Screening for Depression in MS

6/5/2014 Screening for Depression in MS May 28, 2014 CMSC Conference CE Workshop # 15 Dallas, Texas Presenters Peter Arnett, Ph.D. Professor of Psy...
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6/5/2014

Screening for Depression in MS May 28, 2014 CMSC Conference CE Workshop # 15

Dallas, Texas

Presenters Peter Arnett, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology & Director of Clinical Training Penn State University Ralph HB Benedict, Ph.D. Professor of Neurology University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Anthony Feinstein, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Psychiatry University of Toronto

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Different Ways of Screening for Depression Clinically Peter Arnett, Ph.D. Penn State University

Key Contributors • • • • • • • • • •

Chris Higginson, PhD Bill Voss, PhD Bruce Wright, MD William Bender, MD Jared Bruce, PhD Dawn Polen, PhD Fiona Barwick, MS Brian Ahlstrom, MD Gray Vargas, MS Margaret Cadden, BS

• • • • • • • • • •

Jon Tippin, MD John Randolph, PhD Pamela Freske, PhD Lauren Strober, PhD Megan Smith, PhD Chris Bailey, PhD Alicia Grandey, PhD Amanda Rabinowitz, PhD Joe Beeney, PhD Dede Ukueberuwa, MS

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Outline • Depression Assessment Problem in MS: MS Disease & Neurovegetative Depression Symptom Overlap. • Ways of Addressing Assessment Problem: Remove Neurovegetative Symptoms from Consideration. • Ways of Addressing Assessment Problem: Use Trunk & Branch Approach. • Clinical Recommendations & Caveats.

Outline • Depression Assessment Problem in MS: MS Disease & Neurovegetative Depression Symptom Overlap.

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Assessment Problem: Many MS Disease Symptoms Overlap With Depression Symptoms

• • • •

Fatigue Psychomotor retardation Decreased concentration Insomnia or hypersomnia All of the above are neurovegetative symptoms of depression

How can this issue be addressed when assessing depression in MS?

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Use measures that do not include neurovegetative symptoms

Overview • Depression Assessment Problem in MS: MS Disease & Neurovegetative Depression Symptom Overlap. • Ways of Addressing Assessment Problem: Remove Neurovegetative Symptoms from Consideration.

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Chicago Multiscale Depression Inventory (CMDI) • Nyenhuis, et al. (1995)1

1Nyenhuis

J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 1995;1(3):291-296.

CMDI: 3 Subscales of 14 Items Each • Mood: Sad, glum, low • Evaluative: Inferior, worthless, a failure • Vegetative: Fitful sleep, exhausted, uninterested in sex, poor appetite Mood & evaluative scales shown to be reliable and valid for use in MS

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BDI – Fast Screen (BDI – FS)1 • 7 items (rated 0-3) • Mood and negative evaluative symptoms only • Takes only a few minutes to complete • Shown to be valid in MS2

1Beck

AT, et al. BDI- Fast Screen for Medical Patients Manual. San Antonio: The Psychological Association; 2000. 2Benedict, RHB, et al. Mult Scler. 2003;9(4):393-396.

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Benedict, et al. (2003) • Explored validity of BDI – FS in MS • 54 patients with MS • 48 informants interviewed

Benedict, et al. Mult Scler. 2003;9(4):393-396.

Benedict, et al. (2003) • BDI–FS significantly correlated with other self-report measures of depression (P

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