REGULAR MEETING of the CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG BOARD OF EDUCATION

Approved by the CharlotteMecklenburg Board of Education October 11, 2005 Regular Board Meeting Charlotte, North Carolina June 29, 2005 REGULAR MEET...
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Approved by the CharlotteMecklenburg Board of Education October 11, 2005 Regular Board Meeting

Charlotte, North Carolina

June 29, 2005

REGULAR MEETING of the CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG BOARD OF EDUCATION The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education held a Regular Board Meeting on June 29, 2005 that began at 6:06 p.m. in the Meeting Room of the Government Center. CMS TV Channel 3 televised the meeting. Present:

Joe White, Chairperson; Kit Cramer, Vice Chairperson; Kaye McGarry, Member At Large; Larry Gauvreau (District 1); George Dunlap (District 3); Louise Woods (District 4); and B. Lee Kindberg (District 6)

Absent:

Vilma D. Leake (District 2) and Molly Griffin (District 5)

Also present at the request of the Board were Dr. James L. Pughsley, Superintendent; Dr. Frances Haithcock, Associate Superintendent for Education Services; Greg Clemmer, Deputy Superintendent for Operations; other members of the Executive and Senior Staffs; Maurice Green, General Counsel to the Board; and Nancy Daughtridge, Clerk to the Board. I. C A L L T O O R D E R Chairperson White called the meeting to order at 6:06 p.m. A. Pledge of Allegiance Chairperson White called upon Dr. Kindberg to lead those present and in the viewing audience in the pledge of allegiance. B. Adoption of Agenda Dr. Kindberg moved that Section III (Action Items A. B. C.) and Section IV (Consent Items A. thru E.) be moved to follow Section I, seconded by Mr. Dunlap, and the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve the motion. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. Dr. Kindberg moved to adopt the agenda as amended, seconded by Ms. Cramer, and the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve the motion. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. 1 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

Chairperson White said for Item I. E. (Report on name for football stadium at Myers Park High School), he would ask the Board to vote on that item at that time. The approval of the name for the stadium is Action Item III. C. C. Recognition of Harding University High School State 4 A High School Girls’ Track and Field Championship Team Chairperson White called upon Ms. McGarry to present the recognition. Ms. McGarry said the Board was pleased to recognize the 2004-2005 Harding University High School State Championship Women’s Track & Field Team. This is the second consecutive year this team has been named State champs. The team scored 90 points which is the most points scored by a women’s team in the 4A State Championships. Representing Harding University were the following: • • • •



• •

Curtis Carroll, Principal Alvin Wideman, Athletic Director Trey Miles, Assistant Head Coach Student-Athlete Sherrika Jordan, a junior. Sherrika is a member of the State Championship 4 by 400 Meter Relay Team. She is the State Runner-up in the 1600 Meter Run. Sherrika is a member of the National Honor Society and Executive Council and is an AP and Honor Roll Student. Student-Athlete Kamorean Hayes, a sophomore. Kamorean is the State Champion and State Record holder in the Shot Put and Discus. She was named Nike All-American and The Charlotte Observer Field Events Athlete of the Year. She has been selected to compete in the World Youth games in Morocco. Kamorean also placed first in the Nike Outdoor Track & Field Nationals for the Shot Put with a distance of 51 feet, l inch. Student-Athlete Jane’t Carothers, a sophomore. Jane’t is a member of the State Championship 4 by 200 Meter and 4 by 400 Meter Relay teams. She was the State Runner-up in the 400 Meter Dash. Jane’t is an Honor Roll student in the IB Program. Student-Athlete Alexis Ivey, a sophomore. Alexis is a member of the State Championship 4 by 200 Meter and 4 by 400 Meter Relay teams. She is one of the top IB students at Harding University High School and has made all A’s and one B in the IB Program with only one absence this year.

Ms. McGarry congratulated the young ladies on their academic and athletic accomplishments. She invited the school representatives to make comments. Mr. Carroll recognized the young women for their tremendous academic and athletic abilities. He also recognized the other individuals who were instrumental in winning the State Championship who were not present. He thanked Dr. Pughsley for all that he has done for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools and Harding University High School. He said Dr. Pughsley has been an outstanding educator and a role model for everyone. D. Above and Beyond Recognition Video Chairperson White reported that if there are no objections, he and Dr. Pughsley have made the decision to not present the recognition video at this time because of the busy agenda. Chairperson White reported there were no objections from the Board members. Mr. Dunlap expressed his disappointment that the recognition video was not being presented. He said there are a lot of people within CMS who deserve recognition and this is the opportunity for them to be recognized. Chairperson White reported the presentation of the video would be on the agenda 2 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

for the July 20, 2005 Regular Board Meeting. E. Community Report 1. Report on name for football stadium at Myers Park High School Chairperson White called upon Dr. Pughsley to present the report. Dr. Pughsley invited Dr. Hammond to introduce representatives from the school to present the report. Dr. Hammond introduced Bill Anderson, principal of Myers Park High School, to present the report and the recommended name to the Board. Dr. Hammond noted that the recommended name is for a person who has demonstrated outstanding contributions to the school and to the school district. The request meets the requirements set forth in Section II of the Board of Education Policy, Naming Parts of School Buildings or Other Facilities. Mr. Anderson introduced Greg Clewis, Athletic Director at Myers Park High School, and Charles Snow, Mustang Club President. Mr. Anderson said they would like the Board to favorably consider changing the name of the Myers Park High School stadium to “The Gus Purcell Stadium.” Gus Purcell was a teacher and coach at Myers Park for over twenty years and he impacted the lives of many people in the community in very positive ways. Mr. Anderson introduced Jeff Beaver, Executive Director of the Charlotte Regional Sports Commission and a former player of Mr. Purcell’s, to say a few words about what Mr. Purcell meant to him and so many others that he coached. Mr. Beaver said Mr. Purcell coached at Myers Park from 1951 to 1971 and was considered by many to be one of the most successful high school coaches in North Carolina history. He was inducted into the North Carolina High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame. Mr. Purcell had a tremendous impact on many student athletes over the years, including himself. Mr. Beaver asked the Board members to name the Myers Park stadium “The Gus Purcell Stadium.” Chairperson White said he is delighted to be a part of this because Gus Purcell had a tremendous impact on his life as well. Chairperson White said when he began coaching Gus Purcell was already a legend. He not only had a great impact on students at Myers Park but also he had an impact on other young people all over the southeast because he ran the finest quarterback camp in the area. Chairperson White said his three sons attended the camp as well as three of his grandsons. Chairperson White said one of the reasons Mr. Purcell was good for the game of football was because he developed very innovative plays. Action Item III. C. Upon motion by Ms. Cramer, seconded by Dr. Kindberg, that the Board approve the Myers Park High School Stadium be named “The Gus Purcell Stadium,” the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve the motion. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. II. REQUESTS FROM THE PUBLIC To follow Section IV (Consent Items). III. ACTION I TEMS A. Recommend approval of appointment of administrative personnel Chairperson White called upon Dr. Pughsley to present the recommendations. Dr. Pughsley invited Dr. Frances Haithcock, incoming interim Superintendent, to make her recommendations for appointments. Dr. Haithcock thanked Dr. Pughsley for giving her the opportunity to present her appointments that will be effective July 1, 2005. The appointments will allow her the 3 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

opportunity to have everyone in place when she becomes Superintendent. She said she is recommending for Board approval six central office appointments and two principals. The central office positions represent movements because it was not appropriate for her to reorganize the whole organization as an interim Superintendent. It was important to back fill some positions and make a few changes. Dr. Haithcock renamed the Executive Regional Superintendent position so that it would be parallel to the Associate Superintendent for Education Services and reinstated the position previously held by Jim Clark to direct her special projects. Dr. Haithcock also initiated some transfers that did not require Board approval. The transfers were as follows: • • • • •

Nancy Hicks named principal at Carmel Middle School. She previously served as principal at Beverly Woods Elementary. Kendra March named principal of Hopewell High School. She previously served as principal at Crestdale Middle School. Alan Cox was named principal on assignment for several critical central office positions for one year. He previously served as principal at Hopewell High School. Dr. Jim Hammond named Regional Superintendent for Middle Schools West. He previously served as Executive Regional Superintendent for Pre-K through 12th Grade. Carolyn Hubbard named Regional Superintendent for Elementary Schools West. She previously served as Assistant Superintendent for Elementary School Curriculum and Instruction.

The appointments were as follows: •











Dr. Cheryl Atkinson named Associate Superintendent for School Administration. Dr. Atkinson has a Doctor of Education, Educational Administration, from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA; a Master of Education, Elementary Education, from the UNC-Charlotte; and a Bachelor of Arts, Elementary Education, from the UNCCharlotte. She previously served as Regional Superintendent for Middle Schools East. Muffet Garber named Associate Superintendent for Education Services. Ms. Garber has a School Administration Certification from UNC-Charlotte; Master of Education, Reading and Curriculum and Instruction, from UNC-Charlotte; and a Bachelor of Arts, English, from UNC-Charlotte. She previously served as Regional Superintendent for Elementary Schools West. Dr. Linda Morris named Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Curriculum and Instruction Department. Dr. Morris has a Doctorate of Education, Curriculum, Instruction, and Supervision, from UNC-Greensboro; a Master of Education, Elementary Education, from UNC-Greensboro; and a Bachelor of Arts, Elementary Education, from High Point College. She previously served as principal at Cornelius Elementary School. Lisa Stickley named Regional Superintendent for Middle Schools East. Ms. Stickley has a Educational Specialist, Curriculum, Instruction, and Supervision, from Winthrop University; School Administration Certification from UNC-Charlotte; a Master of Arts, Reading, from Winthrop University; and a Bachelor of Arts, English, from Queens College. She previously served as principal at Carmel Middle School. LaPonda Bridges Parker named Director of Special Projects for the Superintendent. Ms. Parker has a Master of Education, Guidance and Counseling, from UNC-Charlotte, and a Bachelor of Arts, Speech Communications, from UNC-Greensboro. She previously served as Executive Coordinator of the Educational Services Department. LaTarzja Henry named Executive Director of the Public Information Department. Ms. Henry has a Bachelor of Arts, Communications, from Hampton University, Hampton, VA. She previously served as Assistant Director of the Public Information Department.

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• • •

Jamal Crawford named principal of Northridge Middle School. Mr. Crawford has a Master of School Administration from UNC-Charlotte, and a Bachelor of Arts, History, from UNCCharlotte. He previously served as assistant principal at Eastway Middle School. Avery Mitchell named principal of Crestdale Middle School. Ms. Mitchell has a Master of Education from Winthrop University and a Bachelor of Science, Mathematics, from NC State University. She previously served as assistant principal at Carmel Middle School. Cynthia Hobbs named Director of Child Nutrition. Ms. Hobbs has a Bachelor of Science, Home Economics, from UNC-Greensboro. She previously served as Assistant Director of Child Nutrition.

Upon motion by Ms. Cramer, and seconded by Dr. Kindberg, the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve the administrative personnel appointments. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. B. Recommend approval of one citizen appointment to the equity Committee by the Board Chairperson Chairperson White reported he did not have an appointment to present at this time. He would put this appointment on the agenda for the July 20, 2005 Regular Board Meeting. C. Recommend approval of name for football stadium at Myers Park High School This item was approved under agenda item I. E. IV. CONSENT I TEMS A. Recommend approval of minutes • April 26, 2005 Closed Session • May 3, 2005 Work Session / Special Meeting • May 3, 2005 Closed Session • May 10, 2005 Closed Session • May 18, 2005 Work Session • May 24, 2005 Regular Board Meeting • May 25, 2005 Closed Session • May 31- June 1, 2005 Special Meeting • June 14, 2005 Closed Session • June 16, 2005 Closed Session B. Construction Items 1. Recommend approval of construction contract for Cotswold Elementary School 2. Recommend approval of construction contract for Sharon Elementary School 3. Recommend approval of an easement agreement for utility coordination at Tuckaseegee Elementary School 4. Recommend approval of a joint-use agreement between Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education and the Town of Cornelius at Westmoreland Elementary School 5. Recommend approval of a 15’ Duke Power utility easement at James Martin Middle School 6. Recommend approval of an easement agreement between Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education and Bellsouth Telecommunications, Inc., for various schools C. Item Deleted 5 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

D. Recommend approval of supplementary funding request from US Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Smaller Learning Communities Program for Career and Technical Education Students E. Recommend approval of Budget Amendments for May 2005 and June 2005 Upon motion by Mr. Dunlap, seconded by Dr. Kindberg, that the Board approve Consent Items A. thru E., a discussion followed. Chairperson White asked if there were any Consent Items to be pulled. Mr. Gauvreau pulled B.1. and Ms. McGarry pulled B.2. The Board voted 7 to 0 to approve Consent Items A. thru E. excluding B.1. and B.2. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. The Board discussed Consent Item B.1. Mr. Gauvreau said this item is for $11 million in renovations at Cotswold Elementary School with the source of funding from Bond monies dating back to 1996. Mr. Gauvreau said this is currently a 27-classroom school. The renovations will add 12-classrooms to become a 39-classroom school. This essentially will be a brand new school and be as big or bigger than some of the new schools that are being built. Mr. Chamberlain explained the renovations are for a 12-classroom addition and the net will be basically zero. There will be churn in the existing building to create spaces that they don’t currently have. The intent is to keep the school at the same capacity. This campus does not have enough room for it to be an eight hundred-student school and it will be kept at its current capacity. Mr. Gauvreau asked how many classrooms will the school have after the $11 million renovations are complete? Mr. Chamberlain said he believes there will be less than thirty classrooms but he would have to verify the exact number. The renovations include restroom additions, counseling space, and other spaces. Mr. Gauvreau said his concern for this item was that the renovations were adding an additional twelve classrooms to the existing twenty-seven classrooms to make this school another big school for only five hundred and twenty-five students. Mr. Chamberlain said this is not the case because there is not enough room on that campus to make this a big school. Upon motion by Dr. Kindberg, seconded by Ms. Cramer, the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve Consent Item B. 1. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. The Board discussed Consent Item B.2. Ms. McGarry said the capacity of Sharon Elementary School is 546 students and this item is adding seven classrooms. Ms. McGarry asked how is this item being funded by 1997 Bond monies? She has heard that there are no 1996 and 1997 Bonds remaining. She asked would the school have the capacity of students needed for the seven additional classrooms? Mr. Chamberlain explained this item is similar to Cotswold Elementary School. There will be no net increase in the capacity. This school is an open classroom plan and in order to renovate this plan, space will be lost. In addition, the administrative area will be expanded. Essentially, the classroom addition makes up for the space that will be lost in the existing building. Mr. Chamberlain explained that the 1997 Bonds have been sold but they have not been spent at this time. Ms. McGarry said she was under the impression that they had been sold and spent because she has been told the only money that has not been spent is the 2000 Bonds. She clarified that there is 1996 and 1997 monies that have been sold but we are still spending those funds. Mr. Chamberlain said that is correct. He explained most of those funds have been transferred into active projects through Capital Ordinances. There are some vestiges of the 1997 money left and this is one example of that. Ms. McGarry said of the 2000 and 2002 Bonds there is still approximately $188 million that has not been sold. Mr. Chamberlain said that is probably close. Ms. Cramer asked when we say not sold, are those Bonds committed to a specific project? Mr. Chamberlain said every cent that has been approved by the voters is 6 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

committed to some project. Mr. Gauvreau asked is this one of the Critical Needs Schools in 2007? Mr. Chamberlain said that is correct. This is one of fourteen projects that were originally funded in 1997. Mr. Gauvreau believes this is an enormous amount of money. He has been trying to get this Board to direct the Superintendent to shift on this type of spending. Mr. Gauvreau believes CMS is applying too much money to schools that are very close to other schools that have been revamped and are only half full. He believes if CMS continues to go down this road there will be people in the community who do not have a neighborhood school and that is wrong. Mr. Gauvreau will support this item but this is a classic example of what CMS is doing wrong. Ms. McGarry believes the remaining approximately $188 million in Bonds must be prioritized on-going. She will support this item because it is on the list of critical needs. Upon motion by Ms. McGarry, and seconded by Dr. Kindberg, the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve Consent Item B.2. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. Ms. Woods said it is important for the public to get accurate information. She asked what is the current capacity of these two schools? Mr. Chamberlain said they are both at capacity. Mr. Gauvreau said one school has five hundred and twenty-five students and the new Torrence Creek Elementary School that has thirty-five classrooms and also cost $11 million will open in August 2005 with one thousand students. He believes this is way off. Mr. Gauvreau will continue to try to reset this Board because it is twisted logic that is being put in front of the public. II. REQUESTS FROM THE PUBLIC Public Hearing on Student Assignment: Magnet Programs, Boundaries, and Feeder Patterns Upon motion by Mr. Dunlap that the Board open the Public Hearing, seconded by Dr. Kindberg, the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve the motion. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. Scott Brennan represented the Rosecliff Home Owner’s Association. He requested that the Olde Providence south area remain in the Green Zone and not be changed to the Blue Zone. This would provide this area stability, foster diversity, and a school close to home which follows the Board’s guiding principles. They want to remain at Olde Providence Elementary, South Charlotte Middle, and Providence High schools. Alicia Duran believes in public education. Her family has worked in public education for three generations. When her family first moved to Charlotte, they chose to put their children in private school because of community unrest, constant pupil reassignment, and continued negative press. The private school provided stability and a solid academic program. They enrolled their children in CMS based on promises of neighborhood stability and a renewed commitment to student achievement. Her children have been excelling in a stable school community. She is opposed to the Olde Providence south area being reassigned. She asked the Board to not reassign this area again because it would be the fourth reassignment in ten years. Marie Balogun is a guidance counselor at Albemarle Road Middle School. She represented Albemarle Road Middle School and asked the Board to keep the IB Program at that school because it is instrumental to the school’s make up; it helps to promote diversity in the school and community; statistics show that the IB students are at or above grade-level; and the students are proud to be in the IB Program.

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Victor Fields is a resident in Rosecliff which is a neighborhood in the Olde Providence southwest area. He asked the Board to consider the concerns of the community and the impact the proposed boundary changes will have on Providence High School. Staff repeatedly told them that the proposed changes would not affect their area. They have just been informed about the proposed reassignment and are very opposed to the reassignment. They request that this area remain at Providence High School. Rosemary Debrullo lives in the Thornhill neighborhood. She is concerned about the reassignment and the distance her children will have to travel to get to school. This is not a natural progression. This area has had twelve different school assignments. She asked the Board to assign the Thornhill area to Ardrey Kell High School because this will keep the children within the community. This area is assigned to Community House Road Middle School and it would be a logical feed to Ardrey Kell High School. Elaine Babcock represented the Thornhill neighborhood. She asked the Board to keep the siblings together and to keep these children at a school close to home. She asked the Board to assign their area to Ardrey Kell High School not to South Mecklenburg High School. Liz Downing said Board members must consider the current wants and the future needs of the community. She has worked with the people in the CMS Planning Department. She believes it is important for the community to trust the people working in the Planning Department because they have submitted proposals that are professional and based upon the best data and growth models. She has trust in the process and with the staff of CMS. She encouraged the Board to consider all the needs of the community. Laura Prince represented the Crown Point feeder area. She encouraged the Board to keep them at Butler High School and not send them to East Mecklenburg High School. These students have been reassigned to three different middle schools in three years. She noted that the utilization data did not include a 500-seat addition at Butler High School that would be completed December 2006 so there should be room for these students at that school. Nancy Durham lives in the Selwyn Farms Community. This area is assigned to Sedgefield Elementary School. She thanked the Board for the proposal for returning them back to their home school of Myers Park High School. She encouraged the Board to approve this proposal. Janet Williams thanked Dr. Agruso and staff for conducting the Community Meetings. She lives in Selwyn Farms which is part of the Sedgefield community. She supports the proposal for returning this area to Myers Park High School because it is their closest school to home and would allow the community to be active school families. She encouraged the Board to support this proposal. Carol Sawyer thanked Dr. Agruso and staff for their hard work in developing the proposals for the Transportation Zones and attempting to balance the poverty levels in the zones. This is moving in the right direction. She asked the Board to consider a lottery priority which would help to stabilize and balance Magnet Programs and schools. She suggested that students who are eligible for free-and-reduced lunch would have a priority in schools with majority high-wealth populations in the Magnet Programs and likewise for students not eligible for free-and-reduced lunch would have a priority in schools with majority free-and-reduced lunch. These priorities would help foster diversity in magnets and help them remain diverse and stable.

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Lorie VanBuskirk is chairperson for the 2.8 Mile Group. They live in the southern most tip of Pineville south and are located 2.8 miles from Community House Road Middle School. They are on the boundary line for Ardrey Kell High School and request that they be assigned to Ardrey Kell with their peers. They are currently assigned to E. E. Waddell High School, Community House Road Middle School, and Pineville Elementary School. They are the only neighborhood in this area not assigned to Ardrey Kell High School. She encouraged the Board to make the boundary for this area logical, provide them stability and a school close to home. Dr. Walter Johnson represented the Olde Providence south neighborhood. They support the overview and the neighborhood’s request as presented by Scott Brennan. They believe the proposal contradicts the Board’s guiding principles of community, stability, diversity, the use of major roads and natural boundaries, and keeping schools close to home. He encouraged the Board to focus on the guiding principles and keep their children at Olde Providence Elementary, South Charlotte Middle, and Providence High schools. He asked the Board to leave this area Green. Robert Hudson represented the Reawoods, Ballantrae, and Piper Glen neighborhoods. They are concerned about staff’s recommendation for McAlpine Elementary School and its subsequent impact on the middle and high school feeds. They are very proud that this school was recognized as a School of Excellence. The proposed boundaries will drastically change the make-up of McAlpine and will lessen the school’s chances of maintaining its distinction. He said staff’s recommendation does not share added diversity equitably and noted that many South Charlotte schools remain unchanged. He expressed concern for the future stability, diversity, and predictability of this area’s school because this is not an equitable split. He encouraged the Board to not support this proposal. Judy August is a western McAlpine Elementary School parent. She supports Proposal 4 as it stands because it improves the feeder pattern going from South Charlotte Middle School to South Mecklenburg High School and improves the feeder pattern by adding some of the southern Olde Providence area to McAlpine Elementary School. She expressed concern for this area because they are split between two districts and are not a priority to anyone. Patti Bonevac represented the neighborhoods that border Endhaven Lane. They are concerned about the proposal that splits the students from Community House Road Middle School. The proposal has 90% of the students attending Ardrey Kell High School and the remaining 10% attending South Mecklenburg High School. She expressed concern for the 10% of the students who will not be attending school with their friends and the negative impact this will have on their well-being. Please keep all the children together. Wes Settlemyer represented Together for Excellence at Middle Ring Schools (TEAM). He is a parent of a future student at South Mecklenburg High School. He spoke in support of Proposal 4 because it is good for South Mecklenburg High, Ardrey Kell High, Myers Park High, Providence High, Olympic High, E. E. Waddell High, and Butler High schools. He supports South Mecklenburg High School and that the attendance zone should include the areas of Thornhill and Endhaven. He believes those families will be happy with the reassignment. He would like East Mecklenburg High School and Quail Hollow Middle School be given some additional consideration. Leslie Dellinger is a Pineville resident. She supports Proposal 4 and encouraged the Board to adopt it in its entirety because it returns Pineville students to South Mecklenburg High School; adds magnets to E. E. Waddell High School to strengthen that school; puts Pineville south and 9 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

north together at South Mecklenburg High School; and keeps the elementary students at Pineville Elementary School rather than reassigning them to the new Lancaster Elementary School. She would support renovating and expanding Pineville Elementary School rather than building a new elementary school because this would save money. Donna Dawson summarized an article that appeared in the June 22nd Charlotte Observer entitled All Schools Need Community for All Students to Meet Potentials. The author was a businessman who believed schools were like businesses and business strategies could be used to make the school system better. He thought public schools need to change and educators were a major part of the problem. It was pointed out that businesses seek quality (materials, employees, etc.) but schools must take all students and that is why a school is not a business. Schools need to change and educators cannot do this alone. Schools reflect attitudes, beliefs, and health of the communities they serve. Michelle Sellers is the PTA president of Beverly Woods Elementary School. Beverly Woods Elementary School is a feeder school to Carmel Middle School and South Mecklenburg High School. Beverly Woods needs a strong feeder area to maintain its momentum and future success. They support Proposal 4 in its entirety because it maintains the school’s strength, follows the guiding principles, and is a good compromise for all the schools. Carol Hall represented the Old Farm Homeowners’ Association. She encouraged the Board to vote ‘yes’ to the proposal to reassign the Old Farm neighborhood to Sharon Elementary School, Carmel Middle School, and Myers Park High School. This new assignment follows the Board’s guiding principles. Ashlynn Kelker is president of the Huntingtowne Farms Neighborhood Association and a past graduate of South Mecklenburg High School. This neighborhood has been attending South Mecklenburg High School for almost forty years. They support public education and the schools. They are concerned about the negative impact to South Mecklenburg High School by Ardrey Kell High School. They want South Mecklenburg High School to remain strong, stable, and fully utilized. They strongly support Proposal 4 because it leaves South Mecklenburg High School as a strong viable school and allows for growth at Ardrey Kell High School. She asked the Board to support Proposal 4. Lisa Frick represented the Olde Providence southwest area. She asked the Board to leave them Green. This area has been attending Providence High School for the past sixteen years. They have been very loyal and supportive of the school and this has created a very stable environment for the students. This reassignment will only affect a very small group (only 71 students). They do not want to go to South Mecklenburg High School. This change will have a very negative impact on the students. She asked the Board to not support this reassignment. Ken White represented the Charlotte-Mecklenburg NAACP and People United for Education. He expressed concern for the lack of diversity in the proposed home school boundary plan as it relates to the free-and-reduced lunch program. He interprets this as a measure of social economic status which also may relate to the racial make-up of the system. He said diversity does not always translate to a quality education or to equality for all students in the system. He believes many times children of color get caught up in a web of systematic discrimination that relegates them to the lower rung of educational quality and educational equality. He is concerned about the number of African American students being placed in special education classes and alternative learning environments. He encouraged the Board to make the schools stronger by focusing on curriculum, quality teachers, quality management, and diversity in both race and 10 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

social economics. He is concerned that the boundaries restrict diversity to certain parts of the community and is not shared equally across the entire community and to all schools. He believes diversity is the responsibility of the entire community. He encouraged the Board to change the school zone boundaries to share the free-and-reduced lunch responsibility because this would allow diversity to spread throughout the community. Jason Waldrop represented the Olde Providence south area and asked the Board to leave them Green. This area is very disappointed with the proposed realignment because it will negatively impact this neighborhood and will have a negative long-range emotional impact on the students. These students need a neighborhood school close to home so that the needs of the student can be balanced with the everyday demands of managing a family. South Mecklenburg High School is too far away. Pete Anderson is a parent of three students at Sharon Elementary School in the Magnet Program. They have had a great experience at this school. They are concerned about the changes that are taking place. The proposal could split his family up to cause his children to attend two different elementary schools and then continue to two different middle schools at the same time. They are concerned about the elimination of the sibling guarantee and the feeder patterns. He asked the Board to modify the proposal to allow full grandfathering for siblings to attend the same middle school and to keep the sibling guarantee at Sharon Elementary School. Amy Manson supports sibling guarantees. She is the mother of two children. One child is four years old and one will be attending Sharon Elementary School in the fall. This proposal could place her children at two different schools. They are a family that is involved and want their children to attend the same school. She asked the Board to maintain the sibling guarantee. Claire Buie is a mother of children attending Sharon Elementary School. She asked the Board to support the proposal to keep the Communication Arts Program at Sharon Elementary School. They will be negatively affected by the removal of the Magnet Program and are very concerned about the elimination of the sibling guarantee. She asked the Board to maintain the sibling guarantee. She believes the temporary location for Sharon Elementary School will have a very negative impact on families. Helen Richards is a Sharon Elementary School magnet parent. She asked the Board to support full grandfathering at Sharon Elementary and Carmel Middle schools. Stewart Jones is a Sharon Elementary School/Carmel Middle School parent. He asked the Board to support full grandfathering at these schools. He said partial grandfathering is not consistent with the guiding principles. He provided Board members with reasons to support full grandfathering. Jean Anderson represented Together for Excellence at Middle Ring Schools (TEAM). TEAM is a collaboration of members from the East Mecklenburg, Myers Park, Providence, and South Mecklenburg high school’s feeder areas. They were formed in response to the opening of the new Ardrey Kell High School. They desire to foster strength and stability to the middle ring schools. She presented guiding principles for student assignment with respect to boundaries and feeder patterns for the Board’s consideration. She encouraged the Board to develop boundaries that would fully utilize the inner ring schools that are in low-growth areas and under-utilize the outer ring schools where rapid growth is experienced. She asked the Board to consider free-andreduced lunch numbers when setting boundaries and to encourage diversity in all schools.

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Carolyn Allred is a Piedmont Open Middle School parent. She supports the proposal to have a middle ring zone that allows students to chose Piedmont Open Middle School or Randolph Middle School. She asked the Board to support the IB Program and Open Program at both schools and to allow Villa Heights Elementary School and the Montessori Programs to feed to Piedmont Open Middle School. She asked the Board to think about a work place magnet without transportation and to review the impact of the priorities because the priorities as written harm Magnet Programs that are in distressed neighborhoods like Piedmont Open Middle School. Barbara Eudy represented the Park Crossing Homeowners’ Association. This is an area of 600 families and they support public education. They need a strong South Mecklenburg High School. They love South Mecklenburg High School. The school provides an excellent academic experience for the students and is close to their homes. They support Proposal 4 for student assignment at the new Ardrey Kell High School because it provides full utilization and a wellbalanced student population long-term at South Mecklenburg High School. She asked the Board to support Proposal 4 intact. Bonnie Abramowitz expressed concern because the guiding principles are applied to some groups of students but not to others, are conflicting, and in some cases are completely ignored. She believes the outcome of this process should provide a non-partisan recommendation that helps all students. She believes the proposal will have a negative impact on McAlpine Elementary School and does not provide stability and predictability. She does not support the proposal that splits the students attending South Charlotte Middle School to different high schools. Rev. Tonya Rawls is the pastor of Unity Fellowship Church and a member of People United for Education. She encouraged the Board to strongly consider diversity as a more central principle when establishing boundaries, feeders, and the district’s overall pupil assignment plan. She believes the Board continually resists serious efforts at providing greater balance along racial and socio-economic lines. She believes there are compelling reasons for having diverse classrooms and talked about the negative impact of having schools with more than 40% poverty. Studies show, regardless of the students’ capacity to learn, all students fair worse. She said the current plan has created schools with poverty levels at 60%, 70%, and 90%. She asked the Board to find ways to bring more diversity into the schools because it has been proven to work. Scott MacLatchie represented the Carrington Homeowners’ Association which is a part of the Olde Providence southwest area. He does not support Proposal 4 because it is contrary to the guiding principles. He is concerned about the safety and travel time for students. They have been attending the same school for fifteen years and it is only three miles away. He asked the Board to keep the students close to home and allow them to attend Olde Providence Elementary, South Charlotte Middle, and Providence High schools. Peggy Fadero represented the School Leadership Team and the PTSA of South Mecklenburg School. They support Proposal 4 because it allows for the opening of the new Ardrey Kell High School and maintains the quality of education at the current high schools involved. She encouraged the Board to approve Proposal 4 intact. This proposal will allow South Mecklenburg High School to continue to provide a wonderful academic experience to a diverse balance of students. Lou Trosch thanked the Board for what they do for the community. He is a graduate of West Charlotte High School and noted that it was a diverse school that worked. He is a member of TEAM and advocates for solutions and recommendations for four different schools. He supports 12 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

the proposals by staff. He encouraged the Board to make the right decisions for all the students in all the schools. He supports Proposal 4 but believes it needs a few tweaks. Pat Boorman represented the people of Myers Park High School boundaries. She said Myers Park has achieved academic success and embraces a diverse student population. She expressed concern about the removal of Olde Providence north and Sharon south from the assignment zone. These areas are critical for maintaining stability and economic balance at the school. She encouraged the Board to maintain stability at Myers Park High School. George Fowler, Mayor of the Town of Pineville, represented Pineville and stated they support Proposal 4. Pineville has always been very supportive of South Mecklenburg High School and are very happy about the possibility of being reassigned back to South Mecklenburg. He encouraged the Board to approve Proposal 4 intact. Pineville will be a very positive and supportive part of South Mecklenburg High School. Vincent Frisina represented People United for Education. They encourage that staff consider a socio-economic and diverse balance in the schools. They asked that staff review four reports so that they could utilize fact-findings from a professional standpoint. He will provide a copy of these reports. He said to Dr. Pughsley, “Great job, great run, and good luck.” Rhonda Lennon represented Families United for North Mecklenburg Education. She expressed concern about the proposed Transportation Zones, particularly for Mallard Creek High School. They are concerned because this area is proposed to be split from the North County Zone. This does not follow the guiding principles. They want the same considerations that other parts of the county have received. The North Transportation Zone should include Hopewell High, North Mecklenburg High, and Mallard Creek High schools, and the northern portion of West Mecklenburg High School. Pam Smith represented Partners for Highest Quality Schools. They support the boundary changes for the East Mecklenburg feeder area. They believe CMS provides legitimate choices to families and are not sure that other choice alternatives are necessary or healthy. They support the boundary changes for East Mecklenburg High School because they strengthen the school and community by including areas of growth. She encouraged the Board to make the tough decisions that strengthen schools and to approve Proposal 4 intact. Amy Woods represented the Blueberry Lane neighborhood. She asked the Board to approve the zoning changes for Blueberry Lane because they are logical and the students will attend a school that has a much safer travel route. This change will have them attending the same schools as their surrounding neighbors. George Young lives in Matthews in the Pineville Subdivision. He believes assignment is the symptom of a problem. He believes there are deeper issues that should be resolved. This began with the Court Ruling a few years ago which forced the Board to change their direction. Growth has compounded this issue. He noted a new development is planned for his area which will have approximately 190 new homes. He suggested that CMS partner with the developers to review the possibilities of them providing some resources and land for renovations and new schools in the area. Dean Unumb represented the Quail Hollow Estates Homeowners’ Association and the sixteen surrounding neighborhoods. They support Proposal 4 intact because it offers South Mecklenburg High School long-term stability and keeps the heart of South Mecklenburg School’s activities and 13 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

organizations intact. South Mecklenburg High School is the heart of their socio-economic, diverse community. He encouraged the Board to approve Proposal 4 intact. Jeri Ramsey has a student at Sharon Elementary School. She is concerned that her younger child will not be able to attend the same school because of the elimination of the sibling guarantee. She encouraged the Board to maintain the sibling guarantee. Missy Giles has a student at Sharon Elementary School in the Magnet Program. She encouraged the Board to keep siblings together at Sharon Elementary School and Carmel Middle School. She asked the Board to fully grandfather Sharon magnet families. Lolita Polland expressed concern about the removal of the IB Program at Albemarle Road Middle School. She said the IB Program provides value and rigor to the students and asked the Board to maintain the IB Program at Albemarle Road Middle School. She asked the Board to provide strong teachers and leaders at this school. Upon motion by Ms. Cramer, seconded by Ms. McGarry, the Board voted 7 to 0 to approve that the Public Hearing be closed. Ms. Leake and Ms. Griffin were absent. At 9:30 p.m. the Board took a five-minute break. The Board reconvened the Regular Board Meeting at 9:42 p.m. V. R E P O R T S / I N F O R M A T I O N I T E M S A. Report on Superintendent Search Firm Request for Proposals/Initial Superintendent Profile Chairperson White called upon Maurice Green, General Counsel, to present the report. Mr. Green reported the Board had been provided a draft Request for Proposal (RFP). Mr. Green said the timeline provides that a report would be presented to the Board at the June 29, 2005 Regular Board Meeting and scheduled for a Board vote at the July 20, 2005 Regular Board Meeting. He said the Board had decided to use a search firm to assist it with the search for the next Superintendent. The Board had also indicated that it would like to review proposals from potential search firms before it selects the search firm that it would use to assist it in its search. Mr. Green highlighted the draft Request for Proposals. The document allows that the Board may add, as appropriate, requirements for the Superintendent of CMS. The document presently includes some minimum requirements or qualifications for the Superintendent. The RFP includes an introduction; general information; a revised proposed timetable pending Board approval on July 20th; a scope of work for what the search firm would be expected to provide; the proposal format; and a request for information on the search firm’s experience and background. Mr. Green noted that Exhibit J was the initial Superintendent Candidate Profile. The Board had decided to include an initial Superintendent Profile with the Search Firm RFP although the Board has not met to develop that finalized document. Mr. Green said the Board could use Exhibit J as a starting point for the creation of the Superintendent Profile. Exhibit J is the Profile used in 1996 when the Board conducted its search that ultimately yielded Dr. Eric Smith. Mr. Green said the draft RFP and Superintendent Profile are being presented as a template for the Board’s consideration and could be revised as the Board deems appropriate. Mr. Green said he would be glad to respond to any questions and comments from the Board members. Chairperson White suggested that the Board members review the document and then meet with Mr. Green to discuss revisions. Chairperson White asked Board members to contact him with any drastic changes to the document so that a Board Work Session could be scheduled, if needed, to discuss the changes. Ms. McGarry said the minimum qualifications for a Superintendent in North 14 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

Carolina includes must have been a principal in a North Carolina public school. She asked is this a legal requirement? Mr. Green said Section 1.4 outlines legal minimum qualifications of a Superintendent in North Carolina and includes that the legal requirements can be met more than one way. The law for the qualifications for a Superintendent in North Carolina was broadened about two to three years ago to include individuals who were non-educators. Mr. Gauvreau does not see the need for the Board to issue an RFP. He said this is an onerous task for anyone to have to respond to with all the CMS bureaucracy when we are simply looking for a Superintendent. He questioned why the Board puts RFPs out for some contracts but not for others. He does not believe a forty page RFP is necessary for the Superintendent Search. Mr. Gauvreau asked how did the decision to issue an RFP for this come about? Mr. Green said he is taking guidance from the Board. Mr. Green said there is more than one way to select a search firm. The Board could consider three or four search firms that they know do good business and ask them for bids. This could be a short process that is not as detailed as this one. The Board could also follow a more open process that would allow all interested companies to present a proposal. Mr. Green said once this field is opened, it is helpful to have some uniformity in the information received from the companies. If there is no uniformity in the process, the Board could receive back a lot of different documents which could make it more difficult to compare the companies. This RFP outlines what CMS is requesting and provides a format for the information to be provided. This would allow for a large number of proposals for all to provide the same information and in the same format. The law does not require that a RFP is necessary for a service contract. Mr. Green said he is taking guidance from the Board and if they would prefer to do this in another way, he would be happy to work with the Board to do it a different way. Mr. Gauvreau said this is very bureaucratic and hopes the Board will consider another way that will expedite the process. He believes there are better ways to accomplish this process and hire a Superintendent. Ms. Woods believes the draft for the Superintendent Profile is very important. She is very uncomfortable with a document from 1996 and the responsibility on Mr. Green to have to meet with Board members on an individual basis. Ms. Woods said because this so important she believes the Board should have a Work Session to discuss the profile criteria so that the decisions made on this are group decisions. She would also like to have the requirements listed in a priority order. Mr. Dunlap believes the Board should take the guidance of the Chair and review the document first and then share their concerns. He completely understands why this document was developed in the manner it was developed. Mr. Dunlap said Mr. Green has considered the liability involved when making contracts and the need for uniformity in the information received in the proposals. Mr. Green has organized the proposal in such a manner that will allow the Board to be able to review all the proposals and clearly see the requested information. Mr. Green has already stated to let him know if there are things included in the RFP that are not necessary. Mr. Dunlap said it is better to have the information in advance than to have to request it at a later time. Chairperson White said he is going to assume that Board members will contact Mr. Green to provide input and ask questions. He said he would be open to talk with Mr. Gauvreau to discuss other avenues for selecting a search firm. He said he believes the Board could spend months discussing the profile for a Superintendent but the most important thing is an individual who can do the things that the Board thinks are important for this community. He would be glad to schedule a Work Session for early July if the Board deems it necessary. Ms. Cramer said she would like to discuss the characteristics that the Board is looking for in a Superintendent. She also believes a larger public process is necessary than what is outlined. She believes the Board should provide the public an initial statement for what they believe and then allow the public to provide feedback. She would like the Board to schedule a Work Session to discuss the RFP, the Superintendent Profile, and to review what was done last time. She believes the Work Session should be scheduled when all Board members are available and suggested mid-July. Ms. Cramer believes the RFP is lengthy but it is easier to make a comparison when the information is provided in a uniform format. Ms. Cramer thanked 15 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

Mr. Green for the work he has done in providing the Board members a starting point for this process. Chairperson White said he would review dates to schedule a Work Session, perhaps July 15th or July 18th. Ms. Cramer asked that the Board consider permanently scheduling a Work Session for the 3rd Monday of each month with a rotating time. She requested that this item be placed on the agenda for the July 20, 2005 Regular Board Meeting for a Board vote. Chairperson White said he would place this item on the agenda for the July 20th meeting. B. Comprehensive Review of the Student Assignment Plan: Report on Recommended Changes for Transportation Zones Chairperson White called upon Dr. Pughsley to present the report. Dr. Pughsley invited Dr. Susan Agruso, Assistant Superintendent for Assessment, Planning, and Technical Support, to present the Comprehensive Review of the Student Assignment Plan. He said this would be a two-part report. Dr. Agruso said this is the second part of staff’s recommendation for the Comprehensive Review of the Student Assignment Plan. Dr. Agruso said she would first present the recommendations for the Transportation Zones and the second part would be responses to Board and community questions. This information will be posted on the CMS website on June 30, 2005. She informed the Board members that she would be glad to schedule meetings with Board members to answer questions or provide additional information. Dr. Agruso explained an issue that staff has been trying to address is that the student assignment plan presently has four choice zones and a set of Magnet Programs which do not necessarily go together. This plan attempts to establish zones within which transportation would be provided to students and establish those zones so that magnet areas could be superimposed on top of them. By doing this, we limit to some degree the number of buses and the miles that children travel on those buses for choicing into a school that has room as well as attending a magnet zone, and for meeting the No Child Left Behind requirements. The recommended Transportation Zones are aligned based on the high school Magnet Programs; utilize school boundaries; are compact, logical, and contiguous; provides diversity within the zones; balances high-performing schools and low-performing schools to allow more options for children; contain somewhat similar student populations with a range from 19,000 students to about 40,000 and the free-and-reduced lunch population varies from 35% to 59%; and provides transportation within the zones. The recommended Transportation Zones are as follows: •

Violet Zone (North Mecklenburg IB)  North Mecklenburg School  Hopewell High School  West Mecklenburg High School - North  This is the Coulwood Middle School area and this is the only high school that has been split • Grey Zone (West Charlotte IB)  West Mecklenburg High School - South  West Charlotte High School  Vance High School  New Mallard Creek High School • Green Zone (East Mecklenburg IB)  East Mecklenburg High School  Garinger High School  Independence High School  Butler High School  Providence High School

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Blue Zone (Myers Park IB)  Myers Park High School  Olympic High School  E. E. Waddell High School  South Mecklenburg High School  Ardrey Kell High School

Dr. Agruso said the IB Programs at the elementary, middle, and high schools are aligned within each zone. The goal is to have the Magnet Programs fit each of the zones so that students do not have to travel out of their zone to attend a particular Magnet Program. This plan works very well for the IB Program and the Talent Development Programs and establishes the guarantee feeds for the programs. The IB Program alignment zones are as follows: Zone

Grey

Elementary School Barringer Academic Center Shamrock Gardens Idlewild Tuckaseegee

Violet

Lincoln Heights

Blue Green

Middle School Sedgefield

High School Myers Park

Albemarle Road

East Mecklenburg

Davidson Ranson Ranson

West Charlotte North Mecklenburg

The Learning Immersion/Talent Development Program alignment with zones are as follows: Zone

Green Grey

Elementary School Huntingtowne Farms Cotswold Lansdowne Irwin Avenue Open

Violet

Statesville Road

Blue

Middle School Sedgefield

High School Myers Park

Albemarle Road Davidson Ranson Ranson

East Mecklenburg West Charlotte North Mecklenburg

The recommendation for the Transportation Zones also establishes Half-County Magnets or HalfCounty Zones. The concerns for the Full-County Magnets have been the transportation time and exorbitant costs. This is an effort to reduce transportation as much as possible. The plan divides the County into two Half-Counties. Each Half-County consists of two of the Transportation Zones. A Center Zone was established because some the Magnet Programs with very strong feeds from certain neighborhoods, and depending how the boundary lines were drawn, overlapped with a few of the elementary school areas in the center section. As a result, five of the local areas were pulled out and the Center Zone was created. The Center Zone was imposed on top of the two Half-Counties. It serves the purpose of allowing the students within the five feeder areas to attend either Half-County Magnet. The Half-County Zones and Center Zone are as follows: •

North  Violet Zone  Grey Zone • South

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 Green Zone  Blue Zone • Center (Select Half-County LI/TD, Open, and Paideia Magnets from either Zone)  Irwin Avenue Open Elementary School  First Ward Elementary School  Walter G. Byers Elementary School  Eastover Elementary School  Billingsville Elementary School Dr. Agruso said in the North Zone, Villa Heights Elementary School would serve as the elementary school Talent Development Magnet and Piedmont Open Middle School would serve as the middle school IB Magnet and Open Paideia Program combined. In the South Zone, Barringer Academic Center would serve as the elementary school Talent Development Magnet and Randolph Middle School would serve as the middle school IB Magnet and Open Paideia Program combined. The Half-County Magnet Programs include Center for Leadership and Global Economics; Communication Arts (North only); Languages; Learning Immersion/Talent Development; Montessori; Open; Paideia; Visual and Performing Arts; and Traditional. A feeder pattern for each program has been established in the North Zone and the South Zone. The Transportation Zone recommendation also includes County-wide Magnet Programs and their guaranteed feeder patterns. These are being limited to the extinct possible because of the transportation problems. The Transportation Zones are designed to be simpler, a little smaller, and align with the Magnet Programs. A discussion with Board members followed. Mr. Dunlap noted that one group in the community requested that more than one proposal be drafted. He expressed concern for how this recommendation would be presented to the Board for the Board vote. He said the community requested a more diverse proposal that would include consideration for economic and poverty levels. These people believe they have not been listened to and their concerns were not taken into consideration because a different proposal was not drafted. Mr. Dunlap asked how difficult would it be to draft an alternate proposal? Dr. Agruso said at this point there is only one proposal. She explained the overall process. She said for example, for the overall boundary proposal for Ardrey Kell High School, there were actually about twenty-five different versions created and seven maps of those versions were published. The versions were generated as a result of listening to various groups and receiving feedback from them. The Board was presented the best recommendations of what the boundaries should be on June 14th. The recommendations were a result of a nine-month process of listening to the public and the Board and receiving feedback. The intent was for staff to provide the Board with one final recommendation for their consideration. The same process was used for the Transportation Zones but only two maps have been published. This is the second one that was published. Prior to that, there was a considerable amount of time spent, and with input from some Board members, trying to determine what would be the best way to do that. This is our best recommendation of what those zones should be at this time. Mr. Dunlap said he understands what the process has been. He would like to be responsive to the people who feel their concerns have not been heard and would like a more diverse setting considered. He asked can an alternate proposal be drafted that would take these concerns into consideration? Dr. Pughsley asked for clarification. Dr. Pughsley asked is the alternative proposal request for the Transportation Zones or for the high schools? Mr. Dunlap said for the geographical boundaries. Mr. Dunlap explained that people in the community believe if the lines were drawn differently there would be a different ethnic make-up of the geographical boundaries that would be more diverse. This is about the schools themselves and not about the Transportation Zones. Mr. Dunlap said for example, some people believe the boundaries for Providence High School could be drawn so that the school would be more than 7% white. He would like to see what this would look like. Mr. Dunlap expressed concern about the balance of the percentages of diversity and 18 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

free-and-reduced lunch students in the schools. Mr. Gauvreau said this is just once again rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. There is very little difference with these schemes. He does not understand why CMS chose to do this themselves rather than bring in an expert who would have done something differently than the normal status quo approach. He believes this is trying to take incremental steps instead of a sweeping change. He said this must be changed. Mr. Gauvreau said the public wants neighborhood schools not these rigged zonal boundaries that we now call Transportation Zones. The public cannot understand why a school system of this size would try to build a student assignment plan around an IB Program and a couple of Magnet Schools. The public wants simple neighborhood school assignments and stability. Mr. Gauvreau does not believe this is a comprehensive plan and this has gone from bad to worse. He does not believe there will be any meaningful savings in the transportation costs across the district with this plan. Mr. Gauvreau said we must do a better job and proposed that CMS bring in an outside expert to get this done right. This is not educationally focused and will not work until this is broken-up or deconsolidated to some level where people have ownership. The Board is not going through a practical, pragmatic review of a simple process that should be a better student assignment policy. Dr. Agruso said this plan included expert advice from the Urban Institute which is a group located at UNC-Charlotte that works with school districts throughout North Carolina and the country to develop their transportation plans. The Urban Institute taught the staff of CMS how to use the software that is used for doing our busing routes. The transportation experts drew maps for CMS that were very similar to the zones created by CMS. Staff also consulted with an expert on Magnet Programs who previously worked with the Wake County School district. He reviewed our existing situation and Magnet Programs and provided CMS with very good advice and information on how to make our system better. Mr. Gauvreau said he does not value the Urban Institute’s analysis. He believes CMS should seek an expert from outside of Charlotte and North Carolina. He said the cocoon that CMS wants to stay in is not serving our public education program well. He reported that he has provided expert data that is nationally recognized to the Board several times for their review that says too many Magnet School Programs are causing the white flight. Mr. Gauvreau said CMS is seeing this in their numbers but the Board refuses to recognize that data. Ms. McGarry asked how many Magnet Programs are recommended in this proposal? Dr. Agruso said there are about fifty programs. Ms. McGarry believes CMS has too many Magnets and that the Magnets are being put in schools where they are not working and are not well developed. She is very concerned about this and is not happy about where the Magnets are placed. She is concerned that the Transportation Zones are gerrymandered districts. She is also concerned about the number of students who are free-andreduced lunch that are not on grade-level. She previously requested this data and was told that there are between 70% and 80% free-and-reduced lunch students that are at grade-level or above grade-level in reading and math. She asked how many students in CMS are not at gradelevel regardless of color, creed, and nationality? She believes the families are looking for stability; a school close to home or a neighborhood school; a qualified teacher; and a safe school. Ms. McGarry believes CMS should be more of an education system instead of a transportation system. She said this goes back to the Magnet Programs. The Magnet Programs that are in place are not strong enough and there has not been enough done to eliminate those magnets that are not working well. She is concerned about the decisions for moving and not moving magnets and for the magnets that are working and not working. Ms. Cramer said she could understand the request for an additional proposal. The recommendations have taken into consideration the guiding principles and several versions have been reviewed. She is not sure if it would be viable and the best use of staffs’ time to request a different proposal at this time. Ms. Cramer loves magnet schools and is very excited about the work CMS is doing with them. She believes staff has done a good job of distributing the magnets throughout the County and this plan makes them more accessible. She understands that CMS is developing a strategy for strengthening the magnets that need strengthening and transitioning out those that are weak. 19 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

She believes the magnets provide a viable alternative for the students who are interested in these programs. Mr. Dunlap said everyone has an interest in this. The purpose of his request was to ensure that staff and the Board heard the concerns of one group of people who had not been as vocal in the process. He expressed concern about the varying thoughts of the Board members of what and how things should be done. Mr. Dunlap said this community was never designed as a neighborhood school community. If you know the history of this community, schools were built where the people were. As this community began to grow and we filled in all those little empty spots, there were no schools in those spots. Mr. Dunlap said it would not be practical to put a school in every neighborhood. Mr. Dunlap said he has just made a request as all Board members do for their constituents. He encouraged the Board members to do the right thing. Ms. Woods said staff has worked very hard on the draft for the Transportation Zones and it is much better. She reminded the Board that the purpose of the Transportation Zones is to provide an opportunity for fostering diversity which is included in the Board’s overall guidelines. She said if the Board wants other plans, the Board must ensure that they meet the guidelines the Board has set or the Board must make changes to the guidelines which might create more opportunity for diversity. Ms. Woods said if the Transportation Zones are not diverse, the guideline for diversity should be deleted. Ms. Woods asked does this plan include the guideline that allows for 5% of the space in schools to be available for students who are underachievers in schools that are highachieving and low free-and-reduced lunch schools? Ms. Woods believes if student achievement is our purpose this is only fair. Ms. Woods would like to ensure that, if the Board adopts these Transportation Zones, this guideline would be included for students in each zone. She said if this is not a part of this, then the Board must make some adjustment in that particular situation. Chairperson White said this is not part of the proposal and asked Dr. Pughsley to answer the question. Dr. Pughsley said there is a 5% clause that is built into it now. Dr. Agruso said this is in the proposal for the overall plan. Chairperson White asked is this a part of the Transportation Zone proposal? Dr. Agruso said to answer Ms. Wood’s question regarding would this be possible in each of the zones, the fact is there are very few schools in the district that have a significant amount of room in them. There are schools (perhaps not high schools) within each zone that are not at full capacity but there would be very limited options. The proposal presented to the Board is that it is a limited choice program because there are very few choice options for students. Students are offered choice through the Magnet Programs, through the No Child Left Behind Legislature under certain circumstances, and providing choice to students for schools that have room. Ms. Woods believes provisions for space should be made for the students who are below grade-level and who do not have those options because of the Transportation Zone limits. She said space should be provided in a school in each zone or the Transportation Zone should be extended for those children. Dr. Agruso said the guiding principles have provided for that by setting up special programs in schools that have room. Other opportunities for this include having a partner to the overcrowding policy of what to do with underutilized schools and what types of special programs can be designed for that. Dr. Kindberg said she would save her detail questions for the Work Session because she is looking forward to the next report on Student Achievement. Dr. Agruso said the second part of the report reviews several questions from parents and Board members with answers provided in the form of a proposal. Several parents and Board members have asked how will students be phased-in to schools. Dr. Agruso explained that along with the boundary changes for the new opening of Ardrey Kell High School there are also a number of proposed moves for students. Dr. Agruso presented a proposed recommendation for how those students would be transitioned to their new setting. Dr. Agruso explained because Ardrey Kell High School would be a brand new school opening and the school would have to be staffed and make arrangements for other new school opening things, CMS would propose the following, which are standard practice: 20 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

• •

In the fall of 2006-2007, move the 9th, 10th, and 11th grade students to that school. For the other high schools impacted by the boundary changes, only rising 9th grade students would be required to move to their new school. This would apply to the students in the southwest portion of Olde Providence. Only the rising 9th graders would move and the students currently in a different high school, in this case Providence High School, would be allowed to complete their high school years at their current home school.

Dr. Agruso explained that the other schools similarly impacted are listed. She said in some cases, students who are 10th or 11th graders will want to move immediately. That option is available but it is not required under this proposal unless they are rising 9th graders. The only other group of students that would be asked to be moved immediately, in all grades except the terminal grade, would be the students who are currently attending Smithfield Elementary School who have been reassigned to Sterling Elementary School. This plan proposes to move a small group of students on the western portion of Smithfield Elementary School. The middle school for these students would not change and their high school assignment would be E. E. Waddell High School. The purpose of making the move at the elementary level is because the school is very overcrowded and this would provide immediate relief and would utilize Sterling Elementary School to over 90% capacity. The students in grades K through 4 would be asked to move to Sterling Elementary School that first year and the terminal grade students would be allowed to remain at Smithfield Elementary School if they choose. Dr. Agruso noted there are no middle school proposals with this plan at this time. Dr. Agruso said another question frequently asked is what is the possibility of moving the IB Magnet from Albemarle Road Middle School to McClintock Middle School? Dr. Agruso said the proposal that was presented to the Board was to leave the IB Magnet at Albemarle Road Middle School and provide additional support over the next two years. If the magnet proves to be successful, it will remain at Albemarle Road Middle School; otherwise, other options will be reviewed. The reason the IB Magnet has been left at Albemarle Road Middle School is to give the program time to mature and to give the staff and principal time to make it a successful program. Dr. Agruso said it is very difficult, very expensive, and very time consuming to build a strong IB Magnet. If the program were moved, two things would have to happen. The boundaries for McClintock Middle School would have to be redrawn because there is not enough room at that school currently to house the Magnet Program and most likely the result would be McClintock Middle School students would be sent to Albemarle Road Middle School because that would be the only place where there would be room for those students. Dr. Agruso said the transition proposal for Bailey Road Middle School would be a similar pattern. All the assigned students in grades 6 and 7 in all the affected schools would be moved in the fall of 2006-2007. The terminal grade students would not be required to move but may move if they choose. The Bailey Road parents are very concerned about overcrowding and this proposal addresses overcrowding at Bradley, Alexander, and Coulwood middle schools. The recommendation for the transition proposal for Old Farm, Blueberry Lane, and McMillan Place would be the same phase-in process that has been used with the option that students may move if they choose because it effects elementary, middle, and high schools. Dr. Agruso said other questions have been asked and they will be addressed and posted on the website. A discussion with Board members followed. Chairperson White said parents are concerned about having two children at two different schools. He explained that this plan prevents that from happening if the true issue is having two children at two different schools. Dr. Agruso said that is correct. Chairperson White said there could be other reasons why parents have two children at two different schools and it may be their choice. Dr. Agruso said they would have the option of moving both students to the new assignment. Ms. Woods expressed concern that the proposal is not being consistent with establishing the boundary lines and the proposal also splits neighborhoods. She would like staff to review the proposals from Partners for Highest Quality Schools because they may incorporate Mr. Dunlap’s suggestion of providing more diversity in 21 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

schools. She would like to be provided information on those recommendations for East Mecklenburg High School. She believes these should be reviewed because they are practical solutions that may address the diversity concerns and they do follow Board guidelines. Ms. Woods noted several speakers asked that the Board revisit economic guidelines for magnets. She asked the Board to discuss this issue again to decide how the Board could best serve the community on the long-term. Ms. Woods expressed concern that the plan does not provide options for underachieving students at underachieving schools. She encouraged the Board to find ways within the Board’s guidelines to address this issue. Ms. McGarry noted that the prelude of the guiding principles addresses every student in every school. She expressed concern that the Board loses the main focus of every student in every school. She believes if a student is not achieving, the resources should be sent to that student rather than trying to take the student all over the County. C. Report on End-of-Grade and End-of-Course testing results Chairperson White called upon Dr. Pughsley to present the report. Dr. Pughsley said this report would provide the Board with the preliminary results of the End-of-Grade and End-of-Course testing for the 2004-2005 school year. Dr. Pughsley invited Dr. Susan Agruso, Assistant Superintendent for Assessment, Planning, and Technical Support, to present the information to the Board. Dr. Agruso said CMS held a press conference last week that announced the preliminary results of the testing programs. She reported the state is scheduled to release the Adequate Yearly Progress results for No Child Left Behind on July 18, 2005 and the ABCs on August 4, 2005 at their Regular Board Meeting. The Board will be provided this information as it becomes available. Agruso reviewed the overall results for the End-of-Grade (EOG) and End-ofCourse (EOC) testing. The Reading EOG results were very good. CMS had an increase in three grades and the other three grades remained stable. This is a significant improvement over the last three years and actually the last ten years in terms of reading achievement by all students. The Math EOG results were somewhat disappointing. The 7th grade reflected an improvement but there were several grades that showed some downturn in the percent of students at or above grade-level. The reading achievement gap narrowed but the math achievement gap increased by two points. Dr. Agruso said there was an overall improvement on the EOC composite scores. The EOCs are predominantly high school tests and all the EOC scores collapsed together increased overall by three points. This is a huge gain for a single testing program in one year. Dr. Agruso said the EOG tests are given in grades 3 through 8 in math and reading. Over 54,000 CSM students took each of these tests. The EOGs are given over a three-day period and include two math and one reading tests. The EOCs are given in eight subjects in high school and two subjects (algebra and geometry) in middle school. There were over 50,000 EOC tests administered. These state tests are the equivalent of the students’ final exams for these courses and counts at a minimum of 25% in their Grade Point Average (GPA). There are four levels of achievement on these tests. Level III is considered to be at grade-level or at-standard and in the case of an EOC a Level IV is considered to be above grade-level. Dr. Agruso reported the composite score results. The composite score is taking all the scores and collapsing them together across all the grades. The EOG composite score is the result of grades 3 through 8. The CMS EOG reading composite score was 84% compared to an 83% in 2004. This means 84% of our students are at or above grade-level in reading. The EOG mathematics composite score was 87% compared to an 88% in 2004. The composite score of all the EOCs administered was that 66% of our students scored a Level III or higher. This is a three percent improvement over 2004. Dr. Agruso reported the CMS EOG results for the past three years and was happy to report positive results. The percent of students at or above grade level are as follows:

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Elementary Reading Elementary Mathematics Middle Reading Middle Mathematics

2002 78% 83% 75% 81%

2003 84% 91% 80% 85%

2004 85% 92% 80% 84%

2005 86% 90% 82% 84%

Dr. Agruso said student demographics are also tracked to show EOG achievement by groups. Student demographics are tracked for African American, Hispanic/Latino, free-and-reduced lunch, Limited English Proficient, and Exceptional Children populations. Dr. Agruso reported that all groups showed achievement improvement in EOGs for reading except for the Limited English Proficient group. She said this is important for CMS because these are the groups of students who tend to have the greatest educational needs as groups within our district and their improvement is important because that is how we narrow the gap and how we ensure that part of the population is also benefiting from academic achievement. Dr. Agruso said all groups showed a slight decline in the EOG mathematic scores. Dr. Pughsley asked Dr. Agruso to inform the Board about the change that has taken place regarding mathematics at the state level. Dr. Agruso said an issue that CMS has been grappling with is why did the math scores decrease this year. A variety of issues are being reviewed to include ensuring that CMS is paying attention to standards and to what the state is requesting. A curriculum change is taking place at the state level that will go into effect the next school year. This is significant in terms of the content being asked at different grade levels. Fourth graders who were learning a certain amount of content in order for this test to be taken were also learning additional content this past school year which was not tested this year but is critical for them to be successful as fifth graders. This is a significant change in mathematics. There are actually things in mathematics that a fourth grader must learn this year that were not part of regular End-of-Grade testing that they need as prerequisite information for the new test in fifth grade. This year CMS provided a transition curriculum from the state. The teachers had to use a new textbook, a different curriculum, and teach things that are not on this test. Some of their instructional time had to be used to teach the prerequisites. The students were asked to do some things differently and the teachers had more content to teach this year. We believe this had some impact on the mathematic scores. We are not saying this is the only issue that affected the scores and other things are being analyzed. As we embed the new curriculum next year and the students have this prerequisite knowledge, we should get back on track in mathematics next year. Dr. Agruso said in regards to goals for 2005, it is important to recognize that the state test is one achievement level that CMS must make and students must pass. That test is a relatively low standard by CMS’ measure because we want to see students excel and do better. Our goal is to have the scores improve and to have more and more of those students excelling at Level IV. This is a benchmark for CMS. CMS has been tracking the reading and mathematics progress in Level IV since 2002. Dr. Agruso said in reading, there has been an improvement in all grade levels compared to last year except for the 8th grade which had a slight decline. There are higher percentages of students who are performing at Level IV. CMS did not hit the fifty percent mark but did get very close in some grades. In mathematics, CMS did exceed the fifty percent benchmark for students in Level IV in grades 4, 5, 6, and 7, and justly slightly missed it for the 8th grade level. The reading achievement gap has decreased which is a reflection of the scores increasing. A significant reading improvement has been noted in some of our lowest performing schools this year. Dr. Agruso said CMS had a number of schools that had a ten to fifteen percent increase in the number of students who are at or above grade-level. This shows a significant improvement at those schools. There has been a very serious and strict concentration on those schools which included assistance from Rapid Support Teams, Central Office, and Specialists to help those teachers. Lead Teacher Programs have been established and intensive interventions have been 23 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

conducted for students who have been struggling readers. The cumulative effects from last year and other years are paying off for some of these schools. Many of these schools have shown dramatic improvements in reading scores and some saw significant improvement in their mathematic scores. Dr. Agruso noted that some of the mathematic scores had declined slightly and that is a reflection of the overall downturn in mathematics for this year. Dr. Agruso was pleased to report that the reading scores in 6th grade had improved by three points. CMS has been very concerned about the 6th grade scores because this is a transition year and scores have a tendency to drop. This is an indication that the gap is closing. Dr. Agruso said there was also an improvement in 7th grade mathematics which indicates the gap is closing there as well. Dr. Agruso reviewed the End-of-Course (EOC) results. The EOC tests have been flat over the last few years and it is very exciting to report that the EOC composite score had a three percent increase over 2004. This is an indication that CMS is doing something right and moving in the right direction. CMS was pleased to report that the percent of students at Levels III and IV showed an improvement over 2004 in the subjects of Algebra I, Geometry, English, Biology, Physical Science, while Physics and Chemistry remained the same, and Algebra II showed a slight decline. The percent of students at Level IV also showed improvements in all subjects except Algebra II and Physics which had a slight decline. The middle school program is a very important program to CMS because of our acceleration in mathematics for our students. There are a significant number of middle school students who take Geometry and Algebra prior to entering high school. It is important to keep this in mind in reviewing the Algebra I scores at the high school level because a number of students have been pulled out and were given Algebra I as middle school students. The scores reported for high school do not include the students who are accelerated in mathematics. These score are for the students who usually have the greatest difficulty with mathematics. As a result of Project Acceleration, 5,684 middle school students took Algebra I with 90% of them achieving at Level III or IV and 1,487 took Geometry with 91% achieving at Level III or IV. Dr. Agruso reported that 56% of middle school students scored at a Level IV in Algebra and 60% in Geometry. This is an outstanding performance and CMS is very pleased with the results. Dr. Agruso reviewed the 2005 Goals. The goal is to have 50% of the students in grades 4, 5, 6, and 7 performing at Level IV with 54 of our schools in the district having more than 50% of their students performing at this level in mathematics and 38 of our schools performing at this level in reading. The goal also includes having 95% of the students performing at Level III or IV with 18 of our schools in the district having more than 95% of their students performing at this level in reading and 23 schools performing at this level in mathematics. Dr. Agruso reviewed schools to recognize for their test score improvements as follows: •

More than 10 points gain in reading and math  Bruns Avenue Elementary School  Ashley Park Elementary School • More than 10 points gain in reading  Allenbrook Elementary School  Chantilly Montessori / Billingsville Elementary School  Druid Hills Elementary School  Montclaire Elementary School  Reid Park Elementary School • Gains in EOCs  Myers Park High School – 8 points  E. E. Waddell High School – 9 points  Vance High School – 7 points  Independence High School – 7 points

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Dr. Agruso reported that although the high schools have not made the great gains we hoped for, they have made good progress which is a sign that we are moving in the right direction. Myers Park High School is now the second high school to achieve over 80% performance in the EOCs. CMS had ten high schools to make gains this year. This is certainly something to celebrate. A discussion with Board members followed. Mr. Dunlap said he gets concerned when he hears people talk about what we did not do. He asked what does it take to have a one-point gain in the district, in terms of how many students improved? Dr. Agruso said about one hundred students would have to have a gain. Mr. Dunlap said for CMS to receive a three point gain, three hundred students showed an improvement. He believes this is a very significant improvement. Ms. Cramer asked regarding the reading scores at 6th grade, is the dip a problem that is occurring around the country? Dr. Agruso said this is typical around the state and the country in every testing program. Dr. Pughsley said this is a transition grade and the dip has caused a number of schools to start looking at K-8 configurations. Ms. Cramer said she is very concerned about the dip and suggested that the 5th and 6th grade teachers should get together to discuss what they are doing in 5th grade and to deal with that articulation issue. Ms. Cramer said because the Hispanic population is the fastest growing, she believes CMS should have a comprehensive plan to address Limited English Proficient (LEP) students because that population growth is not going to end any time soon. Ms. Cramer suggested a Project Charter be established to address this issue because it could develop a plan to measure that performance and what we plan to do differently to get that achievement level up. Mr. Gauvreau asked was there a change to the cut scores this year, particularly in K-8? Dr. Agruso reported that all the tests were exactly the same as last year. Mr. Gauvreau asked was there any change in the requirements of the levels? Did we inch students into levels because they were close enough? Dr. Agruso said the Standard Arrow of Measure is a statistical term and its determination varies by test and grade. This was standardized for all students this year. We were experiencing difficulties with students who would actually score higher on a test but not make the Standard Arrow of Measure. They have equalized this so that it is a certain number of points and everybody gets the same Standard Arrow at a particular grade now. The Standard Arrow is used to determine if a student has made the gateway. It is not used to determine if a student has made Level III. A student must hit the cut point or higher to be at a Level III. The Standard Arrow of Measure is only used to determine if a student is making the gateway. The gateway is a lower standard. For example, if a test cut score is 256 for making Level III and a student scored 254, we would determine that the student made the gateway expectations but that student is still declared as a Level II student and is still required to have a Personal Education Plan for the next school year and to have support through the Intervention Programs. The numbers that have been reported are strictly students who have made the cut. Ms. Woods agrees with Ms. Cramer about establishing a Project Charter to address the dip at 6th grade. She is particularly concerned about the significant dip for the Limited English Proficient, African Americans, free-and-reduced lunch, and Hispanic/Latino students from 5th grade to 6th grade. She believes this should be analyzed as soon as possible. She believes the Board should establish an Achievement Gap Committee and believes this is a requirement of the state. She believes this could be a charge for the Equity Committee. She said the percent of students at Level IV is key. She asked who are the schools that are 50% or above free-and-reduced lunch that met this goal and what are they doing? She would also like an analysis of the schools that are breaking the mold when comparing different groups of children, particularly the free-and-reduced lunch, African American, and Latino students (those students that CMS does not typically succeed as well with). She asked what schools are exceeding where comparable schools are not? She suggested the Board schedule a Work Session to review this type of analysis and to duplicate the things that are working at other schools. Ms. Woods believes the competency scores of the students going into high school should be compared with the next year test scores to help determine why the scores in the high schools are so different. She is concerned about the students who are not meeting competency in high school. She is not 25 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

sure if certain high schools are not delivering the work or are they being set up to fail. She would like to have whatever information is available that best shows what schools are succeeding with all groups of children. She believes the CMS local accountability goals address this issue. She said parents want to know that, if their child is below grade-level, are they going to be able to grow at better than expected growth so that they can get on grade-level? Parents also want to know if their child is above grade-level, will they be able to achieve in this school, whether it is a school that is high-poverty, low-poverty, or whatever? She believes this type information should be quickly distributed to parents and should be analyzed by staff to differentiate the schools. She would like to see this type of analysis and for the Board to schedule a Work Session to review what is happening in the schools and to create some solutions. Chairperson White is concerned about the amount of time this may take for staff. Chairperson White asked for the schools that had students to transfer out because of the No Child Left Behind requirements, what happened to the students who chose to leave and did their scores increase or stay the same? Were they successful at pulling the scores down at some other school? Chairperson White said this is not a priority request. VI. R E P O R T F R O M S U P E R I N T E N D E N T Chairperson White called upon Dr. Pughsley for his report. Dr. Pughsley said he did not have a report but would share a few comments. Dr. Pughsley thanked the Board, individually and collectively, for the opportunity to serve as the Superintendent for the last three years and said it has been a pleasure to be associated with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools for the last nine years. He said it has been an enjoyable journey and he was able to gain experiences that have been good for him. Dr. Pughsley plans to remain in the area and will continue to have an opportunity to be involved in education. He has established a consultant association with the Cleveland School District and may have the opportunity to work with Baltimore as well. Dr. Pughsley said a lot of his enjoyment with CMS is attributed to the professional and administrative staff. He said staff delivered the goods each and every day and their efforts have attributed to the increase in scores and the achievements of CMS. He will continue to contribute to the education system in some form or fashion for years to come. He thanked the Board and the community for their support. He has thoroughly enjoyed his forty-two years of service to education. VII. REPO RTS FROM BO ARD MEMBERS George Dunlap said he also is looking forward to his retirement from law enforcement. He said he has the utmost respect and admiration for Dr. Pughsley as a man and as an individual because of what he stands for. He said Dr. Pughsley has stood tall and he is proud that he stood with him. He is happy that Dr. Pughsley will remain in Charlotte. Kit Cramer congratulated Dr. Pughsley on his retirement. She offered Dr. Pughsley her deep and sincere thanks for all his work with CMS. She also is happy Dr. Pughsley will remain in Charlotte and that he will continue to pursue his passion of education throughout the country. Kaye McGarry thanked Dr. Pughsley for his service to CMS. She also thanked the parents for attending the Board meeting. She said we are looking for solutions but there are not any easy ways. She said between now and July 20th, she intends to do some more homework and to listen to the public. She will vote responsibly on July 20th. Larry Gauvreau said best wishes to Dr. and Mrs. Pughsley. He said he is excited for Dr. Pughsley to not have to do as much as he has been doing. He thanked Dr. Pughsley for all his efforts. 26 of 27 – Regular Board Meeting, June 29, 2005

Louise Woods recognized Jeri Haigler, Executive Director for Public Information, who recently took a position with another company. She said Ms. Haigler provided a very valuable service to CMS. She represented CMS with style and grace and always provided good stories to the press. She said Ms. Haigler is a quality person with a tremendous amount of integrity and commitment to the school system. She wished her well in her new position at Central Piedmont Community College. Ms. Woods said Dr. Pughsley is the epitome of integrity and commitment. She gives Dr. Pughsley a tremendous amount of the credit for the improvements in student achievement in the last eight or nine years. She said this has been a difficult accomplishment and she and the community will be forever grateful to Dr. Pughsley for his leadership. She hopes the community will pledge to build on these accomplishments because this will make the public education system successful. Dr. Lee Kindberg said it has been an honor to serve with Dr. Pughsley. She hopes he has a feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction for what was actually accomplished at CMS. She said we have a tendency to focus on the things that we did not get done. She believes the amount that has been accomplished is very significant. She thanked Dr. Pughsley for his integrity and the trust that the Board was able to place in him. She hopes the new Superintendent will have the same standard of integrity. Chairperson White said there are hundreds of student reassignment appeals and asked the Board members to make their schedules available so that the appeals could be reviewed as soon as possible. Chairperson White said he retired eight years and told the soon-to-be retirees that they should be careful of what they ask for because they may get it. Chairperson White said it has been an honor and a pleasure to work with Dr. Pughsley. He said what Dr. Pughsley did this year was one of the most impressive things that he has ever seen. He said Dr. Pughsley is the most focused educator he has ever seen. Chairperson White recognized Dr. Pughsley for his ability to stay focused through a year when he was being shot at from every direction. Chairperson White said Dr. Pughsley stayed focused on the children of this community and student achievement, and did it well. He said he has a great respect for Dr. Pughsley and thanked him for being a friend. ADJOURNMENT Upon motion by Dr. Kindberg, seconded by Ms. Cramer, by consensus the Board agreed to adjourn the meeting. The Regular School Board Meeting adjourned at 11:45 p.m.

________________________________ Chairperson, Joe. I. White, Jr.

________________________________ Clerk to the Board, Nancy Daughtridge

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