. (See Fine Art: Dance) The P.E. Substitution is added to Academic History at the end of the semester with a grade of pass/fail. This grade does not count in GPA/Rank. COUNTRY WESTERN DANCE TEAM PE5338 PE SUBSTITUTION CREDIT FOR CW DANCE TEAM A –1st spring semester country/western dance team (STANDARD) PE5339 PE SUBSTITUTION CREDIT FOR CW DANCE TEAM B –2nd spring semester country/western dance team (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Audition

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One-half credit for P.E. Substitution (Drill Team) for participation in the spring country/western dance team. This course does not appear on the students’ schedule. CW Dance Team members are enrolled in Fine Arts: FA8026, FA8027 or FA8028 (See Fine Art: Dance). The P.E. Substitution is added to Academic History at the end of the semester with a grade of pass/fail. This grade does not count in GPA/Rank. Note: A student may earn only a total of one (1.0) credit in Drill Team or Country Western Dance Team or a combination of these activities.  For specific guidelines, contact the campus administrator or Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction.

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CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

Agricultural Food and Natural Resources Richardson High School Only Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Small Animal Management One credit; full-year course – 9-12 (All campuses)

Horticulture Science One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Landscape Design and Turf Grass Management One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Principles and Elements of Floral Design One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Veterinary Medical Applications One credit; full-year course – 10-12 (All campuses)

and/or Advanced Plant and Soil Science One credit; full-year course – 12 Counts as fourth science for DAP and Rec. Program

Mathematical Applications in Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources One credit; full-year course – 12 Counts as math for Rec. Program

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Practicum in Agriculture, Horticulture, Food & Natural Resources Two credits; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Floral Certification OSHA Career Safe Private Pesticide Applicator Texas Certified Nursery Professional Texas Master Gardener

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Agricultural Food and Natural Resources Courses CT7101 PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course allows students to develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, personal development, agriculture industry standards, details, practices and expectations in the fields of agriculture, food, and natural resources. The student through classroom and lab experiences the following course components; cultural diversity, history of the agriculture industry, leadership organizations, communication skills, mathematical problem solving skills, information technology skills, plus plant, animal, and ag processing skills specific to food systems as well as agriculture economics in relation to the world economy. CT7102 HORTICULTURE SCIENCE – 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course A laboratory-oriented course designed to develop skills in the various areas of the horticulture industry. Course components include management and production of horticultural plants, identification of pests and diseases of plants, proper safety for the industry, tools identification and usage, career opportunities, marketing and management skills for the industry. CT7103 LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND TURF GRASS MGMT – 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course is designed to develop an understanding of landscape and turf grass management techniques and practices. Students will identify potential, environmental, aesthetic, and financial benefits of landscape site, performs landscape business procedures, tool purchase, use, and care, turfgrass establishment and maintenance along with establishing employability skills with proper business procedures. CT7100 PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTS OF FLORAL DESIGN – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course is designed to develop students’ ability to identify and demonstrate the principles and techniques related to floral design, as well as develop an understanding of the management of floral enterprises. In a laboratory setting students will identify techniques in floral art, interiorscape design principles and techniques. Students will prepare corsages, boutonnieres, and flower arrangements for various occasions. Students will utilize skills for trimming, cutting, fertilizing, pruning, regular and tropical flowering plants. The student will also learn the employability skills for a successful employee and by identifying entrepreneurship, career development opportunities in the field of floral design and interior landscape development. 98

CT4401 ADVANCED PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE – 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Three units of Science One credit; full-year course This course is designed to prepare students for careers in the food and fiber industry. Components of the course include; soil science, relationships between resources and environmental systems, water systems, components of plant science in relation to crop production, basic plant makeup, genetics, plant chemistry at the cellular level, and resources needed for producing domesticated plants. Practical application include ecosystems, soil fertility, irrigation, use of fossil fuels, alternate energy, crop species by area, food crop genetics and variations, and fertilizer analysis. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. CT3401 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES – 11th and 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Algebra I, Geometry One credit; full-year course This course is designed to provide students mathematic, including algebra, geometry, and data analysis in the field of agriculture, food and natural resources. Components of this course include statistics, data analysis, charting, percentages, graphs, algebraic applications, and geometric principles to solve real world agriculture related problems as lumber volume, grain drying requirements, plant growth data, energy and construction costs, gear ratio, fuel efficiency, heating efficiencies, and engine performance. This course will meet math requirements on the Recommended and High School Programs if taken prior to Algebra II. CT7105 PRACTICUM IN AGRICULTURE, HORTICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Recommended one course in Agriculture, Horticulture, Food or Natural Resources Two credits; full-year course This is an occupationally designed course whereby students in either an on the job training experience or in a specific laboratory training area learn the function, safety, applications, of the tools, equipment, and technologies in the specific fields of Agriculture, Horticulture, Food, or Natural Resources. Students may be enrolled in paid or non-paid on the job training experiences as well as internships in the various related industries. CT7104 SMALL ANIMAL MANAGEMENT – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course prepares students for careers in the field of small animal management and care. Students will acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, career opportunities, career entry requirements, safety for the industry, and industry expectations. Suggested small animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, avian, dogs, and cats. CT7106 VETERINARY MEDICAL APPLICATIONS – 10th, 11th, and 12th (All campuses) 99

DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course provides training in the veterinary assistant field. The course includes but is not limited to; animal training and restraint, health and safety, sanitation, surgical preparation, anatomy, physiology, medical terminology, infectious diseases, instrument and equipment identification, vaccine preparation and injection techniques, laws and ethics, communication skills, and veterinary office procedures. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Architecture and Construction Principles of Architecture and Construction (LHHS only) One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Principles of Human Services One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Architectural Design One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Construction Technology (LHHS only) Two credits; full-year course – 10-12

Interior Design One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Advanced Architectural Design Two credits; full-year course – 10-12

Advanced Construction Technology (LHHS only) Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Advanced Interior Design One credit; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Architectural Design Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Construction Management Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Interior Design Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Autodesk Certifications OSHA Career Safe NCCER Certifications: Carpentry, Construction Technology, and Electrical

Architecture and Construction Courses CT7120 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION - 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course provides an overview to the various fields of architecture, interior design, construction science, and construction technology. The course is taught exclusively in a laboratory setting where students are emerged in the following major components; safety, material handling, hand and power tools selection, usage, maintenance, technical drawings, teamwork, and information technology equipment.

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CT7125 CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY – 10th, 11th, and 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None Two credits; full-year course This course is designed to prepare students to enter the work force as carpenters, building maintenance supervisors, or prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Major components of the course include safety, tool usage, building materials, codes, framing, drywall, roofing, and building fixtures. CT7122 ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY - 11th and 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Construction Technology Two credits; full-year course Students gain advanced knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter the workforce as carpenters, building maintenance technicians, supervisors and prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Major components are architectural drawings, safety, roof framing, and exterior/interior finish out skills. CT7124 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN - 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course prepares students to enter a career in architecture and construction or prepare toward a postsecondary degree in architecture, engineering, construction science, drafting, interior design, and landscape architecture. Students will use the latest version of Autocad software focusing on the development of original working drawings, freehand sketching, communication processes, US CADD standards, layer management, presentation drawings and model building. Students will also be exposed to the concepts of energy in relation to “smart house” technology as well as the new “green” architecture as related to the field of existing architecture. CT7121 ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN –10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Architectural Design Two credits; full-year course A continuation of Architecture Design with students transfer of basic single dimension images to three dimensional objects by use of three dimensional printers, mills and lasers, orthographic projection, multi-view drawings, standards, specifications, and geometric tolerances. Students will continue with Autocad utilizing programs as Architecture Desktop, Civil 3D, Inventor, 3DS Max. CT7129 PRACTICUM IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN - 11th and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Recommended Architectural Design or Advanced Architectural Design Two credits; full-year course This is an occupationally designed course whereby students in either on the job training or in specific laboratory training areas learn the function, safety, applications, of the tools, equipment, technologies, and materials used in this specific field. The student selects and designs multimedia communications and animation technology to assist in specific architectural design models used in the industry.

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CT7126 INTERIOR DESIGN – 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester Interior design is a technical course that addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological need of individuals by enhancing the environment in which they live and work. Emphasis is placed on the selection of color, pattern, texture, and fabrics for furniture, accessories, windows, walls, floors, and ceilings. Other units covered include furniture styles, lighting, furniture arranging, floor plans, and styles of architecture. The course culminates in a project of designing and decorating a room of the student’s choice. CT7123 ADVANCED INTERIOR DESIGN - 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Interior Design One credit; full-year course An advanced continuation of Interior Design. Course components include tool identification and usage, safety for the industry, architectural computer design, identification of furniture styles, periods and designs, upholstery devices for repair and refinish, identification of various types and properties of woods, and basic interior design theory throughout residential and commercial properties. CT7127 PRACTICUM IN INTERIOR DESIGN - 11th and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Recommended Interior Design or Advanced Interior Design Two credits; full-year course This is a specifically designed laboratory or on the job training course designed to provide advanced training in interior design. The student will learn safety, work ethics, employability characteristics of a successful worker, as well as the functions of the tools, safety, equipment, technologies, and materials used in the industry. The student will be able to use multimedia communications and animation technology to meet specific interior design needs as well as the usage of modeling and modular interior design units. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Arts, AV Technology, and Communications Principles of Arts, Audio Video Technology and Communications One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Animation One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Audio Video Production One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Fashion Design One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Commercial Photography One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Advanced Animation Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Advanced Audio Video Production Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Advanced Fashion Design Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Advanced Photography Two credit; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Fashion Design Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Audio Video Production Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Audio Systems Certificate Broadcast Technologist Certificate Flash Television Operator Certificate

Arts, AV Technology, and Communications Courses CT7200 PRINCIPLES OF ARTS, AUDIO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS – 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) WT7200 PRINCIPLES OF ARTS, AUDIO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS – 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full -year course This course is an introductory course that gives the students a general overview of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in the arts, audio/video and communications industry. Students will be provided experiences in the following areas of instruction: Communications strategies, technology applications (email, writing, publishing, presentation, spreadsheet, database), safety regulations, ethical conduct, leadership, career opportunities, group/teamwork activities, equipment usage, formal and 104

informal professional presentations. Various software will be available for the student including ISM (Independent Student Media) from Hollywood, California. CT7204 ANIMATION – 10th, 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Careers in animation span all aspects of motion graphics. Students in this course will be provided with the following components; professional communication strategies, problem solving methods, technology applications, safety, leadership, computer hardware components, various software programs, sound editing, design elements, character design, lighting and camera shots, flip books, claymation, symbol usage, editing, and creation of animation projects plus storyline. CT7201 ADVANCED ANIMATION - 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Animation Two credits; full-year course A continuation of Animation whereby students in this course expand on curriculum to create two and three dimensional animations. Students will develop advanced technical skills by using the following production techniques; transitions, edits, framing, lighting, cycles, layers, line, color, shape, texture, color theory, and additive color theory. Students will also be exposed to pre-production and post production processes, modeling characters, animating lighting and developing rigs for animation with visual effects as rain, snow, and fire. CT7205 AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION – 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) WT7205 AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION – 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course places emphasis on pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video applications. Major components include communications strategies, design systems, ethical decision making, writing audio scripts, audio music, tape, tapeless file formats, analog/digital formats, framing, focusing techniques, camera and tripod movements, linear systems, digital platforms, production processes, animation effects, and utilization of computer-based productivity tools. CT7203 ADVANCED AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION – 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) WT7203 ADVANCED AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION – 11th and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Audio Video Production Two credits; full-year course A continuation of Audio Video Production with students applying learned professional communications strategies, leadership, and use of AV technical skill for efficiency. Components include setting up editing systems, trouble shooting, wireless transmission systems, recording system metering, props, sound effects, distribution, talent work and crew contracts, freelance self promotion techniques, time based mathematics, studio productions, and standards established by the Federal Communications Commission. 105

CT7211 PRACTICUM IN AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION - 11th and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Recommended Audio Video Production or Advanced Audio Video Production Two credits; full-year course Instruction is designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment in on site laboratory or on the job training. Students will script, shoot, edit, direct, and produce in video media settings. Students will be expected to develop an increased understanding of the industry using state of the art equipment and technology through advanced audio, video, or animation format. CT7208 FASHION DESIGN – 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Careers in fashion span all aspects of the textile and apparel industries. This course focuses on apparel from the perspectives of personal decision making related to apparel, the apparel industry, and career preparations. Components of the course include evaluations of clothing care products, equipment, proper safety procedures, basic clothing design skills, fabric identification and selection, and application of design elements by designing, constructing, and altering apparel. CT7202 ADVANCED FASHION DESIGN – 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Fashion Design Two credits; full-year course An advanced continuation of Fashion Design, whereby students employ basic skills into employment opportunities in the Apparel industry. Students will utilize state of the art equipment in a lab setting to learn the following components: garment development, worldwide fashion, dyeing, printing, fashion figure drawing, color characteristics, garment fitting, pattern making/alterations, fabric textures, wardrobe coordination, and garment construction. CT7210 PRACTICUM IN FASHION DESIGN - 11th and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Recommended Fashion Design or Advanced Fashion Design Two credits; full-year course This is an occupational specific course for laboratory or on the job training for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the field of fashion design. The course covers knowledge and skills particular to the fashion design industry and focuses on safety, garment construction and design while using current and state of the art equipment and technology for the industry. CT7207 COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY – 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) WT7207 COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY – 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course

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Students in this course develop an understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on creating quality photographs as well as develop knowledge and skills for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Communications career cluster. Components of the course include; technology applications, safety, commercial photography systems, teamwork, leadership skills, ethics, copyright laws, camera types, lenses and their applications, photographic composition and layout, black and white/color photography, lighting techniques, matting and framing, and use of current industrystandard production processes. CT7209 ADVANCED COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY – 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Commercial Photography Two credits; full-year course Students will be able to develop an advanced technical understanding and skills of the commercial photography industry with a focus on producing, promoting, and presenting professional quality photographs. Components of the course include; problem solving methods, safety, ethics, time-management skills, defined purpose photographs, art and photography relationships, varied camera and lens usage, high speed photography, photographic mediums, lighting conditions, advanced technological hardware and software for the industry, plus maintenance of a career portfolio to document work experiences, licenses, certifications, and work samples. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Business, Management, and Administration Touch System Data Entry One-half credit; one semester course 9-12

Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Business Information Management 1 One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Virtual Business One-half credit; one semester course 10-12

Business Information Management 2 One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Business Law One-half credit; one semester course 11-12

Practicum in Business Management Three credits; full-year course – 11-12 (Career Prep 1)

Business Management One credit; full-year course – 11-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Practicum in Business Management 2 Three credits; full-year course – 12 (Career Prep 2)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) National Professional Certificate in Customer Service Office Proficiency Assessment Certification

Business, Management, and Administration Courses CT7221 TOUCH SYSTEM DATA ENTRY – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) CT7221A TOUCH SYSTEM DATA ENTRY ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course The purpose of this course is to teach the “touch” keyboarding skills to address business application in various emerging real life technologies. Components of this course include keyboarding accuracy, 108

speed, document formatting, business documents, word processing, and developing social skills in an office environment. CT7220 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND FINANCE – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students gain knowledge and skills in the different aspects of the business world. Components of the course include the role of business in a global society, business ethics, economic systems, organized labor, costs and profits in finance, sales process, advertising, personal finance, and career opportunities. CT7222 BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 1 -- 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Touch System Data Entry; Concurrent enrollment in Touch System Data Entry; or instructor approval required One credit; full-year course Business Information Management I prepares students to apply technology skills to personal/workplace business situations focusing on word processing, spreadsheet, database, telecommunications, desktop publishing, presentation management, networking, operating systems, and emerging technologies. Students develop intermediate level skills in this course. CT7223 BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 2 – 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Business Information Management 1 or instructor approval One credit; full-year course Provides advanced technology skills required in the business environment; includes workplace technology standards in applications of word processing, spreadsheets, databases, telecommunications, desktop publishing, presentation management, networking, operating systems, and emerging technologies; and develops advanced level skills. CT7274 BUSINESS LAW – 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Business Law provides insight into the evolution and development of laws that govern business in our society. Students will develop a clear understanding of their rights and duties within the business environment. CT7225 VIRTUAL BUSINESS – 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Students will organize a virtual business of their own. They will be able to identify steps needed to locate customers, set fees, develop client contacts, utilizing components as online and offline marketing, office services, billings and collections, business records, recordkeeping, customer records, leadership and career development activities.

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CT7226 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT – 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course In this course, students analyze the primary functions of management and leadership, which are planning, organizing, staffing, directing or leading and controlling. Students will also develop a broad base of knowledge that includes the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate managerial decisions. CT7227 PRACTICUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Career Prep 1) – 11th and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite for Level 1 – Preferred Business Information Management 1; student is 16 years old; Coordinator approval. Three credits; full-year course Practicum in Business 1 is an on-the-job program designed for students desiring skills and/or careers in selected office occupations such as administrative assistant, general office clerk, receptionist, bank clerk, medical or legal clerk, accounting, or recordkeeping. The course of study is coordinated with practical work experience students receive. CT7228 PRACTICUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 2 (Career Prep 2) – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite for Career Prep 2—Completion of Career Prep 1; student is 16 years old; Coordinator approval. Three credits; full year course Practicum in Business 2 is a continuation in the on-the-job program designed for students desiring skills and/or careers in selected office occupations such as administrative assistant, general office clerk, receptionist, bank clerk, medical or legal clerk, accounting, or recordkeeping. The course of study is coordinated with practical work experience students receive. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Education and Training Principles of Education and Training One credit; full year course – 9-12

Human Growth and Development One credit; full year course – 10-12

Instructional Practices in Education and Training (Teaching Internship 1) Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Practicum in Education and Training (Teaching Internship 2) Two credits; full year course – 12 Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Educational Aide Certificate 1

Education and Training Courses CT7240 PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) CT7240A PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course This course is designed for students to gain an understanding of the basic knowledge and skills essential to careers within the education and training career cluster. Students complete career investigations in education, administration, and support services. The student also explores options in the various fields of education based on interest area and explores the different levels of education-elementary, secondary, and post-secondary. CT7241 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT - 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course

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This course is an examination of human development across the lifespan with emphasis upon research, theoretical perspectives, and common physical, cognitive, emotional, and social developmental milestones. Components include prenatal care, newborns, children, adolescents, adults along with their care and protection at each level. CT7242 INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING (Teaching Internship 1) – 11th and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None Two credits; full-year course This course provides classroom instruction in combination with off-campus, unpaid internship in an educational setting through which the high school student gains an understanding of the challenges and potentials of careers in education. Students who successfully complete one year are eligible to receive an open contract to teach in RISD through the Grow Your Own Teacher Program. CT7243 PRACTICUM IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING (Teaching Internship 2) – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Instructional Practices in Education and Training Two credits, full-year course This course provides classroom instruction in combination with off-campus, unpaid internship in an educational setting through which the high school student gains an understanding of the challenges and potentials of careers in education. Students who successfully complete one year are eligible to receive an open contract to teach in RISD through the Grow Your Own Teacher Program. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Finance Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Accounting 1 One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Money Matters One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12

Accounting 2 One credit; full-year course – 11-12

Banking and Financial Services One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Securities and Investment One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Insurance Operations One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Booking Fundamentals Certificate

Finance Courses CT7220 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING AND FINANCE – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students gain knowledge and skills in the different aspects of the business world. Components of the course include the role of business in a global society, business ethics, economic systems, organized labor, costs and profits in finance, sales process, advertising, personal finance, and career opportunities. CT7302 BANKING AND FINANCIAL SERVICES – 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Students in this course develop knowledge and skills in the economical, financial, technological, international, social, and ethical aspects of banking to become competent consumers, employees, and entrepreneurs. Course components include the role of banking, banking processes and services, career requirements, bank security programs, banking laws and regulations, customer relationships, Ecompliance issues, federal regulations and banking equipment. CT7305 ACCOUNTING 1 – 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course 113

This course introduces students to accounting concepts, principles, and procedures and helps prepare them for advanced Accounting courses in postsecondary as well as enables them to conduct personal business. Components include; careers in the industry, accounting technology tools, accounting cycle, T accounts, work sheets, trial balances, cash control procedures, journals, taxes, receivable functions, inventory records, cash flow, laws and regulations. CT7306 ACCOUNTING 2 – 11th and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Accounting 1 One credit; full-year course This course is a continuation of Accounting I whereby students develop Intermediate Accounting skills in areas as financial statements, bond purchases, managerial accounting concepts, budget details, taxes, compliance and regulatory issues. CT7301 MONEY MATTERS – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Students will determine methods of achieving long-term financial goals through investment, tax planning, asset allocation, risk management, retirement and estate planning. CT7303 SECURITIES AND INVESTMENTS – 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite –None One-half credit; one semester course Students will describe and abide by laws and regulations in order to manage business operations and transactions in the securities industry; access, process, maintain, evaluate, and disseminate information to assist in making decisions common to the securities industry. CT7304 INSURANCE OPERATIONS – 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Students will describe and abide by laws and regulations in order to manage business operations and transactions in the insurance industry, access, process, maintain, evaluate, and disseminate information to assist in making decisions common to the insurance industry. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Government and Public Administration Principles of Government and Public Administration One credit; full-year course – 9-12

National Security Two credits; full-year course – 10-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Code Enforcement Officer Security Contractor Class B

Government and Public Administration Courses CT7320 PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course introduces students to foundations of governmental functions and career opportunities within the United States. Components of the course include; history of major political ideas and form of government, rights guaranteed by the US constitution, personal and civic responsibilities, voluntary participation in a democratic society, government and culture, government and geography, and comparisons between state and national governmental bodies. CT7321 NATIONAL SECURITY, 10th, 11th, and 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None Two credits; full-year course National Security introduces the students to the aspects of disaster management. Course components include simulation exercises related to natural disasters, man-made disaster, and terroristic events. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields. 115

Health Science Medical Terminology One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12 Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet

Principles of Health Science One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12 (All Campuses)

Health Science One credit; full-year course – 10-12 (All Campuses)

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Practicum in Health Science Two credits; full-year course – 11-12 Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet

World Health Research One credit; full-year course – 12 Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet

Practicum in Health Science 2 Two credits; full-year course – 12 Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet

Anatomy and Physiology One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses) Counts as fourth year science

Medical Microbiology One-half credit; one semester course – 11-12 (All campuses) Counts as fourth year science

Pathophysiology One-half credit; one semester course – 11-12 (All campuses) Counts as fourth year science

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Certified Coding Associate (CCA) Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) Certified Nurse Aide Emergency Care Attendant Emergency Medical Dispatcher Emergency Medical Technician-Basic Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) OSHA Career Safe Pharmacy Technician (CPhT) Phlebotomy Technician Sterile Processing and Distribution Technician

Health Science Courses CT7330 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (STANDARD) WT7330 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit, one semester course This course is designed to give an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, environmental, and informational systems of the health care industry. The course focuses on health careers, exploration, leadership development, ethical and legal responsibilities, the history of health care, and economics of health care as well as in specific areas as client care, safety, first aid, and CPR. This course also prepares the student for the transition to clinical or work-based experience in the health care field. 116

WT7331 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY – 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course A course designed to develop a working knowledge of the language of medicine. Students acquire wordbuilding skills by learning prefixes, suffixes, roots, and abbreviations. By relating terms to body systems, students identify proper use of words in a medical environment. Knowledge of medical terminology enhances the student’s ability to successfully secure employment or pursue advanced education in health care. CT7332 HEALTH SCIENCE – 10th, 11th, and 12th (STANDARD) WT7332 HEALTH SCIENCE – 10th, 11th, and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Principles of Health Science and Biology One credit; full-year course This course is designed to develop health care specific knowledge and skills utilizing the following components; effective communications leadership, ethical and legal responsibilities, disease prevention, client care, safety, career opportunities, first aid, and CPR. This course prepares the student for the transition to clinical or work based experiences in health care using classroom and pre-employment laboratory instruction. WT7333 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE – 11th, and 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisites – Health Science and Biology Two credits; full-year course A course designed to provide for the development of multi-occupational knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. In this course students will go through clinical rotations at an area hospital or health care facility. The rotation areas will include such departments as; radiology, emergency, physical therapy, surgery, and many others. In these rotations, students observe and obtain hand-on trainings from health professionals in real-life experiences. WT7334 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE 2 – 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisites – Practicum in Health Science Two credits; full-year course An occupationally specific course designed to provide knowledge and skill for certification or licensure in an allied health career. Students develop advanced clinical skill necessary for employment in the health care industry. The course may be taught by different methodologies such as pre-employment lab, cooperative education or an occupationally specific course with clinical training at area hospitals or other health care facility. CT4407 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY-HONORS – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science Academic core component requirement or concurrent enrollment One credit; full-year course In this class students will conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students will study a variety of topics that include: structures and functions of organs 117

and systems and their interactions with each other and their environment, and body processes that maintain homeostasis. Counts as fourth year science on the DAP, Recommended and RISD High School Programs. CT4409 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY – 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Science Academic Core Component requirement or concurrent enrollment One-half credit; one semester course In Medical Microbiology, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and equipment during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include the relationship between microbes and health maintenance, and the role of microbes in infectious diseases. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. CT4410 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Regular or Pre AP Biology, Regular or PreAP Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology One-half credit; one semester course In this course students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: mechanisms of pathology; process of pathogenesis study of human diseases; and effects of disease prevention and control. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. CT7338 WORLD HEALTH RESEARCH – 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Biology and Chemistry One credit; full-year course This course examines major world health problems and emerging technologies as solutions to these medical concerns. Components of the course include; synopsis of world major health problems, global health care, clinical engineering technologies, clinical trials, clinical research, role of the Food and Drug Administration, implication and limitations of vaccines, immune systems, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, technologies to prevent vital organ failure, culminating with a student project that addresses a major health problem. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Hospitality and Tourism Principles of Hospitality, Culinary Arts, and Tourism Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12

Principles of Hospitality and Tourism One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12

Restaurant Management Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12

Travel and Tourism Management One-half credit; one semester course – 9-12

Culinary Arts Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet Two credits; full-year course – 10-12

Hospitality Services One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Practicum in Culinary Arts Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Hospitality and Tourism Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Culinary Arts 2 Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet Two credits; full-year course – 12

Practicum in Hospitality and Tourism 2 Two credits; full-year course – 12

Food Science One credit; full-year course – 12 Counts as fourth year science

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Certified Culinary Specialist OSHA Career Safe Certification Serv Safe Certification

Hospitality and Tourism Courses CT7400 PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) CT7400A PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course This is an introductory course for the hospitality and tourism industry which includes lodging; travel and tourism; recreation, amusements, attractions, resorts, and restaurants. Components of the course include time management, career goals, technology software applications, teamwork skills, job safety, roles of the industry, and research skills applicable to the industry. WT7409 PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY, CULINARY ARTS, AND TOURISM – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course 119

This is an introductory course for the Hospitality and Culinary Arts industry. Components of the course include time management, teamwork skills, job safety, roles in the industry, food production, healthy food choices, nutrition, sanitation, basic skills and techniques involved in basic cookery while exploring career opportunities in the food service industry. WT7401 RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT – 9th 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course This course will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. Students will obtain extensive knowledge by experience with the following restaurant management components; team work units, technology information tools, health, safety requirements, professional ethics, effective communication, restaurant service techniques, and employability skills for the industry. WT7403 CULINARY ARTS – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Interview Two credits; full-year course Culinary Arts is designed to prepare students for the growing demands of accomplished chefs, sous-chef, and restaurant managers. While learning food preparation in a state-of-the-art commercial kitchen, students will also develop the necessary skills for food preparation and restaurant management. WT7404 PRACTICUM IN CULINARY ARTS – 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Culinary Arts and Interview Two credits, full-year course This course provides occupationally-specific hands on training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the area of food production, management, and services. Instruction includes operation and management of a foodservice establishment, marketing strategies, quantity food production skills, food presentation and service techniques, and technology applications in the foodservice industry. Students have the opportunity to exhibit their skills and knowledge in an onsite state of the art kitchen and café. WT7405 PRACTICUM IN CULINARY ARTS 2 – 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Practicum in Culinary Arts Two credits; full year course A continuation of Practicum in Culinary Arts. Students will continue with advanced culinary arts training either on site or on selected certified training sites in restaurants away from campus. CT7402 TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT – 9th 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course

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This course incorporates management principles and procedures for the travel and tourism industry as well as destination geography, airlines, international travel, cruising, travel by rail, lodging, recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts. Students experience a multitude of learning activities utilizing technology information tools in industry areas as safety, team-building skills, people behavior skills, employability and communication skills, reservation techniques, and create multimedia publications. CT7406 HOSPITALITY SERVICES – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course An advanced course designed to provide students additional technical preparation in hospitality related industries. Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or through non-paid internships. Course components include communication skills, career research, team and department roles, advanced food service skills, hotel service skills and advanced travel and tourism skills. CT7407 PRACTICUM IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None Two credits; full-year course This course is a two-hour block for non-paid internships which provides occupationally-specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the multifaceted hospitality services industry. Emphasized are career options; managing multiple family, community, and career roles; business procedures; laws; industry technology applications; safety; sanitation; customer relations; and other knowledge and skills for employment. CT7408 PRACTICUM IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 2 – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Practicum in Hospitality and Tourism Two credits; full-year course This course is a two-hour block for non-paid internships which provides occupationally-specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the multifaceted hospitality services industry. There will be continued emphasis from Hospitality Services & Tourism 1 for employment in lodging operations and food and beverage operations. Content includes an orientation to supportive operations such as sales and marketing, quantity food production, human resources, accounting, security, and engineering. CT4403 FOOD SCIENCE – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Three Units of Science (Prerequisite – Principles of Hospitality and Tourism) One credit; full-year course This course is the study of the nature of foods, the causes of deterioration, the principles underlying food processing, and the improvement of foods for the consuming public with 40 percent of instruction laboratory based. Components of the course include scientific methods and inquiry, food safety and microbiology, food chemical properties, food enzymes and properties, food additives, food basic nutrients, food groups, USDA guidelines, and food preservation. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program.

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CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Human Services Principles of Human Services One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Cosmetology 1 BHS and LHHS only Two credits; full-year course – 10-12

Dollars and Sense One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Child Development One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Cosmetology 2 BHS and LHHS only Two credits; full-year course – 11-12 Practicum in Human Services (Career Prep 1) Three credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Human Services 2 (Career Prep 2) Three credits; full-year course – 12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: CPR Certification Child Development Associate (CDA) Cosmetology Operator License OSHA Career Safe Red Cross Certificate

Human Services Courses CT7420 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) CT7420A PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES ALTERNATE* – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course will enable students to develop skills in the human service field in areas including counseling, mental health, family and community resources, personal care services as grooming, personal wellness, clothing selection, consumerism, child needs and development, family services, foods, nutrition, and career opportunities.

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CT7428 COSMETOLOGY 1 –10th, 11th, 12th (Berkner and Lake Highlands High Schools ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None Two credits; full-year course This course is part of a planned 1500 clock hour, two-year sequence of classroom and lab instruction. One thousand laboratory clock hours plus 500 academic hours awarded upon the completion of the laboratory hours en route to earning a state license and permit from TDLR. Instruction is designed to provide job-specific training for entry level employment in cosmetology careers. Instruction includes sterilization and sanitation processes, shampooing and rinsing hair, application of creams and color rinses, application of scalp and hair treatments, shaping and thinning hair, hair-styling, permanent waving, hair coloring, manicuring, facial massage and make-up. CT7429 COSMETOLOGY 2 –11th, 12th, (Berkner and Lake Highlands High Schools ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Cosmetology I Two credits; full-year course The second year continuance of Cosmetology I allowing students to earn the necessary hours to earn state license and permit from TDLR upon passing state examination and completing in class course hours. CT7421 DOLLARS AND SENSE–10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) CT7421A DOLLARS AND SENSE ALTERNATE* –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course This course focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, money management process, decision making skills, impact of technology, and preparation for human service careers. Major components of the course include; management of personal finances, consumer skills related to housing, relationships of the environments to family resources, relationships between the economic systems and consumer actions, and entrepreneurial endeavors, banking, budgeting, credit, and insurance. CT7422 LIFETIME NUTRITION AND WELLNESS –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) CT7422A LIFETIME NUTRITION AND WELLNESS ALTERNATE* –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course This course is designed to help students make informed choices that promote wellness in relation to sound nutrition. Units of study for this course include; principles of cooking, kitchen management skills, meal planning, nutrition, eating disorders, principles of digestion and metabolism ,diets, safety, sanitation, food management, and careers in nutrition. CT7424 CHILD DEVELOPMENT –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Child Development is designed to develop knowledge and skills related to the growth and care of children. The course begins with a focus on parenting skills and the impact of parenthood on the individual, while addressing concepts relating to prenatal and postnatal development and care from 124

infancy through elementary years. The course emphasizes parenting techniques for special needs children and addresses causes and prevention of child abuse. CT7426 PRACTICUM HUMAN SERVICES –11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) (Career Prep 1) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Student is 16 years old and coordinator approval Three credits; full-year course For college and non-college bound students, these courses offer experience in careers such as child care, food services, hospitality services, commercial/housekeeping services, fabrics and apparel, and home furnishings. Emphasis is placed on these careers through classroom instruction and practical experience in part-time, paid employment. The course of study includes employability skills, human relations, consumer responsibilities, money management and career exploration. CT7427 PRACTICUM HUMAN SERVICES 2 – 12th (OPTIONAL) (Career Prep 2) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Practicum Human Services 1 and coordinator approval Three credits; full-year course For college and non-college bound students, these courses offer experience in careers such as child care, food services, hospitality services, commercial/housekeeping services, fabrics and apparel, and home furnishings. Emphasis is placed on these careers through classroom instruction and practical experience in part-time, paid employment. The course of study includes employability skills, human relations, consumer responsibilities, money management and career exploration. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Information Technology Fundamentals of Computer Science One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Computer Science 1 1 credit; full-year course – 9-12

Principles of Information Technology One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Game Programming & Design 1 credit; full-year course – 9-12

Digital and Interactive Multimedia 1 credit; full-year course – 9-12

Computer Maintenance 1 credit; full-year course – 10-12

CISCO Internetworking Technologies 1 1 credit; full-year course – 10-12

TAIN: Digital and Interactive Multimedia 2 1 credit; full-year course – 10-12

Computer Technician 1 credit; full-year course – 11-12

CISCO Internetworking Technologies 2 1 credit; full-year course – 11-12

or Computer Science 1 - AP 1 credit; full-year course – 912

Computer Science 2 1 credit; full-year course – 10-12

Computer Science 3 1 credit; full-year course – 11-12

TAIN: Computer Science 4 1 credit; full-year course – 11-12

Web Design 1 credit; full-year course – 9-12

TAIN: Web Design 2 1 credit; full-year course – 10-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course–11-12 (All campuses)

LHHS/PHS Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 1 credit; full-year course – 912

Geographic Information Systems 1 (GIS) 1 credit; full-year course – 1012

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: A+ Certification CCENT (CISCO Certified Entry Network CCNA certification CST (Certified Computer Service Technician) JAVA Programming Certification (Instructor approval)

Information Technology Courses CT7500 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course prepares students to apply information technology skills to personal/workplace environments focusing on identification of hardware components, various software platforms, network systems, word processing, spread sheet and data base technology and presentation management technology along with web publishing techniques.

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CT7507 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands and Pearce High Schools Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course The purpose of this class is to introduce students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technology through academic study and applied instruction. Teachers and students will use a locally customized Geographic Information System (GIS) to learn about their local community using the same data, imagery and software that NASA uses. Students will participate in structured, applied learning exercises taken from existing data sources, as well as conduct new study of these data sources. CT7504 GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1 –10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands and Pearce High Schools Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Introduction to GIS One credit; full-year course The purpose of this class is to provide students with advanced instruction in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technology through focused academic study and continued emphasis on applied instruction that began in the introduction class. While student projects until this point were smaller in scope, this class will provide emphasis placed on special geographic projects dealing with the local community environment that will be planned, conducted, and presented by the student, with guidance from the instructor and community/industry mentors. CT7501 COMPUTER MAINTENANCE –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course focuses on the assembly and disassembly of modern computer systems for students desiring to work in the area of computer repair or technical support. The operation and check out of system board circuitry, computer architecture, and schematic diagrams will be presented. Students also will be trained in troubleshooting system abnormalities while integrating basic electronics and hardware needed to properly diagnose malfunctions. CT7502 COMPUTER TECHNICIAN –11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Computer Maintenance Two credits; full-year course Advanced course whereby students gain knowledge and skill in the area of computer technologies, including knowledge of electrical and electronic theory, computer principles, and components related to the installation, diagnosis, service, and repair of computer based technology systems. Major components include safety, tool identification and usage, microprocessor theory, storage processes, digital, analog, input and output theories, complex IT projects, security threats, service and maintenance, troubleshooting, complete work orders, estimations, read an interpret technical documents as schematics, drawings, charts, diagrams, technical manuals, and creates a personal portfolio of personal projects and accomplishments, as academics, volunteer experience, employment experience, awards, and certifications.

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CT7503 DIGITAL AND INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will design and create multimedia projects. Additional components of the course include; design and layout principles, lighting, color theory, typography, bitmap graphics, digital hardware, digital graphics, transfer video images, podcasting, streaming, linear and non linear animation, web page design, and project management such as a storyboard, and stage development. 7822 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INDEPENDENT STUDY: DIGITAL AND INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Digital and Interactive Multimedia One credit; full-year course Advanced study for students desiring to acquire advanced skills applicable to multimedia professions. Students determine problem to be solved, form hypotheses, and develop strategies for task. Students are expected to use research strategies and a variety of electronic formats, including text, audio, video, and graphics. 7831 WEB DESIGN – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students in this course will build interactive websites using current professional web development software. They will design and develop these websites featuring rich internet applications, XHTML coding, cascading style sheets, JavaScript, internet protocols, legal and ethical responsibilities, interactive multimedia animation and sound design, and alternate navigation techniques. Extensive website projects will include implementation of industry standards and code validation 7833 TECHOLOGY APPLICATIONS INDEPENDENT STUDY: WEB DESIGN 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Web Mastering and instructor recommendation; Computer Science 1 recommended One credit; full-year course Advanced study for students to create and edit www pages using web authoring tools. This course focuses on scripting, development of publishing strategies, information security, web animation, and the formation of digital technology into real products. Students work with district designers on campus web-site design and maintenance. CT7505 CISCO INTERNETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES 1 –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Algebra I One credit; full-year course Internetworking Technologies 1 is a course designed for students interested in obtaining skills and certifications in CISCO wireless networking for home and small businesses. The curriculum presents basic networking education to equip students with knowledge and skill that can be applied toward entry-level ICT careers.

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CT7506 CISCO INTERNETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES 2 – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CISCO Internetworking Technologies One credit; full-year course This course is designed for CISCO CCNT students to further their skills in both wireless and traditional internetworking systems. CCNA Explorations is composed of four areas: Network Fundamentals, Routing Protocols and Concepts, LAN Switching and Wireless, and accessing the WAN. 7807 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – none One credit; full-year course This course is designed as an entry level course for those students just beginning the study of computer science. Students will foster their creativity and innovation skills through opportunities to design, implement, and present solutions to real world problems. Students will create interactive stories, games, animations, algorithms, web pages, and effective user interfaces. Students will learn digital citizenship by researching current laws and regulations by practicing integrity and respect. Students also will gain an understanding of the principles of computer science through the study of technology operations and concepts. 7808 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Algebra 1 or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 1 One credit; full-year course Computer Science I will foster students' creativity and innovation by presenting opportunities to design, implement, and present meaningful programs. In an object-oriented environment students will design, code, test and debug computer programs to solve problems. Programming topics will include objectoriented design, data types, variables, methods, encapsulation, control structures, iteration, algorithms, logical and relational operators, random numbers and one-dimensional arrays. 7810 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 – AP, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-E Prerequisite – Geometry or concurrent enrollment in Geometry One credit; full-year course This course prepares students to take the Computer Science A exam. Students learn to develop programs utilizing various problem-solving skills and techniques. Topics include object-oriented programming, data structures, control structures, repetition, algorithm analysis, and a case study. This course counts as the fourth math requirement for the Recommended Program. This course will also count as the fourth year of math for the DAP. 7809 COMPUTER SCIENCE 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – AP Computer Science 1 and instructor recommendation One credit; full-year course Computer Science 2 increases the understanding of object-oriented programming started in Computer Science 1. Computer Science 2 includes topics needed for the AP Computer Science exam and can offer an alternative path to the AP Computer Science test. Topics include data structures, algorithm analysis, case study, inheritance, interfaces, regression, polymorphism and two-dimensional arrays. 129

7815 COMPUTER SCIENCE 3 –11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Computer Science 2 or Computer Science 1 - AP One credit; full-year course Computer Science 3 reinforces and increases the depth of understanding of the basic concepts of Computer Science. It covers advanced programming concepts as an extension of the topics taught in Computer Science 2 and AP Computer Science. This includes data structures, access methods, recursive programming, software development and building a strong logic foundation. 7834 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INDEPENDENT STUDY: COMPUTER SCIENCE 4–11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Computer Science 3, or Computer Science 2/Computer Science 1 AP with instructor approval. One credit; full-year course This course expands Computer Science 3 with the advanced study of object oriented programming. Possible topics include advanced graphics, new computer languages, server-based applications and interactive web applications. Large projects, project planning and team programming will be a major emphasis. Students in this course may elect to complete the Java Programming Certification with instructor approval. 7827 GAME PROGRAMMING AND DESIGN – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Algebra 1 One credit; full-year course This course will provide students with opportunities to design, implement, and present meaningful programs through a variety of media. Through data analysis, students will include the identification of task requirements, plan search strategies, and use programming concepts to access, analyze, and evaluate information to design games. Students will create a storyboard, write programs, create backgrounds, sound mechanics, write game rules, evaluate and test the finished game project. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of artificial intelligence whereby developing and implementing artificial intelligence. Students will also explore and understand safety, legal, cultural, and societal issues relating to digital citizenship. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Lake Highlands High School Only Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security One credit; full- year course – 9-12

Law Enforcement 1 One credit; full- year course – 10-12

Security Services One credit; full- year course – 11-12

Correctional Services One credit; full- year course – 11-12

Forensic Science One credit; full- year course – 12 (All campuses) Counts as fourth year science

Law Enforcement 2 One credit; full- year course – 11-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Practicum in Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Two credits; full- year course – 11-12

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Correctional Officer Security Contractor Class B Security Officer 911 Certificate

Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Courses CT7520 PRINCIPLES OF LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITY – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full- year course This course introduces students to professions in law enforcement, security, corrections, and fire and emergency services. Components of the course include safety, legal responsibilities, interagency cooperation, philosophical development of criminal law, roles of the professional, roles and functions of courts systems, roles and functions of the correctional system, and roles and functions of private security agencies and fire protection services. CT7521 LAW ENFORCEMENT 1 –10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course A course designed as a study of the history and philosophy of criminal justice and its ethical considerations. Crime is defined. Its nature and impact are explored. Instruction includes an overview of 131

the criminal justice system, law enforcement and the court systems, a study of prosecution and defense, trial processes, and corrections and penal systems. This course can be part of a Tech-Prep coherent sequence in Criminal Justice with appropriate approval. CT7522 LAW ENFORCEMENT 2 – 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Law Enforcement I One credit; full- year course A continuation of Law Enforcement I featuring the following components; Use of telecommunication (911 emergency communications) equipment, testimony presentations, anger management techniques, domestic violence, civil law enforcement, alcohol and beverage laws, crowd management, transportation, motor vehicle accidents, managing explosives, infrastructure protection, and new emerging technologies in law enforcement. CT4404 FORENSIC SCIENCE – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Biology and Chemistry One credit; full-year course Forensic Science uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse, neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Components of this course include; critical thinking skills, safety, systematic investigations, laboratory procedures, fingerprinting, DNA testing, ballistic and bullet marks, anthropology, decomposition, serology and toxicology tests. Counts as fourth year science for DAP, Recommended, and RISD High School Program. CT7524 SECURITY SERVICES – 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course provides instruction in the history and philosophy of security; ethical considerations, the nature and impact of security; and an overview of security systems, agencies, and practices. The concepts and skills for security officer plus Texas’ rules and regulations, security specialist training and certification, organization of personnel, risk analysis and surveys, security applications, security problems, and the future of security services. CT7523 CORRECTIONAL SERVICES – 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students prepare for certifications required for employment as a correctional officer. Components include history of correctional services, ethics, safety, first aid, infection control, laws of correctional systems, individuals with disabilities, conflict resolution skills, and conflict management skills. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course 132

This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields. CT7525 PRACTICUM IN LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITY – 11th, and 12th (Lake Highlands High School only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite --Law Enforcement 1 or Law Enforcement 2 Two credits; full-year course This is an occupationally designed course whereby students in either an on-the-job training experience, or in a specific laboratory training area on site whereby students learn the functions, safety, application of tools, equipment, and technologies in the specific fields of Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security. Students may be enrolled in paid or non-paid on-the-job training experiences, as well as non paid internships in the various related industries.

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Manufacturing Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering and Robotics One credit; full year course – 9-12

Precision Metals/Manufacturing RHS and LHHS One credit; full year course – 10-12

Manufacturing Engineering LHHS only Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Practicum in Manufacturing, Engineering & Robotics RHS only Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Advanced Precision Metals/Manufacturing RHS and LHHS Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: NCCER Industrial Course Certificate OSHA Career Safe

Manufacturing Courses CT7540 PRINCIPLES OF MANUFACTURING/ ENGINEERING AND ROBOTICS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course provides an overview and beginning insight to the various fields of science, technology, manufacturing, engineering, and mathematics, and their interrelationships. Students will be provided hands on lab activities utilizing a variety of engineering to manufacture robotics platforms and other manufacturing projects using physical and mechanical systems. The students will also participate in a team-based culminating robotic project while maintaining and engineering notebook including design processes, development and testing, project end presentation and demonstration. CT7541 PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) WT7541 PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course prepares students basic knowledge of the metal trades industry and its relationships with engineering systems as robotics, electronics, and engineering design. Major components include safety, identification and use of hand and power tools for the industry, design and interpret blue prints and schematic drawings, mathematical applications of measurement, basic numerical control operations, and developing proficiencies in cutting processes, lathe procedures, and mill procedures, basic welding and cutting while designing projects displaying knowledge and skills of the industry.

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CT7544 ADVANCED PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 11th, 12th (Richardson High School Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet and Lake Highlands) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Precision Metals Manufacturing Two credits; full-year course This course is designed to provide skills in the areas of safety, blueprint reading, mechanical drawing, engineering design, metallurgy, hydraulics, precision measurements, shop mathematics, power and hand tools, utilizing state of the art equipment and technology. Formats may range from full metal labs including production mill, lathes, welders to Computer Integrated Manufacturing components included in virtual and enhanced robotic precision metal virtual simulations and real CNC and robotic control metal manufactured devices. CT7542 MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING – 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School Only) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Concepts of Engineering Technology; Engineering Design and Presentation Two credits; full-year course In this course students gain advance knowledge and skill in the application, technology, design, production, and assessment of systems, products, services and how these skills are applied to manufacturing with robotic systems. Major components of the course include software skills, safety, logic controls, electronic control devices, computer numerical control operations, mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems, quality control systems, hand and power tool identification and operation, whereby enabling the student to transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant hands on activities in an advanced robotic manufacturing setting. WT7543 PRACTICUM IN MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND ROBOTICS – 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Robotics and Automation, Teacher Interview and approval Two credits; full-year course The practicum course is a capstone experience where students continue in advanced instruction of science, technology, engineering, robot and systems design. Students will create complex robotic systems and functions utilizing advanced software, CNC precision metal machining and design, computer aided design software, and advanced manufacturing system utilizations. Autodesk certifications/Student electronics Certifications, OSHA Career Safe certifications CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) WT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (Richardson Arts, Law & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields. 135

Marketing Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Fashion Marketing One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Sports and Entertainment Marketing One-half credit; one semester course – 10-12

Marketing Dynamics Three credits; full-year course – 11-12 (Career Prep 1)

Practicum in Dynamics Three credits; full-year course – 12 (Career Prep 2)

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: National Professional Certificate in Customer Service

Marketing Courses CT7220 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND FINANCE - 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students gain knowledge and skill in the different aspects of the business world. Components of the course include the role of business in a global society, business ethics, economic systems, organized labor, costs and profits in finance, sales process, advertising, personal finance, and career opportunities. CT7602 SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course In this course students explore the intriguing world of sports and entertainment from the perspective of Marketing. Sports and entertainment marketing cover topics such as college and amateur sports, professional sports, licensing products, public images, and marketing entertainment. Students will design marketing strategies, products, and promotional activities for the sports and entertainment industries.

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CT7601 FASHION MARKETING – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One-half credit; one semester course Explore the marketing business world through the eyes of the fashion industry. Students will get the best of both worlds in this one semester elective course as they learn basic fashion marketing concepts, product selection, branding, pricing strategies, advertising, and promotions. Through exciting projects based on real world scenarios, students receive and understanding of how fashion marketing has changed over the decades, along with learning interesting facts about their favorite designers and their role in fashion today. CT7603 MARKETING DYNAMICS (Career Preparation 1) – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Student is 16 years old and Coordinator approval Three credits; full-year course Marketing Dynamics instruction is designed to meet the needs of persons who desire to enter and improve their knowledge and ability in occupations involving one or more of the marketing functions. Students are employed in retail businesses in areas such as sales, warehousing, or customer services, in addition to receiving daily classroom instruction. Classroom studies include human relations, distribution systems, marketing and communication, management principles, business policies, business law, etc. CT7604 PRACTICUM IN MARKETING DYNAMICS, (Career Preparation 2) – 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Marketing Dynamics and Coordinator approval Three credits; full-year course This is an advanced course of marketing which includes the study of business management and small business ownership through classroom instruction and on-the-job experiences. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Concepts of Engineering, Robotics, and Technology One credit; full year course – 9-12

Berkner High Electronics

Lake Highlands

One credit; full year course – 1012

Advanced Electronics Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Practicum in STEM Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Robotics and Automation One credit; full year course – 1012

Practicum in STEM Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Precision Metals/ Manufacturing One credit; full year course – 10-12

Engineering Design and Presentation One credit; full year course – 10-12

Advanced Engineering Design and Presentation Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Manufacturing Engineering Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Practicum in STEM Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Practicum in STEM Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Berkner High STEM Project Lead the Way Introduction to Engineering Design One credit; full year course – 9

Principles of Technology 1 One credit; full year course – 11-12 RHS Robotics Magnet

Advanced Precision Metals/Manufacturing Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Concepts of Engineering, Robotics, and Technology One credit; full year course – 9-12

Engineering Design and Presentation One credit; full year course 10-12

Principles of Engineering One credit; full year course – 10

Robotics and Automation One credit; full year course – 1012

Computer Integrated Manufacturing/Engineering One credit; full year course – 11

Engineering Design and Problem Solving One credit; full year course – 12 Counts as fourth year science

All Campuses

Pearce High

Digital Electronics/ Engineering One credit; full year course – 12

Precision Metals/ Manufacturing One credit; full year course – 1012

Computer Science 1 or Computer Science 1 - AP One credit; full year course – 9-12

Electronics/Robotics One credit; full year course – 10-12 Engineering Mathematics One credit; full year course – 12 Counts as fourth year math

Practicum in Manufacturing, Engineering & Robotics Two credits; full year course – 11-12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Advanced Precision Metals/Manufacturing Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

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Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: Autodesk Certification SET Student Electronics Certification OSHA Career Safe Certifications

Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Courses CT7621 CONCEPTS OF ENGINEERING, ROBOTICS AND TECHNOLOGY – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course provides students with an introductory overview into the various fields of science, engineering, mathematics, as related to robotic and technology systems. Major components include design software, safety, identification of tools and usage, teamwork, system modeling and designs, controls, basic automation systems, applications and relations in physical and mechanical systems, process control systems, culminating in a team-based project while assuming different roles as a team member, maintaining an engineering notebook, testing, and presenting the project. CT7541 PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) WT7541 PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law, and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course This course prepares students basic knowledge of the metal trades industry and its relationships with engineering systems as robotics, electronics, and engineering design. Major components include safety, identification and use of hand and power tools for the industry, design and interpret blue prints and schematic drawings, mathematical applications of measurement, basic numerical control operations, and developing proficiencies in cutting processes, lathe procedures, and mill procedures, basic welding and cutting while designing projects displaying knowledge and skills of the industry. CT7544 ADVANCED PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) WT7544 ADVANCED PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 11th, 12th (Richardson Arts, Law and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Precision Metals Manufacturing Two credits; full-year course This course is designed to provide skills in the areas of safety, blueprint reading, mechanical drawing, engineering design, metallurgy, hydraulics, precision measurements, shop mathematics, power and hand tools, utilizing state of the art equipment and technology. Formats may range from full metal labs including production mill, lathes, welders to Computer Integrated Manufacturing components included in virtual and enhanced robotic precision metal virtual simulations and real CNC and robotic control metal manufactured devices. CT7631 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION – 10th, 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) WT7631 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School Arts, Law, and Sciences Magnet ONLY) 139

DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Principles of Engineering or Concepts of Engineering One credit; full-year course Students will be exposed to various facets of robotic and automation technology by using various robotics platforms, system components, and programming software. Components include safety, hand and power tools, technology systems, torque and power factors, simulated software, gear ratio, basic electronics, design processes, mathematical controls, robotic arm control, automated processes, culminating in a team built robotic prototype or automated induced completed product. WT7543 PRACTICUM IN MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND ROBOTICS – 11th, 12th (Richardson High School Arts, Law, and Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Robotics and Automation, Teacher Interview and approval Two credits; full-year course The practicum course is a capstone experience where students continue in advanced instruction of science, technology, engineering, robot and systems design. Students will create complex robotic systems and functions utilizing advanced software, CNC precision metal machining and design, computer aided design software, and advanced manufacturing system utilizations. Autodesk certifications/Student electronics Certifications, OSHA Career Safe certifications. CT7622 ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PRESENTATION – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students enrolled in this course will demonstrate knowledge and skills of the process of drafting design as it applies to engineering fields using multiple software applications and tools necessary to produce and present working, drawing, solid model renderings, prototypes. Components of the course include safety and proper work habits, sketching, engineering design methodologies, component design, multi view projections, auxiliary vies, section vies, geometric designs, triangulation methods, piercing points, intersection of planes, file structure and management, potential patent product design, and prototype preparation. CT7625 ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PRESENTATION – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Engineering Design and Presentation Two credits; full-year course This course is a continuation of Engineering Design and Presentation whereby students continue the use of advanced prototypes and three dimensional designs utilizing a variety of advanced software programs and peripheral hardware equipment as 3 Dimensional Printers, mills, and lathes. Components include teamwork processes, safety for the industry, project documentation, block diagrams, detailed part drawings, electronic schematics, sub-assembly diagrams, and prepare advanced development drawings with usage of prototype hardware systems and devices. CT7623 ELECTRONICS – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School and Berkner High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course

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Students in this course will be able to demonstrate knowledge and applications of circuits, electronic measurements, and basic electronic implementation. Major course components include safety, identification and use of hand and power tools, technical knowledge and terms of electronics, electronic theory, electric motors, generators, transformers, circuits, troubleshooting, and improvement of product design, patents, and building prototypes. Students will have the opportunity to train on NIDA instruction suite the standard for industrial trainings as well as have opportunities to earn certifications for the industry as SET Student Electronics Technician Certification and OSHA career safe. (Special Note – Students have the option of selecting one of three Electronics courses for state credit; Electronics CT7623, Electronics/Robotics CT7627, or Electronics/Automotive CT7705 dependent upon the student’s choice of career pathway. If a student enrolls in more than one of these courses, only local credit will be given for the selected additional course or courses). CT7627 ELECTRONICS/ROBOTICS – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School and Berkner High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Note description for Electronics, but adding additional and specialized components specific to robot engineering as automated systems, sensors, and advanced control loops. (Special Note – Students have the option of selecting one of three Electronics courses for state credit; Electronics CT7623, Electronics/Robotics CT7627, or Electronics/Automotive CT7705 dependent upon the student’s choice of career pathway. If a student enrolls in more than one of these courses, only local credit will be given for the selected additional course or courses). CT7624 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS – 11th, 12th (Richardson High School and Berkner High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Electronics Two credits; full-year course Students in this course will demonstrate knowledge and applications of advanced circuits, electrical measurement, and electrical implementation used in the electronics and computer industry. Components of the course include safety, team projects, project documentations, advanced troubleshooting, industry schematics, AC and DC circuits, prototypes, and “green energy and environmental technology, (Home Digital Technology Integrations whereby students gain the DHTI + industry certification. CT7542 MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING – 11th, 12th (Lake Highlands High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Concepts of Engineering Technology; Engineering Design and Presentation Two credits; full-year course In this course students gain advance knowledge and skill in the application, technology, design, production, and assessment of systems, products, services and how these skills are applied to manufacturing with robotic systems. Major components of the course include software skills, safety, logic controls, electronic control devices, computer numerical control operations, mechanical, fluid, electrical, and thermal systems, quality control systems, hand and power tool identification and operation, whereby enabling the student to transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant hands on activities in an advanced robotic manufacturing setting.

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CT7629 PRACTICUM IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Concepts of Engineering Technology, Engineering Design and Presentation Two credits; full-year course This practicum course is a paid or unpaid capstone experience for students participating in coherent sequence of career and technical education courses in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics career cluster. Major components of the course include; professional standards required by the industry, critical thinking and problem solving, oral and written communication skills, leadership and teamwork skills, safety for the industry. Students will have the opportunity to experience on the job trainings in either at school laboratories or in actual away from campus training sites either paid or unpaid representing training in the areas of Engineering/Technology/Science and Mathematics fields. CT4406 PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY-1 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Two credits of Science (Regular/PreAP Biology, and IPC or Regular/PreAP Chemistry), Algebra 1; recommended: Algebra 2 (or concurrent); cannot be taken following the successful completion of Physics. One credit; full year course Principles of Technology is an applied physics course, taught in a Technology Education lab, designed to provide a study in forces, work, rate, resistance, energy, power and force transformations as applied to mechanical, fluid, thermal, and electrical energy that comprise simple and technological devices and equipment. The course reinforces mathematical applications a student needs to understand in order to apply the principles being studied. Students taking Principles of Technology will receive 1.0 science credit in the place of Physics for the Recommended and High School Programs. This course does not count as a science course on the DAP. MT4405 ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PROBLEM SOLVING – 12th (Berkner High School STEM ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Geometry, Algebra II, Chemistry, Physics One credit, full-year course This course is designed to stimulate students’ ingenuity, intellectual talents, and practical skills in devising solution to engineering design problems. Students use the engineering design process cycle to investigate, design, plan, create, and evaluate solutions. Components of the course include; engineering design problem and solutions, critical thinking skills, engineering careers, implications of technology, math models to develop solutions, relevant chemical, biological, mechanical, electrical and physical properties of materials, open and closed loop systems, culminating in an engineering design project. This course will count as a fourth year science credit for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a science credit on the RISD High School Program. MT3403 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS – 12th (Berkner High School STEM ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – 3 credits in math One credit; full-year course This is a course whereby students use a variety of mathematical methods and models to analyze problems involving data acquisition, spatial applications, electrical measurement, manufacturing processes, materials engineering, mechanical drives, pneumatics, process control systems, quality control, and robotics with computer programming. Other components include structural design, 142

trigonometry in spatial engineering, tensile strength analysis, compression testing, air volumes, mass and volumetric flow rate, precision measurement tools, safety for the industry, and use of engineering methodologies to build prototypes. This course will count as a fourth math course for the DAP and Recommended Program and as a math credit for the RISD High School Program.

Project Lead the Way MT7641 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN – 9th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner STEM Academy ONLY) Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Using computer modeling software, students learn the process of product design. They solve design problems as they develop, create, and analyze product models. MT7640 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING – 10th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner STEM Academy ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Introduction to Engineering Design One credit; full-year course Students explore technology systems and manufacturing processes to find out how math, science, and technology help people. MT7642 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING –12th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner STEM Academy ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Principles of Engineering; Intro to Engineering Design One credit; full-year course Teaches applied logic through work with electronic circuitry, which students also construct and test for functionality. MT7643 COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING – 11th (Berkner High School STEM ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Principles of Engineering, Intro to Engineering Design One credit; full year course Enhances computer modeling skills by applying principles of robotics and automation to the creation of models and three-dimensional designs. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Richardson High School Only Principles of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Automotive Technology Two credits; full-year course – 10-12

and/or

and/or

Energy, Power, and Transportation Systems One credit; full-year course – 9-12

Electronics/Automotive One credit; full-year course – 10-12

Advanced Automotive Technology Two credits; full-year course – 11-12

Practicum in Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Two credits; full-year course – 12

Problems and Solutions – Career Cluster Development One credit; full-year course – 11-12 (All campuses)

Industry Certifications/Licenses available in this Cluster: ASE OSHA Career Safe

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Courses CT7700 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND LOGISTICS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Students will learn the basics knowledge and skills in the application, design, and production of technology as it related to the transportation, distribution, and logistics industries. Components of the course include all aspects of transportation careers, concepts of marketing factors, history of the industry, structure of the transportation industry, world transportation concerns, workplace ethics, safe work practices, and the utilization of information technology tools specific with the transportation industry.

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CT7701 ENERGY, POWER & TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Introductory course for Automotive Technology. Components include safety, identification and use of hand and power tools for the industry, identification of major motor vehicle components, customer relations, ethics, perform precision measurements, pre diagnosis of vehicular system malfunctions, read and interpret parts catalogues, service repair manuals and factory specified bulletins. CT7705 ELECTRONICS/AUTOMOTIVE – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Note description for Electronics but electronic specialization for the automotive industry. Students will have the opportunity to train on advanced virtual software and electrical training software and hardware with the capstone project of the class to design and build a small electric car. (Special Note – Students have the option of selecting one of three Electronics courses for state credit; Electronics CT7623, Electronics/Robotics CT7627, or Electronics/Automotive CT7705 dependent upon the student’s choice of career pathway. If a student enrolls in more than one of these courses, only local credit will be given for the selected additional course or courses). CT7702 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY – 10th, 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None Two credits; full-year course Instruction is designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment in the automotive engine repair and service career field. First-year instruction emphasizes use of repair manuals, service and/or repair of basic automobile components—fuel systems, engines, emission controls, power trains, chassis, electrical systems, brakes, heating and air conditioning. CT7703 ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY – 11th, 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Automotive Technology Two credits; full-year course Instruction is designed to provide advanced occupational specific training for employment in the automotive technology and service career field. Second year instruction includes more specific laboratory experiences utilizing client or lab provided vehicles and advanced hands on experience in the areas of fuel systems, engines, power trains, emission systems, chassis, electrical systems, brakes, heating and air conditioning, manual transmissions, and suspension systems. Other components include customer relations, diagnostics, ethics, safety, cost estimations, interpretations of parts catalogues, online service repair agencies, and use of factory specified bulletins. CT7704 PRACTICUM IN TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND LOGISTICS – 12th (Richardson High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Advanced Automotive Technology Two credits; full-year course 145

Students receive on the job training in paid or non paid internships located either in the campus lab or in job experiences off campus whereby developing advanced knowledge and skills required to obtain additional certificates and advanced training in the transportation industry. CT7110 PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS—CAREER CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT – 11th, and 12th (All campuses) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – CTE Sequence Coursework in any cluster area One credit; full-year course This is a research based course for students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to career cluster interest, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, matched with a mentor from the industry or business, professional community, compile findings, utilize equipment, to compile findings, and present their findings in an end project to experts in the fields.

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OTHER ELECTIVES Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

AVID PROGRAM (ADVANCEMENT VIA INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATION) COURSES 9101 AVID – 9th (STANDARD) 9102 AVID – 10th (STANDARD) 9103 AVID – 11th (STANDARD) 9104 AVID – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – application and acceptance into the program, simultaneous enrollment in at least one Pre-AP course and/or AP course One credit; full year course The AVID class addresses key elements in college preparation: academic survival skills, college entry skills, tutorials, motivational activities, and career and college exploration. Additionally students will improve their oral communication skills through presentation and Socratic Seminar, participate in writing to learn activities, including note taking, learning logs, and essay writing, prepare for college entrance examinations, including the SAT and ACT, and complete and present a multi-grade level portfolio of their work.

INTERNSHIP COURSES CT7111 Professional Internship Program (PIP) – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E, Rec-E Prerequisite- Teacher Recommendation; student application; interview with the PIP Coordinator; acceptance is determined in the spring of the junior year. One Credit; one semester only This course is designed for high school seniors who have excelled in academic performance and have demonstrated leadership abilities. Students are given the opportunity to explore specific career interests by being matched with a mentor from the business or professional community in non paid internship training at various sites in the local community. Students develop a project on a topic related to their career internship by using scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. Students must provide their own transportation to and from the internship. The course is designed to provide students an opportunity to earn one advanced measure for the Distinguished Achievement Program.

JOURNALISM COURSES 1705 JOURNALISM 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course Journalism 1 opens the door to learning writing and producing skills for print and broadcast media. This survey course teaches writing styles from news to advertising, and what each has to contribute to the 147

world of a free press. Layout and design techniques, photojournalism’s role in the news, and the history of mass media are just a few of the many other topics explored in this introductory class to the world of journalism. 1701 PHOTOJOURNALISM – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course The skills involved in taking that “picture worth a thousand words” are the focus of this class. Photography for publications in a digital world involves learning camera and lighting techniques, as well as composition rules and computer processing and enhancing. This course offers the chance to learn all these competencies with a hands-on experience. 1708 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK PRODUCTION 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Recommendation of course instructor One credit; full year course While creating a memory book that will last a lifetime, yearbook staff members are learning about magazine style layout and design, writing and editing for publication, working cooperatively with peers and adults, finance, organizational skills, and photojournalism. This course culminates in an end-of-year product with the publication of the school’s yearbook. This course counts as *Part B+ 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1712 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK PRODUCTION 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production 1 One credit; full year course An extension of Yearbook 1, students will also serve as section editors, peer tutors to beginning staff members and contribute to the yearbook’s decision making process. This course counts as a *Part B+ 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1713 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK PRODUCTION 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production 2 One credit; full year course An extension of Yearbook 2, students will also serve as editors, peer tutors to beginning staff members and contribute to the yearbook’s decision making processes. This course counts as a [Part B] 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1718 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK PRODUCTION 4 – INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN JOURNALISM 2 – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production 3 One credit; full year course An extension of Yearbook 3, students will also serve as editors, peer tutors to beginning staff members and contribute to the yearbook’s decision making processes. This course counts as a [Part B] 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only.

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1709 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Journalism 1 or recommendation of course instructor One credit; full year course Students will experience hands-on training in journalism as a member of the school’s newspaper staff. Newspaper 1 students investigate, interview, write, design, and digitally layout each issue while also learning about advertising and circulation campaigns. Besides honing better writing skills, newspaper staff members learn advanced desktop publishing techniques and build self-confidence. This course counts as [Part B] 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1710 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION 2 – 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Adv. Journalism: Newspaper Production 1 or recommendation of course instructor One credit; full year course Emphasis in this course is on in-depth reporting and advanced layout and design techniques. Students are involved in advertising and circulation campaigns. The course is one in which students cooperate with other participating persons and organizations in developing a newspaper. It is an extension of Advanced Journalism: Newspaper Production 1. This course counts as a [Part B] 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1715 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION 3 – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Adv. Journalism: Newspaper Production 2 or recommendation of course instructor One credit; full year course An extension of Newspaper 2, students serve as editors, advertising managers, or advanced reporters. This course counts as a [Part B] 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1717 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION 4 – INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN JOURNALISM 1 – 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – Advanced Journalism: Newspaper Production 3 One credit; full year course An extension of Newspaper 3, students will serve as editors or advanced reporters, while producing the student newspaper. This course counts as a [Part B] 1.0 Technology Applications credit for the RISD High School Program only. 1716 BROADCAST JOURNALISM – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) (Richardson Arts, Law, & Sciences Magnet ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full year course The course emphasizes the nature and evolution of radio and television broadcasting. Students will explore the legal and ethical responsibilities of non-print media and analyze this form of news coverage.

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COLLEGE TRANSITION COURSES 9070 COLLEGE TRANSITION – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) One half credit; one semester 9071 COLLEGE TRANSITION – 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) One credit; full-year course M9071 COLLEGE TRANSITION – 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner High School ONLY) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course The College Transition course is designed to equip RISD students with 21st Century skills and abilities that are required to be active and successful learners in high school and college. This course examines research-based learning acquisition strategies that are proven to enhance and support academic success in a rigorous post-secondary educational setting. With the increased emphasis on College and Career Readiness, a focus emerges on interactive learning. Students will participate in activities such as goal setting, active reading, note taking, ACT and SAT preparation and deep research projects. In addition, students will be required to prepare and submit three college applications and to apply for five scholarships. Teachers will scaffold instruction on how to navigate the transition from the high school to college via classroom examinations, time management strategies, self-advocacy techniques, FAFSA, TAFSA and personal responsibility development. RISD students emerging from this course will be equipped and prepared for their global future. 9074 ADVANCED STUDY SKILLS – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Enrollment in 3 or more AP and/or Dual Credit Courses No credit; one semester In preparation and support for AP and Dual Credit courses, self motivated students may take this course to assist with study time. Students will be assigned to a teacher and/or computer lab to work on multiple advanced courses. 9075 PSAT TEAM – 11th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – by invitation from PSAT teacher No credit; fall semester only The PSAT Team is an intensive educational experience that prepared students for the PSAT administered in October of the junior year. The rigorous instruction is designed to improve both verbal and quantitative test scores. An integral component, requirement of this course is attendance at a 20 hour summer seminar and four Saturday sessions preceding the October PSAT administration. After PSAT exam in October, SAT and ACT prep will finish the semester. 9076 SAT/ACT PREP CLASS – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Passed all sections of EOC/TAKS No credit; one semester The SAT/ACT Prep Class is available to any Junior or Senior to receive support for SAT/ACT. Test taking skills and specific test items are emphasized for both the verbal and quantitative sub-tests. An ACT component will also be included. Purchase of the SAT Study Guide is required.

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ROTC COURSES PE5337 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC 1 – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner High School ONLY) 5401 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC 2 –10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner High School ONLY) 5402 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC 3 –11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner High School ONLY) 5403 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC 4 –12th (OPTIONAL) (Berkner High School ONLY) DAP-C, E; Rec-C, E; HS-C, E Prerequisite – None One credit; full-year course Army JROTC focuses on the development of better citizens and leaders in an interactive environment. Students learn to appreciate ethical values, develop leadership potential, think logically and communicate effectively both orally and in writing. While learning to be members of a team, the student also learns about the importance of physical fitness and will develop mental management abilities.

LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS COURSES 9001 LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM (STUDENT LEADERSHIP) – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Application, teacher recommendation and interview One credit; full year course This course is designed for high school juniors and seniors who are presently in leadership positions or who aspire to these positions. These students have excelled in academic performance and have demonstrated some leadership abilities in their school career. Students will be given training and practice goal setting, project planning, team building, and evaluation to help them develop their potential as leaders. 9072 RICHARDSON YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM – 11th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Application and limited enrollment Non-credit; full year course (does not count toward graduation but appears on the student’s AAR) Leadership Richardson Alumni Association, in cooperation with the Richardson ISD offers this non-credit to provide leadership training to RISD 11th graders in order to develop an awareness and understanding of the dynamics of the highly complex, rapidly changing technological society we live in. During a period of six months, participants will spend one afternoon per month (school-excused absence, but work must be made up) at various businesses in the Richardson area. Participants are involved in activities designed to enhance their leadership and team building skills. Through interaction with a wide range of respected business and civic leaders, the participants develop an understanding of our community needs and the challenges facing them as future leaders. Upcoming juniors are eligible to apply in the spring of their sophomore year. See counselor for application.

LIFE SKILLS FOR PARENTING STUDENTS PARENTING EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL AGE PARENTS 1&2 – 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Request services through the home school; must be a pregnant or a parenting student (see counselor) One-half credit or one credit; one semester or one full year in 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th grades This state-mandated program is designed to serve those Richardson Independent School District students who are pregnant and parenting. The program is structured to provide students with a 151

supportive setting in which they have the opportunity to continue their studies and to participate in prenatal class instruction and pregnancy related services.

PEER HELPING EDUCATION COURSES 5535 PALS 1 (PEER HELPING) – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Advisory Committee Approval One-half credit, one semester; or one credit, full year course This course is a program in which high school students selected by their peers are trained to work as peer facilitators with students on their own campus, and/or in feeder junior high and elementary schools. Students are trained in a variety of helping skills which will enable them to assist other students in having a more positive and productive school experience. The course provides practical knowledge and skills for addressing dropouts, substance abuse, violence prevention, depression, absenteeism, and other areas of concern. 5536 PALS 2 (PEER MEDIATION) – 11th, 12th (STANDARD) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Approval of course instructor. One-half credit, one semester; or one credit, full year course PALS 2 incorporates all of the TEKS of PALS 1 with emphasis on peer mediation; conflict resolution; violence prevention; and community service. The peer mediators will assist feeder schools in the implementation and management of peer mediation teams. This course provides practical knowledge and skills as well as actual field experience for students potentially interested in careers in dispute resolution and other helping professions. 5537 PEER COACHING FOR STUDENTS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (OPTIONAL) DAP-E; Rec-E; HS-E Prerequisite – Approval of course instructor One-half or one credit; maximum one credit Peer Coaching for Students (PCS) is designed to promote an inclusive educational environment for atrisk and special education inclusion students. Peer Coaching for Students is a course where positive peers make a positive impact in their fellow peer’s lives. It provides students the opportunity to develop leadership skills. The general and special education teachers collaborate and develop learning strategies, activities, and projects for students with disabilities based from student’s individualized education plans to master the TEKS. The peer coaches obtain initial training in confidentiality for one week and continuous mini sessions throughout the semester. Peer coaches will assist general and special education teachers to develop innovative ways to learn. Ultimately the peer coach strives to motivate fellow students to reach for higher goals.

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SPECIAL EDUCATION

SPECIAL EDUCATON COURSES Placement in any Special Education class is dependent on eligibility and the decision of the Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) Committee. Placement and course selections are reviewed, at a minimum, on an annual basis. Specific goals and objectives are developed based on the student’s present levels of academic and functional performance Modified Courses Modified courses are aligned with general education curriculum in the corresponding grade levels. Students are exposed to the same Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as their general education peers with changes to student expectations and levels of mastery. Modified coursework differs from non-modified coursework in instructional delivery, pacing, and assessment. It is the responsibility of the ARD committee to determine student placement in modified coursework, as well as determination of the appropriate state assessment in each specific subject area. High School modified courses prepare students for success in the corresponding Modified End of Course Exam (EOC) and/or to satisfy Minimum High School Program (MHSP) requirements per a student’s IEP. Alternate Courses Alternate courses are locally developed courses that reflect the prerequisite skills appropriate to the student’s current academic functioning along with alignment to grade level standards in each subject area. Coursework within the alternate class reflects individual student needs. Alternate coursework differs from non-modified and modified coursework in instructional delivery, and focuses on prerequisite skill content based on the student’s goals and objectives within the IEP. It is the responsibility of the ARD committee to determine student placement in alternate coursework, as well as determination of the appropriate state assessment for the student. High School alternate courses prepare students for success in the corresponding Alternate End of Course Exam (EOP) and/or to satisfy Minimum High School program (MHSP) requirements per a student’s IEP. The following courses could be taught in either a general education or special education setting. Guide to Abbreviations for Credit Courses: DAP=Distinguished Achievement Plan; Rec=Recommended Program; HS-High School Program C=Core Component; E=Elective Component

1653 COMMUNICATION – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) HS-C One-half credit; one semester Students will integrate language in order to understand oral, written and/or communication using symbols. Through activity based learning students will learn social appropriateness, environmental cues and prompts, understanding generalizations in a real life context and the responsibilities of independent living and skills directly related to employment.*

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8153 ART – 9th (STANDARD) 8154 ART – 10th (STANDARD) 8155 ART – 11th (STANDARD) 8156 ART – 12th (STANDARD) HS-C, E One credit; full year course This course will offer students the opportunity for creative growth and expression through areas of study and exploration of career interests in art.* 8253 MUSIC – 9th (STANDARD) 8254 MUSIC – 10th (STANDARD) 8255 MUSIC – 11th (STANDARD) 8256 MUSIC – 12th (STANDARD) HS-C, E One credit; one full year Through activity based learning students will gain an appreciation of music and explore career options in the music field.* 5550 HEALTH – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) HS-C One-half credit; one semester This course includes instruction on personal health and responsibility, nutritional health, prevention of disease and interpersonal skills.* PE5052 RECREATION AND LEISURE A – 9th (STANDARD) PE5053 RECREATION AND LEISURE B – 9th (STANDARD) PE5054 RECREATION AND LEISURE A – 10th (STANDARD PE5055 RECREATION AND LEISURE B – 10th (STANDARD) PE5056 RECREATION AND LEISURE A – 11th (STANDARD) PE5057 RECREATION AND LEISURE B – 11th (STANDARD) PE5058 RECREATION AND LEISURE A – 12th (STANDARD) PE5059 RECREATION AND LEISURE B – 12th (STANDARD) HS-E One-half credit; one semester The Recreation and Leisure course is designed to help the student recognize a variety of individual interests, hobbies and abilities. Students will develop leisure activities that foster continued personal growth.* 7353 JOB SKILLS – 9th (STANDARD) 7354 JOB SKILLS – 10th (STANDARD) 7355 JOB SKILLS – 11th (STANDARD) 7356 JOB SKILLS – 12th (STANDARD) HS-E One-half credit or one credit; one semester or full year Job Skills prepares students to enter the job market through a study of employment issues including: recognizing what skills define particular jobs; the application processes; recognizing interests, individual attributes to enhance employability, ways to locate jobs, using community services/resources to aid employment.* 154

9053 LIFE SKILLS – 9th (STANDARD) 9054 LIFE SKILLS – 10th (STANDARD) 9055 LIFE SKILLS – 11th (STANDARD) 9056 LIFE SKILLS – 12th (STANDARD) HS-E One-half credit or one credit; one semester or full year The areas of instruction include vocational, social and independent living skills.* 9153 SOCIAL SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING - 1 – 9th (STANDARD) 9154 SOCIAL SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING - 1 – 10th (STANDARD) 9155 SOCIAL SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING - 1 – 11th (STANDARD) 9156 SOCIAL SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING - 1 – 12th (STANDARD) HS-E One-half credit or one credit; one semester or full year The areas of instruction include self-awareness and confidence, socially responsible behavior, interpersonal skills, independence, problem solving, and communication. Emphasis is placed on daily living skills and school to career skills.* 7357 ON THE JOB TRAINING – 11th (STANDARD) 7358 ON THE JOB TRAINING – 12th (STANDARD) HS-E One to one and one-half credits; one full year This area of instruction is provided in a part-time or full-time competitive job in the community. The student enrolled in On the Job Training will provided an opportunity to develop skills related to awareness, career exploration, work habits, community resources, social skills, and general vocational skills. Placement in this class is an ARD decision and changes instruction to Vocational Adjustment Class (VAC).* 1507M PRINCIPLES OF READING (READING 1 MODIFIED) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) 1057A PRINCIPLES OF READING (READING 1 ALTERNATE) – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) HS-E One credit; full year Through an assessment of process, students are placed in Principles of Reading, which is a one year, intensive course for students who are non-readers. Utilizing the BOOST Phonics program, students spend the year completing extensive lessons that work through the basics of phonics and phonemic awareness. 1530 PRINCIPLES OF READING PLUS – 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th (STANDARD) Prerequisite – Principles of Reading No credit; one semester (will not count toward graduation) Principles of Reading Plus is a one semester course designed for students who didn’t show expected growth in the Principles of Reading course. Throughout the semester, teachers consistently monitor the progress of students to determine what their specific needs are in the areas of phonics and phonemic awareness. Each teacher will reteach concepts in those specific areas of need utilizing the extended lessons of the BOOST Plus program.

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Richardson HS Magnet Programs & Courses Program

Culinary Arts

Theatre Arts Technical Theatre

Focuses on language and technical skills necessary for career in mass media. Four intensive years conclude with internship at professional studio. WEST JHS VISUAL ARTS 7 TECHNOLGY MAGNET: 7th grade: Elements of arts, Audio-Video Technology and Communication (non-credit) 8th grade: Principles of Arts, Audio-Visual & Technology Communication (one credit) Prepares students to compete in the booming hospitality industry. Integrates hands-on application while learning food safety, food preparation, catering and restaurant management.

Allows students freedom to develop creative abilities in unique ways, including acting, directing, and writing. Students develop skills needed by theatre arts professionals Offers engaging opportunities to participate in practical laboratory course, including study of scenery design, sound, props, costume and lighting. Students are responsible for stage crew and design of theatrical productions. Develops student skills in variety of media. Guest artists demonstrate individual techniques to foster learning of different art forms. Integrates higher-level thinking skills, art history and art appreciation into curriculum. The opportunity for specialization in art photography or commercial photography is also available in the Visual Arts strand

Commercial

Visual Arts

9 Grade

Art

Communication Arts

th

Description ARTS MAGNET STRAND

Law

LAW MAGNET STRAND Incorporates higher level thinking skills and student interaction into the study of government and politics with an emphasis in jurisprudence. Designed for those interested in the field of low. Fourth year concludes in local law firm internship.

Media Literacy

Principles of Culinary Arts (one semester) Restaurant Management (one semester) Stage Combat OR Theatre Dance 1 & 2 Technical Theatre 1 Art 1 Pre-AP Sculpture 2 Pre-AP (West Magnet students only) West Visual Arts Magnet students may accelerate to next level

Principles of Art: Photography

Principles of Government

SCIENCES MAGNET STRAND

Environmental Research and Engineering Sciences

Science specializations in environmental and natural resource sciences parallel collegiate theory-toapplication approach. Interdisciplinary teams research, design and publish green-focused projects. Technology resources support math and science application.

Theoretical & Applied Science

WESTWOOD JH: Math, Sci., Leadership Magnet 7th grade: Math Based Science Exploration 8th grade: integrated Health Sciences (.5 credit ) Suggested LOTE Course Plan: Complete three credits of Latin with course working beginning in 7th grade.

Technology

Magnet and non-magnet cohorts open across magnet strands as students have scheduling room. Courses support problem-solving, research analysis and graphic representation of arts, law and science concepts. Open technology courses promote interdisciplinary team projects.

Health Science

Investigates the scientific foundation for a variety of medical/healthcare careers. Blends classroom theory with a series of hospital rotations that provide hand-on experience.

Robotics

Explores high-tech field of tomorrow. Hands-on application of engineering principals wherein students learn to design, manufacture, program and operate robots. Extensive participation in Robotic contests and competitions.

West Robotics Magnet Students: 7th : Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering & Robotics 8th : Concepts of Engineering, Robotics and Technology 8th grade at campuses other than West: Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering and Robotics Students who have not taken either Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering & Robotics nor Concepts of Engineering, Robotics and Technology

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Biology Pre-AP

Computer Science 1 Principles of Information Technologies Web Technologies Medical Terminology (one semester) and Principles of Health Science (one semester) Engineering Design & Presentation and/or Computer Science 1 or Computer Sci 1-AP Concepts of Engineering, Robotics and Technology Principles of Manufacturing/Engineering & Robotics

for 9th grade students entering 2010 – 2011 th

10 Grade

th

th

11 Grade ARTS MAGNET STRAND

12 Grade

Broadcast Internship and/or Advanced Audio-Video Production (two credits) (CTE Certification Program)

Digital & Interactive Multi-Media

Broadcast Journalism Audio-Video Production

Culinary Arts (Two credits)

Practicum in Culinary Arts (two credits) Optional Non-Magnet Credit: Practicum In Hospitality and Tourism (two credits)

Practicum in Culinary Arts 2 (two credits) (CTE Certification Program) Optional Non-Magnet Credit: Food Science (one science credit)

Theatre 1

Theatre Directing (two credits)

Theatre 2

Technical Theatre 2

Technical Theatre 3

Technical Theatre 4

Drawing 2 Pre-AP Drawing 3 Pre-AP

Printmaking 2 Pre-AP Two-Dimensional Design AP Optional Non-Magnet credit: Architectural Design

Photography 2 Pre-AP

Photography 3 Pre-AP or Photojournalism

Painting 2 Pre-AP and Art 4 AP or Three-Dimensional Design AP

AP Two Dimensional Design or Advanced Journalism; Yearbook or Newspaper Commercial Photography

Advanced Commercial Photography (two credits) LAW MAGNET STRAND

Economics AP Government

AP US History

Forensics and Special Topics in Social Studies and/or Law Internship (two credits /one semester)

SCIENCES MAGNET STRAND

Chemistry Pre-AP and either Horticulture 1 Anatomy/Physiology Biology AP

Environmental Science AP and AP and one of the following: Anatomy/Physiology Advance Biotechnology Chemistry AP Earth & Space Science Forensic Science Soil and Plant Science

Computer Science 2 Engineering Design and Presentation Architectural Design

Advanced Engineering Design & Presentation (two credits) Advanced Architectural Design (two credits)

Health Science and Anatomy/Physiology

.Practicum in Health Science (two credits) Non Magnet Options: Medical Microbiology Science (one semester) Pathophysiology Science (one semester)

Robotics & Automation and/or Computer Science 1 or Computer Science 1 AP Engineering Design & Presentation and/or Precision Metals/Manufacturing Concepts of Engineering, Robotics & Technology

Physics B

Electronics/Robotics and/or Computer Science 2 Robotics & Automation and/or Electronics/Robotics Engineering Design & Presentation and/or Precision metals/Manufacturing

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Biology AP or Chemistry AP or Physics C and one of the following: Anatomy/Physiology Advance Biotechnology Earth & Space Science Forensic Science Scientific Research & Design Soil and Plant Science

Scientific Research & Design

Practicum in Health Science 2 (two credits) (CTE Certification Programs)

Practicum in manufacturing, Engineering & Robotics (two credits) (CTE Certification Program) Practicum in Manufacturing, Engineering & Robotics (two credits) Robotics & Automation and/or Electronics/Robotics

NON-CREDIT COURSES GRADES 9-12 The following courses do not earn credit toward graduation. • • • • • • • • •

ACADEMIC DECATHLON—non-credit in spring semester CHEERLEADER—non-credit in spring semester ESL LEARNING POWER: STRATEGIES FOR STUDENT SUCCESS MATH LAB READING LAB RICHARDSON YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM STUDY HALL WRITING LAB ADVANCED STUDY SKILLS PSAT TEAM SAT/ACT PREP CLASS

ASSISTANTS: • • • • •

COMPUTER ASSISTANT LAB ASSISTANT LIBRARY ASSISTANT OFFICE ASSISTANT TEACHER AIDE

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INDEX

159

ATHLETICS/BASEBALL ....................................................... 92 ATHLETICS/BASKETBALL ................................................... 90 ATHLETICS/BOYS JR. HIGH ................................................ 28 ATHLETICS/CROSS COUNTRY............................................ 93 ATHLETICS/FOOTBALL ...................................................... 90 ATHLETICS/GIRLS JR. HIGH ............................................... 28 ATHLETICS/GOLF .............................................................. 90 ATHLETICS/GYMNASTICS.................................................. 91 ATHLETICS/SOCCER .......................................................... 91 ATHLETICS/SOFTBALL ....................................................... 92 ATHLETICS/SWIMMING .................................................... 92 ATHLETICS/TENNIS ........................................................... 91 ATHLETICS/TRACK ............................................................ 92 ATHLETICS/VOLLEYBALL ................................................... 91 ATHLETICS/WRESTLING .................................................... 92 AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION........................................... 105 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY .......................................... 145 th th AVID – 7 , 8 ................................................................... 34 AVID HIGH SCHOOL ........................................................ 147 AVID PROGRAM ............................................................. 147

A A CAPPELLA CHOIR............................................................81 A CAPPELLA CHOIR – HONORS..........................................81 ACCOUNTING 1 ............................................................... 113 ACCOUNTING 2 ............................................................... 114 ADVANCED ANIMATION .................................................105 ADVANCED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN .............................102 ADVANCED AUDIO VIDEO PRODUCTION ........................105 ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY .......................145 ADVANCED COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY ....................107 ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY ....................102 ADVANCED ELECTRONICS ...............................................141 ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PRESENTATION140 ADVANCED FASHION DESIGN .........................................106 ADVANCED INTERIOR DESIGN ........................................103 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: NEWSPAPER PRODUCTION...149 ADVANCED JOURNALISM: YEARBOOK PRODUCTION .....148 ADVANCED PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE ........................ 54, 99 ADVENTURE/OUTDOOR EDUCATION ...............................88 ALGEBRA 1 ........................................................................46 ALGEBRA 1 – 7th ...............................................................17 ALGEBRA 1 – PreAP ...........................................................46 ALGEBRA 1- 8 – PreAP.......................................................17 ALGEBRA 2 ........................................................................47 ALGEBRA 2 – PreAP ...........................................................47 ALGEBRA 3 ........................................................................47 ANALYSIS OF VISUAL MEDIA .............................................39 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY-HONORS.................................56 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY-HONORS ..........................117 ANIMATION ....................................................................105 AP JAPANESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE ..........................65 AP LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH ............................64 AP –SPANISH LITERATURE ................................................64 AP STATISTICS ...................................................................48 AQUATIC SCIENCE .............................................................53 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN ................................................102 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC........................................................151 ARMY JUNIOR ROTC 1 .......................................................93 th th ART – 7 , 8 – CERAMICS .................................................23 th th ART – 7 , 8 – DRAWING AND PAINTING ........................23 th th ART – 7 , 8 – INTRODUCTION TO THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN .........................................................................23 th th ART – 7 , 8 – INTRODUCTORY ART.................................23 ART – DRAWING – AP .......................................................67 ART 1 .................................................................................66 ART 1 – PreAP ...................................................................66 ART 2 – CERAMICS – PreAP ...............................................71 ART 2 – SCULPTURE ..........................................................70 ART 2 – SCULPTURE – PreAP .............................................70 ART 4 – DRAWING.............................................................67 ART FOUNDATIONS.........................................................154 ART HISTORY – ANCIENT THROUGH MODERN – AP .........72 th ART I – PreAP – 8 ............................................................24 ASTRONOMY .....................................................................54 ATHLETICS TRAINER ..........................................................93

B BANKING AND FINANCIAL SERVICES .............................. 113 BEGINNING BAND ............................................................ 24 BEGINNING ORCHESTRA .................................................. 26 BIOLOGY ........................................................................... 51 BIOLOGY – AP ................................................................... 51 BIOLOGY PreAP ................................................................ 51 BROADCAST JOURNALISM.............................................. 149 BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 1................... 109 BUSINESS INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 2................... 109 BUSINESS LAW ............................................................... 109

C C&W DANCE TEAM PREP (DANCE 1) ................................ 74 C&W TEAM 2 (DANCE 2) .................................................. 74 CALCULUS AB - AP ............................................................ 48 CALCULUS BC – AP............................................................ 48 Career and Technology Education Parenting Education Program .................................. 151 CERAMICS 2 – BASIC TECHNIQUES ................................... 71 CERAMICS 3 – ADV. TECHNIQUES .................................... 71 CHEERLEADER JV .............................................................. 94 CHEERLEADER VARSITY .................................................... 94 CHEMISTRY ....................................................................... 52 CHEMISTRY – AP............................................................... 52 CHEMISTRY – PreAP ......................................................... 52 CHILD DEVELOPMENT .................................................... 124 CHORALE – 7th, 8th .......................................................... 26 CISCO INTERNETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES 1 ................ 128 CISCO INTERNETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES 2 ................ 129 COLOR GUARD............................................................ 78, 95 COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY ....................................... 106 COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS ................................... 43 COMMUNICATION APPLICATIONS – 8th .......................... 16

160

COMMUNICATION FOUNDATIONS .................................153 COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING ...................................................................................143 COMPUTER MAINTENANCE ............................................127 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 ....................................................129 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 – AP ...................................... 48, 129 COMPUTER SCIENCE 2 ....................................................129 COMPUTER TECHNICIAN.................................................127 CONCEPTS OF ENGINEERING, ROBOTICS AND TECHNOLOGY .............................................................139 CONCEPTS OF ENGINEERING, ROBOTICS, AND TECHNOLOGY ...............................................................33 CONCERT BAND – 7th, 8th ................................................25 CONCERT BAND 1 .............................................................75 CONCERT BAND 1 – HONORS ...........................................75 CONCERT BAND 2 .............................................................75 CONCERT CHOIR ...............................................................80 CONCERT CHOIR – HONORS .............................................80 CONCERT CHOIR –8th .......................................................26 CONCERT ORCHESTRA ......................................................84 CONCERT ORCHESTRA HONORS .......................................84 CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY .......................................102 CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ...............................................132 COSMETOLOGY 1 ............................................................124 COSMETOLOGY 2 ............................................................124 CREATIVE/IMAGINATIVE WRITING ...................................39 CRITICAL THINKING/READING SKILLS – 8th ......................15 CULINARY ARTS ............................................................... 120 CW DANCE TEAM ..............................................................95

ELECTRONICS/AUTOMOTIVE .......................................... 145 ELECTRONICS/ROBOTICS ................................................ 141 ELEMENTS OF ARTS .......................................................... 32 ENERGY, POWER & TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ........... 145 ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PRESENTATION .................. 140 ENGINEERING DESIGN AND PROBLEM SOLVING.............. 54 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS.................................. 49, 142 ENGLISH............................................................................ 38 ENGLISH 1 ......................................................................... 37 ENGLISH 1 – PreAP ........................................................... 38 ENGLISH 2 – PreAP ........................................................... 38 ENGLISH 3 ......................................................................... 38 ENGLISH 3 – AP................................................................. 39 ENGLISH 4 ......................................................................... 39 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL) 140 ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL) 241 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE – AP ...................................... 55 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ............................................. 55 ESL 1 ................................................................................. 41 ESL 1 – 7th, 8th ................................................................. 13 ESL 2 ................................................................................. 41 ESL 2 – 7th, 8th ................................................................. 13 ESL 3 PRACTICAL WRITING SKILLS ......................................... 41 ESL READING JUNIOR HIGH .............................................. 15 EUROPEAN HISTORY – AP................................................. 60 EXPLORING ARTS Audio Video Technology and Communications ........... 30 EXPLORING BUSINESS/MARKETING ................................. 30 EXPLORING CAREERS ........................................................ 31 EXPLORING CONSTRUCTION/MANUFACTURING ............. 30 EXPLORING ENGINEERING/ROBOTICS .............................. 30 EXPLORING HOSPITALITY/CULINARY ARTS AND TOURISM ..................................................................................... 31 EXPLORING HUMAN SERVICES ......................................... 31 EXPLORING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ....................... 31 EXPLORING TRANSPORTATION ........................................ 31

D DANCE 1 ............................................................................73 DANCE 2 ............................................................................73 DANCE/AEROBIC ACTIVITIES .............................................89 DEBATE 1 ..........................................................................43 DEBATE 2 ..........................................................................43 DEBATE 3 ..........................................................................43 DIGITAL AND INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA .......................128 DIGITAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING .............................143 DIRECTING FOR STAGE......................................................87 DRAWING 2 .......................................................................66 DRAWING 2 – PreAP .........................................................66 DRAWING 3 .......................................................................67 DRAWING 3 – PreAP .........................................................67 DRILL TEAM .......................................................................95 DRILL TEAM 2 (DANCE 2) ..................................................74 DRILL TEAM PREP (DANCE) ...............................................73 Dual Credit..........................................................................9

F FASHION DESIGN ............................................................ 106 FASHION MARKETING .................................................... 137 FOOD SCIENCE .......................................................... 55, 121 FORENSIC SCIENCE ................................................... 55, 132 FOUNDATIONS OF PERSONAL FITNESS ............................ 88

G GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 1 ....................... 127 GEOMETRY ....................................................................... 46 GEOMETRY – PreAP.......................................................... 46 GRAPHIC DESIGN 3 ........................................................... 73

E EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE ..............................................54 ECONOMICS WITH EMPHASIS ON THE FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM AND ITS BENEFITS...........................................60 ELECTRONIC MEDIA 2 .......................................................68 ELECTRONIC MEDIA 2 – PreAP ..........................................68 ELECTRONICS ..................................................................140

H HEALTH EDUCATION 1...................................................... 87 HEALTH EDUCATION 1 – 8th ............................................ 28 HEALTH FOUNDATIONS .................................................. 154

161

HEALTH SCIENCE .............................................................117 High School Courses Agricultural Food and Natural Resources ....................97 Architecture and Construction ...................................101 Art Courses...................................................................66 Arts, AV Technology, and Communications ...............104 AVID ...........................................................................147 Band .............................................................................75 Business, Management, and Administration .............108 Career and Technical Education ...................................97 Choir.............................................................................79 Dance - Fine Arts ..........................................................73 Education and Training ..............................................111 English Language Arts Courses .....................................37 ESOL Courses................................................................ 40 Finance Courses .........................................................113 Government and Public Administration Courses .......115 Health Education..........................................................87 Health Science Courses ..............................................116 Hospitality and Tourism Courses ............................... 119 Human Services Courses ............................................123 Information Technology Courses ............................... 126 Internship Courses .....................................................147 Internship Program ....................................................147 Journalism ..................................................................147 Languages other than English (LOTE) ...........................62 Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security Courses ..............................................................................131 Leadership Programs .................................................151 Life Skills for Parenting Students Courses ..................151 Manufacturing Courses ..............................................134 Marketing Courses .....................................................136 Mathematics ................................................................ 45 Music Theory ...............................................................82 Orchestra .....................................................................82 Peer Helping Education ..............................................152 Physical Education .......................................................87 Reading ........................................................................41 ROTC Courses .............................................................151 Science .........................................................................49 Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Courses ..................................................................138 Social Studies ...............................................................57 Special Education .......................................................153 Speech..........................................................................43 Theatre Arts .................................................................85 Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics ................144 HONORS LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH ..................65 HORTICULTURE SCIENCE ...................................................98 HOSPITALITY SERVICES ...................................................121 HUMAN GEOGRAPHY – AP ...............................................58 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT .........................111 HUMANITIES .....................................................................44

INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING ................................................................................... 112 INSURANCE OPERATIONS ............................................... 114 INTEGRATED HEALTH SCIENCE ......................................... 19 INTEGRATED PHYSICS & CHEMISTRY ................................ 52 INTERIOR DESIGN ........................................................... 103 INTERMEDIATE – ADVANCED BAND ................................. 24 INTERMEDIATE BRASS ...................................................... 24 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA ............................................. 26 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) ....................... 84 INTERMEDIATE ORCHESTRA HONORS .............................. 85 INTERMEDIATE PERCUSSION............................................ 24 INTERMEDIATE WOODWINDS .......................................... 24 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN .................... 143 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS ................................................................................... 127

J JEWELRY 2 ........................................................................ 71 JEWELRY 2 – PreAP ........................................................... 71 JEWELRY 3 ........................................................................ 72 JEWELRY 3 – PreAP ........................................................... 72 JOURNALISM 1 ............................................................... 147 JR HIGH CADET BAND ....................................................... 25 Junior High Courses Art Courses .................................................................. 22 AVID Courses ............................................................... 34 Career and Technical Education .................................. 29 Choir ............................................................................ 25 ESOL and ESL ............................................................... 13 Health Education ......................................................... 28 Language Arts/English ................................................. 12 LOTE - Languages Other Than English ......................... 21 Mathematics ............................................................... 16 Music Courses ............................................................. 24 Orchestra ..................................................................... 26 Physical Education ...................................................... 27 Reading ....................................................................... 13 Science......................................................................... 18 Social Studies ............................................................... 19 Special Education ........................................................ 34 Speech Courses ........................................................... 15 Theatre Arts Courses ................................................... 27 JUNIOR VARSITY CHOIR .................................................... 80 JUNIOR VARSITY CHOIR – HONORS .................................. 81

L LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND TURF GRASS MGMT ................ 98 LANGUAGE ARTS – 7th ..................................................... 12 LANGUAGE ARTS – 8th ..................................................... 13 LANGUAGE ARTS – PreAP - 7th ........................................ 12 LAW 1: AP Government .................................................... 61 LAW 1: ECONOMICS ......................................................... 62 LAW ENFORCEMENT 1 ................................................... 131 LAW ENFORCEMENT 2 ................................................... 132 LEADERSHIP ...................................................................... 16

I INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEECH: ACADEMIC DECATHLON .44 INDIVIDUAL SPORTS..........................................................89

162

LEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM .................................151 LEARNING POWER: STRATEGIES FOR STUDENT SUCCESS .42 LEVEL 1LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH .....................63 LEVEL 2 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH ....................63 LEVEL 3 – PreAP LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH ......64 LEVEL 3 LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH ....................64 LEVEL 3 PreAP SPANISH ....................................................22 LEVEL 4 – REGULAR – SPANISH .........................................64 LIFE SKILLS FOUNDATIONS JR HIGH ..................................35 LIFETIME NUTRITION AND WELLNESS ............................124

PHOTOGRAPHY 2 – PreAP ................................................ 69 PHOTOGRAPHY 3.............................................................. 69 PHOTOGRAPHY 3 – PreAP ................................................ 69 PHOTOJOURNALISM....................................................... 148 PHYSICAL EDUCATION A ................................................... 27 PHYSICAL EDUCATION B ................................................... 28 PHYSICS ............................................................................ 53 PHYSICS – B – AP .............................................................. 53 PHYSICS – C – AP .............................................................. 53 PRACTICUM HUMAN SERVICES ...................................... 125 PRACTICUM HUMAN SERVICES 2 ................................... 125 PRACTICUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ..................... 110 PRACTICUM IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 2................... 110 PRACTICUM IN CULINARY ARTS ..................................... 120 PRACTICUM IN CULINARY ARTS 2 .................................. 120 PRACTICUM IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING .................. 112 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE.................................... 117 PRACTICUM IN HEALTH SCIENCE 2 ................................. 117 PRACTICUM IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM ................. 121 PRACTICUM IN HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 2 ............... 121 PRACTICUM IN MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND ROBOTICS .......................................................... 135, 140 PRACTICUM IN MARKETING DYNAMICS ........................ 137 PRACTICUM IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS .................................................. 142 PRACTICUM IN TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND LOGISTICS .................................................................. 145 PRE DRILL TEAM (DANCE 1) .............................................. 74 PRECALCULUS................................................................... 47 PRECALCULUS – PreAP ..................................................... 48 PRECISION METALS MANUFACTURING/ENGINEERING . 134, 135, 139 PREPARATORY A - LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH ..... 21 PREPARATORY B - LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH ..... 22 PRINCIPLES AND ELEMENTS OF FLORAL DESIGN........ 73, 98 PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES.................................................................. 98 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION.... 101 PRINCIPLES OF ARTS ......................................................... 32 PRINCIPLES OF ARTS, AUDIO VIDEO TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONS ................................................... 104 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING AND FINANCE .. 113 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS, MARKETING, AND FINANCE 109, 136 PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS/MARKETING AND FINANCE ..... 32 PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION AND TRAINING ................... 111 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING ........................................ 143 PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION ...................................................... 115 PRINCIPLES OF HEALTH SCIENCE .................................... 116 PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM .................. 119 PRINCIPLES OF HOSPITALITY, CULINARY ARTS, AND TOURISM ................................................................... 119 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN SERVICES ............................ 32, 123 PRINCIPLES OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY .......... 32, 126 PRINCIPLES OF LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY, CORRECTIONS, AND SECURITY ................................................................... 131 PRINCIPLES OF MANUFACTURING ................................... 33

M MACROECONOMICS – AP .................................................60 MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING ........................... 135, 141 MARCHING BAND .............................................................94 MARKETING DYNAMICS ..................................................137 MATH LAB HIGH SCHOOL .................................................48 MATH-BASED SCIENCE EXPLORATION ..............................19 MATHEMATIC MODELS WITH APPLICATIONS...................47 MATHEMATICAL APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES.................................... 49, 99 MATHEMATICS – 7th ........................................................16 MATHEMATICS – PreAP – 7th ...........................................17 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY......................................... 56, 118 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY ................................................117 MONEY MATTERS ...........................................................114 MUSIC THEORY – AP .........................................................82

N NATIONAL SECURITY .......................................................115 NON-CREDIT COURSES GRADES 9-12.............................. 158

O OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION ................................ 93 OFF-CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION – 7th, 8th................28 ON THE JOB TRAINING ....................................................155 ORAL INTERPRETATION ....................................................43

P PAINTING 2 .......................................................................68 PAINTING 2 – PreAP ..........................................................68 PALS 1 (PEER HELPING) ...................................................152 PALS 2 (PEER MEDIATION) ..............................................152 PARENTING EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL AGE PARENTS 1&2 ...................................................................................151 Parenting Education Program .......................................151 PARTNERS TRAINING PROGRAM ......................................89 PARTNERS TRAINING PROGRAM – 7th, 8th ......................28 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY .................................................. 57, 118 PEER COACHING FOR STUDENTS ....................................152 PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT/AEROBIC ACTIVITIES..............89 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA (Non Varsity) ......................83 PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA HONORS (Non Varsity) .......83 PHOTOGRAPHY 2 ..............................................................69

163

PRINCIPLES OF MANUFACTURING/ ENGINEERING AND ROBOTICS ...................................................................134 PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY ...........................................56 PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY-1 ......................................142 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION ....................................33 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND LOGISTICS ...................................................................144 PRINTMAKING 2 ................................................................ 69 PRINTMAKING 2 PreAP .....................................................70 PROJECT LEAD THE WAY GATEWAY TO TECHNOLOGY .....33 PSYCHOLOGY ....................................................................61 PSYCHOLOGY – AP ............................................................61 PUBLIC SPEAKING 1...........................................................44 PUBLIC SPEAKING 2...........................................................44

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING ................. 136 STAGE COMBAT ................................................................ 87 STAGE/JAZZ BAND ............................................................ 78 STRATEGIC READING 8th GRADE ...................................... 14 SYMPHONIC 1 ................................................................... 77 SYMPHONIC BAND – 7th, 8th ........................................... 25 SYMPHONIC BAND 1 – HONORS ...................................... 77 SYMPHONIC BAND 2 ........................................................ 76 SYMPHONIC BAND 2 – HONORS ...................................... 77 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Varsity) .................................... 82 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA HONORS (Varsity) ..................... 83

T TEAM SPORTS................................................................... 90 TECHNICAL THEATRE 1 ..................................................... 86 TECHNICAL THEATRE 2 ..................................................... 86 TECHNICAL THEATRE 3 ..................................................... 86 TECHNICAL THEATRE 4 ..................................................... 86 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INDEPENDENT STUDY ..... 128 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INDEPENDENT STUDY: COMPUTER SCIENCE 3 ............................................... 130 TECHOLOGY APPLICATIONS INDEPENDENT STUDY: WEB MASTERING ............................................................... 128 TENOR/BASS CHOIR ......................................................... 79 TENOR/BASS CHOIR – HONORS........................................ 79 TENOR-BASS CHOIR – 7th, 8th ......................................... 25 THEATRE ARTS – 7th......................................................... 27 THEATRE ARTS – 8th......................................................... 27 THEATRE ARTS 1 ............................................................... 85 THEATRE ARTS 2 ............................................................... 85 THEATRE ARTS 3 ............................................................... 85 THEATRE ARTS 4 ............................................................... 85 THEATRE PRODUCTION 1 ................................................. 86 THEATRE PRODUCTION 2 ................................................. 86 THEATRE PRODUCTION 3 ................................................. 87 THEATRE PRODUCTION 4 ................................................. 87 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO – AP .............. 72 TOUCH SYSTEM DATA ENTRY – 7th, 8th........................... 30 TOUCH SYSTEM DATA ENTRY HIGH SCHOOL ................. 108 TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT ......................... 120 TREBLE CHOIR .................................................................. 79 TREBLE CHOIR – 7th, 8th .................................................. 25 TREBLE CHOIR – HONORS................................................. 79 TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN PORTFOLIO – AP................. 70

R READING – 7th ..................................................................13 READING – 8th ..................................................................14 READING 1 ........................................................................42 READING 2 ........................................................................42 READING 3 ........................................................................42 READING APPLICATIONS & STUDY SKILLS: COLLEGE RE ....42 READING LAB ....................................................................43 RECREATION AND LEISURE FOUNDATIONS ....................154 RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT .........................................120 Richardson HS Magnet Programs & Courses Quick Reference Chart .........................................................156 RICHARDSON YOUTH LEADERSHIP PROGRAM................151 RISD Graduation Plans Distinguished Achievement Program .............................8 High School Program ...................... 11, 37, 45, 51, 63, 88 Recommended Program .................. 7, 10, 37, 50, 63, 88 ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION .......................................139

S SCIENCE – 7th ...................................................................18 SCIENCE – 7th –PreAP .......................................................18 SCIENCE – 8th ...................................................................18 SCIENCE – 8th – PreAP ......................................................19 SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH & DESIGN ......................................56 SECURITIES AND INVESTMENTS ......................................114 SECURITY SERVICES .........................................................132 Social Studies Special Requirements ...................................... 57, 61, 62 SOCIAL STUDIES – 7th .......................................................20 SOCIAL STUDIES – 7th –PreAP ..........................................20 SOCIAL STUDIES – 8th .......................................................20 SOCIAL STUDIES – 8th – PreAP..........................................21 SOCIAL STUDIES ADVANCED STUDIES: LAW INTERNSHIP .62 SOCIOLOGY .......................................................................61 SPANISH LANGUAGE AP – 8th...........................................22 SPECIAL EDUCATION ................................................. 34, 153 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES: LAW 2 .....................62 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES: STREET LAW ............61 SPEECH A ..........................................................................15 SPEECH B...........................................................................15

U U.S. GOVERNMENT .......................................................... 59 U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS – AP ........................... 60 U.S. HISTORY – AP ............................................................ 59 U.S. HISTORY STUDIES SINCE RECONSTRUCTION ............. 59

V VIRTUAL BUSINESS ......................................................... 109 VOCAL ENSEMBLE ............................................................ 82

164

WORLD HEALTH RESEARCH ............................................ 118 WORLD HISTORY STUDIES ................................................ 58 WORLD HISTORY STUDIES – AP ........................................ 58 WRITING LAB .................................................................... 40 WRITING LAB - 7th ........................................................... 13

W WEB MASTERING HIGH SCHOOL.....................................128 WEBMASTERING – 8th ......................................................34 WINTER GUARD ................................................................ 78 WORLD GEOGRAPHY STUDIES ..........................................58

165