Reality TV Alternative

Reality TV—Alternative Welcome to All about reality TV. • Find out some facts about reality TV. • Learn why it is popular. • Then answer the 10 q...
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Reality TV—Alternative Welcome to All about reality TV. •

Find out some facts about reality TV.



Learn why it is popular.



Then answer the 10 quiz questions.

Good luck!

Facts about reality TV Find answers to the following five questions in the information below. 1.

What does reality TV mean?

2.

When did reality TV start?

3.

Why are reality TV shows edited?

4.

What are format-driven reality TV shows?

5.

What are personality-driven reality TV shows?

Definition of reality TV Reality TV is a genre that shows people in unscripted situations, highlighting personal drama and conflict. It grew out of documentary genre. In some shows, participants are judged or eliminated by a panel, the audience or other participants.

History of reality TV Reality TV began in the US during the early to mid-1990s with The Real World. Some people say that the TV networks favoured reality TV because the costs are lower no need to pay professional actors or scriptwriters. It then exploded as a global phenomenon in the late 1990s and early 2000s with Survivor and Big Brother. There are now many reality TV shows.

Editing is everything Every reality TV show is edited. The producers use editing to tell a good story. And there is just too much footage and too little time to show it all.

© Australian Securities and Investments Commission 2015

Reality TV—Alternative, page 2

Format-driven reality TV shows Format-driven shows derive story and conflict from a particular format, often a game or competition, such as Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy. Their games are governed by explicit rules and game play. Some reality TV shows combine elements from both format-driven and personalitydriven shows.

Personality-driven reality TV shows Personality-driven shows derive story and conflict not from a format, but from a set of characters, or 'personalities', so compelling and engaging that people want to watch. Such shows often include well-known or famous personalities. Some reality TV shows combine elements from both personality-driven and formatdriven shows.

Why is reality TV so popular? Read through these three reasons why reality TV is so popular.

Fame and fortune Fame and fortune appeals to most people, with offers of money and popularity amongst television viewers.

Private lives The private lives of participants become very public, as seen in The Kardashians. People seem to enjoy that.

Despite their embarrassment Despite their embarrassment, fame or social status, participants share their experiences with the public.

© Australian Securities and Investments Commission 2015

Reality TV—Alternative, page 3

Ten quiz questions Question 1: Which two reality TV shows became popular in the early 2000s?  Survivor and Big Brother  The Real World and Big Brother  X Factor and Survivor  X Factor and Australia’s Got Talent.

Question 2: Which TV professionals are usually not needed for reality TV?  paid producers and editors  paid actors and scriptwriters  paid actors and producers  paid actors and editors.

Question 3: Select the option that best describes the main elements of reality TV.  competition and judging  personal conflicts and drama  unscripted sections  all of these.

Question 4: Which two ideas would suit the personality-driven style?  ordinary people aspiring to be actors  young women arranging their wedding  famous people stuck on a remote island  Oprah Winfrey travelling to Australia to meet her fans.

© Australian Securities and Investments Commission 2015

Reality TV—Alternative, page 4

Question 5: Which two ideas would suit the format-driven style?  ordinary people aspiring to be actors  young people arranging their wedding  famous people stuck on a remote island  Oprah Winfrey travelling to Australia to meet her fans.

Question 6: Reality TV footage is edited for many reasons. What is the main reason?  make sure the show fits the allocated time  tell a good story  show the personalities  keep within the format.

Question 7: If a TV network was trying to increase profits, why would it prefer to make reality TV over other types of shows?  It is cheaper to produce because the participants are not paid actors.  It is more exciting because the participants are not using a script.  It presents a more accurate picture of real life than a documentary.  It provides a way for the audience to become involved.

Question 8: What is the most likely reason an ordinary person would want to be a participant in a reality TV show?  share their problems with the audience  make long-lasting friendships  gain money and fame.

© Australian Securities and Investments Commission 2015

Reality TV—Alternative, page 5

Question 9: What are two reasons audiences watch a show like My Kitchen Rules?  The audience can find out more about cooking and learn new recipes.  The audience is interested to see what happens when people try to work closely together in a competition.  The audience can relate to what happens when people are under extreme pressure.

Question 10: Select one group who would probably not like reality TV and one reason for this. Groups:  TV producers  professional actors. Reasons:  fewer job opportunities  lower quality TV shows.

© Australian Securities and Investments Commission 2015

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