S T U D E N T H A N D B O O K

STUDENT HANDBOOK 2015-2016 OFF-CAMPUS STUDY & EXCHANGES 815 N. Broadway Saratoga Springs, New York 12866 USA Tel: +1-518-580-5355 • Fax: +1-518-580-5...
Author: Jasper Roberts
0 downloads 0 Views 3MB Size
STUDENT HANDBOOK 2015-2016

OFF-CAMPUS STUDY & EXCHANGES 815 N. Broadway Saratoga Springs, New York 12866 USA Tel: +1-518-580-5355 • Fax: +1-518-580-5359 [email protected] • www.skidmore.edu/ocse

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SKIDMORE IN PARIS: Liberal Arts, Language & Business PROGRAM CALENDAR.............................................................................................................................................................. 2 PROGRAM CONTACTS .............................................................................................................................................................. 3 BEFORE YOU GO: REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION ....................................................................................................................... 6 FINANCES ................................................................................................................................................................................ 8 PROGRAM COSTS & BILLING ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 STIPEND ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 CULTURAL REIMBURSEMENT FUNDS .............................................................................................................................................. 8 ADDITIONAL EXPENSES ................................................................................................................................................................... 9 MONEY MATTERS ............................................................................................................................................................................ 9 TRANSPORTATION TO FRANCE .............................................................................................................................................. 12 GROUP TRAVEL.............................................................................................................................................................................. 12 AIR TRAVEL AND LUGGAGE ........................................................................................................................................................... 12 PACKING ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 13 COMPUTERS, INTERNET, AND ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES .............................................................................................................. 14 ARRIVAL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................................................................ 15 PARIS: THE CITY ..................................................................................................................................................................... 16 THE SKIDMORE CENTER IN PARIS ........................................................................................................................................... 17 THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM..................................................................................................................................................... 17 OVERVIEW ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 THE FRENCH HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM ................................................................................................................................... 18 WORKLOAD ................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 COURSE OPTIONS .......................................................................................................................................................................... 19 GRADES AND GRADE CONVERSION .............................................................................................................................................. 23 BOOKS ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES .............................................................................................................................................. 26 LIVING IN PARIS ..................................................................................................................................................................... 27 HOUSING ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 27 RENTER’S AND PERSONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE ......................................................................................................................... 28 GENERAL HOUSING GUIDELINES ................................................................................................................................................... 28 MEALS ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 COMMUNICATIONS....................................................................................................................................................................... 31 TRANSPORTATION IN PARIS .......................................................................................................................................................... 33 HEALTH & SAFETY .................................................................................................................................................................. 35 HEALTH INSURANCE AND MEDICAL CARE..................................................................................................................................... 35 PRESCRIPTION DRUGS AND VITAMINS ......................................................................................................................................... 36 PERSONAL SAFETY & CRIME PREVENTION .................................................................................................................................... 37 EMERGENCY Q & A ........................................................................................................................................................................ 40 ENGAGEMENT LINGUISTIQUE / LANGUAGE COMMITMENT PLEDGE ....................................................................................... 41 APPENDIX I – USEFUL TELEPHONE NUMBERS ......................................................................................................................... 41 APPENDIX II - SAMPLE COSTS IN FRANCE ............................................................................................................................... 43 APPENDIX III - SKIDMORE ACADEMIC POLICIES...................................................................................................................... 44

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

PROGRAM CALENDAR Arrival and departure dates are final, however some event dates are subject to change.

FALL 2015 August 23*

Students depart from the U.S.

August 24

Students arrive in Paris.

August 24-26

Orientation Program in Paris.

August 27-29

Orientation Excursion (overnight trip outside of Paris)

August 29

Meet host families.

August 30

Free day in Paris

August 31

Classes begin at Skidmore Center.

October 24 – November 1

FALL BREAK – Skidmore Center is closed.

December 10

Last day of classes.

December 11-13

Study days.

December 14-18

Final exams.

December 19

Move out of home stay; departure from Paris.

(NOTE: Some students enrolled at a Parisian school or university may have classes this week. Check your schedule.)

SPRING 2016 January 10*

Students depart from the U.S.

January 11

New student arrival to Paris.

January 11-13

Orientation Program in Paris

January 13

Full-year participants return to Paris.

January 14-16

Overnight trip outside of Paris

January 16

Orientation ends, new students meet host families.

January 17

Free day in Paris

January 18

Classes begin at Skidmore Center.

February 20 - February 28

WINTER BREAK – Skidmore Center is closed.

April 23-May 1

SPRING BREAK – Skidmore Center is closed.

May 4

Last day of classes.

May 5 – 8

Study days.

May 9-13

Final exams.

May 14

Move out of home stay; departure from Paris.

(NOTE: Some students enrolled at a Parisian school or university may have classes this week. Check your schedule.) (NOTE: Some students enrolled at a Parisian school or university may have classes this week. Check your schedule.)

* NOTE: Departures from the U.S. to France take place the day BEFORE arrival. If you are not leaving from the U.S., be sure to check that you will arrive on the appropriate day to Paris.

2

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

PROGRAM CONTACTS All numbers are direct-dial from the United States. In the U.S.: OFF-CAMPUS STUDY & EXCHANGES Skidmore College 815 N. Broadway / Starbuck Center 202 Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 USA Tel. 1 (518) 580-5355 Fax: 1 (518) 580-5359 [email protected] http://www.skidmore.edu/ocse/index.php Hours: Monday–Friday, 8:30 AM – 12:00 Noon and 1:00 – 4:30 PM (EST) To contact our office in an emergency outside of our regular business hours, call the Department of Campus Safety at 1 (518) 580-5566. They will be able to reach us. Director: Program Manager:

Cori Filson ([email protected]) Kendra Nelson ([email protected])

In France: SKIDMORE CENTER IN PARIS Please contact Off-Campus Study & Exchanges regarding contact information in Paris.

EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES 2 avenue Gabriel 75008 Paris, France Tel: 011 33 (1) 43 12 22 22 http://france.usembassy.gov/ (in English) http://french.france.usembassy.gov/ (in French)

3

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

PROGRAM OVERVIEW Skidmore College has a longstanding presence in Paris. For 35 years, Skidmore has had an official exchange agreement with the Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV) which allows a French student to study at the Skidmore campus in Saratoga Springs, NY, and Skidmore students to study in Paris taking classes at the Skidmore Center, the Université Paris-Sorbonne, or one of Skidmore’s other partner institutions in Paris. Recently, Skidmore has also signed an exchange agreement with the Université Paris-Diderot (Paris VII) to expand course offerings for students. The Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business program is designed for students at all levels of French language skills (beginner to advanced) to study in Paris, taking courses taught in French or English. The program is available in the fall semester, spring semester, or for the full-year. Running concurrently with the Skidmore in Paris program, Skidmore also offers the Paris Fall Seminar (fall semester only) led by a rotating Skidmore faculty director each fall semester with a specific academic focus. Skidmore operates a Center in Paris with a full-time staff including a Resident Director and Program Assistant. The Skidmore Center is not located on a university campus. Instead, the Center is on the 2nd floor of an apartment building in central Paris with close proximity to public transport. All students will take at least one course at the Skidmore Center, offered only for students on the program. Students will then choose from additional courses offered at the Skidmore Center or courses offered at one or more of Skidmore’s partner institutions throughout Paris.

4

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

GOALS FOR STUDENT LEARNING The goals that follow build on Skidmore’s Goals for Student Learning and Development, specifically those goals focused on developing intercultural understanding and an appreciation of students’ own roles as global citizens. According to Skidmore’s Goals for Student Learning and Development, We want our students to acquire both knowledge and capacities that enable them to initiate and embrace change and apply their learning lifelong in new contexts. We believe that this learning takes place throughout our students’ experience, both inside the classroom and out, on campus and off. I. Knowledge  Acquire knowledge of human cultures and the physical world through study in the arts, humanities, and social sciences  Understand social and cultural diversity in national and global contexts II. Intellectual Skills and Practice  Communicate effectively across varied linguistic, cultural, and social contexts  Interact effectively and collaboratively with individuals and across social identities III. Personal and Social Values  Interrogate one’s own values in relation to those of others, across social and cultural differences  Develop practical competencies for managing a personal, academic, and community life IV. Transformation  Integrate and apply knowledge and creative thought from multiple disciplines in new contexts  Embrace intellectual integrity, humility, and courage

5

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

BEFORE YOU GO: REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION PASSPORTS U.S. Citizens Your passport must be valid with an expiration date at least six (6) months AFTER your anticipated departure from France. Individuals with passports expiring too early will not be eligible to receive a French visa, which is required to enter France. American citizens who need to apply for or renew a new passport should immediately begin the process. Visit the U.S. Dept. of State Web site at http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english.html for details. Fall and academic year participants should be able to obtain a new/renewed passport using the standard processing service, as long as the students order their passports before April 15. Spring semester students who need to apply/renewed passport are strongly encouraged to consider paying the extra fee for expedited service to ensure your passport arrives in enough time to allow you sufficient opportunity to apply for a French visa. Non-U.S. Citizens Students from countries other than the United States must confirm their entry requirements for France for a visit of “more than 90 days” by consulting the French consulate in New York City; the consulate provides this information on their Web site at http://www.consulfrance-newyork.org/-Visas,108-. Please then inform Off-Campus Study & Exchanges of your entry requirements, and whether or not you need a visa to study in France. If you are a non-U.S. citizen, you may be able to apply for a visa at one of the French consulates in the U.S.; however, it is up to the discretion of the French consulate. Early planning is important and your timely inquiry and application to the consulate is critical to increasing your chances for positive outcome with your visa application. E.U. Citizens Citizens of the European Union do not need a visa to enter France. However, EU citizens should check with the French Embassy to determine if additional documentation is required to be a visiting student in France.

STUDENT VISA

The Office of Off-Campus Study & Exchanges advises students on obtaining a French Long Stay Student Visa in the United States. Students needing to apply for a French visa in a country other than the U.S. are responsible for knowing their application requirements and the documents they will need to request from OCSE. At the time this guide was written, U.S. citizens planning to stay longer than 3 months for purposes other than tourism must have a long stay visa to enter France. Non-U.S. citizens must check with the French consulate for entry requirements (see previous section). A visa is an official authorization appended to a passport, permitting entry into and travel within a particular country or region. A student visa is an entrance permit that allows you to legally undertake academic studies. The visa application is a two-part process. The first step requires students to gain approval to apply for a visa from CampusFrance, a French organization that is part of the Embassy of France, via an online registration system called PASTEL. Confirmation of CampusFrance’s approval is required to apply for a visa. The second step of the visa application is to apply for a visa IN PERSON at a French consulate (by appointment only). Only a French consulate can issue visas for France. While Off-Campus Study & Exchanges will aid students in the visa application process, all students are advised to make early contact with the French consulate at which they will apply, to become familiar with the documentation requirements for the visa application. Students may also be required to return to the French consulate after their initial appointment to pick up their completed visa. OCSE will provide all students with a separate 6

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

document outlining the visa application instructions. BEGIN THE APPLICATION PROCESS AS SOON AS YOU RECEIVE INSTRUCTIONS, and contact OCSE with any questions. Please note that a valid U.S. passport is required to gain approval from CampusFrance and to apply for a French visa. Your passport must be valid for at least six (6) months beyond your anticipated return date (i.e. 6 months after the program ends). If you do not yet have a passport, or if your passport will become invalid within six (6) months of the end of the program, you should apply or renew your passport immediately.

7

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

FINANCES PROGRAM COSTS & BILLING

Students will be charged the comprehensive fee for their semester or year off campus. This fee is equal to Skidmore’s tuition, on-campus apartment rate, board, and mandatory college fees. Students will be billed by Skidmore’s Bursar directly for the comprehensive fee. The Skidmore program fee covers tuition and mandatory academic fees (up to 18 credits per semester), supplemental international health insurance coverage, room and partial board with a French host family, a monthly meal stipend of approximately 400€, local transportation pass, as well as all program-related excursions and field trips in France. Please note that unlimited meal plans are not available on Skidmore programs.

* Certain courses may require additional fees, such as studio art and music. More detail about program fees and billing is located at http://www.skidmore.edu/ocse/finance/index.php. OCSE’s financial policies are available at http://www.skidmore.edu/ocse/policies/financial.php.

STIPEND

All students participating in the Skidmore in Paris program will be given a monthly stipend intended to cover the costs of meals not provided by the home-stay family and a local transportation pass in Paris. For more details about meals and transportation in Paris, please review the following sections later in this handbook: Meals (p. 31) and Transportation in Paris (p. 34). The stipend includes:  Meals: Approximately 400€ per month  Transportation pass: Approximately 70€ per month Upon arrival in Paris, students will open a French bank account. Stipends will then be deposited directly into each student’s bank account on a monthly basis. The on-site Resident Director, Loren Ringer, will explain the distribution schedule of the stipend once students arrive onsite. Please note that students will be given a partial stipend for the months of December, January and May since the program does not operate for the entirety of these months.

CULTURAL REIMBURSEMENT FUNDS Skidmore will reimburse students up to 100€ per semester for receipts submitted for activities related to French culture with a maximum reimbursement of 20€ per event. All reimbursements will be deposited into the student’s French bank account. Activities must be in Paris or the surrounding suburbs and are subject to final approval by the Resident Director. Students will submit receipts to the Resident Director. The Resident Director will provide students more detail about the cultural reimbursement program and the reimbursement schedule during the onsite orientation.

8

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

ADDITIONAL EXPENSES

In addition to fees paid directly to Skidmore College, there are additional expenses students should expect. Students are responsible for: airfare, passport and visa costs, books, cell phone and usage, occasional meals not covered by the host family or meal stipend, voluntary field trips and excursions, and personal expenses. While personal expenses will vary from student to student, OCSE recommends that students budget an extra $2,000-$3,000 per semester for personal expenses (not including independent travel outside of Paris). Pre-departure Expenses Below is a list of estimated expenses students can expect to incur prior to departure for Paris (these are approximate costs and are subject to change). Skidmore application fee U.S. Passport1: French student visa2: Round-trip Airfare3:

$25 due at the time of application $135 minimum for a new passport or $110 to renew $250 +/- (does not include travel to/from the Consulate or return envelope postage) $900-1,400 (add $200-$400 for connecting flights)

As of July 2014. Consult U.S. Post Office or U.S. Department of State for updated prices. Price includes $ 180 CampusFrance registration fee and visa application fee paid to French consulate at the time of visa application. Fee paid to consulate is subject to change according to currency exchange rates and cost of visa. 3 Airfare costs are approximate and based on recent past rates from New York City area, and are subject to change according to airline policies. 1 2

Expenses after Arrival Students will also incur certain expenses once they arrive on-site in Paris. Below is a list of estimated expenses that students will have in the first few weeks of the program. Books Cell Phone Cell Phone Usage Registration with OFII1

~200-350€ Students should expect to pay between 50-80€ per class ~40€ (to purchase a pay-as-you-go cell phone with start up mintues) ~20€ per month (This amount can vary depending on usage.) ~58€ (processing fees for OFII residence form and medical exam); OFII registration is required for full-year students

Registration with OFII is only required for full-year students. Semester-only students should not complete the OFII registration unless they come as a fall-only student and plan to extend their visa while in France or would like to work while in France.

1

Please see Appendix II for a sample list of daily expenses in Paris.

MONEY MATTERS

Your spending habits in Paris will determine your budget. Keep in mind when planning your budget that most students find Paris an expensive city, particularly with the stronger Euro. There are, however, many ways to spend less money. Ask the Skidmore staff for restaurant recommendations and advice. (The exchange rate will fluctuate, so it is advisable that you check the exchange rate often to stay on track with your budget.) We suggest that you bring approximately 400 Euros in cash to begin your stay. To obtain cash during the semester, most students use an ATM/credit card. We recommend that you pay attention to exchange fees you may have to pay and do not keep too much cash on-hand. Photocopy the front and back off ALL credit cards and ATM cards and store copies in your room in a safe place. You will want to have these copies if your cards are lost or stolen. In France, the most widely used card is the Carte Bancaire (CB), which is a debit card (immediate debit).The CB card is the standard European bank card and you can withdraw cash wherever the CB logo is 9

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

displayed, or use it across the counter. All the cards in France operate on a smart card basis ('chip and pin'), through the use of a microchip embedded in the card, rather than a magnetic strip. You will be given a PIN number with your card, which you will need to use every time you make a transaction. The card is entered into a payment terminal/ATM and you then enter your four digit code and press the validation key. You have to leave the card in the terminal all the way through the transaction. Mean Exchange Rate $1.05 = €1,00  €0,94 = $1.00 (March 2015, http://www.oanda.com/) Traveler's Cheques Traveler’s cheques (in U.S. Dollars or in Euros) are an old stand-by for traveling abroad, and the choice is yours for whether or not to use them. They can be useful as back-up in emergencies if your wallet is stolen or lost, but they are also less convenient than cash or credit/debit. If you do choose to take traveler’s cheques with you to Paris, remember to record the numbers of each of your traveler’s cheques and keep the list in a safe place separate from the cheques themselves. Keep your list up-to-date if you spend any checks, noting the numbers of the checks cashed and the dates. It sounds tedious, but if your traveler’s checks are lost or stolen, you will be reimbursed and the tedium will be rewarded. The program staff can let you know you where you can exchange your cheques. Visa® Card Called carte bleue in France, there is sometimes a minimum 1€ purchase to use the card in a store and 10€ in restaurants. Make sure the card is in your name and that you have an international pin number (numbers only, not letters). Ask your bank or credit card company what type of overdraft you have on your account, if any, and if you will be charged any other fees. Be sure you inform them that you will be using your card internationally so that they do not put a hold on your card for “suspicious activity.” Also, check what weekly or monthly limits may apply. Mastercard® Comparable to the Visa® card, but not as widely accepted at bank ATMs. American Express® Card With this card, in your name, you may cash personal checks up to $500 every 3 weeks and use the American Express® Traveler’s Fund card to obtain Euros at ATMs. You are also exempt from traveler’s check exchange fees at their branch. Ask the Skidmore in Paris staff for assistance in finding the nearest American Express® office. Cirrus® and Plus® Cards These are ATM cards without a credit card symbol. You may have to look around a bit for ATMs to use your card. Some BNP, Credit Agricole, and post offices will accept them, but you will be charged for each transaction. Find out your bank fees before you leave for France. Chip and PIN Technology Many countries around the world, particularly in Europe, have been transitioning to chip and PIN technology in their credit and debit cards. Chip and PIN technology is a new, more secure way of paying with credit or debit cards. The card has a computer chip embedded into it and it also has a PIN (personal identification number). In countries with Chip and PIN technology, credit cards are no longer “swiped” on a magnetic strip as is done in the USA. Instead, the card goes through or is inserted into a chip reader and the cardholder must enter his or her PIN to complete the sale. American debit/credit cards should still work in ATMs in other countries regardless of chip-and-pin technology, but you may have to request for your card to be swiped instead of using a Chip and PIN reader. Keep in mind that some restaurants and stores may only take cards on the Chip and PIN system, so you should always have cash on hand. Unmanned payment 10

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

kiosks (typically found in train stations) usually require cards with the Chip and PIN technology. Some US banks and credit card companies are now offering cards with the Chip and PIN technology. Check with your bank and/or credit card company for more information. Personal Bank Accounts To distribute the program stipend to each student, students are required to open a French bank account upon arrival in Paris. As this is a personal bank account, students and parents can choose to make additional deposits or wire money into this bank account. Students will close their French bank account prior to leaving France at the end of the program. The program staff will provide details about how to close the bank account prior to the end of the semester in Paris. Even though the students will have a French bank account, many students will still choose to keep their bank account in the U.S. Students should be able to access their U.S. bank account via online banking and ATM withdrawals. Check with your bank prior to departure about fees for foreign withdrawal—they can be as much as $5.00 or $10.00 per transaction.

11

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

TRANSPORTATION TO FRANCE GROUP TRAVEL

Students are responsible for the payment and booking of their own international travel to Paris. However, OCSE will select an optional group or preferred flight (official “group flights” require 10 or more travelers per airline policies) with a student fare to the Aéroport Roissy-Charles de Gaulle (CDG). OCSE will notify participants of the flight details, including airline name, flight number, and U.S. departure city, as well as the travel agent to contact for reservations. Skidmore in Paris group/preferred flights typically depart from a New York City-area airport. As a courtesy, students who are at CDG at the time of the group/preferred flight’s arrival will be met by a program representative and will be escorted to the program center. All other students, including those arriving to Paris by train, are responsible for arriving to the Skidmore in Paris Center at their own expense at the required time, which will be explained to students in e-mail prior to the start of the program. ALL STUDENTS must confirm their travel details with OCSE and Paris staff prior to arrival. E-mail OCSE at [email protected] or contact the Skidmore in Paris office by writing to the Resident Director at [email protected] Full-year students returning to Paris for the spring semester are responsible for their own transportation back to Paris (at their own expense) for the start of the spring semester. They may utilize the group transportation for the spring semester students from the CDG airport to the Skidmore Center if they make arrangements with the Paris Center staff prior to the end of the fall semester and arrive at CDG at the required time. Group transportation to the airport will NOT be provided at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for making their own transportation arrangements (at their own expense) and must depart their home-stay on the designated day.

AIR TRAVEL AND LUGGAGE Plan to arrive at the airport AT LEAST two to three hours before your flight, according to airline and/or airport recommendations and requirements. Be sure to allow yourself enough time to account for slow road traffic on the way to the airport or long lines at security check-in at the airport. You will be responsible for making another reservation and getting yourself to Paris and to the Skidmore Center if you should miss your flight. It can be helpful in these situations to have your travel agent’s or airline’s customer service number accessible while you are traveling. The regulations regarding weight, dimensions, and number of bags allowed for carry-on and checked luggage on U.S. domestic and international flights can vary among the various airlines. Be sure to verify these limits before you pack. Many airlines now charge standard fees for some or all checked bags, plus additional fees if you try to check a bag that weighs more or is larger in size than the maximum allowance. Excess luggage may be refused and/or subject to fines. It is recommended that you use luggage that is sturdy enough to take some abuse, as baggage handlers are not able to treat each bag as precious cargo. You will also want to ensure that all clamps, handles, and zippers are in good working order and that you secure them to your bag before travel. Pack all necessities/valuables in carry-on luggage only, such as this program handbook, travel itinerary, one change of clothes, music player, laptop, jewelry, etc. Any money and IDs you will carry while travelling should be carried on your body under clothing, and not in a bag of any kind. Label your luggage with your full name, address, and destination abroad (use the Skidmore in Paris Center address for the trip to Paris, and perhaps the address of a parent’s workplace for the trip home (for reasons of personal safety, you may not wish to use your home address). You may also want to protect your 12

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

luggage with personal property or luggage insurance. Because of security regulations, do not leave your luggage unattended while travelling.

PACKING

Students are encouraged to pack lightly, especially in regards to clothes. One strategy to accomplish this goal is to decide what you THINK you will need and then take only HALF of it. However, if you can make room in your luggage to bring certain necessities, you can avoid spending unnecessarily when you get there. Take only enough toiletries, etc., to carry you through the first few weeks, as almost all toiletries are available in Paris. If you have your own favorite brand of a particular toiletry, consider bringing a sufficient supply with you.

Does this sound too minimalist to you? Consider this: Not only will you have to carry your luggage

throughout your trip, and upon arrival, but you will also likely purchase several personal items throughout the semester/year. You should also consider that some host families will come to pick up their students in a private vehicle, while others may arrive using public transportation. Since French people tend to have small cars, you are encouraged to pack lightly. It could be embarrassing if your baggage doesn’t fit in their car! Also, since most host families live in old buildings without an elevator, you should be able to easily carry your own bags for at least a few city blocks and up/down stairs. REMEMBER: Pre-pack a small travel bag for the Orientation session that will take place upon arrival to France. You should pack enough clothing and toiletries for 5 days. If you cannot use this bag as a carry-on piece, try to place it already prepacked in one of your checked bags. When you arrive to Paris, you may only have a short time to store the bulk ofyour luggage at the Skidmore Center before the start of orientation. The following is some advice about what to pack to help you get started: 

   

  

 

Small pre-packed travel bag/backpack for onsite orientation and the orientation excursion (see “Orientation” section). Students leave their big luggage at the Center and take a small bag to the orientation hotel and orientation excursion. Remember hotel rooms in Paris tend to be small. Clothes you can layer, as it tends to be cooler in apartments and in the Center and warmer on the Métro (really warm, sometimes). One all-weather jacket to protect you against rain, which allows you enough room to wear a heavy sweater under it on colder days. Comfortable walking shoes, warm socks, and informal clothing. One outfit for a special occasion; French people generally dress up their outfits with accessories (scarves, ties, jewelry). Nice jeans (i.e. no holes, tears, excessive fading, or fraying) can be worn almost anywhere, especially when what you have on with it is nice. Money pouch or belt for your cash and ID/passport. Travel alarm clock: (battery-operated is best because electric current and plug shapes and sizes are not the same in France—see section below). Inexpensive present for your French host family, such as typical American food, small collectible, or a book about your home town or state (can be in English) NOTE: If you want to take food, check with U.S. Customs rules regarding what is allowed to be transported in a passenger plane. Fever thermometer in Fahrenheit (French ones are in centigrade). Bathrobe and slippers, even if you are not accustomed to wearing these items at home. (You must NOT walk around in bare feet in your host family’s home, a bathrobe will help you maintain a certain amount of modesty and will help you keep warm if your host family prefers a cooler indoor temperature.) 13

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

 

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

Printed pictures of your home, friends, and family to share with host family and new friends. These are also great conversation starters! All prescription medication and the doctor’s scripts that go with them should be packed in your carry-on luggage.

TIP: Leave fine jewelry and other similar valuables at home.

COMPUTERS, INTERNET, AND ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES

US electrical appliances operate using 110 Volts AC (Alternating Current), while appliances in France and most other countries operate using 220 Volts. The shape of French outlets is also different. You might need an adapter, converter or transformer, depending on the appliances you take to France. BEFORE departing for France, check all of your products’ specifications usually listed on the appliance manufacturer’s label located on the back or bottom of the item. Most modern electronic equipment such as battery charger and computers will not be affected by the difference of voltage as they are dual-voltage (110V/240V). Then, you may only need an adapter plug. Consider buying certain electronics (i.e. hairdryer) in Paris to save space and to avoid buying a converter or ruining an American appliance due to the voltage difference. The Skidmore Center has eight (8) computers available for student use during office hours. However, students are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptop computer. The Skidmore Center is also equipped with wireless internet access (WiFi). Please note that the Center computers are not as current or fast as the public computers provided on the Skidmore campus in Saratoga Springs. In general, the frequency of your internet usage will most likely change in Paris as a result of limited access and a busy schedule. Also, it is not unusual to submit academic papers that are handwritten in France; however you may wish to submit only typewritten work. If you do decide to bring a laptop, you will also have to bring a plug adapter for electrical use/to recharge your battery, as well as a cable for internet connections (if you connect via modem, not WiFi). NOTE: You will have access to the internet in your home-stay. Internet speed and access may not be as fast as what is provided on the Skidmore campus. In general, the French will access the internet much less frequently that Americans.

14

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

ARRIVAL INFORMATION We strongly recommend that you do not plan on arriving in France before the program arrival date. All students must notify OCSE of their arrival information by JUNE 10 (for fall and academic year participants) or by DECEMBER 10 (for spring participants) by e‐mail or by completing the flight information questionnaire in their MyOCSE online account. Students need to submit a copy of the exact itinerary provided by the travel agent or airline. Those arriving to Paris by train should also provide full travel details. Skidmore in Paris staff will meet students arriving on the group/preferred flight. Students arriving independently will receive instructions about meeting the group at the Skidmore Center on the scheduled day of arrival. All students should be sure to have their passport stamped by French immigration upon arrival at Charles de Gaulle airport. Most immigration officials will automatically stamp a passport, but sometimes they are in a rush to push people through and the stamping of a passport can be overlooked. This stamp is necessary for additional processing of your student visa. If you are travelling to Paris via another European city, your passport will be stamped when you arrive in that city and not when you arrive in Paris.

ORIENTATION The orientation for the Skidmore in Paris program includes a 3-day stay in Paris and an 3-day/2-night excursion outside of Paris. Transportation, room, and board are provided during orientation. Lectures in French language, culture, and history will be complemented by guided visits to sites of historical importance. An overview of French academic, social, and, family culture and expectations will also be discussed. Students take a French language placement exam during this time to determine their French grammar course level and eligibility to enroll in regular university courses taught in French. Specific details for the location and tentative schedule of the onsite orientation will be provided prior to the students’ departure for France. Students will receive a variety of program-related materials during Orientation, including a student ID card. This card will provide discounts to theaters, cinemas, and museums (in most cases, museum entrance is free). Students will buy a French cell phone upon arrival. For several reasons, all of the students are required to have a French cell phone number.

15

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

PARIS: THE CITY LES ARRONDISSEMENTS

Paris is divided into 20 different neighborhoods called arrondissements. Arrondissements are named according to their number. For example, you might live in the 5th arrondissement, whic h would be written as 5ème (or 5e) in French. HINT: If you know the postal code of any address in Paris, you can easily identify in which arrondissement it is located because Parisian postal codes take the form of - 75XXX - with 75 being the code for Paris and the last two digits being equal to the arrondissement (e.g. 75003 is the postal code for the 3rd arrondissement, where the Skidmore in Paris Center can be found). The 3rd, along with the 4th, arrondissement makes up the Marais, one of the oldest neighborhoods in Paris. Situated on the Right Bank, many 17th century mansions that once housed the noblest families in Paris can still be seen as one walks along its streets. The suburbs are called the banlieue. (Source: www.parisnet.com)

MAP OF PARIS

Skidmore Center

16

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

THE SKIDMORE CENTER IN PARIS Staffed by our Resident Director and staff, the Skidmore Center is located in the heart of Paris, in the 3rd arrondissement, close to the Centre Georges Pompidou, the well-known and vast complex for the arts and culture. Although Skidmore partners with many institutions in Paris, the Skidmore Center is not located on a university campus. It is an independent study center, which is housed in a large apartment on the 2nd floor of an apartment building. The Skidmore Center is centrally located in Paris, making the center a home base for our students while they are in Paris. The Skidmore Center houses Skidmore’s administrative offices, classrooms for program courses, computer facilities, and a small resource library. The director and staff are available throughout the program to provide whatever support and assistance our students might need. Every fall, the Skidmore professor serving as the Director for the Paris Fall Seminar will also have an office in the program Center. Skidmore aims to use only French in the program Center, maximizing the linguistic benefit of the program and integration into French culture. The Center is open from Monday to Thursday between 9:00 AM and 5:45 PM and Friday 9:00 AM 1:00 PM.

17

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM OVERVIEW The Skidmore in Paris program is designed to develop a student’s French language skills and also allows students to pursue studies in the arts, humanities, social sciences, business, and French studies (courses are taught in French and English). The program can accommodate students at all language levels – from beginning to advanced. Students will take courses at the Skidmore Center and partner institutions throughout Paris. The coursework offered at the Skidmore Center is just for the students on the program. Even though the Skidmore in Paris program is a Skidmore program, students will find a different academic culture in Paris than they would find on a campus in the United States. All faculty and instructors will be international or French and will employ the academic structure and expectations found in the French academic system. The difference in academic culture coupled with the fact that students will take most if not all of their coursework in French creates a very academically challenging semester or full-year in Paris. Skidmore Academic Policies Skidmore in Paris is part of the Skidmore College community. Therefore, the Skidmore College Standards for Academic Excellence and Conduct apply just as much to you in Paris as they do on the Saratoga Springs campus. While studying off campus, all students must adhere to the Honor Code and Academic Policies in place at Skidmore College. Students are responsible for understanding Skidmore College’s academic policies. Students must also follow OCSE’s academic policies as well as any academic policies in place for the Skidmore in Paris program. Please see Appendix III of this handbook for more details. Maintaining Off-Campus Study Eligibility Only students in good academic, financial, and social standing are eligible to study off campus. Participation in an off-campus study program is contingent upon maintaining a good academic, financial, and social standing at Skidmore College. If your cumulative GPA falls below a 3.0 or if your social standing changes dramatically, OCSE reserves the right to withdraw you from your program.

THE FRENCH HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM

Almost everything about the French higher education system is different from what students are used to in the U.S. Be prepared to adjust to a different instructional style in France. Since all courses – those at the Skidmore Center and those at outside institutions – are taught in the French style, this is an important consideration as you prepare for your academic experience. These differences can make for a difficult adjustment for some students and it takes time for them to transition to the new system. We have included a very brief overview of the French system here and expect it will be explained in depth during your onsite orientation in Paris. To begin, the French system is much more structured in terms of students’ degree paths. Students decide on what they want to study very early on in their academic careers and enter university with a very specific, focused curricular path. The exploratory nature of the U.S. liberal arts curriculum is rare in France. This can be challenging for our students when they try to enter into third-year French university courses in certain disciplines. While U.S. students might be well-prepared for third-year study in the U.S., they may not have the academic background to enter those courses or succeed in those courses in France. This is certainly not always the case and is not meant to scare students into staying away from enrollment in the French university system. Instead, it is meant to prepare students for the possibility that certain courses or disciplines may be limited in spite of your academic preparation in the States. Another difference is the level of student support and services provided for students by French institutions. The system is very bureaucratic and much less “user-friendly” than what you are used to in the U.S. While 18

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

in the States structures are often in place to help remove barriers, that is not the case in France. Professors may or may not be available for questions during and outside of class. Teaching methods are often very different with much more lecture and much less discussion in class. A syllabus that details course requirements is not standard in European universities. Administrative support structures to guide you through the semester may be non-existent at the school you are attending. The good news is that the Skidmore in Paris staff is there to help you navigate the system. And, above all, you chose to study in a different country to have a new experience. Embrace it!

WORKLOAD Above all else, this is an academic program. Yes, you will certainly enjoy your time in Paris. Yes, you will have plenty of opportunities to explore and travel. The social aspects of the program are important as they allow you to engage in the local culture and enhance your overall cultural and linguistic learning. However, Skidmore’s expectation is that you will put academics first. Past students have stressed that this is an academically challenging program with a heavy workload. This is due to several factors. First, the differences between the U.S. and French systems are great and it can take a while to adjust. This academic adjustment, on top of the cultural adjustment, can be tough for some students. Second, you will be taking some or maybe even all of your courses in French. Even students with strong French language skills will experience a significant difference between taking classes in Saratoga Springs and taking classes in Paris. In Paris, you are living in French, both in and out of the classroom 24/7. For students taking classes taught in French, all reading, oral and written work will be in French. Learning within a different cultural context is one of many important study abroad experiences. It is exciting yet challenging. Finally, you may be taking course at multiple institutions. This is a great opportunity and gives you access to a broader variety of course topics, professor styles, linguistic styles, and people. It is not, however, the typical French student experience. As in the States, most French students take their courses at one institution. Specifically, it might feel more difficult at first as you get used to the commute to several institutions, adjust to your daily and weekly schedule, and navigate the expectations of different institutions and professors. Effective time management will be critical to your ability to do well academically and enjoy the city.

COURSE OPTIONS

All program participants must carry a standard course load of 14-17 credits per semester. Students who wish to carry a course load over 18 credits must receive permission from the Skidmore in Paris Resident Director and OCSE. There will also be additional credit fees for the overload (paid by the student). Most students will take the majority of their courses at the Skidmore Center. Skidmore also partners with a number of academic institutions in Paris to offer a wider range of course options for students. Enrollment at some partner institutions, such as the French universities Université Paris-Sorbonne, Université ParisDiderot, and l’Institut Catholique, depend on linguistic competence. In order to be eligible for enrollment at an outside institution that offers courses taught in French, students must reach a certain level on their language placement exam taken during orientation week after you arrive in Paris. French language majors who have completed at least one literature course are required to take at least one course at a French university, and are encouraged to take more than one, if possible. Course Registration & Academic Advising Students will submit their initial course preferences at the time of application; this is developed in consultation with your academic advisor on campus and based on the courses we expect to offer at the Skidmore Center. Remember, course offerings in Paris will vary semester to semester and we cannot guarantee that a specific course will be offered the semester you are in Paris. Instead, we ask that you indicate preferences based on your graduation requirements and academic interests. Please also note that 19

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

courses at the Skidmore Center with less than 4 students enrolled may be cancelled; we will do all we can to find an appropriate substitute if this should happen. After acceptance, each student will meet with the Skidmore in Paris Resident Director during his visit to campus prior to studying in Paris. In that meeting, you can discuss the finalized list of courses to be offered at the Center and course options outside the Skidmore Center (depending on your language level or area of interest). During orientation in Paris, you will take your language placement exam. After the exam, you will meet with the Resident Director again to finalize your course schedule based on your language placement exam results. Required Courses All students in the Skidmore in Paris program are required to a French language course (3 or 4 credits), based on results of language placement exam taken during orientation week in Paris. Full-year participants are required to take the Methodology & Advanced Grammar Review (3 credits) course during the spring semester. In addition to the required French language course, students can choose to take other courses offered at the Skidmore Center or partner institutions in Paris. Skidmore Center Courses Each semester, the Skidmore Center will provide 5-7 courses just for students on the program. Sample course offerings at the Skidmore Center each semester (exact course offerings will vary):        

French language courses (placement dependent on language proficiency test) French Culture, Identity and the Media (taught in French) French cinema or literature (taught in French) French Phonetics (taught in French) French history or culture (taught in English) 1-2 Art History course(s) (taught in French or English) 1-2 300-level English department course (taught in English) 1-3 additional courses that would count toward the French major/minor (literature, culture, etc.)

Past course offerings have included the following: Cinema, French History & Society, French 19th Century Art, French 20th Century Art, Paris Art & Architecture, Francophone Studies, American Expatriate Writers, and Metaphysical Poetry. To take courses taught in French at the Skidmore Center, students usually need to have completed at least FF 203 Intensive Intermediate French on campus or must score a certain level on their language placement exam taken during orientation week. Courses taught in English are available to all students on the program. Courses outside of the Skidmore Center In addition to the courses offered at the Skidmore Center, students may be eligible to take coursework at one of Skidmore’s partner institutions in Paris. Skidmore parnters with a wide range of institutions in Paris, some offering courses taught in French, English or both. Enrollment in a course taught in French at a French university, such as Université Paris-Sorbonne, Université Paris-Diderot, and l’Institut Catholique, depends on linguistic competence. Upon arrival in Paris, students will take a placement test that determines their language level and whether they are qualified to take regular university courses taught in French. If enrolling in regular university courses taught in French, the Skidmore Center will organize group tutorials. The tutor will help students navigate the French university system as well as assist with understanding lectures, readings, and assignments. 20

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

NOTE: The list of courses available at outside institutions will NOT be available until after arrival in Paris. Some institutions may not post their courses for the semester until the week of registration at that institution. This is the French system; the Paris staff do not have prior access to the courses and class schedules. Therefore, students should approach registration in outside courses with extreme patience and flexibility. We also ask that you work around the Skidmore Center course schedule, which will be finalized prior to your registration in outside institutions. We simply cannot change the Skidmore Center course schedule to accommodate outside classes. The following partner institutions require advanced language skills to take regular university courses taught in French. These institutions also offer a limited number of courses taught in English in various departments.  Institut Catholique de Paris (history, philosophy, social sciences)  Université Paris-Sorbonne (French language, literature, humanities, etc.)  Université Paris-Diderot (american studies, social sciences, humanities, economics, etc) Students with lower French language proficiency may still be able to take a course outside of the Skidmore Center at one of Skidmore’s other partner institutions that offer courses in English or courses for students at the intermediate language level. Académie de Port Royal (drawing and painting) American Business School in Paris (management, business, and economics) Centre de Danse du Marais (ballet, modern dance, jazz, yoga, salsa, flamenco) ILCF (Institut de Langue et de Culture Françaises) at the Institut Catholique de Paris (french studies, history, social sciences, government, international relations)  Studio Harmonic (ballet, contemporary dance)  Studio Vermés (photography, history of photography)  Schola Cantorum (music – for majors/minors only)    

All students interested in enrolling in outside courses should understand the challenges involved in class registration and attendance. Registration in courses outside the Center is typically confusing and frustrating, with little prior course information available before the first day of class (including days and times). This means that we cannot guarantee any courses before arrival in Paris and on-site registration at the university. It also means that students may not find the exact course they need at the institution they want to attend. It is very important to be flexible when choosing courses from partner institutions outside of the Skidmore Center.

21

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

Students that do enroll in a course outside the Center will need to discuss how they will be assessed for the course (assignments and exam schedules) directly with their professors as Skidmore students are typically not present in Paris for regular university exams. This can be intimidating at first since it is not common practice in the U.S. Skidmore’s Paris staff will do all they can to advise and support students through the registration process and the first few weeks of class. Students also may find that the commute to and from outside courses is challenging. It is important to consider this fact when determining where you might want to register for courses. Due to scheduling and commute time, it may be difficult to take outside classes at more than one institution. The Paris staff will advise you regarding what is reasonable given your academic needs and other scheduled classes. Clearly, students should be prepared to approach the process with extreme patience and flexibility. This is a great view into French bureaucracy! It is also a fantastic academic opportunity that we encourage students to consider seriously. Students will also need to work with the relevant department chairs at Skidmore to get course approvals for any courses taken outside the Center. Students can request course approvals via email by sending a copy of the course description, outline or syllabus to the department chair at Skidmore. If the department chair grants course approval by email, it is the student’s responsibility to forward that approval to the Resident Director and the Program Manager in OCSE. Below is a guide on which partner institutions work best for certain majors/minors found at Skidmore. Majors/Minors

Courses available at:

French

Skidmore Center, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Institut Catholique, ILCF

American Studies

Skidmore Center, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Université Paris-Diderot

Art History

Skidmore Center, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Institut Catholique, Studio Vermès

Art (Studio)

Académie de Port Royal, Studio Vermès

Dance

Centre de Danse du Marais, Studio Harmonic

Economics

Institut Catholique, American Business School, Université Paris-Diderot

English

Skidmore Center, Université Paris-Sorbonne

Government

Institut Catholique, Université Paris-Diderot, ILCF

History

Université Paris-Sorbonne, Institut Catholique, Université Paris-Diderot, ILCF

International Affairs

Université Paris-Sorbonne, Institut Catholique, ILCF, American Business School

Management & Business

American Business School

Music

Schola Cantorum, Université Paris-Sorbonne

Psychology

Université Paris-Diderot

22

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

Internships Internships for academic credit may be undertaken only by full-year participants during the spring semester. Internships may be available in anthropology, art history, business, cinema, education, French, government, history, politics, psychology, and theater. Opportunities may also exist for teaching internships in Parisian secondary schools and universities. Students must have the appropriate professional and/or academic background to be placed in any internship. Full-year students that are interested in an internship should meet with Resident Director in the fall to discuss internship options for the spring semester. Although the program staff will work to get your internship plans finalized before the end of the fall semester, some internship placements cannot be finalized until the start of the spring semester. If the internship is not finalized by the start of the spring semester, students are encouraged to enroll in an additional course for the semester, which they can drop if their internship is finalized at a later date. Students are encouraged to remain flexible during this process and discuss any concerns with the Resident Director. Once you arrive on site, you will receive more specific information about the internship options, placement process and timeline, and expect ations for a successful placement in Paris.

GRADES AND GRADE CONVERSION All courses for Skidmore in Paris will be graded according to the French grading system, even courses taught at the Skidmore Center. This shift in grading can be a challenge for students who are used to the U.S. grading structure. For example, in the French grading system, students are graded on a scale from 0 to 20. Students sometimes panic when they do not receive an 18 or 20 on their first test. Remember though, the French joke that 20 is reserved for God…that’s how difficult it is to get. The following guidelines are meant to help you prepare for the differences between the U.S. and French grading systems. Of course, the Paris staff is available to help you navigate the new structure as well and a good part of the Paris orientation will be used to cover academic structures and expectations. Grades Credits earned on the Skidmore in Paris program are treated as Skidmore courses. Credits may be applied towards major, minor, and distribution requirements with departmental approval; grades will appear on your transcript and count toward your GPA. Students may have a limited number of courses available for satisfactory/unsatisfactory – see guidelines below. Students may not audit classes. You must receive pre-approval for all courses you would like to take in Paris. Most students get courses pre-approved at the time of application, but you can still request course approvals from after you arrive in Paris. Students can request course approvals via email by sending a copy of the course description, outline or syllabus to the relevant department chair at Skidmore. If the department chair grants course approval by email, it is the student’s responsibility to forward that approval to the Resident Director and the Program Manager in OCSE. If you are a non-Skidmore student participating on a Skidmore program, you will receive a Skidmore College transcript at the end of your program. Please check with your home campus for details regarding transfer of credits and grades. All students should note that grades from Paris (and all abroad programs) may be significantly delayed; they will not be available in the same timeframe that grades for on-campus courses are. Typically, grades 23

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

are reported to the Registrar no earlier than 60 days after the end of the semester in Paris. This timetable is based on the due dates set by the French university system and, unfortunately, cannot be controlled by the Skidmore in Paris staff. We urge you to be patient. Grade Conversion Skidmore in Paris has developed grade conversion scales for program center courses and courses taken at partner institutions in Paris. This scale will be sued to determine your Skidmore grade. More details about the grading scale will be provided onsite. French Grades 19-20 16-18.9 15-15.9 14-14.9 13-13.9 11-12.9 10-10.9 9-9.9 8-8.9 7-7.9 6-6.9 5-5.9 0-4.9

Skidmore Equivalent A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Grading Option Skidmore students are eligible to take a maximum of one course per semester graded S/U, excluding internships. Please note: Not all courses in Paris will have an option for S/U. If you wish to take a course S/U, you may do so only with permission of the Resident Director and Off-Campus Study & Exchanges. Courses graded S/U will only count toward general elective credit unless the student has the approval of the relevant Skidmore department chair. French majors are able to count one course taken at the Université Paris-Sorbonne graded S/U toward the French major requirements. S/U grades do not affect the student’s grade-point average, but a student receiving an Unsatisfactory will not receive credit for the course. The college criterion for Satisfactory is the equivalent of a C or better. At Skidmore, a student may take a maximum of sixteen semester hours for an S/U grade, excluding internships. Please be sure you understand and adhere to this limit. Non-Skidmore students must confirm with their home school advisor that an S/U grade will be accepted at their home institution. Assignments and Assessment As is the case on campus, students will find that faculty members in Paris have the freedom to set assignments and evaluate student work as they see fit. It is important that students don’t expect that “all French faculty” will have identical educational methodologies or philosophies. This is especially true when taking outside courses. (Vive la différence!) You can expect that courses taken at the Skidmore Center will be graded in the French system. However, the Skidmore Center instructors understand that students are used to a different system with different expectations. Therefore, instructors are asked to perhaps waive the lowest grade, consider a student’s progress throughout the semester, offer students the opportunity to revise a problematic assignment or submit additional work to show improvement in a difficult area. These are not requirements – again, 24

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

instructors have the freedom to assign and evaluate as they believe best suits the goals of the course. Students will find though that Skidmore Center courses are a bit more consistent in the criteria they use to develop syllabi, assignments and assessments. Courses offered outside the Skidmore Center will vary greatly in terms of the availability of a syllabus (many will not have one), the type of assignment, and the method of assessment (exams, papers, presentations, etc.). The Paris staff completes the administrative and academic registrations for all outside courses for students to ensure they are registered with the school. (In some cases, you might accompany a staff member to the academic registration.) Even though the program staff takes care of these steps for you, you will still need to do some leg work on the first day of classes. The staff will provide you with a letter of introduction that you should give to your instructor on the first day of classes. This letter will introduce you as a foreign student and explain that you will need to work with the instructor to develop a schedule of assignments and assessments. This is based on the fact that the French university calendar does not correspond with the U.S. calendar; therefore, Skidmore program participants cannot stay to complete the entire semester and must have alternative assessment in order to be graded. While this can be intimidating, it is necessary and is also a great way to be sure the instructor knows who you are. After introducing yourself and giving the introductory letter to your instructor, you will be asked to get an email address so that you and the Paris staff can contact the instructor and work out details for assignments and exams. Since instructors’ email addresses and phone numbers are not available to the public, this is an important step and will allow the Paris staff to help you with this process. More details will be given during your academic orientation in Paris and you can always ask the Paris staff for additional assistance.

BOOKS You will purchase (in cash Euros) your textbooks in Paris through the program. Students spend much less on books than they do in the U.S. You should expect to spend 50-80€ per course for books and to purchase most course materials from the staff at the Skidmore Center. Additional books might be purchased outside the Center; instructors should let you know at the beginning of the course what they need you to buy. A French-English dictionary and a good grammar reference book (e.g., Bescherelle), however, is very useful. You should take them with you if you have them. Students can also order books online once in Paris and have the books sent to the Skidmore Center. Go to www.fnac.com or http://librairie-en-ligne.gibertjeune.fr/ and search for your books once you arrive to have them delivered.

25

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES Many of the courses taught at the Skidmore Center will include class meetings or excursions outside of the Skidmore Center to utilize the resources in Paris related to the topic of study. Students are required to attend any excursions that are part of a course. The program will also organize a few excursions throughout the semester, which all students will be required to attend. These excursions are included in your program fees and are organized Skidmore in Paris professors or administrative staff. Below is a sample listing of places that have been visited in the past. The program organizes 2-3 excursions per semester which may include orientation.  Normandy/Brittany region (typically fall orientation, 3 days)  The Loire Valley (typically spring orientation, 3 days)  The Provence region (typical spring mid-semester trip, 3 days)  Chartres Cathedral and the medieval city  The Château de Versailles  Giverny The program may also provide optional excursions or activities within Paris or the greater Paris area.

CULTURAL REIMBURSEMENT Skidmore will reimburse students up to 100€ per semester worth of cultural activities with a maximum reimbursement of 20€ per event. The cultural reimbursement funds are for activities defined by the Resident Director and the office of Off-Campus Study & Exchanges as significantly “cultural” in nature. Reimbursements will be made for students attending events in French or that feature France and/or French culture. When students in the program are uncertain whether a particular activity or event is eligible for reimbursement, they should check in advance with the Resident Director in Paris. The Resident Director holds final authority in determining the cultural or educational value of a claimed activity and its value. Students should keep all receipts and submit them to the Resident Director in order to be reimbursed. Activities must be in Paris or the surrounding suburbs and are subject to final approval by the Resident Director. The Resident Director will provide students more detail about the cultural reimbursement program during the onsite orientation. Examples of cultural reimbursement activities: museum exhibits or entry fees, movies in French, French dinner performance, etc.

26

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

LIVING IN PARIS Quick   

overview of housing and meal plan: Full room and board* during orientation. Full room and board* during official program dates. Family home-stay includes a single room, 7 breakfasts and 4 dinners (main meal) per week, linens, towels, and 1 load of personal laundry per week done in the family’s home.  Supplemental monthly meal stipend, provided on-site, for the purchase of lunches and three dinners per week. *Note: Unlimited meal plans are not available in Paris.

HOUSING

The housing option for the Skidmore in Paris program is a home-stay with a French family. Family selections are made by the staff in Paris who “match” students with French host families. Taken into account is the information you provide in the detailed Housing Questionnaire that was submitted as part of your program application, information provided by the families, and feedback from the personal interviews held by the Resident Director with the students. In order to assist the Paris staff in their task, students are urged to freely express their preferences concerning comfort, lifestyle, eating habits, health requirements, pet allergies, smoking, etc. As a student, you will have an individual room in a French household (single woman, mother with children, a couple, or couple with children) in Paris or a nearby Paris suburb. Each family and each student’s experience will be unique. Generally, there will not be any other Anglophone students housed with the family. Living in a foreign country will be an exciting, and enriching time. You will learn a different language and culture, while better understanding yourself, your values, ideas, and beliefs. You may be invigorated by your new experiences. You may also experience difficult times when struggling with a language and culture that are not yet your own. Even if the French ways annoy and frustrate you, don’t forget that the best way to learn French is by experiencing the French way of life on a daily basis with your host family. At home, you will learn the customs, culture, and mindset of your French family. The Paris staff will be in regular contact with both the student and the host family to ensure that the homestay is a positive and enriching experience for both parties. Program housing is provided only during offical program dates and not between semesters. Participants who arrive to Paris before their program begins, remain in Paris during the semester break, or who choose to stay in Paris at the end of their program are responsible for arranging and paying for their own accommodations and meals during these times. Full year participants enrolled in year-long courses at a local university must notify the Resident Director if any of their courses will 27

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

resume in the spring before the Skidmore program begins. Students should not assume that their host family will provide accommodations during the semester break if arrangements have not been made in advance by Skidmore in Paris staff. Speak with Skidmore in Paris program staff in advance regarding any questions you have about housing in Paris outside of official program dates. Independent Housing Petitions Students studying in Paris for one semester are required to live in program-arranged housing with a French family. In rare cases, a semester-only student may petition OCSE for independent housing; however, petitions will only be considered if a student will be living with family members that reside in Paris. Full-year program participants are required to live in program-arranged housing with a French family for their first semester in Paris. Students may petition for independent housing for their second semester. If selecting independent housing for the spring semester, full-year students are not permitted to live with other Skidmore in Paris program participants or international Anglophone students. Full-year students must submit an independent housing petition for the spring semester to the Resident Director by November 1st and must submit the address of their independent housing and contact information to the Resident Director no later than December 1st. Foyer international des étudiants is just one option that offers dorm style living to students. Visit http://www.fie.fr/english/indexe.html for more information. Students who are approved to make their own living arrangements do not pay Room and Board fees to Skidmore College for their semester/year in Paris, and thus, will not be eligible to receive the meal stipend. They may also be expected to pay for certain meals/accommodations that are normally covered by Room & Board fees. Students will still receive a monthly stipend to cover local transportation in Paris.

RENTER’S AND PERSONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE

The Skidmore in Paris program purchases insurance for students’ own personal property and any damage to other's property. There are deductibles for damages and the plan does not cover loss of house keys. Specific plan details will be provided to you upon arrival in France. Skidmore recommends that you also speak with your parent or guardian about your own family’s Homeowner's or Renter's insurance and inquire if the coverage can extend to you abroad, and if so, what are the terms. This could serve as possible secondary level of coverage to you in France. All damages or losses to property not eligible for coverage by the French carrier, nor a U.S. carrier if you have such coverage, will be the responsibility of the student. You can also find information about purchasing property insurance on page 36.

GENERAL HOUSING GUIDELINES

The following suggestions will help you as you learn about French culture and its idiosyncrasies. You should remember, however, that families’ habits and expectations vary. We will discuss general cultural differences during Orientation. Telephone Usage Students are obliged to buy their own cell phone while in Paris. It is uncommon for students to use the family’s landline phone (if they have one) to make or receive calls. Laundry Towels and sheets are provided by your host family. You will, however, change them regularly. One load of laundry will be done either by you or your host family, depending on the family’s preference, every 7 days. Washing machines are much smaller than in the U.S. Drying space is limited and dryers are almost nonexistent in private homes. You will not be able to wash more than 5 kg (approx. 11 lbs.) of clothes per 28

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

week, so you should prepare for not changing clothes several times a day. Line-drying generally takes 1-2 days, depending on the fabric. Ironing is your responsibility and you may ask to use your host family's iron. Washroom Facilities You may take daily showers according to the family's schedule. Keep them short, as hot water is limited. Don't forget to rinse and eventually clean the tub or shower after you use it. Your Bedroom You are responsible for making your bed daily and keeping your room tidy and clean (clothes hung up, wastebaskets and ashtrays emptied, vacuuming, etc). Your host family keeps its apartment clean, so you should keep your room clean, as well - IT IS NOT A DORM. You are responsible for anything you break or damage (cigarette burns, carpet stains, water or fire damage, etc.) in your room or in the residence. Remember to turn the lights off when you leave a room, no matter how short the absence. When you study use only the lights that you need. Be energy conscious. It is customary to air the room daily, even in winter, as well as to open and close the shutters morning and night. When you leave each morning open your windows, turn off the radiator, and close your bedroom door. Keys You will have your own keys to your famliy’s residence and are free to come and go as you please - just let your host family know your plans. For safety purposes, please do not keep your host's written address with your keys. The lock will need to be changed if you lose them or if they are stolen and this is an expense for which you will be responsible. (Note: If the lock is a special order lock, it could cost as much as $1,000 to replace.) It is a good idea to keep your key on a chain attached to a belt loop and in a pocket or around your neck - NOT in a purse or backpack. Going Out You may, of course, go out at night. You are asked, however, to tell your host family where you plan to go, generally speaking, and approximately when you expect to return (even if it is 5:00 AM). Your family is not there to judge your social habits, but they are concerned for your general safety and well-being. Therefore it is expected that ALL participants adopt this practice of open communication about their comings and goings – men and women alike. Inform your hosts if you are leaving the house, always with a polite “à bientôt” or “au revoir,” and notify them if you plan on spending the night elsewhere. Otherwise they will worry just as your own family might. Remember that your sorties must not hinder the study or sleeps habits of other members of the household. Weekends If you leave Paris for one or more nights, please inform your family, as well as the Skidmore staff. Please complete the Independent Travel Release Form to provide an address or phone number where you may be contacted during your absence in the event of an emergency. Again, this is for safety purposes and this practice should be adopted by ALL participants. Visitors People in large cities are often apprehensive about theft and damage, and thus, opening their apartments to strangers. Your French family needs to become well acquainted with YOU before allowing you to invite someone else into their home. Always ask for permission before inviting a friend between classes or to study. If permission is not granted, do not take the denial as a personal offense. There are also many other places to meet in Paris (e.g., a public park, a museum, library, or a café). You may ask, but do not expect your family to lodge your relatives and/or friends if they come to Paris to visit, even if there is an extra bed in your room or a spare bedroom. If your host family accepts a guest it is not at all unusual for your hosts to suggest a small fee if your guest stays more than one day. If one of 29

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

your friends misses the last métro, suggest that he/she takes a taxi home (15-20 Euros). Nobody should spend the night with you unless permission has been given in advance. If your family is absent over a weekend or during one of the school vacations, you will be left alone in their apartment. Do not have friends over unless the family knows and be respectful of their privacy and property—neighbors and the concierge are watchful!

MEALS

French culture is food-oriented. Families can spend 1-2 hours at the table. Dinner commonly starts between 8:00 and 8:30 PM. The French also expect to see a clean plate so take small portions to avoid leaving food on your plate. If you are a vegetarian, vegan, or have any dietary restrictions, please inform your host family. If you included such details on your Housing Questionnaire, they will already know this fact about you, however it is worth mentioning in person, as well. The family is not required to make a special meal for a vegetarian or vegan student when they are serving meat, so it is important to discuss your dietary preferences in advance. Inform your host family well ahead of time when you need to eat earlier or later because of a scheduled night class or program event, or when eating out with friends. You will not be reimbursed if you choose to miss a meal with your host family. Also decide in advance with your host family which nights you do not take dinner at home. On weekends, you will have breakfast and dinner with your hosts (unless Saturday or Sunday is one of your designated nights out). If you become hungry in the late afternoon, DO NOT take food from the refrigerator unless your host family permits it and DO NOT eat in your room. Instead, ask if you may keep your own food or drinks in the refrigerator or have a small stock of non-perishable snacks, well-sealed, in a cabinet, otherwise, go to the local boulangerie for a goûter (snack). If your host family leaves you alone for a weekend for a short trip out-of-town, you should be left with enough food for the first 3 days and either frozen prepared food to reheat or cash to purchase groceries for the remaining days the family is away. Be sure to ask your family what you are permitted to eat, how the oven/microwave works, where the nearest grocery store is located, and if you should keep any grocery receipts for them. Your host family should also leave you with emergency contact information. All lunches, even over the weekend, are to be taken outside of the host family’s residence. You may sometimes be invited to stay for lunch on a weekend, but you are advised not to take advantage of the situation every weekend. Lunch is not included in the meal arrangements with the families and your family needs some private time to themselves. Days are long, and dinners late, so always eat something at lunchtime. While it is possible to bring food into the Skidmore Center to eat your lunch, we strongly encourage students to take their lunch outside of the program center. The more time you spend outside the Center, the more exposure you will have to local Parisians and the French way of life. It is typical for the French to 30

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

eat lunch at a café or get a take-away meal to eat in a public space like a park. After you arrive in Paris, the program staff will provide you with a list of local cafes near the center with affordable meal options for lunch. If taking classes outside the program center, some of our partner institutions such as l’Institute Catholique and the American Business School have student cafeterias that offer inexpensive options for lunch.

COMMUNICATIONS Internet Students can access the internet in the Skidmore Center or at an internet café in Paris. You will find several options for internet cafes highlighted in any travel guide for Paris. Skidmore encourages students to utilize these public spaces for accessing the internet. The more you spend time in public spaces, the more you will come in contact with locals. Ask your host family for a local recommendation on a café with internet, use a public library, or find a spot on campus at your French university. The Skidmore Center has eight (8) computers available for student use during office hours. However, students are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptop computer. The Skidmore Center is equipped with wireless internet access (WiFi) and each student will have access to the internet in their home-stay if you bring your own laptop computer. Telephone Use In general, the French do not spend large amounts of time on the phone. Instead, the French use the telephone to make appointments, ask quick questions or do business. Long-Distance Calls One popular option for students and their families to consider using is a Voice Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) service to communicate with one another. Services such as Skype (www.skype.com) or Facetime are free and have generally good quality for calls. And, video calls are possible if one or both parties have internet video cameras and connections fast enough to support video. If using regular phone service, it is generally cheaper to call from the U.S. to France, rather than from France to the U.S. Therefore, students should determine a day and time when their families and friends can call them on their cell phone. Please pay attention to the time differences that exist (France is generally 6-9 hours ahead of the U.S., depending on the time zone and daylight savings time). If you call from France, you should plan on using a long distance calling card or ask your host family if they have international communication. Cell Phones While you may be able to use your U.S. cell phone in France, it is generally very expensive to do so even with an international plan. Most students prefer to purchase a prepaid mobile phone (also commonly referred to as a pay-as-you-go phone) in France or unlock their U.S. smartphone and purchase a French SIM card. Pay-as-you-go phones and most French SIM cards do not require a contract, and you purchase credit in advance to make calls or texts. All incoming calls and texts on French cell phones are free of charge. During orientation, the program staff will have you buy a cell phone in Paris. The initial cost for a pay-as-you-go phone itself start from around 20 euros up to more expensive models, all contingent on your preferences. You will then have to purchase credit in advance of using phone to be able to make calls or texts (also called recharge or top up). You will need to recharge the phone regularly according to your usage, (recharge cards come in denominations of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 75, 100, and 150 euros). The conversion is roughly 10 euro equals 20 minutes of talking or 100 texts. Also, students can check the balance of their accounts through a free text message service with the provider. 31

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

If you would like to unlock your U.S. smartphone and purchase a French SIM card to use your phone in Paris, you will have to check with your U.S. carrier to see if the phone is unlocked or if it can be unlocked. Typically, cell phones in the U.S. are locked to be used only for one carrier, and only your carrier can unlock your phone. There may be fees or stipulations in order to unlock your phone. From past experience, it seems that it’s easier to get your phone unlocked while you are still in the US rather than trying to do it from France. Ground Mail Your official mailing address in France will be that of the Skidmore Center. You may not receive mail at your French host family’s home. All letters and packages can be sent to you in care of the Skidmore Center. Your name must appear first (with last name written prominently/in ALL CAPITALS): EXAMPLE:

Skidmore College or Skidmore en France 94, Boulevard de Sébastopol 75003 Paris, France Local Tel: (01) 42 68 04 70

Family members should declare that the articles are “used” and “for personal use only”—NOT gifts, to hopefully avoid paying customs fees. Declaring a value for goods and insuring goods in the U.S. can cost the RECIPIENT up to 300 Euros to get them out of French Customs. If you are not able to pack all the items you want to have in Paris, they may be sent to the Skidmore address. The reverse can also be done to send things home. Please refer to the French postal service Web site – http://www.laposte.fr – for information about sending mail from France.

32

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

TRANSPORTATION IN PARIS

Paris has one of the best public transportation systems in the world – seriously! With the Métro, RER, and buses, one rarely has to walk more than 2 or 3 blocks to catch some form of transport. The cost of local transportation pass is included in your program fees (to get from your homestay to class at the Skidmore Center or any of Skidmore’s partner institutions). See the section labelled “Transportation Tickets” below. The greater Paris area is divided in 6 geographical zones (on which the price of transportation depends), zone 1 and 2 being “downtown” Paris (Paris Intra-muros).

Le Métro - The Paris Métropolitain (Métro) was inaugurated in 1898 and is one of the safest, most efficient, and least expensive subway system in the world. Fourteen lines criss-cross the city which makes it the fastest way to get from one place to another in Paris. First trains start running around 5:30 AM and the last trains leave their end stations around 12:15 AM (around 1:15 AM on weekend nights). An interactive online map for the Métro can be found at http://www.ratp.fr/ or on the RATP app, in case you can use your smartphone in Paris. Bus Don't hesitate to take the bus! It's slower than the Métro but a GREAT way to see Paris. At each bus stop there is information posted, indicating which buses stop there, their itinerary and timetables. The PC buses are particularly useful, since they travel around the exterior of Paris (NW-SW, NE, SE). Noctilien This bus service operates every half hour throughout the night from 12:30AM to 5:30AM. There are 47 lines which leave from the center of Paris (Châtelet), St. Lazare, Gare de l’Est, Gare Montparnasse, and Gare de Lyon towards the outskirts of the city. Not all lines stop at every station and some are hourly, some, are more frequent. You can find information about the Noctilien service at http://www.vianavigo.com/fr/noctilien-sur-vianavigo/. RER (Réseau Express Régional) The RER “commuter line” is the express network that links certain suburbs to the center of Paris, but is also rapid and practical for getting from one place to another within Paris. YourMétro ticket (called Navigo Découverte) is valid on the RER, provided that you are travelling still within Paris (zones 1-2). To travel to the suburbs (zones 3-6) on the RER, you must pay for an additional fare at the ticket window. More information on the RER is available at http://www.ratp.fr/. Tramway You may also use your transportation passes on the six tramway lines (T1, T2, T3a, T3b, T5 & T7). These lines are similar to the PC bus lines and travel around the periphery of Paris. Transportation Tickets/Navigo Découverte The Navigo Découverte card is a “smart card” used to access the bus, Métro, and RER, Ile-de-France (Transilien) trains (though not the TGV). Fares can be loaded/re-loaded to the card on a weekly (Monday through Sunday) or monthly basis (from the 1st day of the month to the last). The Navigo Découverte is sold at nearly any ticket window (guichet) that normally sells tickets and passes for the métro, RER, and Ile-de-France trains. The cost of your Navigo card is included in your program fees. During your orientation in Paris, the program staff will accompany you to buy your first pass 33

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

recharge. You will receive a monthly stipend in order to recharge your Navigo card for the duration of the program. Consult with the Paris staff upon your arrival for instructions. The pass consists in two cards: one with a chip that is the actual pass, and one ID card with your name and picture on it. Make sure you keep both cards together, in their case. If you get controlled by a ticket inspector, you will need both of them to justify the pass is yours. If not, you will get a fine. You can read more information about the Navigo Découverte at http://www.ratp.fr/fr/ratp/c_21137/forfaits-navigo-mois-etsemaine/.

Batobus The Batobus – a great introduction to Paris – is a boat ride that runs up and down the length of the Seine

River, and allows you to get off and on at many stops along the Seine. Tickets are about 9 €/day for students with a Student ID card (this means you!). Check http://www.batobus.com for the schedule, where to purchase tickets, and details about what you will see on this enjoyable boat ride. Taxis Taxis are plentiful. There are specific taxi stands throughout the city, but you can also hail a passing one at night. Day and night prices are indicated inside each taxi (night is usually from 7 PM to 7 AM). Prices will change if you cross the city limit into the suburbs. The minimum journey fare is about 7€. A supplement is charged for luggage, a 4th person, and if you have phoned for the taxi to pick you up. A tip of 10% is generally expected. Taxis Bleus - Tel: 36 09 or Taxis G7 – Tel: 36 07.

34

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

HEALTH & SAFETY HEALTH INSURANCE AND MEDICAL CARE Health Insurance All Skidmore in Paris participants will receive international health insurance coverage for the dates of the program. Skidmore students are insured by the Gallagher/ACE American Insurance Company Study Abroad Accident & Sickness Insurance Program, while non-Skidmore students are insured by Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI) World Class Study Abroad Plan. Each policy will be purchased and paid for by Skidmore College and is considered secondary to your primary insurance. Information on both of these policies is available through Off-Campus Study & Exchanges. Insurance cards and policy brochures will be sent to each student prior to the start of the program. The insurance policy provided by Skidmore College is secondary to your primary insurance. You must submit any claims to your primary insurance first. If your primary insurance does not cover claim, they will provide you with an Explanation of Benefits (EOB). You can then submit a claim and the EOB to either HealthSmart Benefit Solutions (Skidmore students) or CISI (non-Skidmore students) as your secondary insurer with documentation that you have already submitted a claim to your primary insurance. Any specific questions regarding your health insurance coverage should be directed to Gallagher (Skidmore students) or CISI (non-Skidmore students) prior to your departure. When reviewing Skidmore’s policy with Gallagher/ACE American Insurance Company or CISI, you should be sure you understand the extent of your coverage abroad. Pay special attention to the restrictions that may apply to overseas living. Note: Students are only covered by Skidmore’s policy outside of the U.S. and only during the official dates of the program. Students are not covered prior to the official start date of their program or after the official end date of the program. Insurance cards and policy brochures for Skidmore College students should be reviewed and downloaded from the “Learning Content” section in your MyOCSE account (http://myocse.skidmore.edu). Non-Skidmore students will be sent insurance cards and policy brochures by email prior to the start of their program. If you will be traveling outside of the official dates of the program (prior to the official start date of the program or after the official end date of the program), it is important to understand your insurance coverage during these times. Some students will be covered internationally by their primary, U.S.-based insurance; other students may be covered by the insurance provided by their program directly. These policies may or may not cover you outside of the official program dates. In addition, some student international identification cards, such as the International Student Identification Card (ISIC), offer basic international medical insurance. These cards, available online, are fairly inexpensive and may be an option if your personal health insurance policy does not cover you abroad. It is the students’ responsibility to determine what coverage they will have outside of the U.S. If students are not covered by their own insurance, by the program’s insurance or through a student ID card, they will need to purchase additional insurance to cover them outside of the program dates and during extended breaks. The following is a list of insurance companies that offer short-term, leisure travel insurance. Please feel free to visit their website to obtain a quote.   

CIEE INext - http://www.inext.com/plans/supplemental/basic.aspx CISI - http://www.culturalinsurance.com/students/ Gallagher - https://www.gallagherstudent.com/students/leisure-travel/ 35

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges



Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

HTH Worldwide - http://hthworldwide.net/

Property Insurance If you will be traveling with a laptop, digital camera, smart phone, iPod, iPad or other valuable equipment, make sure it is properly insured in case of loss, theft or damage. Check your parent/guardian's homeowner’s insurance policy. Coverage for such valuables typically extends from the homeowners policy when travelling. If coverage isn't available under your parents/guardians' current homeowners insurance policy, there may be an option to add a rider to provide for such coverage. Have them check with their insurance agent/company. Purchase a personal articles insurance policy. Here are a few companies that offer plans for property insurance. You should research companies that will fit your specific needs.   

Gallagher - https://www.gallagherstudent.com/students/student-personal-property/ State Farm - http://www.statefarm.com/insurance/other/personal.asp College Student Insurance - http://www.collegestudentinsurance.com

Medical Care Please consult the Skidmore program staff if you have any questions about obtaining medical care or if you need assistance making appointments or dealing with health issues. The staff can help you seek a specialized physician or pharmacy. Your host family will have knowledge of health care providers and pharmacies near their home. It is common to first consult a pharmacist in France for minor problems and medical advice such as a cold/cough or headaches. The pharmacist can tell you if you need to see a doctor and also recommend appropriate over-the-counter medication(s). If you are accustomed to taking a specific brand of over-thecounter medication at home it is best to take some with you, as certain brands common in the U.S. are not available in France. If you need a doctor or a prescription during the weekend or in the middle of the night, ask your host family for assistance. If your host family is away and you are alone at home, you should call the Resident Director on his cell phone. You can also call SOS Médecins at 01.47.07.77.77. They make house calls 24 hours/day, 7 days/week. If you are experiencing a major health problem, it is recommended that you go to the American Hospital, 63 Boulevard Victor Hugo, 92200 Neuilly (local tel. 01 46 41 25 25) where most of the staff speaks English. Fees, however, are much more expensive than with a French doctor, but they do accept credit cards. Your Skidmore health insurance will provide coverage and reimburse some costs, but you must pay the full bill upon receiving the service. If you must go to the hospital, you should call the Resident Director immediately so that either he or another Paris staff member can accompany you.

NOTE: A visit to a general practitioner in Paris will cost approximately 25€ to 40€. Specialists will range from approximately 60€ to 125€. Please take your insurance information with you to Paris.

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS AND VITAMINS

If you plan to take any medicine or prescription drug while abroad, you should consult your physician prior to departure regarding any need for monitoring or onsite referrals in Paris. If there are any prescription medications that you need to take while abroad, it is strongly recommended that you bring enough prescription medication for the duration of the program. In general, prescription medications cannot be 36

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

sent through international mail. Prescription drugs have the additional problem of brand name changes from country to country. Make sure to keep your prescription medicine in its original containers, which show the prescription number, and have the original script from your doctor with you, as well. This will facilitate Customs clearance in and out of France. Please note that if you try to fill the prescription in Paris or need to tell a French doctor what you are taking, you will need the generic name of the prescription and/or the chemical compound or formula from your primary doctor. In many cases, a pharmacist in Paris may not fill a prescription provided by a foreign doctor and may require you to obtain a script written by a doctor in Paris. You should consult your physician and insurance company as soon as possible to obtain enough medication for the duration of your program. It can sometimes take weeks or even months to get authorization from your insurance company to get prescription medication in advance of use. For corrective eyewear, we recommend that you take both an extra pair of eyeglasses and enough contact lenses to last the entire semester or year—and extra lenses to replace damaged ones—plus your prescriptions for glasses and contacts. Those with extra sensitive eyes might want to bring enough contact lens solution from home, as even the same brand may have different ingredients in other countries. Others should consider purchasing solution in Paris to save weight in your luggage. Vitamins are available in France, although the brands you may be used to may not be available whereas certain types of vitamins may only be available with a prescription. If you currently take vitamins regularly, bring a supply for your entire stay.

CONTRACEPTION AND STDS

Contraception is no more difficult to get in France than in the U.S., but you may wish to take some with you if you think you will need birth control while abroad. If you need information or contraceptive devices during the year, the Skidmore staff can give you information on how to contact a doctor or local organization that can assist you with obtaining contraceptives. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrom (AIDS) are significant problems around the world. While the easiest mode of HIV transmission is through blood contact with a HIV-infected person, the most common mode of transmission is through sexual contact and intercourse. Since HIV/AIDS knows no geographic boundaries, avoiding infection relies on appropriate preventive behaviors. Those who choose to be sexually active while abroad are encouraged to remain cognizant of the risks and act accordingly. Information concerning STDs, HIV, and AIDS prevalence in different countries may be found at the Center for Disease Control Web site at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/default.aspx.

NARCOTICS Many Americans assume that since illegal drugs or narcotics may be more accessible in other countries than in the U.S., their use is condoned and that drug laws and their enforcement in other countries are more lenient than in the U.S. These assumptions are false. Penalties for illegal drug use in all European countries can be more severe than in the United States. Aid from the U.S. embassy will be limited to providing a list of local attorneys and contacting a family member in the U.S.; then, the offender is generally on his or her own. Do not use or knowingly be associated with users of illegal drugs or narcotics while abroad. If you attend a gathering where drugs are present, leave.

PERSONAL SAFETY & CRIME PREVENTION Paris has much less violent crime than American big-city equivalents, but it is still a big city. You should not be paranoid but it is wise to take a few precautions, especially at the beginning when you will be hesitant 37

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

and still acclimating to your surroundings. Your safety and security is always important when travelling internationally, but at this time, we ask students to be particularly aware. Please keep in mind these safety precautions for Americans studying abroad. General Safety Tips  Register yourself with the local U.S. Embassy and know how to contact them in case of emergency. (https://travelregistration.state.gov). Do this even for short weekend trips outside of France.  Avoid speaking English in public if it is not the native language of the country you are visiting. If you must speak English, speak softly.  Use caution when talking about yourself and other members of the program. Do not offer information freely regarding the program or anything that might link you to an American organization.  Never give out the street address or the door code of Skidmore Center in Paris. Also, do not indicate these items on a map of Paris or anything else that has Skidmore Center in Paris address. Memorize the door codes for Skidmore and your host family's residence.  Communicate regularly with your parents/guardians, host family, and with the program staff.  Make sure your cell phone is always charged with both minutes and batteries.  Be constantly aware of your surroundings and those around you. Remove yourself immediately from any situations that you suspect may be dangerous. Report any suspicious activities to the proper authorities.  If someone pesters you on the Métro. Ignore him/her. Once you engage the person in eye contact or conversation, you have subliminally invited that person to interact with you. If you feel uncomfortable, change cars at the next stop or tell the person firmly to leave you alone.  If someone is following you, duck into a café, tabac, shop, police station, etc. until the person continues on his/her way. Explain your situation to the shop owner or policeman, who is generally willing to help.  When you are travelling to an area that you don't know, map out your course BEFORE you leave. Buy a Plan de Paris, which shows every street in Paris by arrondissement. For other cities, check Web sites such as http://www.mappy.fr or http://maps.google.com.  If anything should happen to you or to one of your classmates, go to the nearest hospital or police station to report the incident and call the Resident Director immediately, no matter what time of night.  Record these numbers in your cell phone: Police 17, Firefighters 18, Ambulance 15. From a mobile phone 112 will also call a centralized emergency response center. Going Out at Night  Always carry about 40€ of emergency cash on you, outside of your wallet (e.g., in a hidden money belt or shoe).  Be selective and conservative when providing your name and contact information.  Try to blend in as much as possible. Wear clothes that make you seem less like a tourist and more like a local. Typically American clothing (e.g., college sweatshirts, shorts, baseball hats, running shoes, etc.) will make you look like a tourist and hence possibly make you an easy target for crime. When visiting a place of worship, please remember to cover your shoulders and knees.  Avoid highly trafficked tourist attractions and American establishments, such as fast-food chains and American bars and restaurants.  When going out to a bar or club, go in a group and never take a drink from anyone other than the bartender or server. A savvy student knows not to leave his or her glass lying around if s/he is still drinking from it. If someone offers to buy you a drink, go with them to get it at the bar if there is no server. France has the same problem with "ruffies" as the U.S.

38

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

  



Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

Look out for one another. If you think your friend has had too much to drink, escort him/her home by taxi to be extra cautious. A drunken person by him/herself can become an easy target for crime. Do not take a ride from someone you do not know. If you miss the last Métro, take a taxi or the Noctilien bus. Always get a taxi from a taxi stand or call ahead. If you intend to take a taxi and are in an unpopulated area, call ahead of time to avoid wandering around alone. Please use caution if taking the Noctilien. We do not recommend taking the Noctilien bus if you are traveling alone. Given the hours that the Noctilien bus operates, other passengers on the bus may be intoxicated. If you do take the Noctilien bus, make sure you review the route and time-table information ahead of time. If you have to wait more than 15 minutes for a Noctilien bus, it may be a better idea to take a taxi. Do not fall asleep in the Noctilien bus or you are likely to end up stranded in the greater suburbs of Paris. (Don’t laugh – this has actually happened!)

Traveling Out of Paris and/or France  Make sure you have the proper paperwork (VISA) and vaccines to travel outside France.  Avoid travelling in large groups or alone and check the U.S. State Department Web site before travelling outside of your host country (http://travel.state.gov/content/travel/english.html).  If you travel away from Paris, leave a detailed itinerary and contact details with your family at home, host family, and with Skidmore in Paris staff (Independent Travel Release Form). Be sure to stick to your itinerary. Your family and the program staff need to know how to reach you in case of an emergency.  Note: 112 is the emergency services number in all European countries. Formulate a plan for what to do in an emergency. Know the direct numbers of Skidmore in Paris and Skidmore U.S.  Use your common sense and “go with your gut.” If a situation does not feel right to you, trust your instincts and leave. Special Circumstances  Be aware that anti-American sentiments do exist, so you are advised not to engage in arguments – especially with strangers.  In case of a transport strike or a protest, be patient, polite, and avoid conflict. Strikes can be common-place for the locals, so follow their lead in terms of your behavior. The more you outwardly complain, the more you will stick out as a foreigner. Feel free, however, to vent your frustrations to program staff and perhaps even your host family.  Skidmore in Paris will contact the students by cell phone and/or text message in case of an emergency with instructions on how to proceed. If a national emergency should present itself, STAY WHERE YOU ARE if you are at home or at school. If you are outdoors, calmly proceed to the Center, your host family or the U.S. Embassy, whichever is the closest and open at the time.

39

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

EMERGENCY Q & A What constitutes an emergency? A situation that places a person at risk. It may include illness or bodily harm, or other traumatic incidents involving violence, a student who is missing, and civil unrest or a natural disaster in the host country. Emergencies are not necessarily medical. They do, however, represent circumstances out of the ordinary, unplanned, or unexpected that threaten the health, safety, and well-being of one or all of the students. What should I do in the event of an emergency? Immediately contact the Resident Director or the Skidmore in Paris Center! In health and safety emergencies, a Skidmore staff member will call you back immediately. For all nonemergency business, please contact Skidmore in Paris staff during business hours. Note: 112 is the emergency services number in all European countries. It also works from a cell phone.

40

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

ENGAGEMENT LINGUISTIQUE / LANGUAGE COMMITMENT PLEDGE Please remember throughout your time on the Skidmore in Paris program that you have already agreed to the program’s Language Pledge: « En acceptant de participer au programme de Skidmore à Paris ou Paris Fall Seminar, j’accepte entièrement et complètement les règles linguistiques de Paris. Je promets de parler français au Centre Skidmore et pendant toutes les activités organisées par le programme. » « Je comprends que mon engagement a pour but de maximiser mon apprentissage linguistique et mon intégration dans la culture française. » « Je comprends que parler anglais au Centre ne favorise pas mon perfectionnement linguistique ni celui des autres étudiants du programme. » « Tout comportement contraire à cet engagement personnel dévalorise l’esprit du programme et ne justifie plus ma présence à Paris. »

“By agreeing to participate in the Skidmore in Paris or Paris Fall Seminar program, I accept fully and completely the Center language rule in Paris and promise to speak French as much as possible at the Program Center and during the activities organized by the Program.” “I understand that my commitments will promote maximum linguistic benefits for all program participants and aid in our process of integration in the French culture.” “I understand that by speaking English at the Program Center although I am capable of speaking French, I am seriously jeopardizing my own language progress, as well as that of other students. Such behavior undermines the spirit of the Program.”

Bienvenue à Paris!

41

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

APPENDIX I – USEFUL TELEPHONE NUMBERS EMERGENCY NUMBERS SAMU/Ambulance Police/Secours POMPIERS/Fire Dept. Emergency Service (from cell phone) SOS Médecin/ Doctors 24hr house calls SOS Dentaire/ Dental emergency Centre anti-poison / Anti-poison center

15 17 18 112 36 24 01 43 37 51 00 01 40 05 45 45 or 48 48

ENGLISH-SPEAKING MEDICAL CAREGIVERS American Hospital 01 46 41 25 25 63, bd. Victor Hugo 92200 Neuilly sur Seine Métro: Pont de Neuilly + 10 min. walk Hertford British Hospital 3 rue Barbès 92300 Levallois Perret Métro: Anatole France or Louise Michel

01 46 39 22 22

Pharmacie PERRAULT 01 48 87 62 30 24, Bd Sébastopol, 75004 Métro : Châtelet, Châtelet- Les Halles or Rambuteau MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING International Counseling Service 65, quai d'Orsay 75007 Paris Métro: Invalides Staffed by qualified bilingual professionals SOS Crisis Help Line (in English)

01 45 50 26 49

01 47 23 80 80

CENTERS FOR SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES Institut Alfred Fournier 01 40 78 26 00 25, bd. Saint Jacques 75005 Paris Métro: Maubert Mutualité La Croix Rouge – Free HIV/STD Testing Center 43, rue de Valois 75001 Paris Métro: Palais Royal

01 42 97 48 29

Mouvement Français pour le Planning Familial (Planned Parenthood) 10, rue Vivienne 75002 Paris Métro: Bourse Information about contraception, abortion, etc.

01 42 60 93 20

SIDA (AIDS) Info Service (free call)

0 800 840 800

INFORMATION Yellow / White Pages

118 218 42

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

APPENDIX II - SAMPLE COSTS IN FRANCE We have created a short list of expenses you can expect once in Paris; please take note that these are average prices and can change without notice. Students regularly shop at Monoprix (http://www.monoprix.com) for a variety of items. You can use the Monoprix Web site to find prices in advance (in Euros, of course!). (Monoprix is a department store with many locations throughout Paris.) Personal Items Shampoo: Toothpaste: Toothbrush: Shaving cream: Body lotion: Soap: Feminine items: Pain relievers: Meals during vacation:

3-10€/250 ml 1,50-4€/75 ml (tube) 1,50-7€ 2-5€/can 5-10€/250 ml 1-4€/4 bars or 3-5€/250 ml bath gel 3-5€ 1,50-3€/10- pills Will vary based on individual and location

School Supplies Text books: Notebook: Folder: Pen: Pencil: USB flash drive:

50-80€/course 1,50-5€ 1,50-4,50€ 1-4€ (Bic ballpoints are usually the cheapest, 1.50-2€/4) 1-4€ 9-20€/8G

Entertainment Movie ticket: Concert/sports ticket: Coffee/tea: Glass of beer: Glass of wine: Candy bar: Soft drink: Dinner out:

6-10€ http://www.allocine.fr/film/ 10-50€ (http://www.fnacspectacles.com) 2-7€ 3-7€ 4-10€ 1-3€ 1,5-5€ 10-30€

43

Off-Campus Study & Exchanges

Skidmore in Paris: Liberal Arts, Language & Business 2015-2016

APPENDIX III - SKIDMORE ACADEMIC POLICIES ACADEMIC POLICIES Skidmore in Paris is part of the Skidmore College community. Therefore, the Skidmore College Standards for Academic Excellence and Conduct apply just as much to you in Paris as they do on the Saratoga Springs campus. While studying off campus, all students must adhere to the Honor Code and Academic Policies in place at Skidmore College. Students are responsible for understanding Skidmore College’s academic policies. The Skidmore College Academic Policies can be found in the Skidmore College student handbook at http://cms.skidmore.edu/student_handbook. Students must also follow OCSE’s academic policies as well as any academic policies in place for the Skidmore in Paris programs. OCSE’s academic policies can be found at http://cms.skidmore.edu/ocse/policies/academic. Skidmore College Honor Code The Skidmore Honor Code defines the guiding principles of honesty, respect, and integrity that should inform all choices and behavior patterns in the Skidmore academic and social communities. Each student, in matriculating at Skidmore College (or engaging in any Skidmore-sponsored activity or program, such as offcampus study, as a non-matriculated student), agrees to the following code:

I hereby accept membership in the Skidmore College community and, with full realization of the responsibilities inherent in membership, do agree to adhere to honesty and integrity in all relationships, to be considerate of the rights of others, and to abide by the College regulations. It is the responsibility of every student and every member of the faculty and staff, both by example and by instruction, to encourage students to embrace the standards of the Honor Code. If a student is aware of a violation, he or she is honor-bound to speak to the student, and if necessary, to report the student to the Dean of Student Affairs or other appropriate member of the staff or faculty. If a member of the faculty is aware that someone has committed an academic violation, faculty legislation requires that the faculty member report the violation to the Dean of Studies. It is only through a combination of ethical commitment, guidance, and sanctions that the Honor code can become a living set of principles for our community. Maintaining Off-Campus Study Eligibility Only students in good academic, financial, and social standing are eligible to study abroad. Participation in an off-campus study program is contingent upon maintaining a good academic, financial, and social standing at Skidmore College. If your cumulative GPA falls below a 3.0 or if your social standing changes dramatically, OCSE reserves the right to withdraw you from your program.

44