Present Utilization of Small-Diameter Teak Log from Community Teak Plantations in Java and Eastern Indonesia

Present Utilization of Small-Diameter Teak Log from Community Teak Plantations in Java and Eastern Indonesia Technical Report ITTO PPD 121/06 Rev. 2(I...
Author: Diane Martin
25 downloads 0 Views 4MB Size
Present Utilization of Small-Diameter Teak Log from Community Teak Plantations in Java and Eastern Indonesia Technical Report ITTO PPD 121/06 Rev. 2(I)                                        

Prepared by Eko B. Hardiyanto T.A. Prayitno 

ITTO

Contents Contents ….………………………………………………………….……………….........ii Preface …. ………………………………………………………………………… …...iii  1. Introduction

 …………………………………………………………………………1

2. Data collection .. …………………………………………………………………......1  Field survey    … …………………………………………………………………………2  Literature review       …………………………………………………………………….2 

3. Community-grow teak plantation ……..………………………………………….4  Site conditions ……………………………………………………………………………4  Size and productivity     …………………………………………………………………4  Silvicultural practices     ……………………………………………………………..…11  Stem form …...... .………………………………………………………………………  14  The need for stem quality improvement …...   ………………………………………15 4. Log quality and wood property

… …………………………………………….17 

Log quality    ….. ………………………………………………………………………..17  Wood property  .…..…………………………………………………………………….26  Mechanical property …… …………………………………………………………..26  Longitudinal variation  …...…………………………………………………….28  Radial variation …..………………………………………………………… ….28  Interactions between factors  .….………………………………………………29  Physical property  .…..………………………………………………………………31 

5. Wood processing

.. ………………………………………………………………..34 

Sawing technique  ..…..…………………………………………………………………34  Wood drying ..….……………………………………………………………………….35  Manufacturing . ….……………………………………………………………………..37  Wood processing in the surveyed areas .….…………………………………………38  The need for wood proceessing improvement  ..… ………………………………...42 

6. References.……..……………………………………………………………………..44 

ii

Preface This technical report has been prepared as part of the output of ITTO PPD 121/06  Rev 2(I)   titled ‘Development of value‐adding processes for short‐rotation, small‐ diameter  community  teak  plantations  in  Java  and  eastern  Indonesia’.    The  information  presented  in  this  technical  report  is  derived  from  the  survey  and  study as well as existing literature.    Many individuals and institutions have generously assisted in the survey, testing  wood sample and the preparation of the report. We  are particularly grateful to  the following:    • • • • •

• • • •





International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO)  provided the funding.   The  Dean  of  the  Faculty  of  Forestry  Gadjah  Mada  University  provided  facilities and support.  J.  Suranto,  Navis  Rofii,  Ermy Erene Koeslulat, Elma, Vendy, Rifky and a number of students carried out field surveys and data inputs.  In  Yogyakarta,  Ambar  Polah  Wood  Drying  shared  information  on  wood  drying.  In Gunung Kidul, Mr. Darmanto, owns a small wood processor,  offered  time and shared information on wood processing;  Mr. Supoyo, the Head  of  Batur  Agung  Cooperative  provided  information  on  teakwood  manufacturing, marketing and challenges.  In  Wonogiri,  Mr.  Bambang  Wahyu  of  the  Forestry,  Estate  Crop  and  Mining District Office helped for arranging the field survey.  In  Pacitan,  Mr.  Suyitno  of  the  Forestry  and  Estate  Crop    District  Office  helped for arranging the field survey.   Forest  District  of  Timur  Tengah  Selatan,  East  Nusa  Tenggara  helped  for  arranging field surveys  In  South  East  Sulawesi,  Mr.  Suntoro  offered  help  for  arranging  the  field  survey.  The  Forestry  Cooperative  (Koperasi  Hutan  Jaya  Lestari‐KHJL)  shared generously their time and information.   In  South  Sulawesi,  Mr.  Djohan  Perbatasari  and  Mr.  Budi  Santoso  from  FORDA  Forestry  Research  Institute,  provided  information  and  facilities  for field survey.    Many  farmers  and  wood  processors  in  the  surveyed  areas  in  Gunung  Kidul, Wonogiri, Pacitan,  East Nusa Tenggara, South Sulawesi and South  East  Sulawesi  spent  their  time  and  provided  information  on  their  teak  plantations and teaklog processing.    

iii



Perum  Perhutani  of  Cepu  District  provided  access  to  the  information  on  its teak plantation and wood processing unit. 

    Eko B. Hardiyanto  T.A. Prayitno 

iv

1

Introduction

Teak  (Tectona  grandis)  is  one  of  the  worldʹs  premier  hardwood  timbers,  rightly  famous for its mellow color, fine grain and durability. It occurs naturally only in  India,  Myanmar,  the  Lao  Peopleʹs  Democratic  Republic  and  Thailand,  and  it  is  naturalized in Java, Indonesia, where it was probably introduced some 400 to 600  years ago  (Troup 1921).    Indonesia has a long history of growing teak as an exotic plantation. The species  is believed to be introduced the first time in 14th century by Hindus (Simatupang  2001). Currently Indonesia is one of the world’s largest teak grower. Most of the  plantations  have  been  grown  in  Java,  where  the  largest  grower  is  Perum  Pehutani  (state‐owned  forest  corporation)  which  manages  over  1  million  ha    of  teak‐bearing  plantation  with  a  net  area  of  teak  estimated  to  be  around  6,00  000  ha.  Community‐grown  teak  plantations  have  been  becoming  of  importance  in  producing teak log, not only in Java, but also in eastern Indonesia such as South  Sulawesi, South East Nusa Tenggara and East Nusa Tenggara. The trend of teak  planting  by  farmers  has  been  continuously    increasing  in  recent  years  due  to  decreasing  the  log  supply  from  state  forest  managed  by  Perhutani  while  the  demand of teaklog is steadily increasing.     Teak log harvested from community‐teak plantation  has been stated to have low  quality and consequently low price as well due to be harvested at much younger  ages  around  15‐20  years  compared  with  that  of  traditionally  known  of  teak  log   from  the  state  forest  harvested  at  least    at  40  years  old.  However,  complete  information on the productivity, log quality, wood properties and processing of  teak log harvesting from community‐grown teak plantations in Indonesia is still  lacking.  The  present  study  is  intended  to  gather  this  information  with  a  particular  reference  to  Java  and  eastern  Indonesia  which  have  a  large  size  of  community teak plantations .  

1

2

Data Collection

Field survey Field  surveys  were  carried  out  in  major  community‐grown  teak  plantations  in  Java  and  eastern  Indonesia.  In  Java  surveys  included  the  following  districts:  Gunung  Kidul  (Yogyakarta  Province),  Wonogiri  (Central  Java),  Pacitan  (East  Java).  In  eastern  Indonesia  surveys  covered  the  following  districts:  Konawe  Selatan  and  Muna  (South  East  Sulawesi  Province),  Timur  Tengah  Selatan  and  Belu (East Nusa Tenggara Province) (Figure 1).     The  field  survey  was  designed  to  gather  base‐line  data  on  community‐grown  teak  plantations  such  as  size,  productivity,  quality,  silviculture  practices  (planting  pattern,  density,  maintenance  etc.)  In  every  designated  district  a   minimum of 20 plots were made and in each plot 20‐30 trees were measured (tree  height,  stem  diameter)  and  evaluated  (stem  form,  cylindricity,  fluting).  Stem  form was classified as follows: straight, sweep, bow, sinuous, wobble, kink and  fork (Figure 2). The stand selected for sampling was at least 10 years old.       The field surveys also collected  information on a wide range of log dimensions  and  qualities  at  selling  time  harvested  from  short‐rotation  community  teak  plantations.  During  field  surveys  interviews  with  teak  growers  and  processors  were also conducted.  

Literature review An  extensive  literature  search  was  carried  out  in  order  to  collate  all  sources  of  data and information related to community‐teak grown plantations and teaklog  utilization harvested from the community teak plantations.          

2

       

Figure 1. The location of survey of the community-grown teak plantations indicated by red stars

Figure 2. Classification of stem form used in the survey

3

3

Community-grown teak plantations

Site conditions The site conditions where the major community‐grown teak plantations has been  developed  vary.  Mostly  the  soil  belongs  to  vertisol  and  alfisol  derived  majority  from  limestone  and  sediment.    Annual  rainfall  ranges  from  around  1,200  mm   (East Nusa Tenggara) to more than 2,850 mm (South East Sulawesi). All  of the  sites  where  teak  has  been  grown  have  monsoonal  season,  namely  wet  and  followed with dry season (Table 1). The amount of rainfall and the length of wet  season  will  affect  the  growth  and  quality  of  teak  wood.    Some  sites  can  be  categorized  as  fairly  good,    like  in    Konwale  Selatan  (SE  Sulawesi).  In  contrast,  other sites are very poor, stony soil having very shallow soil, like in some parts  of  Gunung  Kidul,  Wonogiri  and  many  parts  of  Pacitan.  The  elevation  of  the  surveyed sites ranged from 0  to 300 m above sea level.         Table 1. Site conditions of selected community teak growing areas Location Soil Rainfall Type Parent material (mm/yr) Gunung Kidul Vertisol, Alfisol Limestone, marl 2,145 Andesitic sediment Wonogiri Vertisol, Alfisol Limestone, marl 2104 Pacitan Vertisol, Alfisol Limestone 1,892 E.Nusa Tenggara Vertisol, Alfisol Limestone 1,286 S. Sulawesi Alfisol Limestone, marl 1,620 SE Sulawesi Alfisol, Vertisol Sediment 2,850

Length of dry season (month) 6 6 6 7 5 5

Size and productivity It  is  not  easy  to  assess  the  accurate  size  (ha)  of  the  community‐  grown  teak  plantations  for  various  reasons.  Teak  is  planted  in  various  patterns  by  farmers:  planting block either pure or mixed with other tree species, a mixture of different  ages, edge rows planting along the borders of farm land, scattered trees in home  garden.    4

A survey carried out in 2003 (Central Bureau of Statistic 2004) revealed that teak  was the most favoured tree species grown by farmers amounting to 79.7 million  trees, followed by Paraserianthes (59.8 million trees), mahogany (45 million trees),  and acacia (32 million trees). There were over three million households growing  teak  all  over  Indonesia.  The  majority  of  community‐grown  teak  plantation  is  located in Java. Three major growing areas of community teak plantation in Java  are  Central  Java  (26.5  %),  Yogyakarta  (8.9  %),  and  East  Java  (21.3  %).    Outside  Java  teak  is  grown  by  farmers  in  high  quantity  in  East  Nusa  Tenggara  (6.8  %),  South  Sulawesi  (4.5  %)  and  South  East  Sulawesi  (2.2  %).    In  these  major  community teak plantations some of the trees are ready for harvest (Table 2).     Total  teak  log  production  from  the  community  teak  plantations  in  Java  in  2006  amounted to 758,720 m3 (Table 3), which is much higher than teak log produced  by Forest State Enterprise, Perhutani in the same year around 486,948 m3.  Teak  log  production  from  community  forest  can  vary  from  year  to  year  since  harvesting plan does not exist and it is based  more on  the economic need of the  farmer.    Figure  3‐5  illustrate  the  community  teak  plantations,  while  Figure  6  shown the teak plantation managed by Forest Estate Enterpise, Pehutani.   Table 2. The size of community-grown teak plantation in major growing areas in Java and eastern Indonesia (Central Bureau of Statistic 2004) Province Number of Number of trees 1 household Total Ready for harvest2 West Java 171,907 4,053,909 (5.09) 1,216,096 (6,54) Central Java 926,748 21,099,806 (26,47) 4,054,652 (21.98) Yogyakarta 253,164 7,089,864 (8,89) 1,522,888 (8,26) East Java 964,758 16,963,633 (21.28) 510,770 (24.45) East Nusa Tenggara 193,076 5,458,148 (6.83) 775,830 (9.63) South Sulawesi 112,996 3,551,805 (4,46) 1,405,706 (7,62) South East Sulawesi 29,653 1,765,981 (2.24) 436,644 (2,37) 1

The numbers in bracket are the percentage of total teak trees grown in the community plantations in Indonesia; 2 The numbers in bracket are the percentage of trees ready for harvest from the total trees in the respective province

Table 3. Teaklog production from community teak plantation in Java in 2006 Province Log production (m3) References West Java 11,486 West Java Forest District (2007) Yogyakarta 98,650 Forest and Estate District of Yogyakarta (2007) Central Java 248,111 Cental Java Forest District (2006) East Java 400,473* Perhutani Unit 1 East Java (2007) Total 758,720 * = estimated

5

a

b

Figure 3. Community teak plantation in: (a) Gunung Kidul and (b) Wonogiri

6

a

b Figure 4 Community teak plantation in: (a) Pacitan and (b) East Nusa Tenggara

7

a

b

Figure 5. Community teak plantation in: Sulawesi

(a) South

8

Sulawesi and (b) South East

Figure 6. Teak plantation in the state forest managed by Perhutani

        9

An  inventory  conducted  in  a  village  of  Pringsurat,  Gunung  Kidul,  Yogyakarta  revealed  that  the  potential  of  teakwood    produced  from  the  community  plantation was approximately 60.5 m3 per ha (Awang 2006).     It  is  not  easy  to  obtain  accurate  data  on  tree  growth  of  community  teak  plantations  due  to  a  number  of  reasons:  a  mixture  of  trees  of  different  ages,  unknown  tree  age,  mixed  planting  with  other  species,  a  mixture  of  different  methods  of  regeneration,  different  stocking  etc.  Table  4  shows  the  rate  of  teak  growth at different locations. The data should be treated cautiously and used as  an indicative teak growth in the community plantations.     Teak growth in the community plantation seems to vary dependent upon the site  condition  and  genetic  material  of  planting  stock.  In    Gunung  Kidul,  Wonogiri,   Pacitan and East Nusa Tenggara teak had slow growth rate, but comparable with  that  of  Perhutani  in  Cepu.  Genetically  poor  planting  stock,  poor  soil  conditions  and  poor  maintenance  likely  contributed  to  this  less  growth.    In  contrast,  in  Konawe  Selatan  (South  East  Sulawesi)  teak  had  rapid  growth,  reaching  0.88  –  2.70  cm  in  stem  diameter  per  year  which  is  attributable  to  more  fertile  soil  condition  and  a  longer  rainy  season  than  other  areas  being  surveyed.      Bhat  (2006)  reported  a  similar  finding  in  India  in  that  trees  from  wet  sites  had  faster  growth  than  dry  sites.  Teak  responds  very  well  in  terms  of  growth  and  girth  increment  in  areas  where  the  trees  received  at  least  sufficient  moisture  throughout the year than growth in monsoonal areas.     

Table 4. Growth rate of community teak plantation Location Mean annual increment Height (m/yr) Stem diameter (cm/yr) Gunung Kidul 0.58-1.36 0.90-1.69 Wonogiri 0.38-1.19 0.52-1.30 Pacitan 0.45-1.10 0.68-1.29 East Nusa Tenggara 0.31-0.68 0.80-1.69 South East Sulawesi 0.70-1.62 0.88-2.70 South Sulawesi 0.40-1.34 0.70-1.40 Cepu (Perhutani)* 0.50-0.70 0.86-1.22 *) Forest state enterprise

10

Silvicultural practices The  community‐grown  teak  plantations  are  established  using  a  variety  of   planting  materials,  including    seed,  seedling,  stump  and  coppice.  Mostly  the  planting  materials  are  from  genetically  unimproved  seeds  and  often  unknown  seed  sources.  Only  recently  some  farmers  have  been  using  some  planting  materials  purchased  from  seedling  growers  that  claim  their  planting  materials  are of improved ones. Seeds may be picked off from the ground from trees in the  surrounding areas and directly planted at the early rainy season. Seeds may also  grown first in the polybag before planting in the field. Seeds may also collected  from  available  stands  nearby    belonging  to  the  state  forest,  for  example  in  Gunung Kidul and South East Sulawesi. The wildlings growing under stands are  often  allowed  to  grow.  Stump  is  often  prepared  from  the  wilding    from  surrounding  areas  or  other  locations  and  then  planted.  Coppice  system  is  also  used in many community teak plantations in a number of locations.     The  use  of  wildings  and  coppice  are  for  example  found  in  Gunung  Kidul,  Wonogiri, Pacitan,  East Nusa Tenggara and South Sulawesi. Coppice method of  regeneration is very common found in Bulukumba (South Sulawewi) (Figure 7).     The  use  of  wilding  is  particularly  causes  for  concern  due  to  the  possibility  of   inbred seed which results in low productivity and poor quality of the plantation.  Seed bearing trees per a unit area in the community teak plantation may be not  many or scattered. The crossing rate of such trees are likely not good, resulted in  producing inbred seeds. In addition, due to the best trees are usually harvested  by  farmers  to  get  quick  income,  and  leaving  the  poor  ones,  this  practice  could   results in deterioration of tree growth and quality in the future plantations.       Coppice  regeneration  when  unsingled    and  leaves  more  than  one  stems  also  results  in  poor  growth  and  stem  form  (sweep  and  fluting).    Also,    tree  growth  from coppices  is poor when they are unfertilized.     At  the  time  of  planting  the  majority  of  the  growth  of  community‐grown  teak  plantations  are unfertilized so that their productivities are mostly low, except at  the site where inherent soil fertility is relatively high such as at Konawe Selatan  (SE  Sulawesi).  Nutrient  inputs  after    planting  are  rarely  applied.  No  single  tree  spacing is adopted. When teak is planted as planting block it may be spaced  2 m  x  2  m,  3  x  2  m;    4  x  2  m  etc.  Teak  may  also  planted  between  agriculture  crops,  known  locally  as  tumpangsari  (taungya  system),  using  spacing  distance  of    2  m  within  rows  and  4‐6  m  between  rows.  Teak  may    be  planted  purely  or  mixed 

11

with other tree species. Teak may also be planted in the edge of garden (border  planting) which are often in close spacing (1 m apart).        

a

b

Figure 7. (a) Wilding and (b) coppice are often used for regeneration in community teak plantations

      At  the  time  of  planting  the  majority  of  the  growth  of  community‐grown  teak  plantations  are unfertilized so that their productivities are mostly low, except at  the site where inherent soil fertility is relatively high such as at Konawe Selatan  (SE  Sulawesi).  Nutrient  inputs  after    planting  are  rarely  applied.  No  single  tree  spacing is adopted. When teak is planted as planting block it may be spaced  2 m  x  2  m,  3  x  2  m;    4  x  2  m  etc.  Teak  may  also  planted  between  agriculture  crops,  known  locally  as  tumpangsari  (taungya  system),  using  spacing  distance  of    2  m  within  rows  and  4‐6  m  between  rows.  Teak  may    be  planted  purely  or  mixed  with other tree species. Teak may also be planted in the edge of garden (border  planting) which are often in close spacing (1 m apart).    

12

Pruning  is  seldom  done  or  if  it  is  practiced  the  pruning  method  is  incorrectly  applied  (Figure  8).  If  performed  incorrectly,  pruning  can  reduce  the  quality  of  stem  wood  even  more  than  failing  to  prune  at  all.  Incorrect  pruning  can  also  damage  the  quality  of  wood  by  inviting  disease  or  insect.  For  example  leaving  long brunch stub which eventually leads to loose knots in the stem or branch size  is  already  too  big  when  pruning  is  done  leaving  the  a  large  size  of  scars.   Therefore,  pruning  is  required  to  keep  tree  trunk  free  from  knots  that  reduce  quality and to increase merchantability height.    

b

a

Figure 8. (a) Pruning is rarely done resulting in trees with poor stem form or big knot, (b) Thinning is sometime practiced and cut logs are sold (photo from infojawa.org)

Thinning practice  varies dependent on the knowledge of the farmer. Generally  small  holder  farmers  are  reluctant  to  undertake  silvicultural  thinning.  They  believe  that  all  trees  have  economic  worth  and  are  reluctant  to  cut  trees  unless  the log can be sold. However,  in some locations, for example in certain parts of  Gunung  Kidul  and  Wonogiri  thinning  has  been  practiced  (Figure  8).  Farmers  who thin their stands  expect earlier income from thinning and better growth and  quality of the remaining trees in the future. On the other hand, some farmers feel  reluctant  to  cut  their  trees  because  of  additional  cost  with  no  economic  return  and  always  think  that  thinning  will  be  a  loss  in  their  investment.    With  no 

13

thinning  has  been  practiced  particularly  during  the  first  ten  years  in  densely  growing stands,  trees’ growth potentials are lost. The high competition in dense  stand  will  result  in  smaller  stem  diameter  classes  which  reduces  the  price  each  log can generate.       Farmers  use  their  teak  trees  as  a  form  of  savings.    Harvesting  is  done  using  a  principle  of  the  need  of  the  farmer.  Whenever  farmers  need  a  large  sum  of  money,  for  instance  to  pay  their  children’s  education,  wedding  ceremonies,  medical emergencies etc., then they will cut their trees, usually the biggest ones  in their land which commands highest price.   

Stem form quality The  important  property  requirements  of   teak  wood   include  straight  bole  with  least  taper,    reduced    fluting  (irregular  involution  and  swelling)    and  knot‐free  volume.  Results  of  the  survey  in  the  community  teak  plantation  revealed  that  trees  have  different  types  of  stem  form.  Higher  percentages  of  trees  in  the  community plantation did not have straight bole,  except in South East Sulawesi.  In the later location the majority of trees had straight stem. Compared with teak  plantation grown by forest state company (Perhutani) in Cepu, the stem form of  teak  plantation  grown  by  farmers  was    poorer,  except  that  from  SE  Sulawesi  (Table  5).    High  percentages  of  trees  had  flutes  both  in  the  community  grown  teak  plantations  as  well  as  in  the  Perhutani  plantation.    Stem  cylindricity  was  mostly  categorized  as  moderate,  except  in  Pacitan  where  most  of  the  trees  had  poor  stem  cylindricity.  Teak  in  Perhutani  had  better  stem  cylindricity  than  community‐grown teak plantations (Table 6).      Overall community teak plantations had poorer stem form  compared with those  of Forest State Enterprise,  Perhutani. As mentioned in the preceding section that  community‐grown  teak  plantations  were  mostly  established  using  genetically  poor  planting  stocks  and  often  unknown  origin.  The  combined  poor  planting  material and poor maintenance resulted in poorer stem form compared with that  of Perhutani’s plantation. The later had used better planting material at least the  seeds come from seed production area.  

14

Table 5. The percentage of tree with different types of stem form Location Trees with different type of stem form (%) Bow Fork Kink Sinuous Straight Sweep Gunung Kidul 10.9 15.4 3.0 9.6 57.1 1.7 Wonogiri 14.1 6.7 1.0 9.6 57.4 9.3 Pacitan 7.8 11.5 14.7 35.3 22.5 5.3 E. Nusa Tenggara. 11.4 11.7 9.4 9.0 49.0 9.1 South Sulawesi 13.8 8.3 6.0 32.3 36.8 12.3 SE Sulawesi 4.6 11.2 6.3 9.9 74.5 5.0 Cepu (Perhutani)* 6.7 10.8 4.4 10.0 67.5 0.0

Wobble 2.0 1.9 3.9 0.3 4.9 0.0 0.3

*) Forest state company

Table 6. Stem cylindricity and butt fluting Location Tree with cylindrical form (%) Good Moderate Poor Gunung Kidul 52.0 27.0 20.0 Wonogiri 17.8 60.2 22.0 Pacitan 15.0 18.8 66.1 E. Nusa Tenggara. 2.6 64.8 32.6 South Sulawesi 43.7 51.8 10.6 SE Sulawesi 74.2 21.7 7.6 Cepu (Perhutani)* 69.7 27.3 0

Tree with butt fluting (%) 74.9 71.0 41.6 9.6 95.2 93.1 85.5

*) Forest state enterprise

The need for stem quality improvement As  mentioned  in  the  preceding  section  that  stem  quality    of  the  community‐ grown  teak  plantation  is  still  low.  Therefore,  the  improvement  of  stem  form  of  the teak plantation grown by farmers are needed. This can be done in a number  of  ways.  Genetically  improved  planting  materials  should  be  used.  In  teak  stem  form  has  been  reported  to  be  strongly  under  genetic  control  (Kaosa‐ard  2000,  Danarto and Hardiyanto 2001).     Genetically improved planting materials are now available. Perhutani through its  tree breeding program has produced improved planting materials which are also  available for sale.  Perhutani owns 1,300 ha of clonal seed orchard (CSO) varying  in age from 11 to 23 years which produce 20 tons of seed annually.  In 2006 the  CSO of Perhutani produced 41 tons of clean seeds, 33 tons for own use, 3 tons for  public relation and 5 tons are available for public sale (Purwanta, pers. comm.).    

15

In  South  East  Sulawesi  seed  production  areas  (SPA)  have  been    established  by  the government on state forest, for example in Buton (50ha) and Muna (37 ha). A  new  SPA  has  also  been  established  in  Konawe  Selatan,  but  it  is  yet  to  produce  seed (Midgley et al. 2007).    It is recommended that seed used for planting at least from seed production area  and whenever possible to get seed from the CSO of Perum Perhutani.  The use of  wilding,  seedling  or  stump  from  unknown  source  should  be  avoided.  Coppice  method of regeneration should not be  practiced.      In addition to the use of better planting materials, proper silvicultural practices  should also be practiced to improve productivity and stem quality of community  teak plantations.   Spacing, pruning and thinning should be practiced properly.  Training  or  extension  activities  on  better  growing  teak  plantations  for  small‐ holder farmers are urgently needed.   

16

4

Log Quality and Wood Property

Log quality Commercial  teak  woods  harvested  from  community  plantations  in  Gunungkidul,  Wonogiri,  Pacitan,  East  Nusa  Tenggara  and  South  East  Sulawesi   showed  different  quality  when  they  were  compared  to  the  commercial  teak  wood  harvested  from  the  teak  plantations  of  Forest  State  Enterprise,  Perhutani.  Generally  teak  logs  from  community  plantations  were  smaller  in  diameter,  higher portion of sapwood and occurrence of knots along the stem, poorer stem‐ form  and  more  stem  defects  than  those  of  Perhutani’s  plantation.  Detailed  observations  on  teak  logs  from  community  plantations  revealed  that  heart  rot  occurred even the trees were still relatively young.     The average log diameter of the community‐grown teak plantations in Java, for  example   ranged  from  22.0  cm  to  26.2  cm.  This   is  much  smaller  than  teak  logs  harvested  from  the  Forest  State  Enterprise,  Perhutani    in  Cepu  which  had  the  average diameter of 40 cm.     The  heartwood  portion  was  determined  by  measuring  the  area  of  heartwood  compared to area of two cross section of the stem obtained from two ends of the  log.  The  average    heartwood  portion  of  log  from  community  teak  plantations  ranged from  52 % to 78 %.  The average log with flute  varied from 3.6 % to 51.3  %,  while  the  average  log  with  end  split  ranged  from  23.1  %  to  61.1  %.    In  comparison  logs  from  Perhutani’s  plantations  in  Cepu  had  the  average   heartwood  percentage    of  72  %,  the  average  log  with  flute    of  17  %  and    the  average of log with end split of  11 %.  The high percentage of heartwood of teak  log  from  South  East  Sulawesi  is  possibly  related  to  the  rapid  growth  of  teak  plantation in the area (see Table 4). Fast growth of teak is previously reported to  correlate with high percentage of heartwood and strength (Bhat 2000, Bhat et al.  2001).  The  higher  quality  of  teak  log  from  Perhutani’s  plantation  can  be  understood as the logs had larger diameter and  were harvested from older teak  plantations, normally at 60 years old, even tough at certain cases the harvesting  age has been reduced  to younger ages, around 40 years old.   

17

Figure 9  shows samples of teak logs from different sites.  The high percentages  of    sapwood  (light  color  wood  appearing  in  the  outer  portion  of  logs,  near  the  bark) are attributable to small diameter logs and young ages when the trees were  harvested. The heartwood portion was significantly lower than that of teak logs  harvested  from  Forest  State  Enterprise  Perhutani’s  teak  plantation  which  harvests its plantation at 40‐60 years of age (Figure 10c). Prayitno (2001) studied  the changes in  teak wood quality of Perhutani’s plantations and found that the  decreased wood quality in its teak plantation was due to the cutting age. Older  age  teak  trees  having  bigger  stem  diameter  produced  greater  portion  of  heartwood. Okuyama et al. (2003) reported that the heartwood ratio was related  to stem diameter not age.      In  addition,  log  defects  were  found    in  logs  harvested  from  community  teak  plantations,  such  as  knot  with  variation  of  its  diameter,  flute, and heart rot downgraded  the  log. As a consequence, logs  form  the  community‐grown  teak  plantation are sold at lower prices than those from Perhutani.                                                   18

     

a

b

c

d

Figure 9. Teak logs harvested from community teak plantations: (a) Gunung Kidul, (b) Wonogiri, (c) Pacitan and (d) East Nusa Tenggara

19

a

b

c Figure 10. Teak logs harvested from community teak plantations: (a) South Sulawesi, (b) South East Sulawesi, (c) Forest State Enterprise, Perhutani in Cepu for comparison

        20

  The low percentage of heartwood has a consequence, that is,  the low price of the  teak log. It could drop to one third up to one half  of regular price of the log per  cubic  meter.  For  example,  the  price  of  Perhutani’s  teak  log  with  the  same  diameter but having almost full heartwood could be sold at Rp 20 million, while   that  of  teak  log  from  community  plantation  is  only  Rp  6  up  to  10  million  per  cubic meter. This situation  becomes worse when the buyer already knows that  the  sapwood  is  not  quite  durable  compared  to  heartwood.  In  the  field  the  teak  log price varies widely due to market mechanism, namely supply and demand of  the  teak  log.  When  the  teak  supply    falls  short,  the  teak  log  price  soars  up,    in  contrast when the teak log is abundant then the price goes down.    Detailed  information  on  the  quality  of  logs    coming  from  community  teak  plantations  are presented below according to the location.  

Gunung Kidul Twenty five enterprises were surveyed in the district, all of them were  small   in scale  and    managed  as  family‐run  enterprise.  They  generally  have  log  yards  for  collecting  logs before  being processed or sold. They do not have large amount  of    capital,  high  quality  and  sophisticated  machineries.  Typically  the  processor  have  only  small  amount  capital  with  traditional  and    semi  manual‐processing  machineries.     Table  7  presents  the  teak  wood  log  quality  found  in  the  log  yard  of  each  processor surveyed in Gunung Kidul. The average log diameter was 26 cm. The  average  minimum    log  length  was  1.89  m,  while  the  average  maximum  log  length  was  4.08  m.  This  range  of  log  length  is  suitable  for  producing  door  and  window  frames,  short  beam  for house  constructions  and  furniture  components.  However,  it is much  shorter compared with commercial tropical wood species  from  Kalimantan.    The  commercial  tropical  hardwoods  (Kalimantan  hardwood  species) such as meranti, keruing, belangeran are produced in a 6 m log‐length or  longer.  The  differences  could  be  traced  back  to  the  quality  of  teak  plantation  owned  by  the  community  teak  growers.  The  striking  factor  affecting  this  log  length was the branching habit of the trees. The branch has been found so low on  the stem making the log length produced from the trees is less than 2 m.    Teak  logs  harvested  from  community  plantations  in  Gunung  Kidul    had  a   variety  of  defects.  The  common  defect  found  was  the  existence  of  large  knots  

21

and  sometimes  distributed  along  the  stem,  which  significantly  downgrade    the  quality of logs.  It was also found high percentages of logs with   flute, end‐split   and  heart  rot  in  the  log  cross  section.  The  average  diameter  of  knot  was   about  4.28  cm,  and  the  average  log  length    free  of  knot  was  2.23  m.  The  average  percentages of log with flute,  split and  heart rot were was 51.3  %,  23.1 %  and   5.5 % respectively.     Table 7. Teak log quality in the log yard of traditional, small scale industries in Gunungkidul Industry name

Diameter (cm) Min

Max

Ave.

Karya Manunggal

17 12 11 12 20 22 23 23 20 13 20 14 14 14 17 19 15 16

42 44 40 31 34 45 37 73 36 41 28 43 22 37 35 52 48 30

26 29 19 21 26 29 29 37 27 26 25 26 19 23 27 34 32 22

Average

17

40

26

Kurnia Jati Karya Jati Mutu Jati Dwi Bangun Gasing Jaya Sinar Mulia Sumber Rejeki Suminar Jati Nugroho Widodo Sumber Jati Kabul Santoso Jati Unggul Israk Mebel Mandiri Batur Agung Bukit Seribu

Log length (m)

Heart

Knot

Log length

Log with

Log with

Log with

Min

wood (%)

diameter (cm)

free of knot (m)

flute (%)

heart rot (%)

end split (%)

0.62 0.64 0.46 0.61 0.61 0.62 0.57 0.74 0.60 0.64 0.61 0.57 0.40 0.53 0.60 0.67 0.65 0.48 0.59

4.9 4.0 2.8 3.4 5.5 3.5 5.2 5.6 0.0 3.7 3.7 4.4 2.7 4.5 6.0 5.7 5.7 4.3 4.3

1.4 1.2 1.8 1.9 1.6 1.7 2.1 2.9 2.2 2.7 1.8 1.4 2.4 1.8 2.9 2.2 3.1 1.2 2.2

53.3 20.0 26.7 50.0 70.0 36.7 76.5 64.7 75.0 36.7 40.0 45.4 50.0 23.1 68.7 52.9 54.5 28.6 51.3

10.0 10.0 26.7 10.0 30.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 10.0 10.0 18.2 5.0 0.0 18.7 0.0 4.5 0.0 5.5

6.7 3.3 3.3 3.3 40.0 26.7 0.0 17.6 0.0 26.7 10.0 18.2 35.0 23.1 0.0 23.5 22.7 100.0 23.1

1.8 0.5 2.0 1.7 1.6 1.0 2.0 1.5 2.5 1.5 2.0 1.4 2.5 2.0 3.0 1.3 1.0 2.0 1.9

Max

2.9 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.6 2.9 4.0 6.0 5.0 4.5 3.0 3.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.0 6.5 2.0 4.1

Wonogiri Wonogiri  district  is  located  at  the  east  side  of  Gunungkidul.  It  has  similar  site  conditions  as  those  of  Gunungkidul.  Surprisingly  the  teak  logs  observed  in  ten  log  yards  in  Wonogiri  showed  better  qualities  than  Gunungkidul.  The  average  log diameter was 22 cm. With regard to  log length being sold, or the debugging  policy of the wood seller, teak logs in this area were cut at length ranging from   0.9  m  to    3.0  m.  These  log  lengths  were  much  shorter  than  those  found  in  Gunungkidul  (1.4  ‐  4.5  m).  Compared  with  the  teak  log  observed  in  Gunungkidul,  teak  logs  in  Wonogiri  had  less  defects.  The  average  heartwood 

22

portion  found  in  the  cross  section  of  teak  logs  was  62%  compared  to  59  %  in  Gunung Kidul. The knot diameter was also much smaller (0.99 cm) compared to  4.28  cm  in  Gunungkidul,  while  the  length  of  free‐knot  log  was  shorter  in  Wonogiri  (1.  53m)  compared  to  Gunungkidul  (2.23  m).  The  logs  with  buttress  and heart rot incidence were considerably lower in Wonogiri,  but the percentage  logs with split end  percentage was higher in Wonogiri (Table 8).   Table 8. Teak log quality in the log yard of traditional, small scale industries in Wonogiri Industry name

Sido Lancar CV. Kartika Kayu Mas UD.Cinta Abadi Sugeng Surupan

UD. Maju Jaya UD. Jati Mas Karya Baru Delanggeng Mutiara Jati Average

Diameter (cm) Min

Max

Ave.

14 10 14 14 10 15 14 10 14 13 13

33 32 29 28 27 35 35 32 32 32 32

22 21 21 22 18 24 24 22 23 23 22

Log length (m)

Heart

Knot

Log length

Log with

Log with

Min

wood (%)

diameter (cm)

free of knot (m)

flute (%)

heart rot (%)

end split (%)

0.56 1.32 1.50 1.37 1.00 0.53 1.17 0.00 0.93 1.50 0.99

2.0 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.7 1.7 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.5

26.7 16.7 23.3 23.3 16.7 6.7 13.3 26.7 10.0 10.0 17.3

0.0 0.0 3.3 0.0 0.0 6.7 3.3 0.0 3.3 10.0 2.7

30.0 33.3 30.0 43.3 26.7 13.3 16.7 30.0 23.3 16.7 26.3

1.0 1.0 1.0 0.7 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.9

Max

2.5 2.5 2.5 2.1 2.5 3.0 3.0 2.5 2.5 2.8 2.6

0.67 0.60 0.49 0.54 0.62 0.62 0.74 0.64 0.68 0.62 0.62

Log with

Pacitan Pacitan has similar site conditions to those of Gunung Kidul and Wonogiri (see  Table  1).  Teak  log  qualities  observed  in  Pacitan  were  slightly  lower  that  those  found  in Gunungkidul or Wonogiri. The average log diameter was 23 cm.  The  average minimum length of teak log found in a number of  log yards was 1.45 m.  As mentioned the preceding section that the debugging policy at each location is  different,  indicating  that    the  minimum  log  length  is  dependent  on  the  market  demand or the end product dimension. Teak log length in  Pacitan was shorter  than Gunungkidul but similar to Wonogiri, which  ranged from 1.0 m to 2.5 m.      The    growth  and  quality  of  community  teak  plantations  in  Pacitan  were  significantly  poorer  that  those  found  in  the  adjacent  districts  (Wonogiri  and  Gunung  Kidul)  producing  teak  logs  of  much    lower  qualities.    The  heartwood  percentage of teak log in Pacitan was only 52% which is lower compared to that  of  Gunungkidul  and  Wonogiri.  The  average  diameter  of  knot  was  found  to  be 

23

larger  (8.42  cm)  than  Gunungkidul  (4.28cm)  and  Wonogiri  (0.99  cm),  while  the  average  length  of  knot‐free  log    was  much  shorter  (0.98  m)  compared  to  Gunungkidul (2.23 m) and Wonogiri (1.53 m) (Table 9).     Teak logs obtained from Pacitan had lower percentage of log with flute, possibly  due  to  site  conditions  and  plantation  management.  The  average  percentage  of   log with flute was only 26.8 % compared to that of  Gunungkidul (51.3 %). The  same condition occurred for log splitting behavior. The average percentage of log  with  end  split  was  51.1  %  which  is  very  high  when  it  is  compared  to  that  of  Gunungkidul (23.1 %) and Wonogiri (26.3 %). These findings confirm the results  from  informal  interviews  with  wood  processors  that  teak  log  quality  in  Pacitan  was lower than Gunungkidul and Wonogiri.   . Table 9. Teak log quality in the log yard of traditional, small scale industries in Pacitan Industry name

Diameter (cm) Min

Marjuki Arjosari UD. Wahyu Jati Abdul Romi TPN Desa Candi UD Tri Rukun Average

12 10 11 12 12 11

Max

Ave.

26 51 38 32 52 40

20 29 22 20 27 23

Log length (m)

Heart

Knot

Log length

Log with

Log with

Log with

Min

Max

wood (%)

diameter (cm)

free of knot l(m)

flute (%)

heart rot (%)

end split (%)

2.0 2.0 2.0 2.5 2.5 2.2

0.51 0.61 0.45 0.39 0.65 0.52

6.7 9.6 7.6 7.0 11.2 8.4

0.85 0.90 0.94 1.10 1.10 0.98

0.0 50.0 0.0 40.0 0.0 18.0

30.8 30.0 23.1 30.0 20.0 26.8

69.2 50.0 46.1 50.0 90.0 61.1

2.0 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.0 1.4

East Nusa Tenggara Teak  log  qualities  from  East  Nusa  Tenggara    were    inferior  to  those  previously  reported from southern part of Java (Gunungkidul, Wonogiri and Pacitan). The  average  log  diameter  was  18  cm.    The  average  minimum  length  of  teak  log  available in the industry was 1.2 m, while the average  maximum length was 2.8  m,  which is shorter than Gunungkidul, but longer than Wonogiri. The average  heartwood  percentage  was  the  same  as  that  of  Pacitan  (52%),  and  lower  than  Gunungkidul  (59%)  and  Wonogiri  (62%).  Knot  diameter  average  was  considerably very high (10.52 cm). The average knot‐free log was very short, in  fact    the  shortest  among  the  four  locations  has  been  reported  so  far  (Table  10).  This indicates that the knots appeared on the entire log length.   

24

Table 10. Teak log quality in the log yard of traditional, small scale industries in East Nusa Tenggara Industry name

Bengke Bahtera Karya Setia Zona Dewata Buana Kelu Mitra Kencana Average

Diameter (cm) Min

Max

Ave.

12 16 9 12 13 12

32 21 20 22 19 23

20 17 14 17 21 18

Log length (m)

Heart

Knot

Log length

Log

Log with

Log with

Min

wood (%)

diameter (cm)

free of knot (m)

with flute (%)

heart rot (%)

end split (%)

0.57 0.52 0.51 0.51 0.47 0.52

6.4 9.2 14.2 15.2 6.3 10.2

0.28 1.01 0.94 0.55 0.13 0.58

10.0 0.00 3.33 0.00 4.76 3.62

13.3 0.00 6.7 20.0 4.8 8.9

36.7 0.0 53.3 40.0 33.3 32.7

1.1 1.5 1.3 1.0 1.0 1.2

Max

3.8 2.0 3.2 2.0 2.8 2.8

South Sulawesi Teak  logs  harvested  from  community  plantations  in  South  Sulawesi  had  relatively  similar  quality  to  those  in  Java  (Gunung  Kidul  and  Wonogiri).  The  average  diameter  log  was   24  cm.  The  average  minimum  log  length  was  1.6  m,  whereas  the  avearge  log  length  was  3.0  m.  The  average  heartwood  percentage  was suprisingly quite high (73.0 %) (Table 11).      Table 11. Teak log quality in the log yard of traditional, small scale industries in South Sulawesi Industry name

Haji Damang Usaha Mujur Jati jaya Mandiri Panrita M. Samsurya Average

Diameter (cm) Min

Max

Ave.

16 14 13 12 20 15

41 44 40 30 33 38

26 29 19 21 26 24

Log length (m)

Heart

Knot

Log length

Log with

Log with

Log with

Min

wood (%)

diameter (%)

free of knot (m)

flute (%)

heart rot (%)

end split (%)

82.0 48.0 60.0 80.0 95.0 73.0

0 11.9 5.0 7.9 0 8.3

0 0.4 1.1 0 0.8

1.9 1.6 1.2 1.7 1.7 1.6

Max

2.9 2.7 3.1 2.9 3.2 3.0

0 7.0 3.0 3.0 0 4.3

0 7.0 10.0 3.0 0 6.7

0 10.0 7.0 0 0 8.5

South East Sulawesi As  mentioned  previously  that  community  teak  plantations  in  South  East  Sulawesi grew faster and showed better stem quality than other surveyed areas.  The teak log quality indicators such as heartwood percentage, log without knot  or buttress, incidence of heart rot and end split  determine the good management  in  the  community  teak  plantations.  Table  12  shows  the  information  of  teak  log  quality in Southeast Sulawesi.   

25

Table 12. Teak log quality in the log yard of traditional, small scale industries in South East Sulawesi Industry name

Diameter (cm) Min

Max

Ave.

Marsuki 15 Darmokusumo 17 16 Average na = not available

44 46 45

24 26 26

Log length (m)

Heart

Knot

Log length

Log

Log with

Log with

Min

wood (%)

diameter (cm)

free of knot (m)

with flute (%)

heart rot (%)

end split (%)

73 82 78

na na na

na na na

na na na

na na na

na na na

1.60 1.17 1.39

Max

2.15 2.40 2.28

Wood property   Teak  logs  harvested  from  community  teak  plantations  were  collected  from  5  locations,  namely  Gunungkidul,  Wonogiri,  Pacitan,  East  Nusa  Tenggara  and  South East Sulawesi. The logs were then sawn to make samples for determining  the  physical  and  mechanical  properties  according  to    the  ISO  1975  standard.  Results of the assessment of wood properties are reported in details below.  

Mechanical property Teak wood  is used for structural purposes in house constructions as well as in  boat and ships. In order to assess if community‐grown teak plantations have the  required  strength  properties  for  those  end‐uses,  mechanical  strength  of  wood  samples collected from 5 locations were determined.       Table 13 presents the results of assessment of mechanical strength of teak wood  from  different  locations.  Teak  wood  strength  differed  between  locations.  Generally,  teak  wood  from  South  East  Sulawesi  showed  greater  mechanical  strength compared to other four locations (Gunungkidul, Pacitan, Wonogiri and  East Nusa Tenggara). The strength difference might be due to specific conditions  of each location.  Site condition and plantation management have been known to  have pronounced effects on physiological activities in trees, which in turn affect  tree growth and wood quality. The mechanical strengths of teakwood originated  from  South  East  Sulawesi    were  58.4  N/mm2;  80.5  N/mm2;  30.7    N/mm2;  119.4  N/mm2 and 11,537.8 N/mm2 for compression parallel to grain, tension parallel to  grain,  shear,  modulus  of  elasticity  (MOE)  and  modulus  of  rupture  (MOE),   respectively.  

26

Table 13. Average teak wood mechanical properties from different locations Location

Compression strength // to grain (N/mm2)

Tension strength // to grain (N/mm2)

Shear strength (N/mm2)

MOR (N/mm2)

MOE (N/mm2)

Gunung Kidul

47.0

95.9

26.8

104.1

9,184.2

Wonogiri

52.7

99.8

24.2

107.4

8,942.2

Pacitan

41.7

78.9

23.7

93.7

9,590.7

E. Nusa Tenggara

46.0

73.0

22.5

83.4

6,745.1

S. E. Sulawesi

58.4

80.5

30.7

119.4

11,537.8

    Earlier  studies  on  wood  mechanical  properties  teak  wood  taken  from  a  plantation  of  17  years  old    in  Java  reported    that  the  MOE  was  10,729  N/mm2,   while  the  MOR  was  76.2  N/mm2  (Putro  and  Sutjipto  1989).  A  similar  study  in  Thailand  using  logs  taken  from  20  year  old  plantation  and  tested  according  to  ISO 3129‐1975 (E) found that compression and tension parallel to grain and shear  strength  were  35.2  N/mm2  ,    81.8  N/  N/mm2  and  0.83  N/  mm2    respectively  (Ruksasupaya et al. 1995).     Results of this present study are not much different from a similar study in India  reported by Bhat (1997) who found that the MOR and MOE of  27 year old trees  were  112.4  and  11,179  N/mm2,  respectively.  Similarly  the  bending  strength  of  community teak plantations reported in the present study was not inferior to the  older  trees.  Bhat  (1997)  reported  the  MOR  and  MOE  of  52  years  old  trees  were  103.6  and  12,985  N/Nm2,  respectively.    Other  published  reports  on  mechanical  properties of natural‐grown teak and plantations present the same variability, in  particular,  a  wide  range  of  MOE  and  MOR  values  ranging  from  8600  to  13400  N/mm2 for the first MOE and from 58 to 148 N/mm2 for MOR (Trockenbrodt and  Josue  1999).    Teak  log  normally  attains  maturity    mechanical  maturity  by  20‐21  years  (Bhat  2000,  Bhat  et  al.  2001)  which  is  coincident  with    the  cutting  age  of  mostly community teak plantations in Java.        An  analysis  of  variance  for  mechanical  properties    reveals  that  the  only  factor  affected significantly  on the mechanical strength of teak wood was location. The  location  had  profound  influence  on  the  structure  and  anatomy  of  teak  wood  which in turn resulting in different strength properties. The other factors such as  axial  positions  (butt,  middle  and  top  portion  of  the  stem)  as  well  as  radial  position  of  sapwood  and  heartwood  did  not  affect  the  mechanical  strength 

27

significantly.  As mentioned in the preceding section the wood from South East  Sulawesi  had  greater  percentage  of  heartwood  than  other  locations  which  contributed to the differences in mechanical strength.       Longitudinal variation Longitudinal  variations  in  teak  log  have  been  reported  in  various  publications.  At higher positions of log (top portion of tree), the strength tends to have lower  value  compared  to  near  the  base  (butt  portion).    Significant  longitudinal  variation  of  teak  log    strength  harvested  from  the  community  teak  plantations  was not observed in this study (Table 14). More detailed observations reveals  the  reason  behind  this  finding.  Teak  logs  from  community  teak  plantations  were  harvested at young ages, typically at 15‐20 years old,  they had more branches at  the  lower  positions  of  the  stem,    compared  to  those  cut  from  Forest  State  Enterprise,  Perhutani’s  teak  plantations.  The  log  length  of  community  teak  plantations sold commercially was in a range of  3 m for each axial portion. This  means  that  the  whole  log  length  is  only  about  6  m  or  less.  Consequently,    the  mechanical  strength  of  teak  logs  from  community  teak  plantations    is    more  or  less  the same along the axial direction.       Table 14. Average teak wood mechanical strength at the axial position Longitudinal Compression Tension Shear MOR position strength // to strength // to Strength (N/mm2) 2 2 2 grain (N/mm ) grain (N/mm ) (N/mm ) Butt 49.3 89.2 26.1 101.5 Middle 48.2 80.9 25.1 104.0 Top 50.0 86.7 25.5 99.4

MOE (N/mm2) 7,791.7 9,937.7 9,870.6

Radial variation The sapwood of teak wood is characterized with light color, while the heartwood  is dark, brown yellowish in color. The higher percentage of sapwood is normally  found in the cross section of stem of young trees. This has been used by the user  for  determining  the  commercial  price  of  wood.  The  higher  percentage  of  sapwood  found  in  the  stem  (cross  section  of  log),  the  lower  the  price  per  cubic  meter will be.    

28

There  was  no  clear  relation  between  the  sapwood  proportion  and  mechanical  properties.  The  sapwood  strength  was  not  always  inferior  to  the  heartwood.  Table  15  shows  that  the  heartwood  portion  was  only  more  superior  than  sapwood  in  tension  strength  parallel  to  grain  and  modulus  of  elasticity  (MOE),  while  in  the  other  mechanical  properties    were  not  much  different  and  had  no  practical values.   Table 15. Average teak wood mechanical strength according to radial position Radial Compression MOE Tension Shear MOR position strength // to (N/mm2) strength // to strength (N/mm2) grain (N/mm2) grain (N/mm2) (N/mm2) Sapwood 49.7 82.6 25.9 103.0 8,909.5 Heartwood 48.6 88.6 25.2 100.2 9,490.5

Interactions between factors In  this  study,  the  effect  of  interactions  between  two  or  more  factors  involving  location, axial and radial position was tested.  Table 16 presents the mechanical  properties  according  location  and  axial  direction,  whereas  Table  17  depicts  the  mechanical properties according to location and radial direction.  Results of the  analysis  variance  reveals  that  only  location    exerted    significant  effect  on  the  mechanical  strength.  Other  factors  and  their  combinations  did  not  affect  significantly on the strength of the wood (Table 18) . Published data on a similar  study but on matured trees report that the effect of axial and radial potions  their  effect is  significant on the mechanical properties. The different results reported  in this study might be caused by the age of trees. All of the tree samples in the   current  study    represented  the  commercial  teak  wood  when  they  were  sold  by  the farmer.        

29

Table 16. Average teak wood mechanical strength according to location and axial position Compression Tension Shear strength Longitudinal strength // to MOR MOE strength position grain // to grain Location (N/mm2) (N/mm2) 2 (N/mm ) (N/mm2) (N/mm2) Butt 45.7 101.9 29.2 108.2 7,890.4 Gunungkidul Middle 45.6 99.5 24.2 99.5 9,263.6 Top 49.8 86.2 26.9 104.7 10,398.5 Butt 53.3 91.5 24.3 104.6 7,986.1 Wonogiri Middle 51.9 91.2 24.9 110.2 9,765.8 Top 52.9 116.8 23.3 107.4 9,074.6 Butt 43.4 86.5 22.1 102.6 9,115.5 Pacitan Middle 38.6 73.2 24.4 91.7 10,652.2 Top 43.0 76.9 24.8 86.8 9,004.5 Butt 46.5 79.6 23.6 80.8 4,350.5 East Nusa Middle 45.2 67.0 19.9 93.9 8,110.6 Tenggara Top 46.4 72.6 23.9 75.4 7,774.2 Butt 57.7 86.8 31.3 111.1 9,616.3 South East Middle 59.7 73.8 32.1 124.7 11,895.9 Sulawesi Top 57.7 80.8 28.8 122.4 13,101.2

Table 17. Average teak wood mechanical strength according to location and radial position Compression Tension Shear strength // to strength Radial Location MOR MOE strength grain position // to (N/mm2) (N/mm2) 2 (N/mm ) (N/mm2) (N/mm2) Sapwood 47.0 89.7 26.4 107.3 9,091.5 Gunungkidul Heartwood 47.1 102.0 27.1 101.0 9,276.9 Sapwood 53.8 97.3 24.0 109.7 9,741.0 Wonogiri Heartwood 51.7 102.3 24.3 105.1 8,143.3 Sapwood 41.6 83.8 24.0 91.7 8,317.4 Pacitan Heartwood 41.7 73.9 23.5 95.7 10,864.1 Sapwood 48.3 66.1 23.3 91.4 7,346.3 E. Nusa Tenggara Heartwood 43.7 79.9 21.7 75.4 6,143.9 Sapwood 57.9 76.1 31.9 115.1 10,051.4 S.E. Sulawesi Heartwood 58.9 84.8 29.4 123.7 13,024.3

30

Table 18. Analysis of variance of teak wood mechanical properties Significance Source

df

Location (L) Axial (L) Radial (L) LxA LxR Ax R LxAxR

4 2 1 8 4 2 8

Compression strength // to grain ** ns ns ns ns ns ns

Tension strength // to grain ** ns ns ns ns ns ns

Shear strength ** ns ns ns ns ns ns

MOR ** ns ns ns ns ns ns

MOE ** ** ns ns ns ns ns

** = significant at 0.01, ns= not significant

Physical property The physical  properties  assessed  in  this  study  consist  of  wood  specific  gravity,  shrinkage  and  swelling.  Three  factors  were  involved  in  the  study,  namely  the  locations of teak wood taken from the teak plantation, three levels axial positions  (butt,  middle  and  the  top  portion)  and  radial  position  (sapwood  and   heartwood).     Table  19  presents  the  average  wood  specific  gravity  and  shrinkage  behavior  of  teak  wood  from  different  sites.  Teak  logs  from  five  locations  relatively  had  the  same  physical  characteristics.  The  highest  wood  specific  gravity  was  found  in  teak  wood  coming  from  South  East  Sulawesi.  The  oven  dried  wood  specific  gravity of teak wood from this area was 0.69 and decreased slightly when it was  measured  in  air  dry  condition.  On  the  other  hand,  the  lowest  wood  specific  gravity  was  obtained  in  teak  wood  from  East  Nusa  Tenggara.  The  oven  dried  wood specific gravity was 0.55, while the air dry specific gravity was 0.53.  Teak  wood  from  Java  (Gunungkidul,  Wonogiri  and  Pacitan)    had  oven  dry  wood  specific gravity of 0.63, 0.64 and 0.60  consecutively, while their  air wood specific  gravities  were  0,60;  0.62  and  0.57  for  Gunungkidul,  Wonogiri  and  Pacitan  respectively.    

31

Table 19. Physical characteristics of teak wood from different locations Location Oven dry Air dry Radial Tangential specific specific shrinkage shrinkage gravity. gravity (%) (%) Gunungkidul 0.63 0.60 2.40 6.65 Wonogiri 0.64 0.62 2.40 5.76 Pacitan 0.60 0.57 2.27 5.86 East Nusa Tenggara 0.55 0.53 1.99 3.80 South East Sulawesi 0.69 0.66 2.14 4.94

Longitudinal shrinkage (%) 0.72 0.41 0.49 0.52 0.28

  The  higher  wood  specific  gravity  tends  to  have  the  higher  wood  strength.  The  lowest  oven  dry  wood  specific  gravity  in  this  study  which  was  found  in  teak  wood  from  East  Nusa  Tenggara,  which  had  also  the  lowest  wood  mechanical  strength.  The  highest  wood  specific  gravity  found  in  South  East  Sulawesi  produced the highest  mechanical strength.         Shrinkage  behavior  of  teak  wood  from   community  plantations  agrees  with  the  universal  rule of shrinkage and swelling. The highest shrinkage value from the  green condition  to oven dried state was at the tangential direction, followed by  radial direction and the lowest was at the longitudinal direction. The tangential  direction shrinkage was almost twice radial shrinkage. Among the five locations,  Gunung  Kidul  and  Wonogiri  produced  teak  wood  with  high  and  similar  shrinkage values, namely 2.40 %. The values of   tangential shrinkage were 6.65  % and 5.76 % respectively for Gunung Kidul and Wonogiri. Pacitan had slightly  lower radial shrinkage (2.27 %) and tangential shrinkage (5.86 %) than Gunung  Kidul and Wonogiri.    A  different  result  in  wood  shrinkage  was  found  in  teak  wood  collected  from   South  East  Sulawesi.  Among  five  locations  studied,  it  had  the  highest  wood  specific gravity in oven dry and air dry conditions, but the shrinkage values were  relatively  low.  It  was  lower  than  the  shrinkage  values  of  teak  wood  from  Java  (Gunung Kidul, Wonogiri and Pacitan). The low shrinkage values were found in  three  directions,  namely  radial,  tangential  and  longitudinal.  It  might  be  attributable to the high percentage of heartwood of the logs harvested from this  area.       Earlier  studies  on  wood  shrinkage  of  teak  wood  taken  from  a  17  ‐  year  old  plantation  in Java reported that that the radial shrinkage was 2.19 %, while the  tangential  shrinkage was 3.55 % (Putro and Sutjipto 1989).     32

The shrinkage values of log from community teak plantation observed here  are  markedly lower than  those reported from a similar  study using logs harvested  from  a  20  year  old  plantation  in  Thailand  which  found  that    radial    and   tangential shrinkage values  were 4.1 %, and 10.7 % respectively  (Ruksasupaya  et al. 1995). Other published data on shrinkage of teak wood range from 2.5 % to  3.0  %  in  the  radial  direction,  3.4  %  to  5.8  %  in  the  tangential  direction  (Trockendrodt  and  Jouse  1999).  The  shrinkage  values  of  the  log  from  the  community teak plantation in Java and eastern Indonesia were practically within  the ranges mentioned above.    An  analysis  of    variance  was  also  conducted  for  shrinkage  data  as  it  was  in  mechanical strength. Three factors were involved in the analysis namely location,  axial  and  radial  directions  (Table  20).  The  wood  specific  gravity  was  affected  significantly  by  combination  of  location  and  axial  and  radial  directions,  indicating  that each location has a different effect on axial and radial variations  on wood specific gravity.     Table 20. Analysis of variance of physical properties of teak wood Significance Source df OD wood AD wood Radial Tangential spec. gravity spec. gravity shrinkage shrinkage Location (L) 4 ** ** ns ns Axial (A) 2 ** ** ns .ns Radial (R) 1 ** .** ns ns LxA 8 ** ** .ns ns LxR 4 ** ** ns ns AxR 2 ns ns ns ns LxAxR 8 ns ns ns ns ** = significant at 0.01, ns= not significant

33

Longitudinal shrinkage ns ns ns ns ns ns ns

5

Wood Processing    

    In  every  area  being  surveyed    there  were  teak  wood  processing  units    run  by  local  people.  They  were  typically  small  sized  enterprises,  traditional,  and  had  low  capital.  Surprisingly  there  were  many  people  involved  in  the  teak  log  marketing  and  processing.  Some  were  involved  in  marketing  logs  only,  some  were  involved  in  marketing  logs  and  processing,  the  others  were  involved  in  processing  and  marketing  products.  The  small  enterprises    were  generally  initiated  by  the  availability  of  opportunities,  personal  communication  or  family  heritage. They have not been  managed professionally.     Information  gathered  from  the    survey  reveals  that  there  were  two  types  of  enterprise working on teak wood. The first type is called teak log buyer. They are  involved  in  buying  trees  from  the  community  teak  growers  in  the  villages,  collecting and putting logs in  log yards and then selling the teak logs to wood  processors. The teak buyer usually owns log yard for sorting and piling logs. The  second type is teak businessmen who are involved in teak log processing and/or  producing end product of teak wood such as furniture, housing components and  other ordered items. They have the wood processing site such as sawmill, drying  facilities,  and  other  processing  machineries.  Interviews  were  also  carried  out  with  the  teak  log  buyers  (first  type  of  enterprise)  to  collect  additional  more  information on log  qualities.      

Sawing technique Almost of the observed sawing techniques in the rural or community teak wood  industry were   traditional,  and very simple. The log was reduced to all lumbers  of tangential type. The advantages of this sawing technique are very fast sawing,  efficient,  and    no  time  required  to    turn  logs  for  specific  dimension  of  sawn  lumber.  All  products  of  processing  these  tangential  lumbers  are  for  making  furniture. However, the technique could produce lumber prone to defect such as  splitting, bowing, and cupping.      

34

Some  community  industries  used  band  saw    for  breaking  down  the  logs,  the  others employed large diameter of circle saw (Figure 11). The first sawing type is  more  efficient  in  processing  and  producing  high  yield,  while  the  second  one   produces lower yield due to high sawdust waste.     The  data  on    the  recovery  rate  of  sawing  is  lacking.  Most  of  the  small  sized  processors  did not assessed the yield from sawing the log. Observations on the  sawmill reveals that the recovery rate of most of the sawmill processing teak log  form community plantation was low, below 40 %.       

a

b

Figure 11. Examples of sawing tools used by small sized processor : (a) band saw,  

and (b) circular saw       

Wood drying The drying technique employed by the community teak wood processing in the  surveyed area is mostly air drying ‐  traditional and also simple (Figure 12a). It   does not require much effort to do it. This type of drying technique is only done  by arranging the lumbers in arrow, almost vertically leaning to a wall or leaning  to the center bar. By this technique the teak wood processors have earned a lot of  benefits,  such  as  low  cost,  easy  to  work  on,  requires  less  area  to  dry.  However,  this drying method has a number of  disadvantages. It needs longer time to dry,  can  not  be  controlled  in  such  a  way  to  produce  specific  moisture  content,  and  very high variability of  moisture content in the wood.   

35

However,  some  industries,  for  example  in  Gunung  Kidul  have  employed  a  relatively high technology of drying wood, which is so‐called heating type by a  wood heater (Figure 12 b and c). This drying technique is done by burning wood  waste or lignocellulosic materials that is considered as waste in a box like burner  and then the hot air is supplied to the drying chamber. The lumbers are stacked  or piled in such a way that hot air could pass through the inter lumber space and  could remove water from the lumber quite fast. This technique will shorten the  drying time but if it is not done carefully would produce more percentage drying  defects.   

a1

a2

b

c

Figure 12. Drying techniques employed by small sized processors: (a1 and a2) air drying, (b) hot- air drying, (c) hot-water drying

36

Manufacturing   Teak  logs  from  community  plantations  were  processed  and  manufactured  by  small  sized  industries    mainly    for  furniture.  Some  are  used  for  house  components  such  as  frame,  door  and  window  (Table  13).  A  very  small  percentage  is  used  for  light  construction  of  houses.  However,  exact  data  on  the  end products are currently not available.      

Figure 13. Housing components and furniture made of teak log from community teak plantations by the small sized industry in Java, mostly for domestic market

37

Wood processing in the surveyed areas Gunungkidul Twenty five industries  were  visited  and  surveyed  during  the  study.  It  is  noted  that the majority of industries found in Gunung Kidul had sawmill. Mostly they  employed air drying technique to dry the wood. Some of them used  heater, but  no kiln dryer found in the district (Table 21). From 25  processors surveyed, there  were  19  companies  who  broke  down  teak  logs  into  sawn  wood  by  themselves.  The remaining 6 companies  might ask for help to other companies or the third  parties  to  break  down  their  logs.  It  was  found  11  companies  who  dried  their  sawn wood using the oldest technique of wood drying, namely air drying. Some  companies  (5  industries)  have  been  studying  how  to  improve  the  drying  technique  by  heating   the  wood  with  hot  air  circulated   in  a  chamber. The heat  was  obtained  from    burning  the  wood  waste  in  the  mill.    The  other  form  of  heating  is  warm  water  to  be  circulated  around  the  wood  chamber.  Table  18  shows that among 25 industries, more than half worked for furniture production.   Table 21. Teak wood processing conditions in Gunung Kidul No

Industry Name



Manufacturing furniture, housing components √

√ √

√ √





√ √

√ √

Drying

Sawing Air

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

UD. Kurnia Jati Karya Jati Mutu Jati Dwi Bangun Gasing Jaya UD. Sinar Mulia Sumber Rejeki UD. Suminar Jati CV. Nugroho UD. Widodo UD. Sumber Jati UD. Kabul Santoso UD. Jati Unggul Israk Meubel UD. Mandiri Batur Agung Furniture UD. Bukit Seribu UD. Karya Manunggal Jati Murni UD. Mebel Hartini Sunan Jati PT. Kurnia Jaya CV. Dua Dimensi UD. JATI SARI UD. Hasta Karya Total

√ √ √ √ √ √ √

√ √ √ √ √ √ √ √

Heater

√ √







19

√ √ √ √ √ 11

5

38

Combination

√ √



√ √ √ √

Kiln

√ √ √ √ √ √ √ 16

Wonogiri A similar situation  to  Gunung  Kidul  was  observed  in  Wonogiri.  There  were  29   processing companies  surveyed, but not all of them  processed teak logs.  Those  companies  who  were  not  involved  in  wood  processing,  usually  they  only  obtained  teak  trees  from  farmers  and  then  sold  the  log  to  the  wood  processor  locally or nationally. There were 9  companies who acted as teak log buyer. The  remaining 20 enterprises,  could be categorized into the second type  purchased  logs from farmers and then processed them into end products. Almost the same  type of wood products as in Gunungkidul was found in this district.    Table 22 shows that out of 29 companies in this district, 5 companies processed  teak logs in to sawn logs. The industries still used  the traditional wood drying  technique,  namely  air  drying.  Surprisingly  the  number  of  companies  have  improved  the  drying  technique  by  heater  exceeded  the  number  of  companies  used the air drying technique. Almost all industries in the district  manufactured  furniture and housing components.  Pacitan Table 23 presents the total number of industries processing teak wood surveyed  in  Pacitan.  However,  out  of  18  industries  surveyed  only  5  owned  log  yard  for  storing  their  raw  materials.  Most  of  the    industries  in  this  district  worked  for  breaking  down  the  teak  logs  into  sawn  timber.  The  air  drying  was  the  most  popular  technique  for  drying  teak  wood  in  this  district.  No  heating  technique   has  been  introduced  in  the  wood  industries.  A  great  deal  number  of  industries  manufactured  furniture  and  housing  components,  namely  15  out  of  18  being  surveyed.  East Nusa Tenggara In this province most of the companies being surveyed worked on sawmilling the  teak  logs.  Air  drying  was  the  only  technique  employed  for  drying  the  wood  or  sawn  wood.  No  kiln  drying  was  applied  and  no  improved  technique    was  available  for  drying  the  wood.  Most  of  the  industries    manufactured  furniture,  housing  components  and  others  (Table  24).  East  Nusa  Tenggara  is  located  in  eastern part of Indonesia. The province consists of a number of islands. It is still   an  underdeveloped  province  with  limited  infrastructures.  The  market  for  high  quality of wood products is still limited in the province. Most of the teak wood  harvested in the province has to be marketed outside the province, mainly Java  in the form of flitch.  

39

Table 22. Teak wood processing conditions in Wonogiri Drying

Industry Name No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

Sido Lancar* CV. Kartika* Kayu Mas* UD. Cinta Abadi* Sugeng* UD. Maju Jaya* UD. Jati Mas* Karya Baru* Delanggeng UD. Mutiara Jati* UD. Bowo CV. Sinar K Parjo Mebel UD. Giri Usaha CV. Permata 7 UD. Sari Madiri UD. Mandiri Ais Furniture UD. Jati Mulyo Rimba Mulya Lilis Sejati Kusuma Jati Layar Emas Mebel Kayu UD. Bowo Sarwo Jati Tunggal Jati UD. Kartika Jati UD. Sari Laut Total * = first type of enterprise

Sawing

Air

Heater

Kiln

Combination

Manufacturing furniture, housing components

√ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √

√ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √

√ √ √ √ 5

6

√ 9

40

√ 15

Table 23. Teak wood processing condition in Pacitan No

Industry Name

Drying

Sawing Air

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Marjuki P. Dirman Abdul Romi UD. Tri Rukun Juni Bahrudin Suhadi Juli UD. Maju Lancar UD. Aagung Jati Mulya UD. Wahyu Inti Jaya UD. Jati Mandiri Muh. Adnan CV. Anis Rahayu Pangat S. Boyman Marfi UD. Wahyu Jati Iindah Total

√ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ 17

Heater

Kiln

Combination

√ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ 16

Manufacturing furniture, housing components √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ √ 15

  Table 24. Teak wood processing condition in East Nusa Tenggara Drying No

Industry Name

Sawing Air

1 1 3 4 2 3 4 5 9 10 11 12 13

UD. Sinar Cahaya Jepara Bengkel Bahtera Oesena Bersahabat Mebel Jepara Indah CV. Karya Setia CV. Zona Dewata CV. Buana Belu CV. Mitra Kencana Karya Putra Jepara Usaha Bani Dokehia Rubadeo Mebel Mebel Amasat Total

√ √ √

√ √ √

√ √ √ √ √ √

8

√ √ √ 7

41

Heater

Kiln

Combination

Manufacturing furniture, housing componets √ √ √ √

√ √ √ √ √ √ 10

South East Sulawesi By  Indonesian  standard  South  Sulawesi  is  an  underdeveloped  province.  The  infrastructure  is  limited  and  the  economy  remains  small,  very  little  manufacturing  and  only  modest  trade  are  available.    Almost  all  of  the  wood  processing  industry  in  the  province  comprises  of  sawmill,  with  only  small  adding‐value facilities (furniture, carpentry) to meet local  need.  Most teak wood  leaves the province as green, rough‐sawn lumber or flitch.       

The need for wood processing improvement The  current  teak  wood  processing  observed  in  the  small  sized  industries  is  mostly  considered    traditional,  less  efficient  and  using  simple  and  often  traditional tools for wood processing. There are a wide range of opportunities to  improve  the  current  wood  processing  to  achieve  the  high  quality  of  teak  wood  products.  The following areas in wood processing are suggested:  1.

The  sawing  technique.‐  The  technique  employed  should  consider  the  log quality and the price of sawn timber. This combination factor will  generate high revenue of sawmilling. The current sawing technique is  mainly  tangential  lumber  type  sawing.  This  sawing  method  does  not  consider  the  log  quality  or  log  defects  along  the  stem.  Consequently,  the lumber quality and its yield are not predictable. 

2.

Sawing machine. ‐ The proper use of sawing machine and  type of saw  blade  should  be  employed  in  the  sawing  system.  By  doing  so    the  recovery  rate  can  be  increased  significantly  and  the  waste  percentage  can be minimized. 

3.

Drying technique.‐ The proper drying technique should be introduced  to the community wood industry. The setting up location of air drying  with  wood  piling  above  the  ground  and  covered  by    roof  would  minimize the effect of high humidity of soil and high humidity of air  during night. Since wood is hygroscopic material, then it could attract  moisture from the air and soil easily. The current air drying conducted  by  rural  people  or  community  wood  processors  is    merely  vertical  arrangements of teak lumbers in  rows in an open area without roof or  only  laying  the  lumbers  in  a  declining  position.  The  base  lumber   directly  touches  the  soil.  This  technique  of  wood  drying  produces  wide variabilities in the moisture content of wood and longer time to  reach  a  certain  moisture  content.  A  relatively  modern  wood  drying  42

such as heating the wood piling to a certain temperature is an effort to  reduce the drying time and smaller variations of the moisture content.  This system seems to do well and requires small investment to build,  but the drying defect is relatively high. Hot water drying system needs   a  bit  high  capital  to  set  up  the  machine,  however  it  will  produce  uniform moisture content and lesser drying defects.   4.

The improvement of color appearance of sapwood.‐  The light color of  teak sapwood, which is whiter than the heartwood should be reduced  as  much  as  possible  for  increasing  the  teak  wood  value.  One  of  the  known  methods    to  make  this  sapwood  portion  do  not  appear  is  to  change its color to the similar color of heartwood. This could be done  by heating the wood. The heat treatment has shown a good promise to  reduce the heterogeneity of wood color, meaning the color differences  between  heartwood and sapwood become less. 

5.

More  efficient  use  of  logs.‐  All  teak  logs  procured  from  community  teak plantations should be processed into useful products. This can be  done  by  reconstituting  the  waste  to  become  an  acceptable  dimension  of  wood  products.  A  small  dimension  of  log  cut,  log  end,  log  with   knots and end‐splits, and other defects are glued together side by side  to  make  lumber  or  beams.  This  lamination  technique  should  be  introduced to the small sized wood industry of the community. 

6.

Product  diversification.‐  Moving  the  conventional  and  commercial  products of furniture to the high products of housing components such  as  beam,  truss,  window  frames  and  other  items  will  increase  the  revenue of the community teak wood processors. 

43

6

References

  Awang,  S.  A.  2006.  Rancang  bangun  unit  managemen  hutan  lestari.  http://www.infojawa.org/pekan_raya/download/hr/hrmaterisanafri.ppt.  Bhat,  K.M.  1997.  Managing  teak  plantations  for  superior  quality  timber.  In:  Basha,  S.,  Mohanan,  C.  and  Sankar,  S.  (eds.).  Teak.  Proceedings  of  the  International  Teak  Symposium,  Thiruvananthapuram,  Kerala,  India.  2‐4  December,  1991.  Kerala  Forest  Department  and  Kerala  Forest  Research  Institute. pp. 28‐31.  Bhat, K.M. 2000. Timber quality of teak from managed plantations of the topics  with  special  reference  to  Indian  plantations.  Bois  et  Foret  des  Tropiques  263:6‐16.   Bhat, K.M., Priya, P.B., and Rugmini, P. 2001. Wood characterisation of juvenile  wood in teak. Wood Science and Technology 34:517‐532.  Bhat,  K.M.  2007.  Timber  quality:  Fast  grown  vs  slow  grown  teak.  Lecture  note  given  during  the  training  programme  on  ‘Cultivation  and  management  of  teak’ organized at KFRI during  16‐25 May 2006.  Central  Bureau  of  Statistics  of  Republic  of  Indonesia.  2004.  The  potential  of  community forest in Indonesia in 2003. Jakarta.   Danarto,  S.  and  Hardiyanto,  E.B.  2001.  Results  of  progeny  test  of  Teak  (Tectona  grandis)  at  12  years  of  age  in  East  Java.  In  Hardiyanto,  E.  B.  (ed.).  Proceedings  of  third  regional  seminar  on  teak,  31  July‐5  August  2000.  Yogyakarta,  Indonesia.  Perhutani,  TEAKNET  and  Faculty  of  Forestry  Gadjah Mada University.  Kaosa‐ard,  A.  2000.  Gains  from  provenance  selection.  In:  Enters,  T.  and  Nair,  C.T.S. (eds.). Site, technology and productivity of  teak plantations. FORPA  Pub. No. 24/2000, TEAKNET Pub. No.3. pp. 209‐222.   Midgley, S. , Rimbawanto, A., Mahfudz, Fauzi, A. and Brown, A. 2007. Options  for teak industry  development in South East Sulawesi, Indonesia. Salwood  Asia Pacific  Pty Ltd. Canberra. 41p.    

44

  Okuyama, T., Yamamoto, H. Wahyudi, I., Hadi, Y.S. and Bhat, K.M. 2003. Some  crucial wood quality issues of planted teak. Proceedings of the International  Conference  on  Quality  Timber  Products  of  Teak  from  Sustainable  Forest  Management.  2‐5  December  2003,  Kerala  Forest  Research  Institute,  Peechi,  India. pp.150‐159.    Prayitno,  T.  A.  2001.  Kajian  kualitas  kayu  jati  komersial  persyaratan  berbagai  penggunaan  akhir.  Fakultas  Kehutanan  Universitas  Gadjah  Mada  Bekerjasama dengan PT. Perhutani (Persero) Jawa Tengah. Yogyakarta.  Putro, A.M. and Sutjipto, A. H. 1989.  The influence of age and axial position on  physical  and  mechanical  properties  of  thinned  teakwood.  Faculty  of  Forestry GMU, Yogyakarta (unpublished) 98p.   Ruksasupaya,B.,  Kruesuwanwes,  S.,  and  Buranasheep,  S.  1995.  Mechanical  properties  of  teak  wood  (Tectona  grandis  Linn.f)  from  plantation  grown  logs. http://library.kmitnb.ac.th/projects/ind/FDT/fdt0001e.html   Simatupang,  M.H.  2001.  Some  notes  on  origin  and  establishment  of  teak  forest  (Tectona  grandis  L.F.)  in  Java,  Indonesia.  In  Hardiyanto,  E.  B.  (ed.).  Proceedings  of  third  regional  seminar  on  teak,  31  July‐5  August  2000.  Yogyakarta,  Indonesia.  Perhutani,  TEAKNET  and  Faculty  of  Forestry  Gadjah Mada University. pp.91‐98.  Trockenbrodt, G. and Jouse, J. 1999. Wood properties and utilisation potential of  plantation  teak  (Tectona  grandis)  in  Malaysia:  a  critical  review.  Journal  of  Tropical Forest Products 5:58‐70.   Troup, R.S. 1921. The silviculture of Indian trees Vol. II, Clarendon Press, Oxford.  pp. 697‐769.      

   

45

Suggest Documents