PI ProcessBook User Guide. Version 3.2

PI ProcessBook User Guide Version 3.2 OSIsoft, Inc. 777 Davis St., Suite 250 San Leandro, CA 94577 USA Additional Offices Houston, TX Johnson City, ...
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PI ProcessBook User Guide Version 3.2

OSIsoft, Inc. 777 Davis St., Suite 250 San Leandro, CA 94577 USA Additional Offices Houston, TX Johnson City, TN Longview, TX Mayfield Heights, OH Philadelphia, PA Phoenix, AZ Savannah, GA Sales Outlets/Distributors Middle East/North Africa Republic of South Africa Russia/Central Asia South America/Caribbean Southeast Asia South Korea Taiwan

International Offices OSIsoft Australia Perth, Australia Auckland, New Zealand OSIsoft Germany GmbH Altenstadt, Germany OSIsoft Asia Pte Ltd. Singapore OSIsoft Canada ULC Montreal, Canada Calgary, Canada OSIsoft, Inc. Representative Office Shanghai, People’s Republic of China OSIsoft Japan KK Tokyo, Japan OSIsoft Mexico S. De R.L. De C.V. Mexico City, Mexico OSIsoft do Brasil Sistemas Ltda. Sao Paulo, Brazil

Contact and Support: Main phone: Fax: Support phone:

(01) 510-297-5800 (01) 510-357-8136 (01) 510-297-5828

Web site: Support web site:

http://www.osisoft.com http://techsupport.osisoft.com

Support email:

[email protected]

Copyright: © 1994-2009 OSIsoft, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of OSIsoft, Inc. OSIsoft, the OSIsoft logo and logotype, PI Analytics, PI ProcessBook, PI DataLink, ProcessPoint, Sigmafine, Analysis Framework, IT Monitor, MCN Health Monitor, PI System, PI ActiveView, PI ACE, PI AlarmView, PI BatchView, PI Data Services, PI Manual Logger, PI ProfileView, PI Web Parts, ProTRAQ, RLINK, RtAnalytics, RtBaseline, RtPortal, RtPM, RtReports and RtWebParts are all trademarks of OSIsoft, Inc. All other trademarks or trade names used herein are the property of their respective owners. U.S. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS Use, duplication or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions set forth in the OSIsoft, Inc. license agreement and as provided in DFARS 227.7202, DFARS 252.227-7013, FAR 12.212, FAR 52.227, as applicable. OSIsoft, Inc. Published: 9/2/2009

Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 1 What's New in This Release .............................................................................................. 1 What Can You View with PI ProcessBook ......................................................................... 1 PI ProcessBook Essentials ........................................................................................................... 7 Start PI ProcessBook ......................................................................................................... 7 Add-Ins ............................................................................................................................. 11 Menus and Toolbars......................................................................................................... 12 Browser ............................................................................................................................ 13 Keyboard Shortcuts .......................................................................................................... 16 Preference Settings .......................................................................................................... 17 Print .................................................................................................................................. 23 About PI ProcessBook ..................................................................................................... 25 Work with a ProcessBook ........................................................................................................... 27 Basic Steps to Build a ProcessBook ................................................................................ 27 Create a New ProcessBook ............................................................................................. 27 Open an Existing ProcessBook ........................................................................................ 28 Run Mode Pointer ............................................................................................................ 28 Build Mode Pointer ........................................................................................................... 29 Add ProcessBook Entries ................................................................................................ 29 Arrange ProcessBook Entries .......................................................................................... 35 Properties ......................................................................................................................... 40 Import Files to a ProcessBook ......................................................................................... 44 File Sharing Capability ..................................................................................................... 45 Move a ProcessBook to Another PC................................................................................ 45 Work with a Display ...................................................................................................................... 47 Overview of Display Elements ......................................................................................... 47 Manage Displays and Independent Display Files ............................................................ 49 Drawing Tools .................................................................................................................. 54 PI Tags and Point Attributes ............................................................................................ 56 Formatting ........................................................................................................................ 59 ToolTip Statistics .............................................................................................................. 63 Playback Toolbar.............................................................................................................. 64 Layers within Displays ...................................................................................................... 67 Migrate Displays to Another PI Server ............................................................................. 70 Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays ...............................................71

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Table of Contents

Trends ............................................................................................................................................ 81 Create a Trend ................................................................................................................. 81 Edit a Trend ...................................................................................................................... 85 Define Trend Dialog ......................................................................................................... 85 Configure Trend Scale ..................................................................................................... 88 Trend Analysis Tools ........................................................................................................ 90 Change Time Range ........................................................................................................ 92 How Trends Refresh ........................................................................................................ 92 Trend Appearance............................................................................................................ 93 Ad Hoc Trends ................................................................................................................. 97 OpenVMS Trends and Graphics ...................................................................................... 99 XYPlots ........................................................................................................................................ 101 Draw an XYPlot .............................................................................................................. 102 Linear Regression by Least Squares ............................................................................. 112 Correlation Coefficient .................................................................................................... 112 Interpreting an XYPlot .................................................................................................... 113 Zoom/Revert Functions .................................................................................................. 114 Change Time Range Feature ......................................................................................... 115 XYPlot Cursors ............................................................................................................... 116 Bad Status Indicators ..................................................................................................... 117 Out of Range Indicators ................................................................................................. 117 Too Many Points ............................................................................................................ 117 Examples of XYPlots ...................................................................................................... 117 Additional Symbols .................................................................................................................... 121 Dynamic Symbols ........................................................................................................... 121 Static Symbols ................................................................................................................ 129 Work with Symbols..................................................................................................................... 139 Details and Annotations ................................................................................................. 139 Data Favorites ................................................................................................................ 142 Time Range Toolbar....................................................................................................... 145 Select and Move a Symbol ............................................................................................ 147 Select Multiple Symbols ................................................................................................. 148 Rotate a Symbol ............................................................................................................. 148 Flip a Symbol .................................................................................................................. 148 Delete a Symbol ............................................................................................................. 149 Stacking Order ............................................................................................................... 149 Align Multiple Symbols ................................................................................................... 150 Group, Ungroup, or Regroup symbols ........................................................................... 151 Connect Symbols ........................................................................................................... 151 Item Definition ................................................................................................................ 160 Status Report for Dynamic Symbols .............................................................................. 161 Status Flags for Data...................................................................................................... 162

iv

Data Sets ..................................................................................................................................... 163 PI Calculation Data Sets ................................................................................................ 164 Custom Data Sets .......................................................................................................... 167 ODBC Data Sets ............................................................................................................ 168 Placeholders ................................................................................................................... 170 Is a Data Set in Use? ..................................................................................................... 172 Data Set Details ............................................................................................................. 172 Add a Data Set to a Trend ............................................................................................. 173 Time Intervals for Plotting Tags and Data Sets ............................................................. 174 Refresh a Trend Containing a Data Set ......................................................................... 174 Add Data Sets to Bars or Values in a Display ................................................................ 175 Run PI ProcessBook When Data Sets Are Included .....................................................175 Edit a Data Set ............................................................................................................... 175 Delete a Data Set ........................................................................................................... 176 Copy a Data Set to Another ProcessBook ..................................................................... 177 Loading Custom Data Sets ............................................................................................ 177 PI Notifications in PI ProcessBook ........................................................................................... 179 Launch PI Notifications................................................................................................... 179 Notifications Window ...................................................................................................... 179 Contacts Window ........................................................................................................... 182 Embedding and Linking ............................................................................................................. 185 Overview of PI ProcessBook OLE Compound Documents ...........................................185 OLE Automation in PI ProcessBook .............................................................................. 185 Object Linking and Embedding ...................................................................................... 186 ActiveX Controls ............................................................................................................. 187 Example of Embedded and Linked Objects in a ProcessBook Display .........................188 Icons vs. Graphics .......................................................................................................... 189 Embed in PI ProcessBook ............................................................................................. 189 Windows Drag and Drop ................................................................................................ 190 Link a File to a Display ................................................................................................... 190 Dynamic and Manual Updates of a Linked Object .........................................................191 Edit, Update, or Break Links .......................................................................................... 191 How Links Are Stored..................................................................................................... 192 Select a New Source Link .............................................................................................. 192 Edit the Appearance of an OLE Object .......................................................................... 192 Commands That Ignore OLE objects ............................................................................. 192 Placement of OLE objects .............................................................................................. 193 OLE Object Colors ......................................................................................................... 193 Edit the Contents of OLE objects ................................................................................... 193 Edit the Contents of an Embedded Object ..................................................................... 193 Edit the Contents of a Linked Object.............................................................................. 194 Delete an OLE Object from a Display ............................................................................ 194 Display an OLE Object with an Icon............................................................................... 194 Convert Objects to Icons ................................................................................................ 195 Share ProcessBook Displays with Other Applications ...................................................196 PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Table of Contents

Link a ProcessBook to Another Application ................................................................... 197 OLE Container/Server .................................................................................................... 197 Visual Basic for Applications in PI ProcessBook ................................................................... 199 VBA Commands ............................................................................................................. 199 ActiveX Automation ........................................................................................................ 199 What You Can Do with ActiveX Automation in PI ProcessBook ....................................199 Automation Vocabulary .................................................................................................. 200 ODBC ........................................................................................................................................... 201 ODBC Driver Manager ................................................................................................... 201 ODBC Drivers ................................................................................................................. 201 ODBC Data Sources ...................................................................................................... 201 ODBC Data Access ........................................................................................................ 201 ODBC Data Source Administrator .................................................................................. 202 Prepare for ODBC .......................................................................................................... 203 Configure the ODBC Data Source ................................................................................. 203 Use MSQuery to Build Data Sets ................................................................................... 204 Assumptions about Timestamps and Data Sets ............................................................ 204 Stored Procedures in Queries ........................................................................................ 204 Troubleshoot ODBC Data Sets ...................................................................................... 205 Trace ODBC Calls .......................................................................................................... 205 Delete an ODBC Driver .................................................................................................. 206 Delete an ODBC Data Source ....................................................................................... 206 Edit an ODBC Data Source ............................................................................................ 206 Installation ................................................................................................................................... 207 System Requirements .................................................................................................... 207 Upgrade from a Previous Version of PI ProcessBook ...................................................207 Other PI System Client Products ................................................................................... 207 Installation Test .............................................................................................................. 207 Installed Files ................................................................................................................. 208 System Administrator Notes ..................................................................................................... 209 PI ProcessBook Connection to Windows NT or UNIX Servers......................................209 Read/Write Data Access for Users ................................................................................ 209 Machine Address............................................................................................................ 210 PROCBOOK.INI ............................................................................................................. 210 IMPPIGP.INI ................................................................................................................... 220 SETUPProcessBook.LOG ............................................................................................. 223 Migrate a Module Relative Display (MRD) to an Element Relative Display (ERD) .......223 Troubleshooting Tips ................................................................................................................. 227 Display Can't Find Data .................................................................................................. 227 Trend Cursor Does Not Appear ..................................................................................... 227 Trend Legend Does Not Appear .................................................................................... 227 Can’t Change or Save a Display .................................................................................... 227 vi

Is an XYPlot Updating? .................................................................................................. 227 Is an OLE Object in a Display Linked or Embedded? ....................................................228 Linked Object Data Isn't Updating .................................................................................. 228 ODBC Problems ............................................................................................................. 229 Technical Support and Resources ........................................................................................... 231 Index ............................................................................................................................................ 235

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Chapter 1

Introduction PI ProcessBook is a PC application for displaying plant information stored in the PI Data Archive (page 2) or in relational databases. The PI ProcessBook application displays one or more ProcessBooks (page 9), which are collections of display (page 10) entries. These display entries show your process data from one or more PI Systems as well as other static and dynamic information from outside sources such as schematic drawings, laboratory data, or specifications. You can share ProcessBooks among users, thereby eliminating the need to build duplicate displays, however, only one user at a time can open individual display files. On networks, an unlimited number of users may access the same ProcessBook at the same time. Furthermore, you can have multiple sessions of the application simultaneously active on a computer. The PI ProcessBook application incorporates Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), so that you can automate special activities or routine chores. OSIsoft produces several add-in (page 11) products for PI ProcessBook, including PI BatchView and AF Modeler.

What's New in This Release This version of PI ProcessBook provides the following enhancements: •

The Element Relative Display (ERD) (page 71) add-in is provided to replace Module Relative Display. Element relative displays provide a re-useable display that can be shared across similarly configured elements.



Displays can now be played back (page 64) to review a specific time period using DVRlike controls.



Display navigation is enhanced with browser-based navigation controls (page 13) that traverse, open, and bookmark displays and workbooks.



The Notifications add-in (page 179) has been enhanced to provide a list of contacts (page 182), using Office Communicator, associated with a notification to assist in investigating issues.



The PI SQC Statistical Quality Control symbol is now included with PI ProcessBook.

What Can You View with PI ProcessBook A PI ProcessBook display entry may contain data from any or all of the following sources:

PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Introduction



PI Servers, including both point data (actual instrument readings) and calculated data



Calculations from PI data



Other databases with ODBC connectivity



Other databases with custom interfaces to PI ProcessBook



Spreadsheets, documents, schematics, graphics, photos, and other Windows applications through OLE linking and embedding



AF Servers



VBA code

ProcessBook displays may be linked to other displays within the same ProcessBook, or to displays in a separate ProcessBook. You can also include buttons that launch other applications.

Data from a PI System Most displays include a number of tags from one or more PI Systems. The connection to a PI Server allows you to view process data at the current time or at other, discrete points in time. Displays update dynamically whenever values on the PI Server change. PI Data Archive The PI Archive is a time-series database that collects, stores, and retrieves numerical and string data. The PI Archive resides on a host computer and is connected to your PC via the PI Server and your network. When you open a display (page 10) containing dynamic symbols, PI ProcessBook retrieves data from the PI Archive. PI ProcessBook also notifies the PI Server that it would like to receive data whenever the readings for the dynamic symbols change. Each time a reading changes for points in the display, the information is recorded in the PI Server. This new information is sent to your displays and all the new values are added to trend traces. This is true even if you reduce the display to an icon (page 52). Updates to PI Data When a display is opened, current values of PI tags (page 56) are used for dynamic elements other than trends and XY plots. For trends and XY plots, the time scale is configurable on a plot-by-plot basis. See Changing the Time Range (page 145) for information on viewing historical values. Displays are updated whenever values change. Every five seconds, PI ProcessBook displays any new values for tags in open displays from each PI Server. You can modify the update rate. See Procbook.ini (page 210) for more details. For trends, new values are added to the trend traces. This update by exception algorithm has two benefits:

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What Can You View with PI ProcessBook



Values that do not change are not sent over the network at every update. This can be a significant efficiency improvement over traditional scanning.



Values that change more than once within five seconds are shown accurately on trends because all of the changes are delivered to PI ProcessBook.

Values from PI calculations and custom data sets are also updated dynamically. PI Time PI Time abbreviations and PI Time expressions allow you to specify times and time ranges for data using constants, variables, and short expressions. PI Time Abbreviations An interval is a unit of time that can be used in time entries. Intervals that support fractional values are listed below. For intervals where the Fractions column indicates No, fractional amounts cannot be used in time strings. Name

Short name

Plural name

Member names

Fractions

second

s

seconds

no

yes

minute

m

minutes

no

yes

hour

h

hours

no

yes

day

d

days

no

no

month

mo

months

yes (for example, December)

no

year

y

years

no

no

week

w

weeks

no

no

weekday

wd

weekdays

yes (for example, Tuesday)

no

yearday

yd

yeardays

no

no

You can spell out month and weekday names, or enter the first three letters (for example, Dec, Tue). PI Times can also be expressed using certain constants: Constant

Result

*

The current time.

Today or t

12:00 am of the current day.

Yesterday or y

12:00 am of the previous day.

Sunday or sun

00:00:00 (midnight) on the most recent past Sunday (in reference to the PI Server).

PI Time Expressions PI allows three types of time expressions: relative time, combined time, and absolute time. These time expression types are defined in the following table.

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Introduction

Expression

Description

Examples

Relative Time

Relative time expressions specify a number of days, hours, minutes, or seconds with either a leading plus sign or a leading minus sign. The reference time, or starting time, for the relative time expression is the current time if both start and end times are relative.

+1d -24h -3m +24s

Combined Time

A combined time expression is a specific reference time followed by a relative time expression.

*+8h 18-dec-02 3m t+32s

Absolute Time

An absolute time expression is any time expression that is neither a relative nor a combined time expression.

* 14-Dec-97 11-Nov-96 2:00:00.0001 t y

When using PI times, follow these guidelines: •

Use absolute or combined time expressions. Avoid using relative time expressions. Multiple relative time expressions in a time range may cause an incorrect start time or an error message, depending on the context of the expression.



Relative and combined time expressions contain only a single operator: either a single plus sign (+) or a single minus sign (-). Additional operators can lead to unpredictable results. For example, the following are not valid time expressions: *+1d+4h T-1d+12h



The name or short name for an interval used to denote PI time is not case-sensitive.

PI Time String Examples Time Syntax Examples

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PI Time String

Meaning

06-dec-91 15:00:00

3:00:00 pm on December 6, 1991

*

Current time (now)

25

00:00:00 (midnight) on the 25th of the current month

25-aug-92

00:00:00 (midnight) on August 25th, 1992

8:

08:00:00 on the current date

25 8:

08:00:00 on the 25th of the current month

t

00:00:00 on the current date (today)

y

00:00:00 on the previous date (yesterday)

sun, mon, tue, wed, thu, fri, sat

00:00:00 on the most recent Sunday, Monday, ... Saturday

What Can You View with PI ProcessBook

PI Time String

Meaning

*-1h

One hour ago

t+8h

8:00:00 am today

y-8h

4:00:00 pm on the day before yesterday

mon+14.5h

2:30:00 pm last Monday

sat-1m

11:59:00 pm last Friday

Time Interval Examples In interval expressions, a positive or unmarked interval is based on the starttime, and a negative interval is based on the endtime of a time expression. For example, if starttime is y, endtime is t, and interval is +5h for a Sampled Data function, then interpolated values are generated at y, y+5h, y+10h, y+15h, and y+20h. If the interval is -5h, the interpolated values are generated at y+4h, y+9h, y+14h, y+19h and t. PI Time String

Meaning

1.5h

One and one-half hours

32m

Thirty-two minutes

49s

Forty-nine seconds

+5h

Five hours added to the time beginning with the starttime

-5h

Five hours subtracted from the time beginning with the endtime

PI ProcessBook Datasets PI ProcessBook can plot data from relational databases through Open Database Connectivity (ODBC), which means that you can retrieve and display dynamic data from other ODBCcompliant databases based on fixed or variable criteria. You can also view data from data sets based on PI Performance Equations or standard functions, such as minimum or maximum value. These are called PI Calculation data sets (page 164). If you have custom data sets, these may be available to PI ProcessBook using a VBA add-in and will update dynamically.

PI ProcessBook OLE PI ProcessBook provides the capability to use OLE linking and embedding (page 186). You can embed or link OLE objects from other Windows applications into a ProcessBook display. The data might be derived from a wide variety of OLE-compliant applications, such as spreadsheets, documents, graphics objects, etc.

PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Introduction

PI ProcessBook is an OLE Automation server. Programmers can write scripts that manipulate and retrieve PI data.

Visual Basic for Applications OSIsoft licenses Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) from Microsoft in order to provide an integrated development environment. This is the same VBA that is used in Microsoft Office, Visio, AutoCAD, Great Plains Dynamics, and many other applications. In PI ProcessBook, each display has a VBA project associated with it. You can write scripts that execute in response to events in PI ProcessBook, either from user actions or data updates. Also use VBA to automate routine tasks or to cause changes in a display when data changes. The Visual Basic toolbar includes three buttons: Visual Basic Editor, Run Macro, and Design Mode. Use of VBA in PI ProcessBook is documented in the VBA language reference. Click Help > PI ProcessBook VBA Language Reference to open this reference guide. You can find existing custom VBA scripts, and other related resources available at the OSIsoft vCampus (http://vCampus.osisoft.com/) Web site.

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Chapter 2

PI ProcessBook Essentials Process data is stored in the PI Server Archive (page 2), part of the foundation of the PI System. The PI Archive handles the collection, storage, and retrieval of numerical and string data. PI ProcessBook provides access to this data. When you log in to PI ProcessBook, you obtain values from the PI Server(s) to which you are connected.

Start PI ProcessBook To use PI ProcessBook you need to start the application, log in to the PI Server (page 7), open a specific ProcessBook file (page 9), and open a display (page 10). 1. Either double-click on the PI ProcessBook icon on the desktop, or click the Start button > Programs > PI System > PI ProcessBook. If security is not configured at your site, you automatically log into PI ProcessBook. If security is configured, the PI Server Login dialog appears. 2. Enter your PI user name or host user name and password (if prompted). 3. If the PI Server to which you want to connect is not shown, enter the desired PI Server name (sometimes called the node). 4. Click OK to begin the login process. This may take a few seconds while the application connects to the specified server. The status bar displays the message, Attempting to Connect. When the application connects to the server, the status bar displays the message, Connection Was Successful. Note: If you click Cancel, PI ProcessBook starts, but is not connected to the server. Whenever you open a display containing tags from a PI Server, the application attempts to connect again and you may see the login dialog.

Servers and Connections See the PI-SDK Controls and Dialogs User Help to find comprehensive and up-to-date information on connecting PI ProcessBook to a PI Server. Connect to a PI Server Use the PI Connection Manager dialog to manage connections to PI Servers PI ProcessBook User Guide

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PI ProcessBook Essentials



Click File > Connections. The PI Connection Manager dialog appears. The dialog lists the configured servers to which you can connect. It also shows the server you have chosen as the default server.

A selected checkbox next to a server name in the Connections dialog box indicates an open connection to the PI Server.

To manage connection settings: •

Click to select a checkbox and open a connection to a PI Server in the list. Clear a checkbox to close a connection.



Select a PI Server in the server pane to access connection settings.

Note: If you select more than one server, the application tries to connect to each server using the same user ID and password. If it fails, a new PI Server Login dialog appears. If you already are logged in to the server from a different PI application, such as PI DataLink, the application uses the user ID and password with which you logged in. See the PI SDK Controls and Dialogs User Help for more detail.

Network Errors Network Errors update the Status Report (page 161) dialog, rather than displaying error messages on your monitor. When a display is opened but the server is not available, only one Select New Node (page 9) dialog appears. The dialog appears once for each server that is not available.

8

Start PI ProcessBook

Displays and Connection Failure If the connection to your data is not successful, the display (page 10) is still drawn, but data in dynamic elements are replaced with indicators signifying that no data is available. •

Trends are labeled Invalid and no information is plotted.



Values are replaced with pound signs (###) and the message Disconnected appears.



Bar graphs are drawn using hash marks (//////).



Multi-State symbols show the configured color for bad data.

If a server has been disconnected, and/or cannot be reached, the Select New Node dialog appears.

Click Connections to launch the PI Connection Manager dialog. From there you can choose a new server from the drop-down list of connected servers. Node Identifiers for Multiple PI Servers A Node Identifier is stored with each tag name used in a display to point to the correct server. If you define PI Server nodes in the PI Connection Manager dialog, the identifiers are the same on each PC on the network as long as the node names for the PI System are the same.

Workspace When you start PI ProcessBook, it appears as an open window or workspace on the desktop. Depending on your settings, you may initially see an empty workspace, or an open ProcessBook (page 9) in either Book (page 35) or Outline (page 37) view. Within the PI ProcessBook workspace you can open a ProcessBook or independent display.

ProcessBook (PIW) In PI ProcessBook we refer to a ProcessBook as the container for the information and analysis of the process you are monitoring. A ProcessBook may appear as either a tabbed book - Book view (page 35), or an outline - Outline view (page 37), and is saved as a separate file with a PIW extension. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

A ProcessBook is a collection of individual displays of data and analysis. Use a ProcessBook to organize data from the PI System and other sources so that you can analyze the processes you monitor or the tasks you perform. A ProcessBook and its displays are stored in a single file.

Display The main unit for creating presentations of data in PI ProcessBook is the display. A display may stand on its own (.pdi or.svg), or it may be part of a ProcessBook (.piw) (page 9). A display contains all the symbols used to represent an operational environment using realtime, production data from PI as well as data from other sources. In addition to containing this collection of data elements, the display has its own set of features and properties that affect the collection of data elements. Displays can show a variety of elements, such as a schematic representation of a production line, a plot of readings taken from a production line, or a comparison of lab data and batch specifications. Displays can also be linked to other ProcessBooks, displays in other ProcessBooks, or other applications.

New Dialog Use the New dialog to create a new ProcessBook (page 27), add ProcessBook entries (page 29), or create an independent display (page 49). Click File > New to launch the New dialog,

Run Mode and Build Mode When you work with a ProcessBook or an independent display, you work in one of two operating modes, Run mode or Build mode.

10

Add-Ins

Build mode is used to edit a ProcessBook and symbols within a display.

• •

Run mode is used to open entries and execute commands once the ProcessBook is built. You can make some changes to a display while in Run mode; however, working in Run mode keeps you from accidentally making permanent changes to items in a display.

You switch between modes by clicking the Run mode pointer (page 28) (an arrow) or the Build mode pointer (page 29) (a hammer), which are located on the Tools menu and the Drawing toolbar. Your preferred mode of operation is set as a default in your Preference settings.

Add-Ins By default, PI ProcessBook installs with the following add-in components. You can load or unload these and other add-in components by using the Add-In Manager (page 11). •

AF 2.x Data Set



Browser toolbar (page 13)



Data Favorites window (page 142)



Details window (page 139)



ProcessBook SVG File Converter—enables you to save displays as SVG files, which can then be used by RtWebParts.



PI Notifications window (page 179)



Playback toolbar (page 64)



ToolTip Statistics (page 63)



Element Relative Displays (ERD) (page 71)



PI SQC

Other add-ins are installed with PI ProcessBook, but they don't become available until you add additional applications: •

PI BatchView

Add-In Manager The Add-In Manager lists the Add-Ins (page 11) available in your PI ProcessBook installation. Use this dialog to control whether the add-ins are loaded whenever you use PI ProcessBook. 1. Click Tools > Add-in Manager. The Add-In Manager dialog appears. 2. Click an available add-in from the Available Add-Ins list. 3. A description of what the add-in does appears in the Description box. 4. Under Load Behavior, select the appropriate check boxes: PI ProcessBook User Guide

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

Loaded/Unloaded—Loads or unloads the selected add-in. The add-in's current status appears in the Load Behavior column at the top. Load on Startup—Loads the selected add-in on startup of PI ProcessBook. The addin's current status appears in the Load Behavior column at the top. Command Line—Loads the selected add-in when PI ProcessBook is started from the command prompt or from a script.

ο ο ο

5. Click OK to complete the action and close the dialog. Note: If the add-in is unloaded and then reloaded, you must click the Revert toolbar button

to re-synchronize any symbols using the add-in.

Menus and Toolbars Command Menus The active components of menu bars change depending on the active window and current selections. There are five different collections of menu commands. Menu Bar

Function

Default

Displays when no documents are active

Book

Displays when a PI ProcessBook workbook is active

Display

Displays when a PI ProcessBook display document is active

View-Only Book

Displays when PI ProcessBook is running in no-edit mode and a PI ProcessBook workbook is active.

View-Only Display

Displays when PI ProcessBook is running in no-edit mode and a display or workbook document is active.

Customize Toolbars Toolbars may be displayed or omitted as follows: 1. Click View > Toolbars. The Toolbars tab of the Customize dialog opens. 2. Check the toolbars you wish to display, and click OK. Note: Click the Commands tab to see what buttons appear on each toolbar.

3. To move a toolbar, click on the double vertical bar at the left end and drag to the new location. If the toolbar has no move handle, click on the title bar instead. 12

Browser

4. To reshape a floating toolbar (one without move handles), grab one of its edges and drag to a new shape.

Toolbar Buttons Many of the menu commands in PI ProcessBook can be selected by clicking a button on a toolbar. To determine the use of a button on a toolbar, hover the mouse pointer over the button to display a ToolTip. You can configure toolbars to display as view-only to omit unnecessary buttons. View-only toolbars and others can be specified in procbook.ini (page 210). Add Buttons to Toolbars You can change the icons that appear on the toolbars or create your own custom toolbar. 1. Click View > Toolbars. 2. From the Commands tab of the Toolbars dialog, you can select a particular toolbar in the dialog and drag buttons to existing toolbars in your PI ProcessBook window. 3. While the Commands tab is open, you can also drag buttons off of a toolbar to remove them from your window.

Browser

The Browser add-in provides a toolbar that resembles the controls of a typical web browser. The toolbar is automatically loaded when you install PI ProcessBook, and allows you to navigate recently-used ProcessBooks and displays.

Browse ProcessBooks and Displays 1. Click View > Toolbar Manager. The Browser and Playback toolbars appear. Note: These toolbars are open by default when you first launch PI ProcessBook.

2. From the Browser toolbar (page 13), click either the Forward or Back buttons to view previously opened ProcessBooks or displays. Only displays opened during the current session of PI ProcessBook are included in this navigation. You can also use the Address box to open ProcessBooks and displays. 1. Click the arrow to the right of the Address box to see the last ten valid file paths you entered. The last entry in the list is Browse.

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

2. Click Browse to launch an Open File dialog where you can browse for a file. You can also enter a URL to open a file.

View Browsing History 1. Click the small black arrow to the right of the Back or Forward buttons to see a drop-down box that lists the last ten ProcessBooks and/or displays that you visited during the current session. 2. Click an entry to return to that item. The final entry in the list is History. Click History to open the History tab (page 15) of the Organizer window (page 14) from where you can find an alphabetical list of all ProcessBooks and displays visited during the current session

Set a Home Page The Home Page is the startup file that is defined in PI ProcessBook preferences. It can be a PDI, PIW, or a display entry. 1. On the Browser toolbar (page 13), click the small arrow next to the Home button

.

2. From the drop-down menu, select one of the following: ο ο

Use Default to make PIDemo.piw your default file Use Current to set the start file to the current, active ProcessBook or display

Bookmarks and Browser History The Organizer is a docking window that allows you to organize and use bookmarks and the current session's history. By default this window is hidden. Click the Bookmarks button on the Browser toolbar (page 13) to make it appear.

The Organizer window has two tabs: 14

Browser

Bookmarks Tab New bookmarks are automatically added to the root level of the bookmarks tree. You can organize the entries into a hierarchical tree structure by dragging and dropping entries. Rightclick the Bookmarks tab to select one of the following from the context menu: •

New Folder inserts a new folder at the top level of the tree or as a subfolder of a selected folder.



Rename makes the entry name of the selected entry editable.



Edit opens a dialog box where you can enter a new name and file path for the selected bookmark.



Select All selects every entry.



Deselect All clears every entry.



Send To File opens a Save File dialog for the location to store the list of bookmarks. Bookmarks are saved as XML and can be subsequently imported. Only files/folders that are selected (checked) in the tree are exported.



Send To E-Mail opens a pre-populated Outlook email with the selected bookmarks ready to be sent as an attachment with the same format as the Send to File option. Only files/folders that are selected (checked) in the tree are exported. Note: The Send To options are only visible if at least one entry is checked or when right-clicking an item.



Import opens an Open File dialog where you can select a bookmarks file to import.

History Tab The History tab contains an alphabetical list of all ProcessBooks and displays you have visited during the current session. From there you can click an entry to return to that item. The icon of the entry indicates its file type. Hover over an entry to see its full path in a tooltip. Add/Edit Bookmarks 1. On the Browser toolbar (page 13) click the Bookmark button Bookmark tab of the Organizer (page 14) window.

to open the

2. From there you can browse, modify, or delete stored file locations. If the active file is already bookmarked, the same icon appears as the Edit Bookmark icon. Click this button to edit the bookmark's label and file path.

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

Keyboard Shortcuts A keyboard shortcut is a combination of keystrokes to use for frequent actions. Several of these are already assigned in PI ProcessBook. They appear to the right of the corresponding menu command on the drop-down menus. PI ProcessBook lets you assign new combinations of keystrokes or change existing ones. For example you can: •

Assign a keyboard shortcut for inserting symbols without needing multiple mouse clicks.



Assign more than one keyboard shortcut to a specific action.



Change an existing shortcut, such as Ctrl+S, to another sequence you prefer.

Assign a Keyboard Shortcut 1. Click View > Assign Shortcuts. The Shortcut Keys dialog appears.

2. Under Select a macro, click the appropriate macro (menu item). The description for that item and its assigned shortcuts, if any, appears. 3. Click the Create Shortcut button.

16

Preference Settings

The Assign Shortcut dialog appears. 4. In the Press new shortcut key box, type the key you wish to use for the shortcut. Note: If you choose a combination already in use, the current assignment appears in the dialog. If you click OK, the previous assignment is voided.

5. Click OK. The new shortcut appears in the Assigned shortcuts box. Note: If you want to reset all the keyboard shortcuts to their original positions when PI ProcessBook was installed, click the Reset All button, and then the OK button.

Remove a Keyboard Shortcut 1. In the Shortcut Keys dialog, under the Select a macro list, select the appropriate macro (menu item). The description for that item and its assigned shortcuts, if any, appears. 2. Under Assigned shortcuts, select the shortcut you want to remove, and then click the Remove button. 3. Click OK.

Preference Settings You can reach the ProcessBook Preferences dialog by choosing Tools > Preferences. Preference settings determine how the ProcessBook entries look, what colors are available when you draw, and whether your ProcessBook opens in Book View or Outline View. Note: Preference settings are stored in the file procbook.ini. Before you change the Preference settings, consider creating a back-up copy of procbook.ini so that you can restore PI ProcessBook to the original settings.

General Preferences Click Tools > Preferences > General tab to configure application-wide settings. These settings are stored in and retrieved from the [STARTUP] section of your procbook.ini (page 210) file.

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

Author—Determines the name used as the creator of new files and the person who last edited the file. See Summary Information in Processbook (page 40) for more information. This field is blank by default when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. Startup File—The file name and path in this field determine which, if any, file is automatically opened when the application is launched. The default value when PI ProcessBook is first installed is \procbook\pidemo.piw. Library File—The file name and path in this field determine which, if any, file is opened when the original symbol library command is used. The default value when PI ProcessBook is first installed is \procbook\symlibry.piw. Prefer Run Mode—Determines whether ProcessBook starts up in Run mode or Build mode by default. By default, this option is enabled when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. Create Backup Files—Determines whether backup files (with a .bak extension) are automatically created when a PI ProcessBook file is opened. By default, this option is turned off when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. Retain snapshot values on updating plots—Determines whether the archive event pipe is used for updating trends, discarding any snapshot values between stored, archive values. This setting is stored as PB2TraceCompatibility in the [STARTUP] section of your procbook.ini. By default, this option is turned on when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. Leaving this option selected results in a more jagged trace that gets smoothed when the display is reopened or the trend is reverted. Date and Time Format—Settings in this area determine how time is displayed in PI ProcessBook. Previews of each format are shown to help you select the desired option. •

18

The Use local Windows format option uses the current Regional Options settings in the Windows Control Panel on the client machine to determine how dates and times are displayed. Dates are shown using the currently configured Short Date format and Times are shown using the current time format settings.

Preference Settings



The Use PI Time Format option displays timestamps in the default PI format of ddmmm-yy HH:mm:ss.ssss, where dd is the day of the month, mmm is a the short text abbreviation of the month name (e.g., Jan for January), yy is the two digit year, HH is the hour in 24-hour format, mm is the minute and ss.sss is the second, including subseconds, if present.

Default Time Zone—Determines whether timestamps reflect the time zone of the PI Server used to retrieve data (PI Server time zone), or the time zone of the local computer (Client machine time zone), when a new display is created. By default, the PI Server option is selected when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. This setting can also be changed and is stored with each display.

Table of Contents Preferences Click Tools > Preferences > Table of Contents tab to configure the default view of Table of Contents windows for ProcessBook(PIW) files, as well as the font applied to each level of entry in those files. These settings are stored in and retrieved from your procbook.ini (page 210) file.

Default View—Settings in this area determine how ProcessBook entries are displayed by default. The default is Book view. Font Settings—The controls in this area determine the font settings applied to each entry level in a ProcessBook. The font settings control the display of entry names in Table of Contents windows. •

The Entry level field allows you to select the level to configure. You can only select one level at a time.



The Font field lists all the fonts installed on the computer running PI ProcesBook.

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PI ProcessBook Essentials



The Size field determines the size of the text. The first time ProcessBook is installed, the current Windows system font determines the default font settings to use.



The Font style group determines whether text is shown in bold or italic.

Preview—This read-only field displays font settings for each level in a ProcessBook. Each of the 10 possible entry levels is listed and displayed with its current font name, and style settings.

Display Window Click Tools > Preferences > Display Window tab to set options that apply to display windows. These settings are stored in and retrieved from your procbook.ini (page 210) file.

Preserve Aspect Ratio on resize—Determines whether display element sizes change in proportion to the window size when a window is resized. When the check box contains a check mark (is selected), the aspect ratio is preserved and the display element sizes change in proportion to the window size. Show Symbol ToolTips—Determines whether ToolTips are displayed on display symbols. ToolTips appear for toolbar buttons regardless of this setting's value. By default, this option is turned on when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. Show Value Attributes—Determines whether icons are displayed for Value Attribute flags on PI data. This option is turned on when PI ProcessBook is first installed on a computer. Run mode scrolling—Determines the scroll bar behavior of display windows in Run mode. Build mode scrolling—Determines the scroll bar behavior of display windows in Build mode. On

20

Display contains scroll bars all the time.

Preference Settings

Off

Scroll bars never appear.

Automatic

Scroll bars appear when needed (this is the default setting).

Color Palette—These fields present the 16 colors selected for use throughout the application as the basic colors for the color well control. •

Use the Modify button to launch the Color dialog, where you can select additional colors.



Use the Reset button to return the Color Palette to system default values.

Default Display Background Color—Determines the default color used for new displays. The color well control is used to select a color. This color is also set when the Background color of the current display is changed. Symbol Defaults—contains fields to set the default formatting values for new symbols. These defaults are also changed when the Formatting controls are used and no symbols are selected.

Trend Preferences Click Tools > Preferences > Trend tab to set default settings for new trend symbols.

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

Display—Check or uncheck these options to configure what information a trend displays by default. •

AutoScale—Select this check box if you want trends to be scaled as tag values change over time. If you do not select this check box, then trends use the Database scale for each tag.



Plot Title—Select this check box if you want a title to display.



Vert. Scale Ins. Axis(Vertical Scale Inside Axis)—Select this check box to display the numeric scale inside the axis. If you do not select this check box the scale displays outside the axis. Note that the value scale is drawn horizontally when the trend orientation is vertical.



Grids—Select to display grid lines (page 93).



Multiple Scales (page 94)—Add a value scale for each data point when selected. When the check box is cleared, only a single value scale appears.



Markers—Select the Markers check box if you want markers to indicate data points on the trend. If you do not select the Markers check box three markers display on each line. These markers help you match a line to a tag.

Legend—Select or clear these options to configure what information appears in the trend legends. The information that can fit in the legend is determined by the size of the trend. Consequently, not all of the information in the legend may be visible: •

If the width of the legend is more than the width of the trend the legend does not appear.



If the height of the text in the legend is longer than the total height of the trend, items are removed in this order: engineering units, tag name, then value.

Options include: •

Tag Name



Server Name (for PI tags)



Value



Description



Eng Units

Sample—Use this display area to view a preview of selected trend preferences.

Trend Elements Preferences Click Tools > Preferences > Trend Elements tab to set what colors, line styles, etc. are used in individual traces gridlines, text, or the background.

22

Print



Multi-State on Ad Hoc—Select this check box to draw an ad hoc (instant) trend of a Multi-State symbol. When this option is cleared, data from a multi-state configuration is not included on instant trends.



Traces per Ad Hoc Trend—Select the number of traces to have per plot on an ad hoc (instant) trend. The default is 3, the maximum is 8. Once this number is reached, additional plots are created to show the remaining tags selected for the instant trend.

Plot Elements—Use the drop down list to select from pens, text, grids, and background. For each plot element, select a Marker Type, Line Style, Line Weight, and Color. Note: You may select one of several line styles for each trace. You can also specify the line thickness. Select none to omit a grid line.

Sample—See your changes previewed in the Sample area at the bottom of the dialog.

Print

When you print from a ProcessBook, you can: •

In Outline view, print a list of the ProcessBook contents or selected displays.



In Book view, print a list of the entire book or a selected tab section.



Print the entire contents of a display or selected items from that window.

You can also set various printing options, such as the number of copies. Each topic in the help file may be printed separately or you can print them all at once. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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PI ProcessBook Essentials

The Print command is accessible from the File menu, CTRL+P, or the print button. You can print the contents of the active window or if you select items within a display before you open the Print dialog, then you can choose to print only those items. Note: On a non-color printer, symbols are printed in shades of gray, but trends are printed in black and white. On some printers, when you print a trend with cursors, the value and time stamp boxes of the cursor does not hide the information beneath them. However, other trend cursors and the trend time scale may show through the trend cursor boxes, making the values hard to read.

Page Setup for Printing You can select the particular printer, the orientation of the paper, the paper size, and the source within the printer of the paper. Use the Properties button to fine-tune the quality of output or the performance of the printer. The settings you choose in Page Setup become the defaults for all your printing. Note: PI ProcessBook supports dot matrix, HP PCL (LaserJet), Postscript, and color printers. However, all Windows print drivers may not be compatible. If you are not sure if your printer is supported or you observe any printing problems, contact OSIsoft Technical Support (http://techsupport.osisoft.com).

Preview Before Printing

Print Preview displays your selection as it will look when it is printed. Note that the Print Preview shows colors even though you may be using a black and white printer. Once you select the item you want to preview, click File > Print Preview. Zoom in or out of the selection by clicking on the selection with the magnifier cursor or by clicking the Zoom buttons. To print the selection, click the Print button.

Printer Setup Select Print Setup to choose a printer, page orientation, and paper size. In addition, you can fine-tune the quality of output or the performance of your printer. The settings you choose in Print Setup become the defaults for all your printing. 1. Click File > Page Setup. The Print Setup dialog appears. 2. Select the printer, orientation, and paper size and source.

24

About PI ProcessBook

Note: PI ProcessBook supports dot matrix, HP PCL (LaserJet), Postscript, and color printers. However, all Windows print drivers may not be compatible. If you are not sure if your printer is supported or you observe any printing problems, contact OSIsoft Technical Support.

3. Click the Properties button to select printer-specific options. Refer to your printer documentation for additional information about these options.

About PI ProcessBook You can launch the About PI ProcessBook dialog by clicking Help > About PI ProcessBook.

The dialog provides version and build information, as well as a link to the OSIsoft tech support site. Click Copy Info to copy the contents of the grid control to your Windows clipboard where it can be pasted into a spreadsheet or text editor. This can be useful to share with OSIsoft Technical Support engineers if you have a problem. Click System Info to launch the Microsoft System Information dialog. This information can also be useful when troubleshooting issues with Technical Support.

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Chapter 3

Work with a ProcessBook Basic Steps to Build a ProcessBook There are five basic steps to creating a ProcessBook (page 27): 1. Create and save a ProcessBook. 2. Add, organize, and edit entry titles. 3. Design a detailed display for each display entry title, using the drawing tools to create schematics or other drawings with trends, bars, and values. To import outside data, add OLE objects and values from data set queries. 4. Format trends and make other adjustments to each display to present your data in the most useful manner. 5. Save the completed ProcessBook and install it wherever it is needed. Note: In some installations, the System Administrator may set your PI ProcessBook to View Only (page 219) mode. If so, you cannot create and save new ProcessBooks.

Create a New ProcessBook Before you create a ProcessBook, you should consider planning an organizational structure and a naming convention for the ProcessBook and the entries within it. When you create and save a new ProcessBook, the application initially gives it the title Book1, where 1 represents the number of ProcessBooks created during the current session. PI ProcessBook also creates a file name for the new ProcessBook. It suggests the first word from your title and an extension of .piw. For example, PI ProcessBook may suggest Filtrat1.PIW. If you plan to build an entire set of ProcessBooks, you might choose to modify it in Windows Explorer to sort your set of ProcessBooks in some meaningful order, such as 05FiltrP.PIW. 1. In Build mode, click File > New. The New dialog appears. 2. Select ProcessBook (.piw) File. 3. In the ProcessBook Name box, type a name for the new book. 4. Click OK. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Work with a ProcessBook

5. A new ProcessBook appears. Note: If you typed a name in the ProcessBook Name box, then the name appears on the ProcessBook title bar. If you did not type a name, then the default title Book1 appears on the title bar.

Open an Existing ProcessBook 1. Click File > Open, or On the standard toolbar, click the Open button. The Open dialog appears. 2. Click the specific ProcessBook file (.piw) you want to open. 3. Click OK. Note: Depending on the settings in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog, a default ProcessBook may open automatically when you start PI ProcessBook.

PI ProcessBook keeps track of the four most recently opened ProcessBooks or independent display files. Instead of using File > Open, you may select a file name from the bottom of the File menu.

Work With Multiple ProcessBooks You can work in multiple ProcessBooks and/or independent display files at the same time. Open additional ProcessBooks using the File menu. •

Use the Windows menu to select the ProcessBook title and switch among them.



Click inside a ProcessBook window to make it active.



Switch among the open windows by pressing CTRL+F6.

Run Mode Pointer Use the Run mode pointer for opening and executing displays and their associated commands. To obtain a Run mode pointer, on the Drawing toolbar, click the Run button Tools > Run. The mouse cursor appears in the shape of a small arrow.

, or click

Note: You can choose Run mode as your preferred mode of operation by selecting the Prefer Run Mode checkbox in the General tab (page 17) of the ProcessBook Preferences dialog. This is a helpful preference if you spend most of your time observing or analyzing displays rather than building them.

28

Build Mode Pointer

Build Mode Pointer Most of the functions that you use when building a ProcessBook require the Build mode pointer. Use Build mode for building and editing a ProcessBook and for access to symbols and formatting tools. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Build button cursor turns into the Build mode pointer.

, or click Tools > Build. The mouse

Note: You can choose Build mode as your preferred mode of operation by clearing the Prefer Run Mode checkbox in the General tab (page 17) of the ProcessBook Preferences dialog. This is a helpful preference if you spend most of your time building or editing displays.

Add ProcessBook Entries After creating a ProcessBook, the next step is to add individual entries. By arranging and combining displays and other entry types, you can create a complete working environment for plant personnel. Note: You can add entry titles to a ProcessBook and then complete the detailed design of the entries later.

There are five specific types of entries: •

Text (page 30)—provides headings or static information



Display (page 30)—opens a display



Linked displays (page 30)—links to an independent display file



Linked ProcessBook (page 32)—links to an entry in another ProcessBook



Operating system command (page 32)—opens another application.

When you add entries to a ProcessBook in either Outline or Book View, the entries are arranged hierarchically. Subentries are indented under main entries. The name you give each new entry is the name that shows in the ProcessBook. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Work with a ProcessBook

When you create a new entry, it is placed in the ProcessBook just before the selected entry. If no entries are selected, the new entry appears at the end of the current tab section in Book View or at the end of the Outline View. The first entry on a book tab is normally a Level 2 item (Level 1 is used as the tab label). All Level 3 through 10 items are listed below a level 2 item and indented the same. In Outline View, all levels are indented according to their level.

Create a Text or Display Entry Use text entries to add labels and clarify text in a ProcessBook table of contents. Display entries represent a display in a ProcessBook. 1. Click File > New. The New dialog appears. 2. Under Type, select ProcessBook Entry. 3. Click OK. 4. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 5. In the Label dialog, type a name. Note: There is no limit to the number of characters you may use, but for headings, you should try to be as brief and descriptive as possible.

6. For the Type, select Text or Display. 7. In the Level list, click the level at which you want to position the entry in the ProcessBook hierarchy of entries, or Type a number between 1 and 10. Note: If you are creating the first entry in the ProcessBook, the level is automatically set to 1 and cannot be changed. This entry is used as the first tab label.

8. Click OK. The entry is added to the ProcessBook. If the entry is at Level 1 and you are in Book view, a tab is created using the name of the entry. 9. Click the Save button on the toolbar, or Click File > Save.

Linked Display Entry A linked display allows you to use a display name to link to an entry elsewhere in the ProcessBook or in another ProcessBook or independent display file. This means that you create and store only one copy of the display. You can then access the same entry from several different locations in one ProcessBook. Or, while you are in one ProcessBook, you can open an entry from another one without having to close the first ProcessBook.

30

Add ProcessBook Entries

The linked entry is not a copy; it is a way of opening the original, similar to using a Windows shortcut. The Book View or Outline View shows the title of the linked entry, but the actual display window shows the title of the original entry. If you edit the original from any linked entry, the original is updated and automatically appears updated in all the ProcessBooks that are linked to it. To prevent unexpected updates, you can restrict access to an entry so that only the original entry can be edited and all others to which it is linked are read-only. If the entry resides on a server, you can write-protect the file on the server. If you need more information on restricting access to files, see your System Administrator. Before you create a link to an original entry in a different ProcessBook, the ProcessBook that contains the original (target) entry must be open. Once the link is established, you only need to open the ProcessBook with the Linked Entry. If you want to link to an entry in a second ProcessBook, open the second book or use the Display Search dialog. If you want to link to an entry in the current ProcessBook, create the original display entry first, save the file, and then create the linked entry. The target display must be in a file that has been saved so that its path can be determined.

Create a Linked Display Entry 1. Click File > New. The New dialog appears. 2. Under Type, select ProcessBook Entry. 3. Click OK. 4. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 5. In the Label dialog, type a name. Note: There is no limit to the number of characters you may use, but for headings, you should try to be as brief and descriptive as possible.

6. For the Type, select Link/OS Command. 7. Click the Browse button, or Click the Browse arrow to see more search options. The Open dialog appears. 8. To link to an independent display file, locate and select the display file (.pdi) to which you want to link and then click the Open button. The display name appears in the Action box. 9. To link to another ProcessBook, locate and select the processbook file (.piw) to which you want to link and click the Open button. The file name appears in the Action box. 10. To link to a display in a ProcessBook, select the Display Search option from the Browse drop-down and enter criteria to locate the display you want within the open files. If the display you want is not in a file that is open, select a different option in the Look in field. When the display is listed in the Display Search dialog, select it and click OK. The name appears in the Action box. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Work with a ProcessBook

11. In the Level list, click the level at which you want to position the entry in the ProcessBook hierarchy of entries, or Type a number between 1 and 10. Note: If you are creating the first entry in the ProcessBook, the level is automatically set to 1 and cannot be changed.

12. Clear the Options check box if you want the absolute path to the file checked first. Note: By default, ProcessBook attempts to open a linked display from its relative path first. If the relative path fails, then the absolute path is checked. Clearing the Use relative path check box reverses the order in which the paths are resolved. For new displays, this option is checked by default.

13. Click OK. A linked display entry icon is added to the outline and book view of the ProcessBook you are developing. 14. Click the Save button. Note: If you need to move the original entry to another directory or ProcessBook, you must redefine the link between the ProcessBooks. If you move both the original and the linked item and the relationship between the two file paths is unchanged, you do not need to relink.

Linked ProcessBook Entries Similar to a Linked Display, a Linked ProcessBook entry is a link to a different ProcessBook. When you open a linked ProcessBook entry, another ProcessBook is opened. You may open any of the entries in that ProcessBook. Using a Linked ProcessBook entry is the same as opening a ProcessBook using the Open command on the File menu. The same rules apply to Linked ProcessBook entries as to Linked entries. Move Linked Entries If you move a linked pair of displays or ProcessBooks to another location and if this move changes the relationship of the two file paths, you need to relink the items.

Operating System Command Entry An operating system command is used to start another application, such as Microsoft Excel, in addition to PI ProcessBook. Essentially, any command that you can successfully execute with the Windows Run command can be used an Operating System Command entry in a ProcessBook. For example, you can use an operating system command to link to PI DataLink reports or calculations. You can also create links to CAD drawings, modeling packages, or statistics 32

Add ProcessBook Entries

packages. Links to displays saved as SVG files are treated as Operating System Command entries. When you have reports created on a different system, you can convert them to ASCII and, using an operating system command, create a link to Notepad to read the reports. If your company has online Help files for certain procedures, you can create a link to those help files. Your computer must have enough memory to run the applications you want to use in addition to PI ProcessBook. The applications also must be installed on your system. If you do not know whether or not your computer has enough memory, contact your System Administrator.

Create an Operating System Command Entry 1. Click File > New. The New dialog appears. 2. Under Type, select ProcessBook Entry. 3. Click OK. 4. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 5. In the Label dialog, type a name. Note: There is no limit to the number of characters you may use, but for headings, you should try to be as brief and descriptive as possible.

6. For the Type, select Link/OS Command. 7. Click the Browse button to the right of the Action box, or Click the Browse arrow and then click Applications. The Open dialog appears. 8. Browse and locate the file to which want to link, and then click the Open button. The application's path/name is displayed in the Action box. Note: If you know the name of the .exe file for the application, such as C:\excel\Excel.exe for Excel or the path and name of a data file, such as C:\document\report.xls, then you can type the path directly in the Action box. You can use most commands that execute successfully in the Windows Start menu Run dialog.

9. If you need to specify the location of the executable for the application, click the Browse button to the right of the Working folder box. The Browse for Folder dialog appears. 10. Locate and select the folder that you want to specify for this operating system command, and click OK. Note: If you know the name of the working folder for this application, then you can type it directly in the Working folder box.

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Work with a ProcessBook

11. In the Level list, click the level at which you want to position the entry in the ProcessBook hierarchy of entries, or Type a number between 1 and 10. Note: If you are creating the first entry in the ProcessBook, the level is automatically set to 1 and cannot be changed.

12. If the file specified in the Action box is associated with one application and you want to open it with another, select the Ignore the default shell command for recognized file types check box. This option is normally only used with files such as displays saved as SVG so that they can be opened in PI ProcessBook instead of the associated Viewer application. Note: If the file type is supported by ProcessBook (either natively or through an addin), then it is opened directly when this option is selecte for a Link or OS command entry. For example, an .svg file is opened using the .svg File Converter in ProcessBook, even if you have Adobe SVG Viewer installed. Clearing this check box disables this behavior, so the default shell command is used to open the file instead.

13. Click OK. An icon for the program you are launching is added to the outline and book view of the ProcessBook and the application opens. Close the application. 14. Click the Save button. Note: If you need to move the original entry to another directory or ProcessBook, you must redefine the link between the ProcessBooks. If you move both the original and the linked item and the relationship between the two file paths is unchanged, you do not need to relink.

Working Directory for Operating System Commands The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog has a text box where you can enter the working directory. The command line recognizes file extension associations. For example, in the past you needed to enter a command like: C:\EXCEL\EXCEL.EXE C:\MYWORK\MINE.XLS Now you can use a command like: C:\MYWORK\MINE.XLS In other words, if the string works for the Run command under the File menu of the Program Manager, it will work in PI ProcessBook. Some applications that you can access with an operating system command, such as MS Excel, allow only one copy of the application to open, even if you execute the command several times.

34

Arrange ProcessBook Entries

Arrange ProcessBook Entries Once you have created your entry titles, it is a good idea to consider how they are arranged in your ProcessBook. Each ProcessBook gives two possible views of your entry titles, Book View (page 35) and Outline View (page 37). Whether you are in Outline View or Book View, you can edit and rearrange entries, or delete entries altogether. Some functions are performed the same regardless of the view in which you are working. Book View is a useful organizational tool when your ProcessBook has only a few dozen displays. If your ProcessBook is large and contains many displays, Outline View is faster and easier to use. If there is no ProcessBook or independent display selected in your Preference settings, click File > Open or File > Create to open or initiate a file.

Book View In Book View

, the ProcessBook displays as a loose-leaf binder.

Tabs indicate major divisions in the ProcessBook. Each tab section has a heading, which may be any ProcessBook entry. The entry title is used as the tab name. A tab section may contain several pages of entries representing different types of information. There is no limit to the number of tabs you may have in a Book. However, as you add tabs or reduce the size of the ProcessBook, the tabs are stacked to the right of the Book. This might make the ProcessBook difficult to read in Book View. When you create a first-level entry in Book View, the name becomes the label for the section tab. If the entry is the first entry you have added to the ProcessBook, the entry level is automatically set at 1. Subsequent sub-entries are listed below the main entry. When you select another first level entry, a new page is created with a new tab. You can have up to 10 levels of entries in a ProcessBook, but levels 3 to 10 are displayed in Book View as though they were at the same level. Displays within a tab section are typically arranged in a hierarchical fashion. For example, a display that includes a boiler, a condenser, and a pump may be at the top level of a tab section. The boiler, the condenser, and the pump may be separate displays that are arranged underneath the summary display. Each of these displays can have several displays for their components.

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Book View

Turn Pages in Book View 1. Click View > Book to view a ProcessBook in Book View (page 35). Notice the top right . corner of the page is divided into two small triangles 2. Click the upper triangle to move forward one page, or Click the lower triangle to move backward a page. A dark gray triangle indicates there are no more pages in that direction. 3. Click the tabs along the right-hand side to move quickly between sections of a ProcessBook. Resize a ProcessBook 1. Click and drag on the frame of a ProcessBook until the window is the size you want. As you make a window smaller, the ProcessBook is resized so you can still see all of the tabs. If the window becomes too small to display all the members of a group of displays, the displays are moved to new pages. 2. If the ProcessBook window becomes too small, all the tabs behind the first tab are collapsed into one tab labeled More. Click the More tab to display a pop-up list of the other tab sections.

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Arrange ProcessBook Entries

Entries in Book View When you create a first level entry in Book View, the name becomes the label for the section tab. If the entry is the first entry you have added to the ProcessBook, the entry level is automatically set at 1. Subsequent sub-entries are listed below the main entry. When you select another first level entry, a new page is created with a new tab. Change the Name of an Entry in Book View 1. Click View > Book to view a ProcessBook in Book View (page 35). 2. In Build mode, double-click the entry you want to change. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 3. In the Label text box, type a new name. 4. Click OK. Change the Level of an Entry in Book View 1. Click View > Book to view a ProcessBook in Book View (page 35). 2. In Build mode, double-click the entry you want to change. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 3. In the Level list, click the level at which you want to reposition the entry in the ProcessBook hierarchy of entries, or Type a number between 1 and 10. 4. Click OK.

Outline View In Outline View

, ProcessBook displays are arranged hierarchically on a page.

Click View > Outline to display a ProcessBook as an outline. When you are in Outline View, a set of buttons is added to the active ProcessBook window to collapse or expand the outline. You may need to resize the window so all the buttons are visible. Use the horizontal and vertical scroll bars to see all entries in the outline. Hierarchies of entries may be revised by dragging entries from one location to another, or by promoting and demoting entries.

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Outline View

Collapse or Expand Outline View You can collapse or expand sections of the outline to view the list of displays in a meaningful manner. 1. Click View > Outline to view a ProcessBook in Outline View (page 37). 2. Click the black plus sign to the left of an entry to expand it. This shows additional displays that are subordinate to the selected display. Collapsed View:

-orClick the transparent plus sign to collapse the list of subordinate displays. Expanded View:

Note: You can change the font for each level in Outline View in the ProcessBook Preferences (page 17) dialog.

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Arrange ProcessBook Entries

Rearrange Entries in Outline View In Build mode, click and drag the entry name up or down (not sideways) to a new location. A dotted line indicates the location of the entry you are moving. Alternatively, you can use the four buttons at the top left of the window as follows: Promote highlighted entry Demote highlighted entry Move highlighted entry up Move highlighted entry down Change the Name of an Entry in Outline View 1. Click View > Outline. 2. In Build mode, click the entry you want to change. 3. Click Edit > Selected Item. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 4. In the Label box, type a new name. 5. Click OK. Change the Level of an Entry in Outline View 1. Click View > Outline. 2. In Build mode, click the entry you want to change. 3. Click Edit > Selected Item. The Define ProcessBook Entry dialog appears. 4. In the Level list, click the level at which you want to reposition the entry in the ProcessBook hierarchy of entries. -orType a number between 1 and 10. 5. Click OK.

Copy and Paste an Entry 1. Click on the Build mode pointer and select the entry. 2. Click the Copy button. This copies the selection to the clipboard. 3. If it is not already open, open the ProcessBook where you want to paste the entry. 4. Click the Paste button. This copies the contents of the clipboard to your ProcessBook. A copy of the original entry is created, not a link to the original.

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Note: If you highlight an entry first, the new entry is placed above the highlighted entry.

Remove an Entry 1. In Build mode, select an entry title in either Book View or Outline View. 2. Press the DELETE key. The entry is removed from the ProcessBook. Note: If you accidentally delete the wrong entry choose Edit > Undo.

Save a View of Your Displays If you frequently work with several specific displays in a ProcessBook, open the displays and arrange them in the workspace as you would like them. Save the ProcessBook. When you reopen the displays, they will be in the same position as when you closed them.

Save and Close a ProcessBook After creating a ProcessBook, it is a good idea to name the file and save it immediately. It is also important to save a ProcessBook periodically while you are working in it. When you save a ProcessBook, all changes to all entries and to the organizational structure are stored permanently. The ProcessBook remains open in your workspace so you can continue working. 1. To save a ProcessBook for the first time, click File > Save or Save As. The Save As dialog appears. 2. Type a name for the ProcessBook file. A .piw extension is automatically added. 3. Select the drive and directory where you want to save it. 4. Click OK.

Properties Summary Information in ProcessBook Click File > Properties to display the Summary Information dialog for a file. The Summary Information dialog you see is the same for the ProcessBook as a whole or for the individual displays.

40

Properties

The following table describes the fields in the Summary Information dialog: Field Name

Description

Author

Extracted from the Author field on the General tab in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog at the time the ProcessBook is first saved.

Note: You can change the Author field in either the Summary Information dialog or the ProcessBook Preferences dialog. Title

Name of the ProcessBook (extracted from the original creation of the ProcessBook).

Subject

May be used to explain the title more fully.

Keywords

May be added at any time.

Comments

May be used for any text entry. You can revise this field at any time.

Properties button

Clicking the Properties button displays the PI ProcessBook Properties (page 41) dialog, which gives information about the view currently in the active window.

PI ProcessBook File Properties 1. Click File > Properties to display the Summary Information (page 40) dialog. 2. Click the Properties button. The PI ProcessBook Properties dialog appears.

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Note: If you click the Properties button while a display is open, you launch the Display Properties dialog.

The following table describes the fields in the PI ProcessBook Properties dialog: Field Name

Description

Title

Extracted from the Summary Information dialog.

Created

Original date and time the ProcessBook was saved.

Note: If the ProcessBook file is moved to another machine, the original date and time will be preserved, however Windows Explorer shows the date and time the file arrived on the present machine. Created By

Extracted from the Author field on the General tab in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog box. Shows the original author, unless the author’s name has been modified in the Summary Information dialog.

Last Saved

Most recent revision date and time.

Last Saved By

Name of the person who saved the ProcessBook most recently. (Extracted from the Author field on the General tab in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog.) If this field is blank, the PC login name of the author is used. This is useful for tracking who made which revisions.

Revision

Number of times the ProcessBook has been revised and saved.

Displays

Total number of entries in the ProcessBook.

System Commands

Total number of operating system command entries in the ProcessBook.

Modify a ProcessBook Title You can change the name of a ProcessBook at any time. 42

Properties

1. In either Build mode or Run mode, click File > Properties. 2. The Summary Information (page 40) dialog appears. 3. In the Title box, type a new title. Note: The ProcessBook title is different from the file name established in the New dialog when you created the new ProcessBook. The title bar on the ProcessBook window displays the file name, which ends in .piw, rather than the title.

4. Click OK.

PI ProcessBook Display Properties 1. With a display window selected, click File > Properties to display the Summary Information (page 40) dialog for a display. 2. Click the Properties button. The Display Properties dialog appears.

The following table describes the fields in the Display Properties dialog: Field Name

Description

Title

Extracted from the Summary Information dialog.

Created

Original date and time the ProcessBook was saved.

Note: If the ProcessBook file is moved to another machine, the original date and time will be preserved, however Windows Explorer shows the date and time the file arrived on the present machine. Created By

Extracted from the Author field on the General tab in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog box. Shows the original author, unless the author’s name has been modified in the Summary Information dialog.

Last Saved

Most recent revision date and time.

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Field Name

Description

Last Saved By

Name of the person who saved the ProcessBook most recently. (Extracted from the Author field on the General tab in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog.) If this field is blank, the PC login name of the author is used. This is useful for tracking who made which revisions.

Revision

Number of times the ProcessBook has been revised and saved.

Total Symbols

Total number of symbols in the display.

Tags

Total number of unique PI Points used in the display.

Dynamic Symbols

The number of display symbols that are dynamic symbols.

Static Symbols

The number of display symbols that are static symbols.

Servers Required

The number of different PI Servers referenced in the display.

Import Files to a ProcessBook 1. To import PIDisDiff or PI-Graphics files into a ProcessBook, start PI ProcessBook. 2. Open a ProcessBook (page 28) into which you want to import the files or create a new ProcessBook. 3. In Build mode, click File > Import. The Import Files dialog appears. 4. Select the file type. 5. Select the drive and directory where the file resides, or Type the path and file name in the File Name box. You can select more than one file at a time. 6. Click the Open button. The status bar displays each file as it is imported. When completed, a message displays the number of files successfully imported. If errors occurred during the import process, a message box is displayed at the end of the import process showing the number of errors. You can check the message log from the Status Report icon at the bottom of your display. Note: Depending on the size, some files may take several minutes to import.

When a trend is successfully imported, a new Text display showing the full file name is added to the ProcessBook. Each trend is added as a subordinate display and retains its 44

File Sharing Capability

original trend name. For graphics, the VAX display name becomes the Display name. Once converted, graphics and trends can be edited like any other display.

File Sharing Capability Several users may access the same ProcessBook file at the same time. However, if one person makes changes to a particular display entry and saves the changes, then other users are blocked from saving changes in that display. This protects against accidental saving conflicts. If a user has already changed a display, the second user who wishes to make changes to the display receives an error message explaining that someone else has already edited and saved the display. The second user then has two options: •

Save the changes under a different ProcessBook name, thus creating two ProcessBooks, -or-



Close the ProcessBook and reopen it so that the new version of the display is shown. Then make changes and save again.

Open the Summary Information (page 40) dialog to view the name of the person who has made changes and saved the file most recently.

Move a ProcessBook to Another PC If you decide to move a ProcessBook to another PC, you may experience some differences in display entry appearance on the new PC: •

When the number of colors is different between the original PC and new PC, PI ProcessBook uses the closest color when drawing an entry. This is true for any graphics you may have included in an entry.



If an entry calls for a font that is not available on the new PC, PI ProcessBook substitutes a similar font.



If a ProcessBook includes links to other entries, ProcessBooks, or applications, PI ProcessBook may not be able to locate them if the path on the new PC is not the same as the old one.



Node names (for PI Servers) must be identical.



Different monitors have different resolutions, which may distort the appearance of an existing ProcessBook.

PI ProcessBook records both the absolute and relative paths for Linked displays and Linked ProcessBooks. This means you can copy ProcessBooks to new directories without breaking links as long as either all the linked files are placed in a similar directory tree or all the drive, directory, and file names remain the same.

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Chapter 4

Work with a Display PI ProcessBook provides tools for manipulating and analyzing the information shown in a display. For example, you can: •

Display the point attributes of a tag



Change the time range that is used for values, bars, trends, XYPlots, SQC plots, and Multi-State symbols



Use a Trend Cursor to see the value of plotted tags at a specific point in time



Create an instant trend

Overview of Display Elements Displays contain a variety of individual items, including static elements, buttons, OLE objects, and dynamic elements.

Static Symbols Static symbols are symbols that do not automatically change as time passes, such as an image, process diagram, or descriptive text. Static symbols include all items in a display that do not connect to the PI Server or other application to retrieve data, and do not start any application. Text labels and flow lines are examples of static symbols. Other types include rectangles, circles, arcs, and images.

Dynamic Symbols Dynamic symbols are values, bars, trends, XYPlots, SC charts, and multi-state symbols (such as a pump image tied to temperature data) that change over time, and are based on the value of a tag in the PI Archive. If you wish to see how a dynamic symbol was defined, select it and click the Item Definition button on the Drawing toolbar. Dynamic symbols may also report data from outside databases through queries. If you rest your mouse on a dynamic symbol, you can see a ToolTip with the current value, tag name, and time stamp. Icons for questionable, substituted, and annotated PI data can also appear on your displays.

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Most point types can be used with any dynamic symbol. There are some restrictions on string and timestamp data. PI ProcessBook handles a full range of PI Server data types, as shown in this table: Point Type

How It Is Used

PB Support

Digital

Used for points whose value can only be one of several discrete states, such as ON/OFF or Red/Green/Yellow. Nearest equivalent to the PI 2.x Digital type.

Supported

Int16

PI ProcessBook supports these as integers. Used for points whose values are 15-bit unsigned integers (0 to 32767). Nearest equivalent to the PI 2.x Integer type.

Supported

Int32

Negative integer values are supported. Used for points whose values are 32-bit signed integers (- 2147450880 to 2147483647). PI reserves some values.

Supported for positive and negative Integer values

Float16

Used for floating point values, scaled. The accuracy is one part in 32767. Nearest equivalent to the PI 2.x Real type.

Supported

Float32

Used for single-precision floating- point values, not scaled.

Supported

Float64

Used for double-precision floating- point values, not scaled.

Supported

String

Each string event represents an ad- hoc state in a series. Used to store string data of up to 976 characters.

On plots, each string event represents an ad-hoc state in a series; not supported on logarithmic traces, multi-state configurations, or bar symbols.

Blob

Binary large object – Used to store any type of binary data up to 976 bytes.

Not supported

Timestamp

Plotted as seconds over a given range. Not supported for logarithmic traces. Used to store values of type Timestamp. Any Time/Date in the Range 1-jan-1970 to 1-Jan-2038

Plotted as seconds over a given range. Not supported for logarithmic traces, multi-states, or bar symbols.

Buttons Buttons are elements that create a link to other applications, such as a calculator or word processor, or other ProcessBooks or displays. You can also use buttons to execute a script. For example, if you find you work in a particular display and frequently need to update a report with the information you are monitoring, you can add a button that automatically opens a spreadsheet program. You also can use a button to perform common actions using a script, like printing a display, or connect to related displays, ProcessBooks, or Web sites.

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Manage Displays and Independent Display Files

OLE Objects OLE objects include information from outside applications, such as text, spreadsheets, or graphics. This information may be configured to update dynamically. OLE objects may be either linked (page 190) or embedded (page 189) into displays.

Manage Displays and Independent Display Files Open a Display Use any of these procedures to open a display from either Book View (page 35) or Outline View (page 37) of a ProcessBook: •

Click on the display title, then on the New button to open the selected display in a new window.



Click on the display title, then on the Open button to open the display into the last display window you used. If none are open, a display window opens.



With the Run Mode pointer, double-click the display. The display opens and appears within an existing window, if possible.



Click and drag the display title to an unused area in the application workspace and release the mouse. This opens a new display in addition to already opened displays. If you drag the display on top of an open display, it closes that display while opening the dragged display.



To use the keyboard instead of the mouse, use CTRL+F6, to select the ProcessBook, then use the up or down arrow keys to select the display title. Press Enter. If you have more than one display open, it replaces the open display with the new display. Pressing CTRL+N is the same as clicking the New button.

If the display is a Display, Linked Display, or Linked ProcessBook, the display is opened and the contents are displayed on your workspace. If the display is an Operating System Command, the command is executed or the application is started. Note: If you click on an Operating System Command more than once in the same session, it may run the application repeatedly. This depends on the application and how it has been set up.

Displays re-open in the same position, size, and shape as when they were last saved. Open Several Displays at One Time In addition to the procedures for opening a display, you can also open multiple displays simultaneously. Press SHIFT while highlighting the displays you want to open in Outline view. Click the New button at the bottom of the list of displays. Each display or linked display is opened in your workspace.

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Manage Multiple Open Displays Just as you can work with multiple ProcessBooks, you can have multiple displays open in the work area. To make a display active, click in the display window or press CTRL+F6 to toggle between open displays. To improve viewing when there are multiple open displays, choose: •

Window > Cascade—The titles of all open displays and ProcessBooks appear in a cascaded list down the screen.



Window > Tile—All open displays and ProcessBooks appear in a tiled view.



Window > —The selected display is active.

Open Independent Display Files Independent Display Files use a .pdi extension in the file name. When you double-click on a display file in Windows Explorer, a copy of the PI ProcessBook application installed on your PC opens, just as it would if you double-clicked on a .piw file. The independent display appears inside the application.

Browse a Display from Internet Explorer You can select a .pdi file and look at it in Internet Explorer. PI ProcessBook menus and toolbars appear in the Internet Explorer window. This is similar to embedding a display in Excel, except that the display becomes the entire Internet Explorer document. The display is updated as it would be within a ProcessBook.

Zoom Display Size Use the Zoom command to change the size of the drawing within a display window. 1. Click View > Zoom

. The Zoom dialog appears.

2. Click a percentage, or Type a number in the Custom text box to enlarge or reduce the drawing. The Custom text box displays the current Scale Factor. Typing a number greater than the current Scale Factor enlarges the drawing; typing a number less than the current Scale Factor reduces it. 3. Select Fit all symbols to resize all the symbols in a display to fit within the window. If you want only specific symbols to fit within the display window, select the symbols, and then select Fit Selected Symbols. The items in the display resize and take up the entire window. OLE objects are not included. 4. Click OK to accept your changes.

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Manage Displays and Independent Display Files

Note: There is also a zoom level combo box on the Standard toolbar this to enter or select a scale factor, or choose Fit All.

. Use



To resize the window to fill the monitor, click the Maximize button in the upper right hand corner of your display window. When you maximize a display, all open windows are maximized. You can also drag the edge or corner of the window to the desired size.



To minimize the display again, click the Minimize button in the upper right hand corner of your display window.

Note: If you have your Preference setting for Preserve Aspect Ratio check box selected, the contents of the display resize as you resize the window. If this option is not enabled, the size of each element in the display does not change as you change the window size.

Full Screen Mode 1. Click the Full Screen button on the Full Screen toolbar the display enlarges to fit the screen.

. Other toolbars vanish and

2. Click the Full Screen button again to restore your toolbars. A default keyboard shortcut of F11 also toggles between Full Screen and Normal presentations. Note: You can customize the Full Screen toolbar to contain other buttons to use with a Full Screen display.

Search for a Display 1. Open the ProcessBooks (page 28) you want to search. 2. Click Tools > Display Search & Run. The Display Search dialog appears.

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3. In the Name box, type one or more of the letters of the display name. 4. In the Look in drop-down list, click the location you want to search. -orIn the drop-down list, click Browse, and then locate the appropriate folder. 5. Select the Look in subfolders check box (optional). 6. Click the Search button. 7. The search results are displayed under Results. 8. Under Filename, click the display you want to open and then click OK.

Reduce a Display to an Icon to Save Space If you find your work area cluttered with many open displays, you can reduce a display to an icon by clicking its Minimize button. Even though the display is minimized, it continues to be updated with information from the PI Server, however the results are not shown until the window is restored. When you want to use the display, double-click the icon.

Save a Display A display may be saved within a ProcessBook or as an independent file (.pdi). 1. Click File > Save or Save As. 2. From the Save as type drop-down box, select one of the following six formats. The default is .pdi: ο ο

52

.pdi—Display file. If you select this format your display becomes an independent file that updates under certain circumstances. .svg—SVG file for Web use. If you select this format it becomes the default file type when saving files later. PI ProcessBook 3.0 or higher only supports version 3.0 or higher of the SVG add-in. See the SVG add-in release notes for more information.

Manage Displays and Independent Display Files

The last four file types are graphics formats and do not update. If you choose one of the graphic formats, the display in focus is unchanged by the Save-As operation. The display is left open and remains in the same mode (Run or Build). ο ο ο ο

.jpg—JPG-JPEG-JFIF compliant .bmp—32-bit Bitmap

.wmf—Windows Metafile .png—CompuServe Portable Network Graphics

Display Settings To edit display properties, click Edit > Display, or double-click the Time Zone setting in the Status bar. The Display Settings dialog appears.

Background Color—The color applied to the area of the display where there are no symbols. This field uses a color well control to provide color choices. The color selected in this field also becomes the default background color for new displays. Time Zone—This field determines whether the local computer or PI Server time zone is used for interpreting dates and times for this particular display. Connectors—The Enable Connector Attachments check box allows a symbol dragged and dropped on a Connector symbol to be attached to that Connector. Clearing the check box disables this functionality for the Display. Note that even if this feature is disabled for the Display, the you can still use the Connectors dialog to attach Symbols to Connectors.

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Enable Scripting—When displays have many symbols on them, the performance of PI ProcessBook may be affected. One way to improve the situation is to disable the ability to code the majority of those symbols. In order to disable scripting and improve performance, you can take the following actions: •

In the Enable Scripting section, clear the Automatically Enable Scripting check box. This adds new symbols to the display without the overhead of enabling scripting if it isn't needed.



If the display already has many enabled symbols on it, click the Disable Scripting for All Symbols... button in the Enable Scripting section. This button removes the scripting capability for all existing symbols to help improve performance.

OK—Clicking this button accepts the changes made and closes the dialog box. These settings are saved as part of the Display object.

Display Scrolling Properties

Run mode scrolling—Determines the scroll bar behavior of display windows in Run mode. Build mode scrolling—Determines the scroll bar behavior of display windows in Build mode. On

Display contains scroll bars all the time.

Off

Scroll bars never appear.

Automatic

Scroll bars appear when needed (this is the default setting for new displays).

Drawing Tools PI ProcessBook includes a drawing environment with features that allow you to create symbols and graphics within an entry. You can use the drawing tools to: •

Create ellipses, polygons, rectangles, arcs, lines, and polylines



Add dynamic elements such as values, bars, trends, buttons, and graphic files



Add ActiveX controls

The Drawing toolbar contains a set of buttons used for creating drawings and the Draw menu contains the corresponding commands.

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Drawing Tools

To use the drawing tools, click the appropriate button. When you draw a line or other shape, the tool uses the current formatting attribute (page 59) preferences. Each of these objects is considered a symbol by PI ProcessBook. In Build mode, when you select a symbol by clicking it with your mouse, you see small squares around the bounding rectangle of the symbol. These are called selection handles and allow you to resize the symbol. For arcs, polygons, and polylines, there are also reshaping handles at the intersection of the line segments. Each symbol has a name, reflecting the order in which it was added to the display, such as Rectangle1, Rectangle2, etc. In Build mode (or VBA Design mode), an identifying ToolTip (page 63) appears whenever your mouse hovers over a symbol. Note: If you are drawing multiple objects, press the CTRL key while selecting the drawing tool. This lets you continue to work with that tool until you select a different tool.

Organizing Symbols PI ProcessBook provides several tools to help you organize your drawings. These tools include a drawing grid, flip and rotate capabilities, and the ability to change the order in which objects overlap each other. You can move and resize drawing objects. You can also divide a display into layers so that you can segregate various elements. For example, you might separate HVAC elements from Electrical elements in a display. Any of these functions can be performed on a single screen element or group of them. For information on grouping objects, see Grouping Symbols (page 151). Make sure you have selected the item or items with the Build Mode pointer. OLE objects behave somewhat differently; their behavior is discussed under Commands that Ignore OLE Objects (page 192).

Drawing Area The drawing area of a display is actually much larger than your monitor. There are scroll bars on the display window for moving around this area. You should plan to set a few options before you begin drawing: •

Consider turning on snap-to grid and setting the grid size, font style, and default colors of lines, backgrounds, and fills before you begin. It is usually easier to work with a grid when laying out a display. Symbols in your drawing automatically align themselves with the grid lines or the intersections of grid lines. Grid lines not only make it easier to place objects in the drawing, but it helps keep the objects proportional. You can start with one grid size and then modify it as your work gets more detailed.

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Select a font and font size for any values, trends, or text boxes you might add to the drawing.



Select colors for lines, fills, and backgrounds that are easy on the eyes. For example, if you are projecting on a large video screen, a black background with colored lines is better, but if you are printing, a white background is better.

While you are drawing, you can use the zoom feature to zoom in on an area that requires more attention. Zoom out if the drawing is larger than your monitor.

Drawing Grid The grid is a system of vertical and horizontal lines spaced at regular intervals on the drawing area. Dots are placed at the intersection of the grid lines. The grid helps you align drawing objects. When you move an object to a location on the drawing area, the corners or edges of the object are aligned with the closest grid intersection. This is called snap-to-grid or grid snap. When you turn off grid snap, you can move an object to any location within the drawing area. You determine the interval at which you want the grid lines to be spaced by setting the grid size. Set Grid Size and Grid Snap 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Arrange menu, click Grid Size. 3. The Grid Size dialog appears. 4. In the Lines per Screen Unit box, type or select the number of grid lines per unit of drawing space. Note: The size of a unit as displayed on your monitor varies according to the monitor's resolution and driver software.

5. Select the Snap to Grid check box. Once grid snap is on, any symbols you draw are automatically aligned to the grid. Note: The Snap to Grid command also appears on the Arrange menu.

6. Click OK.

PI Tags and Point Attributes A PI point is a stream of real-time data from a defined source, and is described by a corresponding tag name and other attributes.

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PI Tags and Point Attributes

In PI ProcessBook and this guide, PI points are frequently referred to as PI tags, and the terms are used somewhat interchangeably. However, a tag is simply a name for a PI point. When you retrieve PI data into a dynamic symbol, the tag name is the most commonly-used PI attribute to refer to data from a PI point.

PI Tag Search The Tag Search dialog is used to locate PI tags (page 56). To launch this dialog: On the Standard toolbar, click the Tag Search button

,

-orClick the Tag Search button in any of the following dialog boxes: •

Define Value



Define Bar



Define XYPlot



Multi-State Symbol



Define Trend

The Tag Search dialog box provides three types of searches: •

Basic Search allows you to create a tag mask by specifying PI point attributes. The mask is used to find a list of tags on the server with matching attributes.



Advanced Search provides a query-building interface with access to more point attributes for complex searches.



Alias Search provides a logical tree view of a PI Server through the PI Module Database, which you can use to select tags by their descriptive aliases.

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To search for tags: 1. Click a tab to choose a Basic, Advanced or Alias search. 2. Enter the required search criteria and click Search. Use '*' or '?' as wildcard characters to search for tag names and attributes. For example, the tag mask Tem* returns all point names that start with Tem while Tem? returns only points that start with Tem and end with another single character. All point mask fields are case insensitive. You can also click Favorites to access previous searches. 3. Tags returned from a search appear listed in a search results panel. Select the desired tags in the results panel, and click OK. Click column headers in the search results panel to sort the results. Ctrl-click or Shift-click to select multiple tags. For more information on PI tags click the Help button from any Tag Search dialog in PI ProcessBook to launch the PI SDK Controls and Dialogs user help.

Display Point Attributes The configuration information for a point (page 56) is stored as a list of attributes. You can display this list of properties for any dynamic symbol.

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Formatting

The Point Properties dialog displays the attributes and snapshot values of PI Points. 1. Using either the Run mode or Build mode pointer, click the dynamic symbol. 2. On the standard toolbar, click the Tag Properties button

, or

Click the Pt. Attr. (Point Attributes) button if you are in the Tag Search dialog. The Point Properties dialog appears. The tag for which the properties are displayed is shown in the Point Name drop-down list at the top of the dialog box. If a trend has several tags, select each tag from the drop-down list or use the up and down arrows on your keyboard to scroll through the tags. The Point Properties dialog contains the Categorized tab and the Alphabetic tab. The Categorized tab displays the attributes categorically. The following categories are always displayed: ο ο ο ο ο ο

Archive Classic Display Overview Security System

These categories include all the attributes from the Base PointClass. The Base PointClass attributes are common to all PI Points. If the PI Point that is being displayed is not from the Base PointClass, there is one additional category. This category is given the name of the PointClass to which the displayed PI Point belongs. The PointClass-specific attributes are displayed in this category. The Alphabetic tab displays the attributes alphabetically.

Formatting Each symbol you draw and place on a display has attributes that determine how the symbol looks. The fill and line attributes that are currently selected on the Display Window (page 20) tab of the ProcessBook Preference dialog are applied to any new drawing symbol. You may configure these attributes for individual symbols or for all selected symbols as a group. The Symbol Formatting toolbar contains buttons for formatting fonts, colors, and line styles. PI ProcessBook also includes the older Formatting toolbar to support backwards compatibility

Editable Formatting Attributes The following table shows the editable attributes for each symbol. Colors

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Line Styles

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Work with a Display

Line

Fill

Background

Style

Weight

Ends

X

X

X

X

X

Line

X

Rectangle

X

Text

X

Ellipse

X

X

X

X

Arc

X

X

X

X

Value

X

Polygon

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

Polyline Bar

X

Trend

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Font To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose font you want to change. 2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click a name in the Font box.

Note: When choosing fonts, plan to use fonts that other PI ProcessBook users are likely to have. If another user does not have the fonts you used, PI ProcessBook attempts to match the font to an existing font. However, the match may make it difficult for another user to read the entry.

3. Type or click a point size in the Font Size box.

Line Color To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes.

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Formatting

1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose line color you want to change. 2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Line Color button

.

Depending on the symbol type, the following elements change to the color displayed on the button. ο ο

Symbols that display text use the line color to determine the color of the text within the symbol Symbols that have lines (such as ellipses) use the line color to change lines in the symbol

3. Click the arrow on the right side of the Line Color button to display the color palette. Choose from the 16 colors available or click on one of these two buttons: ο ο

Custom Color—Launches the Color dialog where you can choose additional colors from a color well of options None—Disables line color. Setting the line color to None for Pen elements on a trend hides the trace and its associated markers

Fill Color To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose fill color you want to change. 2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Fill Color button of the selected symbol(s) changes.

. The interior color

Note: The Fill Color button is disabled if the selected symbol does not support this property.

3. Click the arrow on the right side of the Fill Color button to display the color palette. Choose from the 16 colors available or click on one of these two buttons: ο ο

Custom Color—Launches the Color dialog where you can choose additional colors from a color well of options None—Disables fill color. Setting the fill color to None shows the display background color.

Background Color To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose background color you want to change.

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2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Background Color button background of the selected symbol changes.

. The

Note: The Background Color button is disabled if the selected symbol does not support that property.

3. Click the arrow on the right side of the Background Color button to display the color palette. Choose from the 16 colors available or click on one of these two buttons: ο ο

Custom Color—Launches the Color dialog where you can choose additional colors from a color well of options None—Disables background color. Setting the background color to None shows the display background color.

Line Weight To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose line weight you want to change. 2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Line Weight button weight options appears below the button.

. A list of six line

3. Select a line weight. The thickness of the selected symbol's line weight changes.

Line Style To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose line style you want to change. 2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Line Style button . A list of six line style options appears below the button. Options include solid, dash, dot, dash-dot, dashdot-dot, and none. Selecting None for a trend Pen element hides the trace line, but not the marker. 3. Select a line option. The symbol's line pattern changes.

Line Ends To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose line ends you want to change. 62

ToolTip Statistics

2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Line Ends button . A list of four line ends options appears below the button. These options determine whether arrows appear at the end of lines. 3. Select a line ends option. The selected symbol's line pattern changes.

Formatting Paintbrush To determine what type of formatting is applicable for each symbol, refer to the table of editable formatting attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display, and click the symbol(s) whose font, color, or line formatting you want to replicate. 2. On the Symbol Formatting toolbar, click the Formatting Paintbrush button

.

Note: Double clicking the Formatting Paintbrush button allows you to apply formatting to more than one symbol. To turn off the Formatting Paintbrush selection, click the button again or press ESC.

3. Click another symbol. The formatting of the first symbol is copied to the selected symbol(s).

ToolTip Statistics In Run mode, hover your mouse over a point on a dynamic symbol to display a ToolTip with summary statistics. Engineering units are shown next to the value followed by the timestamp paired with the value. If you hover your mouse over a point where there is more than one trace, each trace's data is shown on a separate line. Click Tools > ToolTip Statistics to launch the ToolTip Statistics dialog, where you can select what type of data you want to see when viewing ToolTips.

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Note: The options under Summary Statistics to Show do not affect ToolTips for XYPlots.

ToolTip Statistics are shown for any dynamic symbol that has PI data. The effective time range of the display is used to aggregate the data for these statistics.

Playback Toolbar

The Playback toolbar is used to playback a set time period in the current PI ProcessBook display. Playing back a display can be useful for showing the conditions of various systems and analyzing conditions leading up to a specific time frame or event. The toolbar contains the display range (page 65) that shows the duration of the display to play back, the playback period (page 66) that shows the start and end time for the entire playback session, and the following controls: Pause/Play The Pause/Play button

drives the playback feature.

During display playback the button shows the pause icon. When playback is paused, the button shows an arrow for the play icon. End Playback Click the Stop button Time Tracker

64

to end playback. This action changes the Pause/Play icon to Play.

Playback Toolbar

The time tracker is the slide bar that tracks a display's playback. It consists of: •

Playback period (page 66)



Display range (page 65)

The slide bar moves from left to right. Use the arrow keys on either end to extend the playback period. The ends of the display range bar can be dragged to change the effective time range of the display. All symbols on the display are affected by this time range. Fast Forward Click Fast Forward to accelerate the rate of play back. Each successive click of Fast Forward doubles the rate at which the display plays back. The first click doubles playback speed, then advances to 4x, 8x, 16x, and 32x the playback speed. An additional click returns the playback to the default playback speed. Click Play to resume normal speed playback from the current location. Repeat Click Repeat to make the playback repeat each time it reaches the end of the playback period (page 66).

Display Range The display range is the duration of the display to play back. This number must be smaller than the playback period (page 66). Change the Display Range •

Hover over the drag handles at either end of the display range to change the mouse icon to a calendar icon. Click the calendar icon to launch the calendar control, from where you can enter start and end times for the display range.



To increase or decrease the display range, click on the display range and rotate the mouse wheel up or down. You can also click and drag the drag handles on either end to change the display range. The left side changes the start time; the right side changes the end time.



Click the Playback Options button to launch the Playback Options (page 66) dialog, from where you can modify the display range duration. The duration supports PI Time (page 3) string formats.

Note: Any changes made to the display range affect the active display, even if a display is not in playback mode. In addition, once playback is stopped the active display's dynamic symbols are still configured to use the display range time range. A display must be reverted to re-establish any build time configuration time ranges.

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Playback Period The playback period is the start and end time for the playback session. It must be larger than the display range (page 65). By default, the playback period is five times longer than the display range. Change the Playback Period 1. Hover the mouse next to the left or right arrow of the playback period to change the mouse icon to a calendar icon. 2. Click the calendar icon to launch the calendar control. Use the calendar to modify the start and end dates of the playback period. Note: You can also click the Playback Options button to launch the Playback Options (page 66) dialog, from where you can modify start and end dates.

Playback Options The Playback Options window sets the default behavior settings for the Playback Toolbar. The defaults apply to all displays and are retained when PI ProcessBook is closed and reopened.

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Layers within Displays

To open the Playback Options window click the Playback Options button toolbar. The following settings are controlled through this window:

on the



Display Range (page 65)—use any accepted PI Time (page 3) input parameter to set the length of the display range.



Playback Period (page 66)—use the calendar controls to add start and end dates.



Refresh Rate—the number of seconds between updates of the display that is being played.



Speed—the rate at which the display plays back. The speed is expressed in units per second. Speed can be expressed as minutes, hours, days, and months, and must be smaller than the display range.

Layers within Displays You can divide a display into layers containing one or more symbols. This feature could be useful in building a complex display with several systems depicted (electrical, HVAC, etc.). If you separate systems by layer, you can view any one of the layers by making the other layers invisible. •

A layer can be Visible or Invisible in Run mode. Layers are always Visible in Build mode.



You can move symbols between layers or remove them from a layer.



Add, make visible, restack, and lock layers while ProcessBook is in either Run mode or Build mode. Delete layers only when ProcessBook is in Build mode.

Create Layers 1. Open a display. 2. Click the Layers toolbar button

, or

Double-click the Layers icon in the Status Bar, or Click View > Layers. The Layers dialog appears.

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3. Click the New Layer button to open the New Layer dialog. A default name comprised of the word Layer prefixed to the layer number appears. The layer number does not necessarily match the index number; it is simply the next unused integer in the list.

A new layer is added to the end of the collection. Its index is one higher than the previous high index number. All symbols added to this layer are displayed over symbols on lower indexed layers. 4. Click OK to return to the Layers dialog. ο

ο

ο

Index—specifies the index number of the layer. The index is used in determining the display order (Z Order) of overlapping symbols. A layer with a lower index number is lower in the stack than one with a higher number. Higher layers may obscure symbols in lower levels. Count—this is a read-only value that contains the number of symbols on a layer. A composite symbol is counted once and each of its subordinate individual symbols is also counted. Up/down arrows—buttons at the right side of the dialog box are used to move the relative position of one layer to another within a display. As a layer is moved down the list, its index number becomes larger, and vice versa. Symbols on layers with higher index numbers may hide or cover symbols with lower-index numbers. Locked layers cannot be reordered.

5. Select the appropriate check boxes:

68

Layers within Displays

ο ο ο

Visible—makes the elements in the layer visible in Run mode. New layers are visible by default. Active—accepts all new symbols as you add them to the display. Inactive prevents symbols from being added automatically. New layers are Active by default. Locked—prevents you from adding symbols to a layer. Existing symbols on locked layers cannot be cut, copied, pasted, deleted, or moved. New layers are not locked by default.

6. Repeat steps 3-5 as needed. Click OK to accept changes and close the Layers dialog.

Assign Symbols to Layers If you have at least one layer in a display, you can assign symbols to it. 1. Select a symbol, right-click, and select Assign Layers. The Assign Layers dialog appears and displays all of your existing layers.

2. Select or clear the checkbox next to a layer name to add or remove the selected symbol from a layer. If a layer name is grayed out, the layer is locked and you cannot add or remove symbols. You may add the same symbol to more than one layer. 3. Click OK.

Layers and Composite Symbols To link symbols and create composite symbols click Arrange > Group, or click the Group button grouped.

on the Layout toolbar. The symbols may be on different layers when they are



Assign a composite symbol to any layer(s) regardless of its component symbols.



You can not group symbols on locked layers into a composite symbol, but the layers may be locked after the symbols are grouped.



You can not delete a composite symbol that contains symbols on locked layers, however, you can delete an unlocked layer.

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Normally, a symbol existing only on one layer is deleted if the layer is deleted, but when the symbol is inside a composite symbol it is not deleted. It stays in the composite symbol.



If a composite symbol is hidden, all its parts are hidden. If the composite symbol is visible its individual parts may still be hidden if the layers they are assigned to are hidden.



Since you can not individually select the parts of a composite symbol you must first use the Ungroup button individually.

to separate them in order to change their layer assignments

Active Layers Status Bar The Layers icon on the Status Bar shows whether or not the display has more than one layer. This icon appears in the status bar at the bottom of your application, indicating one or more layers in the display currently in focus. Double-clicking the icon displays the Layers dialog. If no layers have been defined, the icon appears with a slash through it. Hovering the mouse over the icon displays a ToolTip with the names of any active layers, beginning with the top layer.

Active Layers Status Bar Area (with ToolTip)

Migrate Displays to Another PI Server When you want to use an existing tag with a different PI Server, PI ProcessBook attempts to locate the correct tags. Each ProcessBook saves the tag information for all of the symbols it contains. Beginning with PI SDK 1.3.6, when you use a PI ProcessBook symbol with a PI Server other than the one for which it was created, the PI Server is added automatically if it is discoverable on the network. If the PI Server is not discoverable, then PI ProcessBook prompts you to select a new PI Server. Once the new PI Server is selected, PI ProcessBook searches the database for a matching tag ID.

70



If a match is found, PI ProcessBook retrieves the tag name associated with the tag ID and compares the tag name with the saved tag name.



If the tag names are the same, the value is shown in the entry.



If the tag names are different, PI ProcessBook searches the database for the tag ID of the saved tag name. If a match is found, the value is shown in the entry.



If a match is not found, PI ProcessBook uses the tag ID saved with the ProcessBook regardless of the different tag names.

Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays



If no tag ID or tag name is found in the database, PI ProcessBook displays a message informing you of the missing tag.

This behavior is governed by the value of PB2TagResolution, located in the procbook.ini (page 210) file's Data Manager section. PB2TagResolution can take the following values: •

0—[default] the Point ID is used to match a missing tag before the stored point name



1—uses the tag name before checking Point ID. This mimics behavior of older version of PI ProcessBook that are based on the PI API.

Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays PI ProcessBook 3.2 includes the Element Relative Display (ERD) add-in, while continuing to provide access to the Module Relative Display (MRD) add-in. While the two provide similar functionality, ERD is based on the new AF platform and provides superior performance and search functionality. You can have both the ERD and MRD add-ins installed together in PI Processbook, however, we encourage you to migrate your displays (page 223) and remove the MRD once you connect to a PI Server that supports this migration process. ERD will eventually replace MRD, therefore if you use MRD you should plan to migrate your displays. Note: In order to convert a legacy Module Relative Display (MRD) to an Element Relative Display (ERD) you must first migrate modules in the Module Database to elements in the AF database. This migration is contingent on the version of PI Server to which you connect. Check the PI Server documentation for further details.

Prior to migration, you can continue building displays using the MRD, however, you should not attempt to combine ERD and MRD references on the same display. The combination of these references will cause problems for any future migration.

Element Relative Display (ERD) Element Relative Display (ERD) is an add-in (page 11) that replaces the hierarchical, Module Database (MDB)-based Module Relative Display add-in from earlier versions of PI ProcessBook with an asset store based on AF elements and their associative attributes. This approach allows you to organize and structure PI System and other data according to objects users are most familiar with. Elements represent either physical or logical entities in your process, such as a physical device, piece of equipment, storage container, or representative section of a process. An attribute represents a single type of value that is part of an element. It can contain configuration information for the element, or measured or calculated process data that provides the information necessary for getting and setting its value to and from a data store. PI ProcessBook allows you to search an AF database for elements and their attributes (page 72). You can then add these data objects to dynamic symbols to graphically display this data PI ProcessBook User Guide

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in real-time. For more information on AF and elements, see the PI AF User Guide and PI System Data Directory Overview. See Also Migrate a Module Relative Display (MRD) to an Element Relative Display (ERD) 223

Connect to an AF Database Use the Select Database dialog to find and connect to AF databases. •

Click File > PI Systems. The Select Database dialog appears.



Use the System drop-down list to connect to an AF System that contains an AF database you wish to use. The (...) button launches the Systems dialog, where you can connect to other AF Systems.



Once you select an AF System, search for an AF database using the Databases search box. Select a database and click OK. The AF database you select is used by the Element Relative Display (page 71) add-in, where you can populate symbols with elements from the AF database you have selected.

Search for Available Elements Search for elements directly in the Element Relative Display window, or use the Element Search dialog for more advanced search parameters. Use elements and attributes to create Element Relative Displays (ERD) (page 71). Note: Elements are stored in an AF database. See Connect to an AF Database (page 72) for information on how to select an AF database.

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Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays

1. Click View > Element Relative Display. The Element Relative Display window appears.

2. In the Search Mask text box enter a search query, and click the green arrow, or a. Click the Element Search button you can use advanced search fields.

to launch the Element Search dialog, where

b. Enter your search query and click the Search button. The Search results list is populated with your results. c. Click any element(s) from the Search results list. d. Click OK. Any new items are added to the Elements of Interest list. Note: You cannot modify AF database connection (page 72) settings from this dialog.

3. Search results appear in the Elements of Interest pane. ο ο ο

Click a column heading to sort results by that heading. Use the Filter text box to filter out unwanted entries. Access previously used filter expressions by clicking the small triangle at the end of the text box. Select the Group by check boxes to group your search results by category or template.

Note: Use the pin icon to lock the docking window to your screen. Click the pin icon again to unpin the window and minimize it along the border of your PI ProcessBook window. When a docking window is unpinned, a button appears along the side of the screen. Hover over it to re-expand the window.

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Add Element Relative Data to a Dynamic Symbol You can configure dynamic symbols (page 47) to display element relative (page 71) information. 1. In Build mode, double-click a dynamic symbol. This opens the Define dialog. 2. Click the arrow next to the Tag Search button. A drop-down menu appears.

3. Click Element Relative. The Select Attributes dialog appears.

The active element in the Elements of Interest pane on the Element Relative Display (page 72) window appear in the top pane under Current Element of Interest. If an element has attributes, those attributes are available to add to a dynamic symbol. 4. Click attribute names to select from the Attributes for the selected element list.

74

Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays

5. Click the button to add the selected attributes to the Selected Attributes list. Apply the following option if desired: ο

Use Full Path—controls whether the context of the selected element displays as a full path or an element name.

6. Click OK to add the selected attribute(s) to your dynamic symbol. You can dynamically change the selected element on your symbols by clicking an element name in the Elements of Interest pane on the Element Relative Display window. The attribute data that appears on your dynamic symbol corresponds to the active element you choose. If the attributes you select are not available for a selected element, you see no data on the display when that element is selected.

Module Relative Display Add-in The Module Relative Display (MRD) add-in is designed to give you a way to create dynamic symbols in a display for a general structure, and then to apply data to the display symbols using different instances of the structure. For example, you can use the same dynamic symbol, such as a trend, and scroll through the Available Modules window to display that trend with different data points representing the selected item in the Available Modules window. The add-in gives PI ProcessBook access to the PI Module Database, taking advantage of its contents as well as its structure. The MRD add-in allows you: •

to use aliases as a data source for dynamic symbols so that a tag can be changed without redefining a symbol that uses it indirectly through its alias.



to use properties in dynamic symbols to show user-defined supplementary information.



at run-time to switch among different PI Module Database nodes using the existing display symbols.

The PI Module Database organization is similar to a file directory structure. Each node (which is like a directory) is called a module, and can contain: •

Properties, which are variables containing any kind of data (including arrays, and collections of more properties)



Aliases (like variables for a tag name)



Modules (sub-modules, like sub-directories in a file directory)



Properties and aliases in the Module Database are time-dependent. See the PI Server documentation for more information on the Module Database.

Features The Module Relative Display Add-in supports the following features: •

Use of Module Database Aliases in dynamic symbols.



Use of Module Database String and Numeric PI Properties in dynamic symbols.

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A user option at design time (Select Available Modules dialog) to choose Contexts to make available at run time. Contexts are saved with the display or independent display, not with a ProcessBook or the application.



A Configuration Dialog (Select Items dialog) for assigning these Aliases and Properties to dynamic symbols in ProcessBook.



Use of Current Context String in dynamic symbols. This provides a mechanism to show the currently selected context in a display.



A way to change the context at run-time (Available Modules Window).



Programmatic access to the Available Context values.

Module Context Selection Before a module context is associated with a symbol, you must choose which Module Database modules will be available to select as a context during run time. The chosen modules should have a common structure and items so that the display can obtain symbol data for any run-time context you select. For example, if you have three pumps described as modules in the Module Database with similar aliases and properties, they would be good candidates for context. Click Tools > Module Context > Add Module to see the Select Available Modules dialog, which is used to establish the available contexts for the active display.

This dialog contains two parts: •

76

The PI Module Database Tree—Use the arrow keys to select nodes to use as contexts. All known PI 3 Servers are available; modules can be selected from multiple Module Databases.

Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays

Note that for new displays, the PI Module Database tree only contains Module databases that have not been migrated to an AF database. If any of the connected PI Servers has a Module database that has been migrated the following dialog appears:

If all connected PI Servers have their respective Module databases migrated to AF databases a dialog appears informing you to use the Element Relative Display (page 71) add-in. •

The Selected Modules list—shows all the selected contexts. During run-time you can select any of these to use as a context.

At least one module must be selected using the Select Available Modules dialog before a dynamic symbol can be configured to use a module alias or property. More modules may be added later. Unresolved contexts display as NO DATA. An unresolved context occurs when a dynamic symbol is configured to show a property and the active context doesn't have the property. For example, suppose you select Module1 and Module2 as the available contexts. Module1 contains PropertyA and Module2 contains PropertyB. A dynamic symbol is configured to display PropertyB. If Module1 is the current context, NO DATA appears in the dynamic symbol. Change the Run-time Module (context) After you have identified modules, properties, and aliases for a display, you can switch from one module to another by highlighting its name in the Available Modules window. In Run mode, from the Available Modules Window, click a different module to highlight it. The associated symbols in the display show the data from the property or alias based on the newly selected module.

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Add Properties and Aliases After you have selected the modules to be available to a display you are ready to build a dynamic symbol with specific module-related properties and aliases. The Select Items dialog allows you to assign aliases and numeric and string properties to the dynamic symbol (other properties are either not shown at all, or marked as unsupported types with a different icon). These aliases and properties are attached to the specific module shown highlighted in the Available Modules Window. 1. In any dynamic symbol configuration dialog, click the down arrow next to the Tag Search button and select ModuleContext. The Select Items dialog appears.

ο ο

Items from Current Module—Only aliases and properties contained in the currently selected module can be selected to appear in the dynamic symbol. Selected Items list—A path is shown in this list when a module has been opened in the Items from Selected Contexts tree and a property or alias from the expanded module has been selected.

2. Highlight each desired alias and property in the Items from Current Module tree and click the arrow button or drag the item to the Selected Items list. You can repeat the process for other modules if there are different aliases or properties to be included. A NO DATA message appears if assigned aliases or properties are not present in a particular module.

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Element Relative Displays and Module Relative Displays

Note: Click the Add Modules button to open the Select Available Modules (page 76) dialog.

3. To display the current module context in the dynamic symbol, select the Current Context check box above the Selected Items list. 4. Click OK. Available Modules Window The Available Modules window appears when your display includes a dynamic symbol (trend, value, etc.) associated with the PI Module Database. It allows you to shift from one module or context to another as the source of the dynamic data in your display. The current module being used is highlighted in the Available Modules window. Click another module to change the context. Your display reflects different data in the dynamic symbols configured to use module context. If a dynamic symbol’s configuration contains an alias or property not supported by the selected context, NO DATA is displayed for that symbol. The label at the bottom of the Available Modules list provides the path in the module database for the currently selected module. Note: When you shift focus from a display to a table of contents window, there are no available modules listed. If you select a different display window, the list of available modules is likely to be different.

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Chapter 5

Trends

A trend is a type of dynamic element that lets you plot values against time. Use trends to show the value of one or more tags over a time period. You may also use trends to show the results of a data set query or to combine data from the PI Server and other sources. Generally, trends are used to graphically display time series data, although you may also include nontime series data. Some components of trends include: •

Traces—Lines drawn on a trend to represent a series of data points, either from a PI Tag or a data set column.



Pens—Formatting components used to determine the presentation of data lines (traces) on trends.



Plot Title—The title of the trend being configured. The plot title can be blank, but a title is supplied by default.



Grid lines—Used to mark intervals along the time and value scales.

If the Plot Time continues through the current time, the trend updates as information changes, unless the length of the overall time period exceeds the limit set by your System Administrator. The default limit is 7 days.

Create a Trend 1. Open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Trend button

, or

Click Draw > Trend. The mouse pointer changes to the Trend pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want to add the trend and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the trend will be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Define Trend (page 85) dialog appears.

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4. In the Plot box, type a name. 5. (Optional) Click the New Plot button if you want to build a trend with multiple plots (page 84). 6. In the Tags in Plot box, type the name of the tag, or Click the Tag Search button to locate a tag, or Click the Tag Search arrow to see more search options: ο ο ο ο ο

Tag Search PI Calculation (page 164) (data set) ODBC (page 168) (data set) AF2—launches the Select AF Attribute dialog, which you can use to search an AF database for elements and attributes. Element Context (page 74)

Your selections for tags, data sets, or attributes appear under Tags in Plot. 7. If you manually enter tag names, select the appropriate PI Server from the Server dropdown list. Normally, the default PI Server is listed. 8. You can rearrange, add to, or delete the selected tags by clicking one of the buttons above the Tags in Plot box. 9. If you have an ODBC dataset column with a PI Tag placeholder or a PI Summary dataset column selected for the plot, the Custom Placeholder button is enabled. Click the button to change the PI Tag used as the placeholder for the selected trace.

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Note: PI ProcessBook allows you to create custom placeholders for a symbol based on a summary Data Set or a PI Tag placeholder in an ODBC data set. Placeholders are not allowed for expression Data Sets. The Custom Placeholders button in symbol definition dialog boxes allows you to specify different PI Tags for a PI Summary Data Set or ODBC data set with a PI Tag placeholder. The change applies only to the configured symbol. See Add or Edit Placeholders (page 171) for details.

10. Under Scale, select Single Scale or, if you have more than one trace, you may select Multiple Scales. The multiple scales option shows a value range for each trace. There is only one time scale. 11. Consider checking the following check boxes: ο

Logarithmic—to display the data in a logarithmic scale. If you have multiple scales, you may set this option differently for each trace. This option is disabled for digital tags.

Note: You may use logarithmic and non-logarithmic scales for traces in the same trend when you select the Multiple Scales option. In this case, the minor grid lines associated with a logarithmic plot may confuse the plot. You can turn off the minor grid lines by setting the vertical minor grid color or line style to none. ο

Regression Line—determines whether a regression line is drawn for a selected trace.

12. In the Max and Min drop-down lists, select Autorange or Database or enter the values to determine the value scale range. Min Settings: ο

ο ο

Autorange—The trend displays with the value scale starting at the closest available major axis. If the minimum is Autorange and the maximum is not, the scale starts at the lowest data value in the trace (not on a major axis) and ends on the closest major axis. Database—The tag's Zero attribute is used to specify the minimum plot value. If the Zero value is Selected Item

Define Trend Dialog In the Define Trend dialog, you can specify tags; the colors and line styles for traces, legends, and backgrounds; and how much tag information is displayed with a trend. Use the Symbol Formatting (page 59) toolbar to make color or line formatting or font changes. Trends are formatted according to certain defaults. Using the Trend Preference settings (page 21), you can create your own default format for new trends. You can set options like line colors, background, and marker shapes, and you can set the types of point information included with a trend. The Define Trend dialog has a General tab where you create a trend (page 81), and the following additional tabs for formatting and layout: •

Display Format (page 86)—options for the elements to be included in the trend.



Trace Format (page 87)—provides an alternate way to choose colors and line styles for each trace (plot line) as well as the axes, background, and text.

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Layout (page 87)—options determine the arrangement of rows and columns for multiple plot trends. This tab only appears when you first create a trend symbol.

Display Format Tab

Legend group box—check or uncheck options for displaying the tag name, server name, description, value, and engineering units. Your choices are reflected in the sample trend at the bottom of the dialog. The information that can fit in the legend is determined by the size of the trend. Consequently, not all of the information in the legend may be visible. ο ο

If the width of the legend is more than 50 percent of the width of the trend, the legend does not display. If the length of the text in the legend is longer than the total height of the trend, the items on the bottom are not shown.

Display group box—check or uncheck the following options. The sample trend reflects the changes you make. ο ο ο

86

Plot Title Vertical Scale Inside Axis—Draws the value scale inside the plot area Grids—Shows grid lines (page 93) on the trend

Define Trend Dialog

ο

Markers—When checked, markers indicate data points on the trend. If the Markers box is not selected, three markers appear on each line to help you match a line to a tag.

Trend orientation—choose from the three radio button options at the top of the dialog: End Time at right (horizontal), End Time at top (vertical), or End Time at bottom (vertical). This feature allows you to orient your trend in a horizontal or vertical direction.

Trace Format Tab Use the buttons on the Symbol Formatting (page 59) toolbar to configure plot elements such as pens (traces (page 96)), text, and background. The Trace Format tab gives you an alternate way to update formatting changes.

Plot Element drop-down box—select from a list of available traces and other plot elements. Element Format group box—select formatting options for the selected plot element. Your choices are reflected in the sample trend at the bottom of the dialog.

Layout Tab The plot arrangement in a multi-plot trend is established by setting up the number of rows and columns of plots in the Layout tab. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Note: The Layout tab only appears when you initially create a trend (page 81). Once the layout is set, you cannot revise it because the plots are no longer associated when the symbol is created. However, individual plots can be moved on the display in Build mode.

To revise the proposed plot arrangement matrix: Under Plot Arrangement, select the number of rows and columns you want. The following example shows four plots, to be arranged in 2 rows of 2 columns each. Tab past the matrix to see the sample of your new selection display in the Preview area.

Configure Trend Scale The Trend Scale dialog provides easy access to the value scale settings for each tag in a trend, SQC chart or XYPlot. If the plot uses a data set, only the Autorange and Absolute options are available for the Maximum and Minimum scale settings.

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Trend Analysis Tools

1. In Run mode, double-click the plot's value scale to open the Trend Scale dialog. Note: In PI ProcessBook you can also click View > Trend Scale. This menu object is not available in PI ActiveView.

2. Select the Single Scale or Multiple Scales radio button. 3. If you are using multiple scales, then select the tag for which to set the scale options from the Tags drop-down list. 4. Select Autorange, Database, or Absolute options for the Maximum and Minimum values of the scale. ο ο

ο

Autorange: sets the value scale using the minimum and maximum tag values between the trend start time and end time. Database: sets the value scale using the tag attribute values in the Point Database. Zero is the minimum. Zero + Span is the maximum. See the PI Server Reference Guide for more information on tag attributes. Absolute: allows you to enter a custom value for the value scale of a tag. Enter the value in the adjacent box.

5. If you have selected the Absolute option, then type in the Maximum and Minimum values of the scale in the adjacent boxes. 6. Click OK. Modifications made to a trend through use of this dialog do not affect the stored settings of the trend. Note: To return the trend scale to its original settings, click Revert on the context menu.

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Trend Analysis Tools PI ProcessBook provides a number of tools for analyzing or monitoring the data in a trend, SQC chart, or XYPlot. •

Trend Zoom (page 90)—lets you use the mouse to drag a box around the data you would like to see more detail.



Trend Expand (page 90)—temporarily expands a trend symbol so that it occupies the entire display window.



Trend Cursor (page 91)—shows the value of the plotted tags at a specific point in time.

Drag Zoom Drag Zoom lets you expand or contract the time scale of a trend. 1. With the Run mode pointer, click an area in the trend at which you want a closer look. 2. Drag the pointer diagonally to create a rectangle. 3. When you release the mouse, the trend displays the data within the rectangle.

Trend Zoom 2x In or Out

Click the Zoom In or Out button at the bottom of a trend to reduce or expand the time range of that trend by a factor of 2. In other words, if your time range is 8 hours, Trend Zoom 2x In divides the time range by 2 and displays the trend for a 4 hour time period. Trend Zoom 2x Out multiplies the time range by 2 and displays the trend for a 16 hour time period. You can remove changes to the time range by clicking the Revert button

.

Note: If a trend is too small these buttons may not appear. Double-click a trend to expand its size and display hidden buttons.

If there are no trend cursors, the Trend Zoom 2x command zooms in or out of the last portion of the time period. For example, if the initial time range is 60 minutes and you select Trend Zoom 2x In, the trend displays the last 30 minutes. Trend Zoom 2x Out displays 120 minutes adding 60 minutes to the beginning of the trend. When a trend cursor is displayed, the command uses the trend cursor as the center of the zoomed trend. If several cursors are used, the last one set is used as the center of the zoomed trend. See Trend Cursor (page 91), for more information on trend cursors.

Expand a Trend When you double-click a trend in Run mode, the trend is redrawn so that it occupies the entire display window. Double-click again to reduce the trend to its original size. 90

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While the trend is expanded, the Drawing toolbar is disabled. If you switch to another display, the Drawing toolbar will work there. All descriptive information (title, tag descriptor, tag value) is shown on an expanded trend.

Trend Cursor

A trend cursor lets you read tag values for a particular time. When you select a trend cursor, a vertical line indicates the cursor position. The box at the top of the line indicates the value and status. The box at the bottom displays the time and date of the value. On verticallyoriented trends the cursor is horizontally oriented. You may display several trend cursors at one time. Note: A trend does not update while trend cursors are visible.

If the trend is too small, the Trend Cursor command is disabled and the mouse pointer does not change when you move over the left axis. You can expand the trend by double-clicking it. Trend cursors may be automated. Add a Trend Cursor 1. Notice whether the time scale appears at the bottom and the timestamp appears at the upper right. If not, the trend rectangle may be too small to use Trend Cursor. Enlarge the trend. If the time stamp does not appear, reformat the display format to show it. 2. With the Run mode pointer, click the Trend Cursor button . A cursor appears at the right edge of the trend. When the mouse pointer changes to a double-headed arrow over the trend cursor, click the vertical line and drag left to position the trend cursor, or Click View > Trend Cursor. An indented icon in front of the command indicates that trend cursors are on. 3. Move the mouse pointer over the left axis of the trend. The pointer changes to a trend cursor symbol. As you drag to the right, a new trend cursor is added to the trend 4. Move the trend cursor back and forth across the trend by dragging it. As you move it, the time stamp, status, and value appear in a box at the top right of the trend. 5. When you release the cursor, the values appear in boxes at the top and bottom of the cursor. You can add additional cursors by grabbing the trend cursor icon at the left axis. Remove a Trend Cursor Click the Trend Cursor button

,

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Click View > Trend Cursor, -orRevert the trend. Note: To remove one trend cursor but not all of them, click the trend cursor and drag it to the left or right until it moves off of the trend.

Change Time Range Scroll time ranges directly on a trend by using the Step Forward or Backward buttons on the time scale. These time changes are not saved with the symbol. Use the Revert button settings.

, located next to the time scale, to return the trend to its configured

Note: If the trend is too small these buttons may not appear. Expand the trend's size to display hidden buttons.

You can also use buttons on the Time Range (page 145) toolbar to modify time configurations settings.

How Trends Refresh If the end time of the trend is current (*) and trend cursors are off, then the trend updates whenever information is sent from the machine instrumentation to the PI Archive at a configurable update rate (5 seconds by default). A dashed line on the plot time grid of the trend indicates the current time and that the plot is updating. If the information has not changed at the instrumentation sensor, the trend shows a flat line from the last update to the current time (the dotted line). You can force a refresh by clicking the Revert button. Note: If desired, a PI System Manager can change the seven-day updating time range limit to another interval on your computer.

PI ProcessBook uses an algorithm to identify the peaks and valleys of data values so that no information is lost when the trend time range is large. It ensures that the plot is not under- or over-sampled and that the correct amount of information is sent from the PI Archive. Unlike data from a PI Archive, data from an ODBC data set refreshes according to a configured refresh rate.

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Trend Appearance

Trend Appearance A trend appears according to the format established in the Preference settings (page 21). You may override this format by selecting the Trend Formatting (page 86) button

.

Typically, the title of the trend appears at the upper left, and the current timestamp appears at the upper right. The selected tag names, current or end value, and engineering units appear in the legend opposite the value scale.

Grid Lines and Labels Trends are formatted according to certain defaults. Use the Trend Elements (page 22) tab in the ProcessBook Preferences dialog to create default formats for new trends. You can set options like line colors and marker shapes, and set the types of point information included with a trend. Grid Lines Horizontal and vertical grid lines align with even units (whole numbers) on the scales. Grid lines for the value scale line up with whole numbers at intervals of 1, 2, 5, 10, or powers of 10 times those intervals. Grid lines for the time scale line up with time intervals such as weeks, days, hours, minutes, etc. The lines then scroll as time passes on an updating trend. Grid Line Labels Configure the labels for the value scale using single or multiple scales. You can place these labels on either the inside or outside of the value axis: Single Scale

The union of the ranges for all traces appears in the label.

Multiple Scales

The range for each trace in the trend appears in the label.

Configure the labels for the time axis using a full timestamp, partial timestamp, or a relative timestamp: Full timestamp

Displays a complete timestamp for the start and end times. The time range of the trend is in the middle of the time axis.

Partial timestamp

Labels most grid lines in the units of the time range. Displays the full timestamp for the end time of the trend at the top right edge of the plot.

Relative timestamp

Displays the offset from the end time limit in weeks, days, hours, etc. and the full timestamp for the end time of the trend at the top right edge of the plot.

Note: Labels for the grid lines appear unless the trend rectangle is too small.

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Value Scale Grid Lines Grid lines are shown in value scale intervals of 1, 2, 5, 10, or powers of 10 times those intervals. The value axis at the left is scaled by one of four methods: •

Autorange scale



Database scale



Logarithmic scale



Manually Defined scale

Autorange Scale The value scale is determined by a calculation based on minimum and maximum values in the trend. As new data are received from the server, the high and low values may change, and the scale is recalculated accordingly. For example, if the original scale ranged from 5 to 100, but the new data has a high of 103, then the new plot shows a range from 5 to 105 (the nearest number divisible by 5 and larger than the high value). If more than one tag is plotted on a single scale, the value scale is calculated from the highest and lowest values for all the tags. Database Scale If the scale is set to Database, the range is the same as the limits for the point on the server. The minimum value is termed zero, and the maximum value is the sum of the zero value plus the span value. For example, suppose the tag attributes for a point are Zero = 3 and Span = 6. The plot range therefore is based on making the minimum and maximum values 3 to 9. Logarithmic Scale If you prefer a logarithmic scale, check this option. This option is disabled for digital, string, timestamp, or integer tags. Manually Defined Scale When the scale is configured, an arbitrary minimum and maximum scale value may be entered.

Single and Multiple Scales for the Vertical Axis Value scales are labeled whenever there is enough room. Configure these labels with either single or multiple scales.

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For a single scale label, the union of the ranges for all traces appears.



For multiple scale labels, the range for the first trace appears next to the value axis. Ranges for the other traces appear in increasing distance from the axis in the order the tags are listed in the trend legend.

Note: On a single scale trend, traces that contain only one value (a flat line) or have no data are governed by special scaling rules. When a trend is composed of only flat or no data traces, the default value scale range is inflated to prevent showing a flat plot area. These default ranges are not applied if the trace in question is on a single scale trend that contains other visible traces that do not fall into either of the aforementioned categories.

A single scale trace containing one flat trace with a constant value of 0.

A single scale trend containing a flat trace and a non-flat trace. The default range for the flat trace is not applied.

Time Scale Grid Lines Grid lines for the time scale line up with whole units of time, such as days, hours, minutes, etc. On a trend that receives updates, the grid lines scroll as time passes. For an updating trend, the current time is indicated by a dotted vertical line. Configure labels for the time axis in one of three ways: PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Full Timestamp—labels the start and end time limits with the date and time. When space permits, the elapsed time between these lines is also shown.



Partial Timestamp—labels each grid line in whole units, such as hours. For example, the grid lines might be labeled 9:00, 10:00, and 11:00. A full timestamp showing the plot end time is shown at the upper right.



Relative Timestamp—labels each grid line with the amount of time preceding the end time limit in days, hours, minutes, or seconds. For example, the grid lines might be labeled -4, -3, - 2, -1, meaning 4, 3, 2, and 1 hours before the end time. A full timestamp for the end time is shown at the upper right.

Traces A trace is a single line on a trend. When a trace is continuous, a line is drawn from measurement to measurement. When a trace is discrete, the value is propagated forward until a new value is recorded in the database. This results in horizontal and vertical lines for the tag (staircase trace). Digital points are discrete type measurements, producing staircase traces. For digital points, the offset from the starting digital state code is plotted. When the value is shown in a trend cursor, ToolTip, or legend, the text translation is displayed (for example, ON or OFF). Staircase traces are used for points from a PI Server that have a Step Flag set to TRUE. ODBC queries may produce either curved or staircase traces, depending on the Stepped Plot check box setting in the ODBC Data Set dialog. Hide Traces You can hide one or more traces on the trend in Run mode so that an area of concern is more easily viewed. 1. Open a trend in Run mode. 2. Hover your mouse pointer over the trend's legend. The mouse pointer changes to a hand cursor

, and the trace in the trend is highlighted.

3. Click on the legend item to hide or show the trace on the plot. If the trace has a regression line configured, the regression line is also hidden. When a trace is hidden: ο ο

ο ο

the trace name is dimmed in the legend and the description, value, and engineering units are hidden (if they were shown before). the space reserved on the legend for the description, value, and engineering units collapses so that the trace under the hidden trace is moved. This clearly shows the visible traces on the legend, especially on a trend with many traces. on a multi-scale trend, the scale associated with the hidden trace is hidden. on a single scale trend, the minimum and maximum values shown on the scale may be adjusted.

You can show hidden traces by clicking their names a second time in the legend, or by clicking the Revert button. All hidden traces are shown in Build mode.

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Note: You can also right click on a trend and select Show All or Hide All to make traces visible or invisible.

Markers Markers indicate data points and allow you to differentiate between traces on a trend. There are three types of markers: •

actual data



trace markers



bad data markers

At least three markers are shown on a trace, unless the plot is too small. Actual Data Markers Actual data markers plot each value stored in the database. The color of the trace and of the marker is the same. You can select the shape of the marker, such as diamonds, circles, squares, or triangles, which can be helpful for color- blind users and for monochrome monitors. Trace Markers If there are too many values to plot based on the size of the trend, the display resolution and the density of the plotted data, actual data markers do not appear and trace markers are used instead. Trace markers are also used if the trend configuration does not specify Markers. Trace markers help you identify the legend information for each trace; they do not indicate actual plot values. Up to three trace markers are used per trace. X Markers When a value is outside the limits defined for the trend, it is plotted as over- or under-range. When a value is out of range or has a bad value, it is not shown on the plot. An X marker is placed on the trend at the beginning and end of the time when data are not plotted. When the data are missing, (for example, not connected to a server) they are given the value No Data and are not plotted.

Ad Hoc Trends Create a trend on an ad hoc basis for tags represented by dynamic symbols in a display within a ProcessBook. Ad hoc trends are like any other trends in that you can scroll the time forward and backward, view cursors, zoom, view point attributes, use multiple scales, or change the time range.

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To create an ad hoc trend, use either: •

Trend tool to add a trend to an existing display pre-configured with data from other symbols on the display.



Trend Display tool to create a separate, new display with a trend preconfigured with data from symbols on the original display.

Note: You can build a trend display before you open any displays.

If you create an ad hoc trend display and then choose to save it for future use, it appears on the Book or Outline View as subordinate to the original display.

Create an Ad Hoc Trend To create an ad hoc trend for a specific tag or tags: 1. In Run mode, select the dynamic symbol(s) with the data you want to trend, such as a bar, value, or Multi-State symbol. To select more than one dynamic symbol, hold down the Shift key while you click them. 2. Click the Trend Display button

.

A new display window opens, and a trend is created automatically for the selected symbols using the default format and time range. It is given the unique name Trend Display#, where # is a number. The plot title is Ad Hoc Trend. - or Click the Trend button . The mouse pointer changes to a trend pointer. Click in the display and drag to create a rectangle. It is given the name Ad Hoc Trend. The trend appears in the rectangle, using the default format. Note: If you select more tags than the default set in your Preference settings, usually 3, then you will have more than one plot in your trend or trend display.

Save an Ad Hoc Trend Display If you create an ad hoc trend display and wish to save it for future use, then you must use the Save or Save As command before you close the instant trend. There are several options:

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Save an ad hoc trend display as an independent display by clicking it and using the Save As command with a .pdi filename extension.



If you had a display entry from a ProcessBook open when the instant trend was created, the instant trend can be saved as a subordinate of the display by using the Save command.

OpenVMS Trends and Graphics



You may save an ad hoc trend as another file type, such as a bitmap (.bmp) file, using Save As.

Note: You cannot save an ad hoc trend from view-only mode.

OpenVMS Trends and Graphics PI ProcessBook allows you to convert your existing OpenVMS trend and graphic files for use within a ProcessBook. Specifically, the following types of files are supported: •

PIDisDIFF files—contain trend graphs built using the PI Data Trending Package. You can convert horizontal, vertical, composite, and overview trends.



PI-GP files—graphic files built using the PI-GP Graphics Builder.

Before you can convert your trend files (PIDisDIFF), you must convert them as ASCII text files on the VAX and then download them to your PC. Once the files are on the PC, you can import them to a ProcessBook. Trends are formatted based on the settings on the Trend Elements tab in the ProcessBook Preference dialog.

Convert Trends This process is used to convert VAX graphics for use with a PC. 1. On the VAX or Alpha at the DCL prompt, type $

Run PISysExe:PIDisDIFF

2. Select option 1 List Master Display Library from the PI Display Data Interchange File Format Builder. 3. Direct the output to a file. 4. Enter a file name. If your file name is more than 8 characters and a 3-character extension (xxxxxxxx.xxx), the name is truncated during the download process. 5. Accept the defaults for display mask, group numbers and unit numbers (*). 6. Select the trend display types you are importing. For optimum performance select only options 1 (horizontal), 2 (vertical), 3 (composite), and 8 (overview). 7. Quit the PIDisDIFF application (option Q). 8. Transfer the file from the VAX or Alpha to the PC using any ASCII text file transfer program you have available.

Convert Graphics This process is used to convert VAX graphics for use with a PC.

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On the OpenVMS computer, copy a graphic file to your working directory. Graphic files are named PISysDat:PIGP_xxxxxxxxxx.dat, where xxxxxxxxxx is the display name. 1. At the DCL prompt, type $

RUN PISysExe:GPAB

2. Select option 1 Convert Binary to ASCII from the PI Graphics Package ASCII/Binary File Conversion menu. 3. Type the display name of the graphic you want to convert and press Enter. Repeat for each file you want to convert. 4. Select option Q to quit the application. 5. Transfer the file from the VAX or Alpha to the PC using any ASCII text file transfer program you have available. Your PI ProcessBook Install disks include an OpenVMS command file which performs Steps 1 - 5 for all graphics. The file is named GPPBConv.com.

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Chapter 6

XYPlots An XYPlot shows a correlation between one or more paired sets of data. On an XYPlot (also called a scatter plot), the X scale shows possible values for one of the items in the pair and the Y scale shows the value of the other item in the pair. A basic scatter plot looks like the following:

Uncorrelated data

This case plotted 10-minute intervals of two points, A and B, for the last hour. Point A had 12 point values; Point B had 16 point values. The number of points plotted equals the number of pairs. Since A had fewer point values, the plot shows only 12 point pairs. The extra data from point B is ignored. You can configure the method by which pairing occurs. Correlation is a measure of the strength of the relationship between two variables. Correlation is indicated graphically by the spread of the data points around a fitted straight line (for example, a straight line that indicates the trend of the data). In general, the closer the points are to the fitted line, the stronger the correlation. The two PI tags shown in figure 1 are not strongly correlated. Another plot shows perfectly correlated data:

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Perfectly correlated

A third plot is somewhat correlated:

Somewhat correlated

In the case of the third plot, a regression line with a slope (M) of 1 and an offset (B) of 0 drawn diagonally across the plot would show all points lying close to the line, some above it, some below it. This line formula is appropriate in this case because both scales are the same and the points appear to have values very close to each other. In other cases, one value may be two or three times the other value (for example) and the regression line would fall on a different slope, depending upon how the scales are configured. If the scales are the same, the slope of the line determines the relationship between the points. If the scales are not the same, the slope is insignificant.

Draw an XYPlot 1. In Build mode, click Draw > XYPlot, -or-

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Draw an XYPlot

On the Drawing toolbar, click the XYPlot button

.

2. Drag a rectangle on the display to create the boundaries. 3. Release the mouse button. The Define XYPlot dialog opens with the General tab open. Use the tabs to: ο ο ο

General Tab (page 103)—Select tags to be plotted. Display Format Tab (page 107)—Choose what to show in the Legend and on the Display. Plot Format Tab (page 108)—Select how to color and style the plot elements, such as trace pens and background.

4. Click OK. The XYPlot appears. To revise an existing XYPlot, select Build mode and double-click the XYPlot. The Define XYPlot dialog appears. Make your changes and click OK. Note: Click Undo to restore your original plot.

General Tab



Plot Title—Enter a plot title. Change it later if you wish.



Tags in Plot—Select the tags or data sets you want to plot.

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Click the Tag Search button to locate a tag, or Click the Tag Search arrow to see more search options: ο ο ο ο ο

Tag Search PI Calculation (page 164) (data set) ODBC (page 168) (data set) AF2—launches the Select AF Attribute dialog, which you can use to search an AF database for elements and attributes. Element Context (page 74)

Your selections for tags, data sets, or attributes appear under Tags in Plot. An Options radio button appears next to each tag name. •

Select the Options radio button to choose the X-axis tag. Unselected tags are Y-axis tags. If a tag that is selected as the X-axis is deleted, the first tag in the list becomes the X-axis tag. Use the four toolbar buttons on the title bar to rearrange this list. They are, in order, Add, Delete, Up Arrow, and Down Arrow.



Server—Enter or select a PI Server name. This field is only used when a PI Tag name is typed directly into the list.

Note: PI ProcessBook allows you to create custom placeholders for a symbol based on a summary Data Set or a PI Tag placeholder in an ODBC data set. Placeholders are not allowed for expression Data Sets. The Custom Placeholders button in symbol definition dialog boxes allows you to specify different PI Tags for a PI Summary Data Set or ODBC data set with a PI Tag placeholder. The change applies only to the configured symbol. See Add or Edit Placeholders (page 171) for details.

Configure Pairings Once the tags are listed in the Tags in Plot list, configure the method for pairing values between X and Y in the Data Retrieval Methods box.

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X Tag—choose either Recorded or Interpolated for the retrieval method. ο Interpolated—an interval may be entered in the Plot Time section. Interpolated is the default for tags and is disabled for ODBC and Custom data sets. This method retrieves interpolated values for the specified time range in regular intervals. For example, if the time range is *-1h to * and the Interval is 10m, then six values spaced 10 minutes apart are returned. This option provides a way to get evenly sampled data. ο Recorded—Retrieves archive values between the specified start and end time.



Y Tag(s)—the Y tag data retrieval method applies to individually selected tags in the Tags in Plot list (unless the Use for all Y tags check box is selected). The default data retrieval method for Y tags is Synchronize.

Draw an XYPlot



Y Tags, paired by position in the list—To use multiple time ranges, select Recorded or Interpolated. In this case, data is paired by position in the point list. If Interpolated is selected for the X tag as well, the interval value for the Y tag defaults to the one for the X tag. When Recorded is the retrieval mechanism, the results are not skewed by minor timestamp differences.



Y Tags, paired by timestamps—to pair values by time, rather than by list position, choose one of these retrieval methods: Synchronize, Match, Match or Previous, or Match or Next. ο Synchronize—synchronizes data found for X with data for Y using the timestamps for the X data. This may result in interpolated data values for Y. ο Match—find the event for Y corresponding to the exact timestamp as X. If no matching event is found, no match is made for that X value. ο Match or Previous—find the event for Y corresponding to the exact timestamp as X. If there is none, find the event that is the closest but earlier in time. ο Match or Next—find the event for Y corresponding to the exact timestamp as X. If there is none, find the event that is the closest, but later in time. Synchronize and Match—use different PI SDK value retrieval methods. Synchronize uses TimedValues. Match uses RecordedValues and then uses the values where the timestamps match. Note: Synchronize is disabled for ODBC and Custom data sets.

If you select Synchronize or any of the Match options, the start and end times for that tag are set the same as for the X tag and cannot be changed. Note: The XYPlot supports ODBC data sets that don't contain timestamps. This type of entry must be plotted as a Y-tag, and data values must be retrieved using the Recorded retrieval method. If a tag is changed from a Y tag to an X tag and has a value for Retrieval Method that is only valid for Y tags, the method is changed to Interpolated. If the tag is a data set, the method is changed to Recorded.

In all cases, if a pair is not made, the unmatched X or Y events are ignored. •

Use for all Y tags—Selecting this box indicates that the Y-tags data retrieval mechanism applies for all Y-tags. If one of the tags is a Custom or ODBC data set and the selection mechanism is Interpolated or Synchronize, the selection mechanism will be Recorded or Match respectively for that tag only.

Scale Box In the Scale Box, set the scale ranges for all tags. •

Single Y Scale—combines all Y tag value ranges onto one scale.

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Multiple Y Scales—provides a separate scale for each Y tag. This choice does not change the scale min and max values, but allows them to be configured independently by selecting each Y tag and making changes. Regardless of your selection, you may independently configure the X scale tag.



Max—Autorange uses the maximum value plotted. You may enter an absolute value here as well. Default is Autorange. Database uses the zero plus span value of the tag in the PI Archive to determine the max. Database with a data set plot uses the maximum value plotted.



Min—Autorange uses the minimum value plotted. You may enter an absolute value here as well. Default is Autorange. Database uses the zero value of the tag in the PI Archive to determine the min. Database with a data set plot uses the minimum value plotted.



Format—Selects the number format of the Y scale, legend entries, cursor values, and ToolTip values.

Plot Time You can set the time for each tag as it is highlighted in the Tags in Plot box. If a Y tag is selected and its selection mechanism is not Recorded or Interpolated, then these boxes are disabled. •

Start—The start time of the XYPlot. The list includes *-1h (minus one hour), *-4h, *-8h, *-1d, *-7d. The default is *-8h.



End—The end time of the XYPlot. The list includes *, *-1h, *-4h, *-8h, *-1d, *-7d. The default is * (current time).



Interval—This field is enabled when the retrieval method is Interpolated. It provides a sampling interval for data.

When you have completed configuring the fields on the General tab, click the Display Format (page 107) tab. Add a Data set to an XYPlot 1. In Build mode, click Draw > XYPlot, -orOn the Drawing toolbar, click the XYPlot button

.

2. Drag a rectangle on the display to create the boundaries. 3. Release the mouse button. The Define XYPlot dialog opens with the General tab open. 4. Click the arrow next to the Tag Search button. 5. Select ODBC or PI Calculation to see the corresponding Dataset Details or PI Calculation Data configuration dialog. 6. When you have completed the configuration, click OK to exit the configuration dialog. The data set name appears in the Tags in Plot box. 106

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7. In the Define XYPlot dialog, click OK to see the plot.

Display Format Tab

Legend Choose the legend elements that appear in the XYPlot. Tag Name—Lists the entries in Tags in Plot. Selected by default. Srvr Name—Select this check box to prepend the tag name with the server name. Cleared by default. Description—The tag description may be displayed on the legend. Selected by default. Value—The last value of the tag plotted may be displayed. For digital and string tags, a string value is shown. Selected by default. Engineering Units—Selected by default. If the tag does not report units, they are not shown on the legend for that tag. Correlation Coefficient—A check indicates that the correlation coefficient should be calculated and displayed on the legend. Selected by default.

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Display Select the optional elements to be included in the XYPlot. Plot Title—Selected by default. Vertical Scale Inside Axis—Check this box to show the vertical scale to the right of the Vertical Axis, inside the plot area. Selected by default. Grids—Check this box to include vertical and horizontal grid lines. Selected by default. On the Plot Format Page, you can configure the appearance of the major and minor grid lines. Linear Correlation Line—Check this to show a linear regression line. The default is cleared, which does not draw a line. Connecting Lines—Check this box to show the paired points connected with straight lines in the order they are plotted. Selected by default. Clear the box to configure a scatter plot with points only, no lines. Sample This area displays a sample XYPlot with the options you have selected. When you have completed the Display Format page, click the tab for the Plot Format page.

Plot Format Tab In the Plot Format tab of the Define XYPlot dialog, you can select colors and styles for the various elements of your plot.

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Plot Element—drop-down list of the elements you can configure, such as major and minor gridlines, background colors, text font, etc. Pens correspond to the X-and Y tags listed in the order in the Tags in Plot box on the General tab.



Element Format—After you select an element in the Plot Element drop-down, available formatting options appear. A drop-down arrow is grayed out if the option is not configurable. For example, text has color but no line style options. ο Line Style—Determines the line style for the selected element. ο Line Weight—Determines the line weight for the selected element. If the selected element does not have a line weight property, this field is disabled. ο Marker Shape—Determines the marker shape for pen elements. ο Color—Determines the color for the selected element. Pen elements apply the color to the line and marker. ο Last Marker Color—Allows selection of a different color for the last marker for a pen. If Match Trace is true (selected), this field is disabled. If the selected element does not have a marker, this field is disabled. ο Next To Last Marker Color—Allows selection of a different color for the secondto-last marker for a pen. If Match Trace is true (selected), this field is disabled. If the selected element does not have a marker, this field is disabled. ο Match Trace—Determines whether all marker colors match the trace color (true) for a pen. If set to false, the Last Marker Color and Next To Last Marker Color fields are enabled so the marker color can be changed for those two plotted pairs. By default, this field is selected (true). If the selected element does not have a marker, this field is disabled.

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Sample—Provides a preview of your formatting changes.

Ad-hoc XYPlots You can draw an XYPlot in Run mode on an ad hoc basis. Click the XYPlot button begin, and follow the steps described in Drawing an XYPlot (page 102).

to

XYPlot Statistics The XYPlot Statistics dialog allows you to view and export raw data values and statistics, such as the mean and standard deviation of each tag’s data. You can also view these statistics in the Details Window (page 139) in PI ProcessBook. To open the XYPlot Statistics dialog: 1. In Run mode, double-click the XYPlot symbol. The Statistics dialog appears. 2. In the Options drop-down list, select Raw Data or Statistics.

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To save this data to a text file: 1. Click the Save Data to File button. The Save As dialog appears. 2. Enter a file name in the Save As dialog. The data is saved to the file in the following format: Tag, Start Time, End Time, Count, < number of points paired> Mean, STDEV, Data Type, Index, Time, Value, Status , , , , , , … Tag, Start Time, End Time, Count, < number of points paired> Mean, PI ProcessBook User Guide

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STDEV, Correlation, Slope, Intercept, Data Type, Index, Time, Value, Status , , , , , , … Etc.

Linear Regression by Least Squares The best-fit linear regression line is a straight line that attempts to summarize the trend of the plotted pairs. This line may be shown on the XYPlot. The best-fit line has the formula:

Where m is the slope and b is the offset. To calculate m, we use the following equation:

To calculate b, the following equation is used:

Once m and b are known, the value of y that intersects the best-fit line can be calculated.

Correlation Coefficient The Correlation Coefficient (r) varies between -1 and +1. Positive values indicate that as X increases, Y also increases. Negative values indicate that as X increases, Y decreases. A value of zero indicates no correlation in the way the sets of values vary. The Correlation Coefficient for a set of points is calculated using the following formula: (n is the number of points, s is the standard deviation). You can display the correlation coefficient in the plot legend. 112

Interpreting an XYPlot

Note: Bad data points are not included in this calculation.

Standard deviation(s) is calculated using the following formula:

The mean is the arithmetic average.

Interpreting an XYPlot In PI ProcessBook the XYPlot is a dynamic symbol. It has specialized characteristics, such as its statistical calculations, which are described in the following paragraphs.

Point Properties Data may be retrieved from PI or from independent data sets. Use the Tag Properties button or the right mouse menu Properties item to determine the attributes of the points in your XYPlot. Scroll Feature Scrolling is available from the ProcessBook toolbar. When time scrolling is used on an XYPlot symbol, all tags’ time ranges are changed to support the scroll duration. Plot Values In a typical XYPlot, the current name for the X tag appears below the plot. The current names for the different Y tags appear at the upper right. Below each one is the correlation coefficient for that XY pair. The dots and lines on the plot are colored to match the tag names. Plotted pair values appear in a ToolTip over the plot when the mouse cursor is hovering over an actual plotted point pair. The following illustration shows an example.

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In the figure above, if there had been more than one Y tag, each one would be displayed on a different line. The X tag information is placed at the bottom. For digital or string tags, the text value is displayed in the ToolTip. You can also view plot values by double-clicking the title bar and choosing the Raw Data option, rather than the Statistics option in the Statistics dialog.

Zoom/Revert Functions You can enlarge a portion of an XYPlot by using the Zoom feature.

Enlarge the whole plot to fill the display window 1. In Run mode, double-click the plot. 2. To reduce the plot to its original size, double-click it again. It does not update while enlarged.

Enlarge a small area of the plot 1. Place the mouse cursor on the upper left corner of the area to be zoomed. 2. Hold the left mouse button down while dragging a rectangle to cover the appropriate area. When you release the mouse, this area is enlarged to the borders of the original plot.

Original plot

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Change Time Range Feature

Drag Zoom Completed

Note: The zoom area must be smaller than the plot area and cannot include the outer 20 percent of the plot. If the mouse is dragged past the plot boundary, the zoom rectangle stops at the border until the mouse reappears within the boundary. If the mouse is dragged off the plot symbol boundary, the zoom is canceled.

Revert 1. Click Undo to return the plot to its state directly before the zoom occurred. 2. Click the Revert button

to return the plot to its configured appearance.

Change Time Range Feature 1. Click View > Time Range. -orOn the Time Range toolbar, click the Change Time Range button

.

The Change Time Range dialog opens. 2. Enter new values in the Time Span box. All tags are affected when you change the range in this dialog box. 3. Click the Revert (page 145) button on the Time Range tool bar its configured appearance.

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XYPlot Cursors The cursor for an XYPlot includes both a horizontal and a vertical line. The mouse cursor is at the cross point of both cursor lines. You must be in Run mode to use the XYPlot cursor. To create a cursor, place the mouse very close to either the X- or Y-axis. Drag the cursor onto the plot. In the XYPlot below, you can see an XYPlot cursor at the Y axis that is not yet intersecting any points on the plot.

You can also see an XYPlot cursor that was dropped on a point. The X and Y values appear in small boxes outside the axes. Using the mouse, you may position and release the cursor over any pair on the XYPlot. If the cursor is dropped on an area that contains no points, the cursor snaps to the nearest pair.

Move the XYCursor from Point to Point Once you have dropped an XYCursor on a point, use the arrow keys to move from point to point in time order. For example, pressing the right arrow key moves the cursor to the pair that is plotted immediately after the current pair in the same series. The left arrow moves the cursor to the pair that is plotted immediately before the current pair in the same series. The up arrow moves the cursor to the first pair in the previous series. The down arrow moves the cursor to the first pair in the next series. The cursor looks the same when it is dropped. The information on the XYCursor point pair is shown in a box on each axis. If the tags are digital or string, the text value is shown in the box rather than a numeric value. Placing the mouse cursor over one of the cursor boxes shows the time of the event.

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Bad Status Indicators

Bad Status Indicators If a single point of a pair contains a bad status, an X appears on the axis of the good point at its value. If both points of a pair contain bad statuses, an X appears at the origin of the plot. The XYPlot symbol supports Questionable, Annotated, and Substituted indicators.

Out of Range Indicators When a point on the XYPlot falls above or below the X or Y scale range, it is not visible. This may be because the plot is zoomed or because the scales have been set within a certain range that does not cover the actual data. In order to indicate there is a point outside of the visible area, an X is used. By default, a straight line connects the points in the order that they are plotted. This line attempts to connect hidden points as well. An X is placed at each position where this line crosses the top or bottom of the plot area.

Too Many Points When an X Tag has too many points to show on the plot, you receive and error message and no points are shown. The maximum number is 10,000 points.

Examples of XYPlots For these examples, the X-axis represents one of the values in the pair and the Y-axis represents the other. The configuration of these axes regarding minimum and maximum values and interval (or unit) settings is left to you.

Example 1: Create an XYPlot on a display in PI ProcessBook to compare values for two PI tags 1. On the Drawing toolbar, click the XYPlot button and drag to form the bounding rectangle for the plot. The Define XYPlot dialog appears. 2. Enter a title for the plot and select 2 tags to be entered in the Tags in Plot list. 3. Click an option button to select one tag to be the X tag. 4. Use the default settings for time range, scale, and retrieval method. 5. Click the Display Format tab and check the box for the regression line. 6. Select the Plot Format tab and accept the default values. 7. Click OK and the plot appears.

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XYPlots

Example 2: Compare different tags to help optimize equipment performance For example, suppose an engineer has just completed some optimization work on Boiler1, one of the four boilers in the plant. He wants to optimize the other three boilers (Boiler2, Boiler3, and Boiler4) so that they perform at the same level. After adjusting the three boilers, he wants to see how closely they perform to the optimized Boiler1. Assume that all four boilers run identical processes. 1. Plot the temperature of Boiler1 (the B1Temp tag) on the X-axis of an XYPlot and the temperatures of the other three boilers (B2Temp, B3Temp and B4Temp) on the Y-axis. 2. Use the same time range for all four tags. 3. Select a single scale so that the Boilers 2, 3 and 4 are compared directly against Boiler1. 4. Configure the plot to show the correlation co-efficient for each of the boilers. By viewing how far from the regression line each of the boilers falls, you can determine how closely their performance matches and which boilers you should continue to adjust. When all three boilers have an acceptable correlation coefficient, you know the work is complete.

Example 3: Lab Comparisons An engineer wants to compare lab results from his lab to those of another lab for the same sample of material. The plant's quality assurance lab has instituted some new testing procedures. In order to gauge the validity of the new testing procedures, an engineer wants to compare results from the new process against data from an outside lab that is known to have valid testing procedures. 1. Put the results from the in-house lab into a data set. 2. Place the results for the same test from the other lab into another data set. 3. Selects each data set as a tag in the plot, and select which one to be the X-axis. 4. Choose Recorded as the retrieval mechanism for each data set so that the results are not skewed by minor timestamp differences. If the XYPlot shows the results from the new process are well correlated with the outside lab's data, the new test procedure is validated.

Example 4: Comparing a Batch Run to a Standard An engineer wants to compare sample measurements taken from one Batch run and compare them to a fixed set of measurements he knows to be desirable. 1. Select the fixed set of measurements by choosing the appropriate tag or data set and indicating it is to be used for the X-axis. 2. Select the appropriate tags for the comparison batches, entering their specific time ranges.

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3. Use Recorded values for all retrieval mechanisms. The data points are paired according to their position in the events list. The XYPlot shows how closely the results are correlated by how closely the pairs fall on a linear regression line. Pairs that fall outside this line may indicate problems with the batch run.

Example 5: Comparing Two Time Ranges An engineer wants to compare the performance of a Boiler unit over two time ranges. He needs to determine whether a boiler's performance has degraded over time or whether there are specific problems with the equipment. To do this, he creates an XYPlot that compares the temperature tag data from two different time ranges. 1. Enter the tag twice and assign one instance as the X tag. 2. Enter separate time ranges for each tag. 3. Set the match mechanism to be recorded or interpolated so that values are paired by their position in the list. If the pairs fall close to a linear regression line, you can assume the boiler's performance is at least steady. If some pairs are far from the line, it may indicate that the equipment has a specific problem.

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Chapter 7

Additional Symbols Dynamic Symbols Values

A Value is the reading obtained at a particular moment in time for a tag in the PI Archive. A value is shown as a number or a digital state string. The tag name and time stamp may also be shown. The time stamp is the time stamp from the PI Server that matches the event value shown. Add a Dynamic Value 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Value button

.

-orClick Draw > Value. The mouse pointer changes to the Value pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want the value to be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Define Value dialog is displayed.

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4. In the Server drop-down list, select the PI Server to use. If a tag name is manually entered in the Tag box, it is expected to be on the selected server. If both server and tag name are entered in the Tag box, this field is updated with the entered server name. This field has no effect for non-PI data. 5. In the Tag box, type the name of the tag you want to display in the value box. -orClick the Tag Search button to locate a tag, or Click the Tag Search arrow to see more search options: ο ο ο ο ο

Tag Search PI Calculation (page 164) (data set) ODBC (page 168) (data set) AF2—launches the Select AF Attribute dialog, which you can use to search an AF database for elements and attributes. Element Context (page 74)

Note: The Sample area shows how the value will look.

6. In the Format drop-down list, select a number for the value, or type your own format (page 123). 7. In the Tag drop-down list, select the location of the tag name in the value box (None, Left, Right, Top, or Bottom). 8. In the Time stamp drop-down list, select the location of the time stamp in the value box (None, Left, Right, Top, or Bottom). 9. Click OK to add the value to the display. 122

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Note: PI ProcessBook allows you to create custom placeholders for a symbol based on a summary Data Set or a PI Tag placeholder in an ODBC data set. Placeholders are not allowed for expression Data Sets. The Custom Placeholders button in symbol definition dialog boxes allows you to specify different PI Tags for a PI Summary Data Set or ODBC data set with a PI Tag placeholder. The change applies only to the configured symbol. See Add or Edit Placeholders (page 171) for details.

Table of Format Values The following number formats are available in PI ProcessBook. The characters used for the decimal and grouping are based on the Regional Settings on the computer where PI ProcessBook is installed. Format

Value

Result

General

-25.434

-25.434

0

25.59

26

0.00

17.246

17.25

#,##0

-1732.87

-1,733

#,##0.00

-1732.87

-1,732.87

(#,##0)

-1732.87

(1,733)

(#,##0.00)

-1732.87

(1,732.87)

0%

3.25

325%

0.00%

3.25

325.00%

Scientific

3.25

3.25000E+00

Database

Uses the Display Digits attribute for the tag from the PI System.

The following table describes how to create a custom number format mask. Symbol

Explanation

#

Placeholder for a digit. Leading and decimal zeros are not displayed

0

Placeholder for a digit. Leading and decimal zeros are displayed.

Button

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You can add a button to your drawing that:

For example:

Opens an independent display (.pdi)

Create a drawing that shows the first part of a general process and add a button that opens a more detailed process in a separate display.

Opens a ProcessBook (.piw)

Create a drawing and add a button that opens a PI DataLink spreadsheet to show a report.

Executes an operating system command

Create a drawing and add a button that opens an independent PI ProcessBook display (.pdi file) on a web site. Note: You need to enter the URL (Uniform Resource Locator) address that points to the location of the specific .pdi file on a web server.

Executes a VBA script

Create a VBA script called AddTrend that inserts a trend on a display. Add a button to the display and configure it to use the AddTrend script (macro) as its Action.

Add a Button 1. In Build mode, open a display. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Button button

, or

Click Draw > Button. The mouse pointer changes to the Button pointer. 2. Click in the display where you want to add the button and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the button will be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Define Button dialog appears. 3. In the Text box, type the name of the button. Note: The name should be no more than one or two words, and should describe the action the button performs when clicked.

4. Click the Browse button, or Click the Browse arrow to see more options. The Open dialog appears. 5. Browse and locate the item that you want to be the button action and then click the Open button. Note: If you know the file or macro name, then you can type this directly in the Action box.

The name of the selected item is displayed in the Action box. 6. Click the Browse button to the right of the Working folder box.

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Note: The Working folder box allows you to specify the working folder for operating system commands. It is ignored if the Action refers to a document type supported by ProcessBook. If you know the name of the working folder for this application, then you can type this directly in the Working folder box.

The Browse for Folder dialog appears. 7. Browse and locate the folder that you want to specify for the operating system command, and then click OK. 8. Leave the appropriate Options check box selected if you want to: ο ο

Open a linked display in a new window. This option is selected by default. Use the relative path before the absolute path.

Note: By default, ProcessBook attempts to open a linked display from its relative path first. If the relative path fails, then the absolute path is attempted. Clearing this box reverses the order in which the paths are resolved. For new displays, this option is checked by default. ο

Ignore the default shell command for recognized file types (for example, SVG).

Note: If the file type is supported by ProcessBook (either natively or through an addin), then it is opened directly. For example, an .svg file is opened using the .svg File Converter in ProcessBook, even if you have Adobe SVG Viewer installed. Clearing this check box disables this behavior, so the default shell command is always used to open a file.

9. Click OK. The button is added to your display.

Bars

A Bar shows the current value of a tag as compared to a specified range of values. For example, a bar may be used to create the effect of a vessel filling and emptying, as the value changes. The range of values can be the maximum and minimum values specified in the point attributes, or, a bar can be designed to show a specific range of values. For example, if a tag’s specified value is between 0 and 100 but it typically falls between 0 and 30, a bar can designed to show that range. However, if the value is outside the range of the bar, the bar will appear the same as a value right at one of the limits of the bar. The start of the bar may be within the limits of the bar. This lets you display deviations from a standard or target value. Bad values are shown with hash marks across the entire bar.

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Add a Dynamic Bar Creating a bar for a value allows you to see how the current value compares to the possible range of values. Since bars are dynamic, they are updated as the information changes from the PI Server. Bars may also be used to display the result of a data set query. String and timestamp data is not supported on Bar symbols. You can draw a bar using the current line style, line color, and fill attributes. 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Bar button

, or

Click Draw > Bar. The mouse pointer changes to the Bar pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want to add the bar and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the bar will be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Define Bar dialog appears.

4. In the Server drop-down list, select the server to use for manually entered tags. If the server and tag name are both entered in the Tag box, this field is updated to show the new server name. This field is ignored for non-PI data. 5. In the Tag box, type the name of the tag you want to display on the bar, or Click the Tag Search button to locate a tag, or Click the Tag Search arrow to see more search options: ο ο

126

Tag Search PI Calculation (page 164) (data set)

Dynamic Symbols

ο ο ο

ODBC (page 168) (data set) AF2—launches the Select AF Attribute dialog, which you can use to search an AF database for elements and attributes. Element Context (page 74)

6. From the Upper and Lower drop-down lists, select the maximum and minimum values you want to use for the bar. Select a constant, or choose Tag Zero() or TagZero()+TagSpan() for either or both values. Note: If you choose a maximum value that is too small, the bar will be fully colored but there will be no warning that it has exceeded the maximum.

7. From the Start drop-down list, select the point on the bar from which you want to start drawing the bar. Select a constant, or select TagZero()+TagSpan() or Tag Zero(). 8. Under Orientation, select one of the options to display the bar either vertically or horizontally. Note: The Sample area shows how the bar will look.

9. Click OK to add the bar to the display. Note: PI ProcessBook allows you to create custom placeholders for a symbol based on a summary Data Set or a PI Tag placeholder in an ODBC data set. Placeholders are not allowed for expression Data Sets. The Custom Placeholders button in symbol definition dialog boxes allows you to specify different PI Tags for a PI Summary Data Set or ODBC data set with a PI Tag placeholder. The change applies only to the configured symbol. See Add or Edit Placeholders (page 171) for details.

Multi-State Symbols

Some symbols support a multi-state configuration, which allows their colors to be altered based on a dynamic data value. Colors are assigned to ranges of values to create conditional formatting states. Any symbol except a trend, XY Plot, graphic, button, or OLE object can have a Multi-State configuration . String and timestamp data cannot be used to configure multi-state behavior. You determine the number of value ranges, the maximum for each range, and the colors assigned to each range. As the value of the tag changes, the Multi-State symbol changes color to reflect the current value state. You can make a symbol seem to disappear by setting a state color to the background color or to a color of none. For alarms or other purposes, you can set a state color to blink. For example, you may have a symbol showing two states. State 1 has a value range from 0 to 50 and a color of blue assigned to it. State 2 may have a range from 50 to 100 and have red assigned to it. When the reading is 50 or below, the symbol appears blue. Above 50, the PI ProcessBook User Guide

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symbol appears red. A color and sometimes a blinking attribute are assigned for data in bad status (e.g., the interface becomes disconnected). For digital point types, a different color may be assigned to each digital state. Create Dynamic Multi-State Symbols You can create a Multi-State symbol after you have drawn a symbol or copied one from the Symbol Library dialog. 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. Click the symbol that you want to use for creating a Multi-State symbol. On the Formatting toolbar, click the Multi-State Symbol button

, or

Click Edit > Multi-State. 3. The Multi-State Symbol dialog appears.

4. In the Server drop-down list, select the server to use for entered tags. If a server and tag are both entered in the Tag box, this field is updated with the new server name. This box does not apply to non-PI data. 5. In the Tag box, type the name of the tag you want to assign, or Click the Tag Search button to locate a tag, or Click the Tag Search arrow to see more search options: ο ο ο ο ο

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Tag Search PI Calculation (page 164) (data set) ODBC (page 168) (data set) AF2—launches the Select AF Attribute dialog, which you can use to search an AF database for elements and attributes. Element Context (page 74)

Static Symbols

6. In the Number of States box, select the number of states to use. If the number of states is not entered, the number defaults to 2. (For digital tags, the number of states is automatically set to the number of defined states for that tag.) 7. From the Color for Bad Data drop-down color palette, select a color that will be used when the information is in bad status. You may also select the Blink check box to call attention to the symbol when data is bad (optional). 8. In the State box, select 1. 9. In the Values box, type in a new maximum value for the state. Note: The Values boxes display a range of values for each state. The total range of the tag is automatically divided by the number of states. For digital tags, the state name is displayed in these boxes. For other tag types, an estimate is made based on the span of values for the tag.

10. From the Color drop-down color palette, select a color that will be used for the state. You may also select the Blink check box (optional). 11. Repeat Steps 9 and 10 for each state in the symbol. Your choices and the relative range of values are displayed on the bar at the bottom of the dialog box. 12. Click OK. Note: You can remove a Multi-State symbol definition by clicking the Convert to Static button, which breaks the link between the symbol and the multi-state configuration. Note: PI ProcessBook allows you to create custom placeholders for a symbol based on a summary Data Set or a PI Tag placeholder in an ODBC data set. Placeholders are not allowed for expression Data Sets. The Custom Placeholders button in symbol definition dialog boxes allows you to specify different PI Tags for a PI Summary Data Set or ODBC data set with a PI Tag placeholder. The change applies only to the configured symbol. See Add or Edit Placeholders (page 171) for details.

Static Symbols Text Symbol

The text symbol allows you to put one line of text on a display. Multiple lines of text are not supported. When this symbol is first added to the display, a text box with a blinking text cursor is displayed. You can add or edit text by double-clicking the Text symbol while in Build mode, which provides the text cursor. Unlike most other ProcessBook symbols, this symbol is not sized by dragging an area on the display. Instead, the symbol is sized to accommodate the text within. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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When text is added, the symbol grows in size and when text is removed the symbol size shrinks. The size of the font used also affects the size of the symbol. You can format the text symbol for font and color. Text symbols have all the functionality of other static symbols except rotating and flipping. Add Text to a Display Use the Text tool to add text to a display. 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Text button

, or

Click Draw > Text. The mouse pointer changes to a text pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want to add the text. 4. Type the text in the text block. (You can only type the text on one line. It will not wrap.) Note: Text block refers to the text area associated with a shape that appears when you click the shape with the text tool or select it with the pointer tool.

5. When you finish typing, press ESC or click outside the text block. Edit a Text Box 1. In Build mode, open a display and double-click the text block you want to edit. 2. Click where you want to add or edit text. 3. Type to add text or edit the text. 4. When you finish typing, press ESC or click outside the text block. Move a Text Block 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. Click the text block you want to move, drag it to the new location, and then release the mouse button.

Line Symbol

Lines within a drawing can be diagonal, horizontal, or vertical. Attributes you can change include line color and whether a line is dotted or dashed, thick or thin, and with or without arrowheads.

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Draw a Line 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Line button

, or

Click Draw > Line. 3. The mouse pointer changes to the line pointer. 4. Point to where you want to start the line. 5. Drag to draw the line. Press the SHIFT key while drawing to constrain the line to a horizontal or vertical line.

Rectangle, Square, Arc, Ellipse, and Circle Symbol

Using the drawing tools, you can create these simple shapes: •

Rectangle, Square



Arc



Ellipse, Circle

Draw a Rectangle, Square, Arc, Ellipse, or Circle 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Rectangle

, Arc

,or Ellipse button

, or

Click the appropriate tool. The mouse pointer changes to a tool pointer. The appearance of the pointer indicates the type of tool you have chosen. 3. Click the display to place the upper left corner of the shape, and drag down and to the right to create a shape of the desired size. Press SHIFT while drawing to constrain the object to a square, circle, or circular arc. 4. Release the mouse button to complete a Rectangle, Square, Ellipse, or Circle. -or5. If you used the arc tool, one quarter of the shape is drawn. Click on it and resize it to the desired shape. Click and drag the end of the arc to change the angle. Press SHIFT to change the angle in 15-degree increments. When the arc is first drawn, the handle for reshaping the angle is just inside the resize handle.

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Example of an arc

Polygon Symbol

The Polygon tool draws irregular shapes. When you select the polygon tool the mouse pointer changes to a polygon pointer. Polygons are drawn using the current color and line style attributes. Draw a Polygon 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Polygon button

, or

Choose Draw > Polygon. The mouse pointer changes to the Polygon pointer. 3. Click inside the display where you want to start drawing the first point of the polygon (point "a" in the example below). 4. Drag to create the first side (point "a" to point "b" in the example below). 5. Release the mouse button to position the second point of the polygon (point "b" in the example below). 6. Click at each of the remaining points of the polygon (points "c" through "g" in example below). Lines are drawn between the clicks. 7. To close and fill the polygon, double-click to place the last point in the polygon (point "g" in the example below). This action draws a line from the last point to the first point (point "g" to point "a" in the example below).

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Example of a Polygon

Polyline Symbol

A Polyline is a set of line segments that you can draw using the Polyline tool. It uses the current line style attributes. Once you add a Polyline symbol, you may edit it in the same manner as the existing Polygon symbol. You can move or resize the entire symbol, as well as move the individual endpoints to create any desired arrangement. Draw a Polyline 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Polyline button

.

The mouse pointer changes to the Polyline pointer. 3. Click inside the display where you want the starting point of the first line segment. 4. Drag to the location of the second point to make the first line. Each time you click the mouse button again, a new line is drawn from the location of the previously plotted point to the current location of the mouse pointer. 5. To finish the Polyline drawing, double-click. Press ESC to cancel the line altogether. Note: Press the Shift key while you draw to create Right Angle Polylines. Similarly, pressing Shift during editing manipulates a point orthogonally in relation to the next endpoint.

Graphic Symbol

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In PI ProcessBook you can: •

Include a graphic file from another application, such as Microsoft Visio or CorelDRAW.



Use a drawing or picture as the background for your display, then add symbols to it. This can reduce the amount of time you take to create a drawing.



Rotate or flip a picture.



Add an illustration to a display, and store it within the display or link it to the original graphic file. (Linking means that if the original graphic is edited or moved, it affects the appearance of the display as well.)



Load an image in one file format and later save it in a different format.

Note: A drawing is display resolution dependent, which means it may look different from one monitor to another. Test the drawing on each monitor to see how it will look.

PI ProcessBook supports the following image formats. Note that PI ProcessBook draws using raster graphics, so vector graphic formats may not appear exactly as expected. BMP

Windows Bitmap file; standard, non-compressed bit-mapped graphic

CUR

A file that contains an image that defines the shape of a cursor on the screen.

EMF

Enhanced Metafile Format; 32-bit Microsoft Windows Metafile vector format that also supports raster images.

ICO

A file that contains a graphic to be used as an icon.

JPEG

Joint Photographic Experts Group - Refers both to the standard for storing compressed images and a graphic stored in that format. Note that this format is prone to lose resolution when it is repeatedly saved.

PNG

Portable Network Graphics - graphic image format that utilizes lossless compression.

TIFF, TIF

Tag Image File Format graphic image.

WMF

The Windows Metafile Format - the original 16-bit native vector file format for the Microsoft Windows operating environment.

Add a Graphic 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Graphic button

, or

Click Draw > Graphic. The mouse pointer changes to a graphic pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want to add the image and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the graphic will be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Define Graphic dialog is displayed.

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4. Click the Browse button to locate the graphic drawing. -orIn the File Name box, type the path and file name of the graphic you want to insert. 5. Under Image Location, select: ο ο

Embed if you want to update the graphic within the display file. Link if you want to store the graphic separately from the display file.

6. Under Format, select the appropriate option. Note: Stretching the image to fit the bounding rectangle may distort the appearance of the graphic.

7. Click OK. 8. A copy of the graphic is added to the display.

Symbol Library

A large selection of symbols is available in the Symbol Library. Many of these have characteristics such as color, fill type, orientation, or background, which you can modify. On the installation CD, OSIsoft provides several other commonly used symbols in the ProcessBook called SYMLIBRY.PIW. This is usually installed in C:\Program Files\ProcessBook\ProgramFiles\pipc\Procbook\SYMLIBRY.PIW. You can cut and paste these symbols into a display. Add a Symbol from the Symbol Library 1. In Build mode, open a display. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Symbol Library button

.

-orOn the Draw menu, click Symbol Library.The mouse pointer changes to the Symbol Library pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want to add the symbol and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the symbol will be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Symbol Library dialog appears. 4. Under Categories, click the type of symbols you want to use, such as Boilers, Controllers, Valves, etc.

5. Click Options (page 136) to modify your symbol. 6. Click OK to add the symbol to your display. Symbol Library Options 1. In the Symbol Library (page 135) dialog, a selection of symbols is displayed in the right-hand side of the dialog box, click the appropriate symbol, and then click the Options button. -orRight-click the symbol and click Symbol Options. The Symbol Options dialog appears.

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Configure the following options: ο ο ο ο ο ο

Fill Mode—Controls the way the image is drawn. Options include Original, Shaded, Solid or Hollow. Fill Color—Click the color box to change the fill color. Flip—Select Horizontal, Vertical, or Both to change the orientation of the symbol. The default setting is None. This setting returns the symbol to its original position. Rotation—Select 90, 180, or 270 to turn the symbol by 90 degree increments. The default setting is 0. This setting returns the symbol to its original position. Transparent—Check this box if you want a transparent background. Background Color—If the Transparent check box is not selected, you can click the color box to change the background color.

Note: You can also change the symbol's fill and background color directly on a display by using the Fill Color and Background Color buttons on the Symbol Formatting toolbar if the symbol has a Fill Mode of shaded or solid.

2. Click the Defaults button if you want to revert to the default settings. 3. Click OK to accept the changes and return to the Symbol Library (page 135) dialog. Change the Appearance of a Symbol After you have created a symbol and added it to your display you can modify its appearance by using the buttons on the Symbol Formatting (page 59) toolbar. Symbol Properties If you right-click a symbol in the Symbol Library, the focus box at the upper left reflects that symbol. A small dialog appears; you can choose either Symbol Options or Properties.

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If you choose Properties, you see a Symbol Properties dialog, which displays the Symbol description, Data size, Type, and Handle information. This information could be used in VBA automation of PI ProcessBook.

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Work with Symbols Before you can apply commands to display objects you must select them. You can select single or multiple items on a display. The commands available to apply to selected objects depend on whether the application state is in Build mode or Run mode. To select an object in either Build or Run mode, click on it one time while the mouse shows the selection arrow. You cannot select existing objects once a drawing tool is selected. In Build mode, selected objects display their resize handles. The resize handles are used to resize an object. In Run mode, selected objects have selection rectangles drawn around them. The color of the selection rectangle contrasts with the display background color and the size and shape are determined by connecting the resize handles (which are not seen in Run mode). Hold down the Shift key to select multiple symbols.

Details and Annotations Details Window The Details docking window is available to show data from dynamic symbols. The window is only available in Run mode and initially appears along the right side of your ProcessBook window; however, you can click and drag it anywhere inside the PI ProcessBook application. The Details window is driven by selections in your display. Moving a plot cursor changes the rows highlighted to show the range of data around the cursor time. By default, the window remains open when a different display symbol is selected. The Details window is cleared when you switch to Build mode. If you open the Details window while in Build mode, the controls are all disabled. The Details window contains the following components:

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Data Source—This field allows you to choose a data source, including datasets and PI Tags in the selected symbol (by default, the first trace or main data source for the selected symbol is shown). The Show All entry shows data for all the data sources in the selected symbol. Note: If a dataset or PI Tag returns more than 3,500 values the Show All option is not available. In addition, only the first 3,500 values are displayed. This value can be increased by adding the registry key HKCU\Software\PISystem\PI ProcessBook\DetailsAddin\MaxPoints (type DWORD) and setting it to the maximum number of points desired.

Option—This field allows you to toggle among three different types of information about your data source. ο

ο

ο

Data—shows recorded values for a selected symbol's time range. By default the table is sorted on the timestamp column in descending order. Click a heading to resort the table on a different column. Statistics—shows a table of available summary values available, for example, Average, Minimum, and Maximum. Selecting this option disables the PI Annotation Maintenance controls. Available statistics vary for each symbol type. Point Attributes—shows an alphabetized list of PI point attribute values. This option is only available for PI Tags. Selecting this option disables the PI Annotation Maintenance controls.

Each view option provides the following controls: —The name of the symbol selected on the display is shown above the data table. Refresh —Refresh data in all tables. Data shown does not automatically change after a symbol is first selected. You must use refresh to view any updates in the Details window. Enlarge/Shrink Font number of visible rows.

140

—Makes the text size bigger or smaller. This may reduce the

Details and Annotations

Copy to Clipboard —Allows you to copy the data table to your clipboard. You can then paste this data into another location such as a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. Note: Use the pin icon to lock the docking window to your screen. Click the pin icon again to unpin the window and minimize it along the border of your PI ProcessBook window. When a docking window is unpinned, a button appears along the side of the screen. Hover over it to re-expand the window.

Open Details Window Click View > Details to display the Details window (page 139). Alternatively, you can select the Show Details and Annotations command from the Context Display Menu.

PI Annotations Maintenance Annotations allow you to associate related information (such as text comments and other binary data) with any archive value. The PI Annotation Maintenance group at the bottom of the Details window (page 139) allows you to easily annotate values on your dynamic symbols.

Annotations can be added, edited or viewed, provided that: •

The selected data source is a PI Tag



The target PI Server can read and write annotations



You have permission to write annotations on the target PI Server



A row representing an event is selected in the Data table

If the target PI Server (or collective) is unavailable or cannot accept edits from the current user, the control is disabled. If the PI Server becomes unavailable while you are entering an annotation and you then click the Save button, you will receive an error. Note: If you select Show All from the Data Source drop-down box on the Details (page 139) window, the Value and Value Type fields in the PI Annotation Maintenance group are disabled.

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Add Annotations 1. Open the Details (page 139) window 2. In Run mode, select a dynamic symbol on your display. 3. Select the event of interest in the Data table. 4. Click inside the Value text box and enter the information you wish displayed in your annotation. 5. Select a value from the Value Type drop-down box. at the top of the PI Annotations Maintenance group. An 6. Click the Save button annotation icon appears on the dynamic symbol if it is showing the annotated event. Hover over this icon to read your annotation. A record of the annotation also appears on the Details window when the Data option is selected. Note: You need to be running a PI Server 3.4 or higher for annotations to work correctly. Otherwise, it is possible that an annotated event will not only be marked as annotated, but will also be marked as substituted.

Data Favorites The Data Favorites add-in provides a way to configure symbols by dragging a PI tag name (or other data reference) from a list onto the symbol. The add-in can be unloaded or set not to load at startup by changing the options in the Add-in Manager (page 11) dialog. When the Data Favorites add-in is first loaded, its window appears in the upper left corner of the PI ProcessBook application window. The window is only accessible in Build mode. If the window is closed, in Build mode, click View > Data Favorites. There are two panels within the Data Favorites window: •

Search (page 143)



Favorites (page 143)

Each panel can be collapsed if it is not needed.

Select a Default Symbol The Default Symbol button controls which symbol is created when data references are dropped on an empty area of the display. To set the default symbol, click the Default Symbol button and select an option from the drop-down list. Available symbols:

142



Bar (page 125)



Trend (page 81)

Data Favorites



Value (page 121)



XYPlot (page 101)

Note: If the selected symbol type does not support the data type of the dropped PI tag, a value symbol is drawn instead.

Search for Data Favorites

The Search panel provides controls for searching for PI tags or other data references. To search for data references, use the Search Mask text box or click the Tag Search button to launch the Tag Search dialog. Tags selected using the Tag Search dialog automatically populate the Data Favorites Search list. The Search Mask field searches for tags matching the entered string on your default PI Server. To save a data reference to your Favorites, either drag and drop it into your Favorites list, or right click the data reference in the Search list and click Add to Favorites. Note: Use the pin icon to lock the docking window to your screen. Click the pin icon again to unpin the window and minimize it along the border of your PI ProcessBook window. When a docking window is unpinned, a button appears along the side of the screen. Hover over it to re-expand the window.

Favorites Panel

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The Favorites panel provides controls for manipulating the list of data favorites (page 142). Note: The Favorites list is saved per user, so when a different user opens PI ProcessBook on the same machine, their list may be different.

Use Favorites 1. In Build mode, click View > Data Favorites to launch the Data Favorites (page 142) docking window. 2. Select a default symbol for Data Favorites (page 142). Any favorites dragged onto a display take the form of this symbol. 3. In the Favorites list (page 143), drag and drop any listed favorite to an existing trend or XYPlot symbol, or to a blank area of a display. The data reference is permanently added once the display is saved. Note: If the dropped selection contains multiple data references (for example, multiple tags) and the Bar or Value symbol is selected, a symbol is created for each one, slightly offset from each other, in cascading windows.

Import or Export Data Favorites To import data favorites: 1. Right-click in the Datasource list in the Favorites panel, and click Import Favorites. 2. Select a text file to import. To export data favorites: 1. Right-click in the Datasource list in the Favorites panel, and click Export Favorites. The Save as dialog appears. 2. Name the export file to save. Process Drags Between PI ProcessBook and Outside Applications The Data Favorites (page 142) add-in supports dragging a list of tag names in the following formats: 144

Time Range Toolbar



One row of tags separated by either a semi-colon or tab delimiter



Multiple rows (row delimited by a new line) of at least two columns which are delimited by either a tab or a semi-colon. Only one delimiter is used, and while there can be more than two columns in the dragged rows, only the first two columns are used. The first column must be the tag name, the second column may be an optional tag descriptor.

Drags can come from any application that supports the text clipboard format, for example, Microsoft Word or Excel.

Time Range Toolbar

The Time Range toolbar is used for working with dynamic symbols. In general, the commands on this toolbar affect only the symbols selected on the display. If no symbols are selected, all symbols are affected. This toolbar, which must be used in Run mode, contains three buttons: •

Revert (page 145)—returns the trend or other dynamic symbol to its original setting. •

Change Time Range (page 145)—opens a dialog to set new, temporary start and end times. For Bars, Values, and Multi-State symbols you can only set an end time. •

Scroll Bar (page 146)—scrolls through time values.

Revert Time Range

To discard any of the changes you have made to the time range of a trend or the effective time of a Bar, Value, or Multi-State symbol and return it to its saved setting: In Run mode, click View > Revert, or Click the Revert button.

Change the Time Range

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The Time Range command lets you enter new starting and ending times for dynamic symbols. When you specify a time range for a single-time dynamic element, such as a MultiState symbol, bar or value, only the end time is used. Note: The time represented on your display is the time relative to the PI Server, unless you have selected the client time zone setting for your display. If the PI Server to which you are connected is in a different time zone, time on your display represents the server time zone, not the local one.

1. In Run mode, select the dynamic symbol or symbols for which you want to change the time range. If no symbols are selected, the time range change affects all dynamic symbols on the display. 2. Click the Time Range button on the Time Range toolbar, or Click View > Time Range. The Change Time Range dialog opens, allowing you to change the time span for a trend or plot, or the effective time for a bar, value, or Multi-State symbol.

3. Select new starting and ending times from the drop-down lists or define your own starting and ending times. Time ranges can be relative, absolute, or combined. 4. Click OK. The selected elements change to reflect the new time range.

Use the Scrolling Time Range

1. In Run mode, select the dynamic symbol or symbols for which you want to change the time range. If no symbols are selected, the time range change affects all dynamic symbols in the display. 2. On the Time Range toolbar, click the forward or backward Scroll Time button, or Click and drag the Scroll Time slider, or Click the space on either side of the Scroll Time slider to increment or decrement by a time span. If the slider is dragged, a ToolTip is updated with the end time that is applied when you release the mouse button. 3. Release the mouse button. Selected symbols are refreshed with the new time range.

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Select and Move a Symbol

Note: You can scroll the time for all items in a display or selected items. If no trend is included in the selected items, the scroll buttons are disabled.

Time Forward and Back

Use the time backward and forward buttons to scroll the time range forward or backward. To do this: 1. Click on the desired symbols with the Run Mode pointer (page 28). 2. Click the Time Forward or Time Backward button. Trends scroll by the time range specified in the trend definition. When you select multiple trends, each trend maintains its time range as it is scrolled. If you select a trend and a dynamic element such as a value, the non-trend symbol scrolls by the time range specified in the first trend's definition. For example, if the trend displays data from 1:00 to 4:00 (three hours) and the value has a timestamp of 5:00, scrolling backward shows trend data from 10:00 to 1:00. The value's timestamp also changes by three hours (2:00).

Future Trends It is possible to set trends with an end date in the future by choosing an end time of the present (*) plus an amount of time, such as 4 hours or 8 days. These trends update if they are less than the maximum update time range limit. The default update time limit is 24 hours, but that duration limit can be changed in the procbook.ini (page 210) file. You can set the time range for a trend into the future by using * + an amount of time no more than 7 days greater than the start time. A trend can also be scrolled into the future using the time range buttons, but then it does not update.

Select and Move a Symbol 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. Click a symbol in your display. Small squares appear around the bounding rectangle of the symbol. 3. If you want to move the symbol, drag the symbol to the desired location within your display. Press the Tab key to toggle among different symbols in your display once a symbol is selected. When you press the Tab key you deselect the current object and select the next object in the tabbing order. The tabbing order follows the stacking order (page 149) on the display (by default, the order in which objects were added to the display). PI ProcessBook User Guide

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To cancel a selection on any one object press SHIFT while clicking the object to deselect. To cancel selection of all objects on a display, click on the display background (in a spot where there are no symbols). Note: ActiveX controls on the display do not react to tab order like other ProcessBook symbols because they are treated as separate windows within the display.

Select Multiple Symbols You can perform many of the editing and organizing functions on more than one symbol at a time. For example, once selected, you can move multiple symbols to a new location, edit the color of lines and fill for multiple symbols, or even flip and rotate multiple symbols. 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. Do one of the following: ο ο ο ο

To select all of the symbols in a drawing area, click Choose Edit > Select All. To select individual symbols, press SHIFT while clicking each symbol. Selection handles display around each selected item. To select several symbols at the same time, click near a symbol, and then drag to create a rectangle that includes all the symbols you want to select. To select symbols that are stacked on top of each other, click the top symbol. Selection handles appear. Continue clicking the top symbol to select symbols located under the top symbol.

3. Click the symbols you want to change or move. The selected symbols display handles.

Rotate a Symbol You can rotate a drawing symbol in 15° or 1° increments. You cannot rotate text, graphics, or OLE objects. Symbol Library images can only be rotated in 90° increments. 1. Select the symbol you want to rotate. 2. Click Arrange > Rotate. A rotation object appears in the center of the symbol. 3. Click a selection handle and drag in the direction that you want to rotate the symbol. The symbol is rotated in 1° increments. -orPress SHIFT while dragging to rotate in 15° increments.

Flip a Symbol You can create a mirror image of a symbol by flipping it. You cannot flip text, graphics, or OLE objects. 148

Delete a Symbol

1. Select the symbol you want to flip. 2. Click Arrange > Flip > Horizontal to flip the symbol from right to left or Vertical to flip the symbol from top to bottom.

Delete a Symbol When you want to delete a drawing symbol or group of symbols: 1. Select a symbol or multiple symbols that you want to delete. 2. Press DELETE, -orClick Edit > Clear.

Stacking Order Each symbol you add to a drawing occupies its own space in the drawing. The layers, and therefore the symbols, are stacked on top of each other. By default, the first symbol you draw is at the bottom of the stacking order and the last symbol you draw is at the top of the stacking order. Using the stacking commands, you can move a symbol forward or backward within the stack (page 149). Depending on the number of objects between top and bottom, you may need to repeat a stacking command several times to move the symbol to the desired location within the stack.

Move a Symbol Forward or Backward in the Stack 1. Select the symbol you want to order. 2. On the Arrange menu, choose the direction you want to move the symbol: ο ο

Click Forward to move it up one level (on top of something else). Click Backward to move it down one level (below something else).

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ο ο

Click Bring to Front to move it to the top of the stack (on top of everything). Click Send to Back to move it to the bottom of the stack (below everything).

Align Multiple Symbols You can align drawing symbols with each other. Use this feature to align symbols along their tops, bottoms, sides, or centers (either vertically or horizontally). The first symbol you select is the symbol to which others are aligned. When two or more value symbols are aligned, the text justification for each matches the alignment rule: left, center, or right. 1. Select the symbols you want to align. 2. Click Arrange > Align. The Align submenu is displayed.

3. Click the alignment options you want. All the selected symbols are aligned to the symbol you first selected, along the axis you specify.

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Group, Ungroup, or Regroup symbols

Examples of Alignment Options

Group, Ungroup, or Regroup symbols When creating or manipulating complex shapes, it is sometimes easier to combine individual symbols into one. You can group two or more symbols together, or you can group several groups. Once grouped, any commands that you apply affect the composite symbol as if it were a single symbol. If you want a group of symbols to remain together, but you need to continue modifying the components separately, you can attach the symbols (page 158) instead of grouping them. Select the symbols you want to group and from the Arrange menu choose one of the following: ο ο ο

Group—The symbols combine into one composite symbol with selection handles around the entire group. Ungroup—The group is disassembled into its component symbols. Regroup—You do not need to re-select all the components to regroup a previously grouped set of symbols. This command is only enabled when it applies.

Connect Symbols Connector Symbol

You can connect two symbols to each other using the Connector symbol. The Connector symbol remains attached to each of the connected symbols whenever one or both are moved. The advantage of using a Connector, rather than a line, is that the Connector remains attached to other symbols when you move the other symbols and avoids overlapping other symbols. The Connector is intended for modeling and automation purposes. Connection Points on each symbol define where the connection occurs. Connection Points can be added, deleted, or moved on a symbol. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Connectors try to avoid objects as they are being connected between two symbols. The Connector symbol is supported by automation within PI ProcessBook. Connect Two Symbols As Connectors are drawn, they are orthogonal to the display, meaning that they go horizontally or vertically. There are no diagonal connectors. Each end of a Connector attaches to a Connection Point on another symbol. If you have not already created a Connection Point on this symbol, a Connection Point is built automatically as you draw the Connector across a bounding line of the symbol. Connectors and Connection Points have unique numbers to help you manipulate them in the Connectors dialog box. You can open the Connectors dialog once you draw a Connector; even if it is not attached to any symbols. Do not manipulate Connectors by dragging and dropping them. Use the Connectors dialog to rearrange them. Follow these steps to connect two existing symbols on a display: 1. Click the Connector button

.

-orClick Draw > Connector. 2. Click on the first symbol, called the Source, and drag the mouse into the second symbol, called the Destination. The Connector arrow has a flow direction from the Source to the Destination. Connection Points appear on both symbols. Note: If your mouse does not touch a symbol, you do not see a Connection Point. Do not adjust the Connector manually. If you do not see Connection Points on both symbols, delete the Connector and draw it again.

You can use the Undo and Redo commands with Connectors. Attach a Symbol to a Connector You can attach a symbol, such as a text box or a meter, to a Connector. Attaching is different from Connecting. An attached symbol moves with a connector but does not account for flow direction. Note: To remove an attached symbol from a connector, click the symbol and drag it away from the connector.

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Connection Points Connection points on each symbol define where a Connector may connect. Connection Points are visible in Build mode only and appear on symbols as small x marks. When you select one with your cursor, it changes to an x within a bounding circle. ProcessBook symbols are originally built without Connection Points. A Connection Point is created automatically when a Connector is dragged into a symbol. This Point is created at the midpoint of the nearest edge of the bounding rectangle of the symbol. The end of the Connector is moved to the Connection Point. You may add Connection Points and move them to specific locations. A Connection Point can be used for either the start of the flow or the end of a flow. The same Connection Point can be used for both. A flow can be bi-directional. If a second Connector is dragged over a symbol, it either moves to the existing Connection Point or creates a new one. For irregular figures, Connection Points are placed near the midpoint of the side of the bounding rectangle of the figure, as shown in the illustration below, rather than inside the figure itself. You can adjust the position of the Connection Point to touch the actual figure.

Connector with Connection Point on the Bounding Rectangle

Note: If a symbol is placed in front of another, the Connection Points on the ‘hidden’ symbol cannot be selected. You can solve this problem by placing the two symbols on different layers of the display.

Add Connection Points If you want an additional Connection Point, you can add it as follows: 1. In Build mode, select the symbol. 2. Click Edit > Connection Points > Add. A point appears at the upper left of the symbol. 3. If you wish, drag the new Connection Point to a different location. Select among Multiple Connection Points on One Symbol After you select one Connection Point, you can press C on the keyboard to cycle through any additional Connection Points on that symbol.

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Delete Connection Points To delete a Connection Point from a symbol: 1. Select the Connection Point. 2. Click Edit > Connection Points > Delete. Move Connection Points Connection Points may be moved to a new position within a symbol. To do this, click on a Connection Point in Build mode and drag it. For very fine adjustments, you can move Connection Points on a symbol. 1. In Build mode, click on a connection point. 2. Click Edit > Connection Points > Move. The Connection Point Placement dialog appears, where you can edit the width and height ratios in comparison to the X and Y axes of the symbol.

Determine the Identifying Number of a Connection Point In Build mode, if you place your mouse over a Connection Point, a tooltip shows you the Connection Point number. The following illustration refers to Connection Point 2 on Rectangle 1. These Connection Point numbers are used on the Connectors Dialog Flow tab (page 155).

Connection Point Numbering

In other words, Connection Points have identifying names that are derived from the symbol name. For example, for a rectangle named Rectangle2, two Connection Points would be named and .

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If you are using a symbol from the Symbol Library, the Connection Point is named , where TBSymbolx represents the specific name of the symbol.

Connectors Dialog

In Build mode, if you wish to adjust a Connector's end point, you might click and drag the end point. Unfortunately, this action stops the auto-avoidance capability of the Connector. Alternatively, you can use the Connectors dialog to rearrange connections. To reach this dialog: Click the Connectors toolbar button, -orClick Edit > Connectivity, -orOn the right-click menu, click Connectivity. The Connectors dialog affects Connector symbols only. It cannot be used to attach one symbol to another symbol without a Connector. The Connectors dialog has two tabs, Flow (page 155) and Attachments (page 156). Each Connector is identified by a unique number, which is revealed by a tooltip in your display. Connectors Dialog, Flow Tab The Connectors Dialog, Flow tab specifies the source and destination of each Connector from one symbol's Connection Point to another symbol's Connection Point. The dialog is available whenever a Connector exists on a display. The Flow tab shows two tree diagrams, Source and Destination, where you can change the Connection Points for the Connector shown in the Connector drop-down box. There is also a Flow Direction drop-down box associated with the Connector that appears in the Connector drop-down box. Each Connector and each Connection Point are numbered. Note: Use the ToolTip on the display to identify the Connector(s) and Connection Point(s) you wish to rearrange before you open the Connectors dialog.

The Auto Avoid option is checked as a default, so that Connectors route around other objects in the display.

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Configure the Flow Tab 1. In Build mode, open the Connectors dialog (page 155). The Flow tab is in focus. 2. In the Connector drop-down box, select a Connector. Connectors are numbered; you can find a tooltip on the display to identify each one. In the Source and Destination boxes, you will see highlights for the current Connection Points for that Connector. 3. Modify the Flow Direction if you wish. 4. Click a new Connection Point on the Source tree to change the Source Connection Point. 5. Click a Connection Point on the Destination tree to change the Destination Connection Point. 6. Click Apply. This changes the display. 7. Repeat these steps for all Connectors on the display that you wish to modify. 8. Click OK. If the display is satisfactory, save it. Connectors Dialog, Attachments Tab For very complex displays, it may be helpful to attach or arrange Connector Attachments through the Connectors Dialog, Attachments tab. (The Attachments tab does not include Connectors or symbols attached to other symbols.) If you do not check the Enable Connector Attachments on the Display Properties dialog, discussed above, you can still attach symbols to Connectors by using this dialog.

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Connectors Dialog, Attachments tab

Configure the Attachments Tab 1. In Build mode, create a Connector (page 152). Notice its number in the tooltip. 2. Create the auxiliary symbol to be added to the Connector. 3. Open the Connectors dialog (page 155), and select the Attachments tab. 4. Choose a Connector from the numbered list in the drop-down box at the top. 5. After you select a Connector, unattached symbols on the display are listed in the Symbols box. Symbols that are already attached to the Connector appear in the Currently Attached box. Existing Source and Destination symbols that are connected to Connectors are not listed. 6. Highlight a symbol in the Symbols box that you want to add and click Add. The symbol now appears in the Currently Attached Box. 7. Adjust the position and placement of the attached symbol as needed. ο ο

To move the symbol closer to one end of the Connector, double-click the specified % and change it. To move the symbol from the top of the Connector to another placement, doubleclick the default Top and choose Left, Right, or Bottom.

8. Click Apply and select another Connector to adjust. 9. If you need to remove an attachment, highlight the attachment in the Currently Attached box and click Remove. 10. When you are finished adjusting, click OK.

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Attach a Symbol as an Adjunct to a Connector Sometimes it is desirable to attach a symbol, such as a flow meter or a text label, along a Connector so that the symbol moves as the Connector does. This subordinate symbol is called a symbol attachment. Note that this is different from connecting a symbol to either end of a Connector. To attach a symbol to a Connector, follow these steps: 1. Click Edit > Display to open the Display Properties dialog. 2. Be sure the Enable Connector Attachments option is checked. Click OK. 3. Create the subordinate symbol and drag and drop it across the Connector. The subordinate attachment is attached to the Connector. The placement is snapped either left/right or top/bottom depending upon the orthogonal direction of the connector at the position where the attachment has been placed. 4. To attach symbols to Connectors, select the Connector, then choose Edit > Symbol Attachments.

Attach a Symbol as an Adjunct to Another Symbol You may want to attach two or more symbols (not Connector Symbols) so that they move together but do not become a Composite Symbol. For example, you might attach a text label symbol to a pump symbol. The text symbol is subordinate to the pump symbol and follows the pump symbol if the latter is moved. The advantage of this method of attachment is that each symbol in the group retains its identity and can be acted on individually for automation purposes. 1. Select at least two symbols. This enables the Symbol Attachments icon

.

2. Click the Symbol Attachments icon, or Click Edit > Symbol Attachments, or On the right-click menu, click Symbol Attachments. The Symbol Attachments dialog appears. The symbols you selected appear in the Attachments dialog as possible master or subordinate symbols.

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3. Select the Master Symbol. As you change the Master, the title of the dialog changes also. 4. Place a check mark for the subordinate symbol or symbols and click OK. 5. Repeat the process for each Master symbol. The Detach All bar at the top can be used to remove all attachments from the currently selected symbol in the Master box. To detach only one attachment, clear its check box. 6. Click OK. When you move a Master symbol, any subordinates move with it. Note: There are two other routes to the Symbol Attachments dialog. Choose Edit > Symbol Attachments, or, on the right-click menu, click Symbol Attachments.

Move Attached Symbols Independently Click and drag an attached symbol that is not the Master Symbol to move the symbol independently without affecting the position of the Master Symbol.

Detect Connections and Attachments You can easily detect which symbols in your display are attached and/or connected to Connectors, or which symbols are attached to symbols. To see whether Connectors or attached symbols exist for a particular symbol: •

Click the symbol or connector and hold down the mouse button for more than one half second. ο If there are existing Connectors, all Connectors with attached symbols for this symbol are spotlighted and display in a different color (for example, white for black or yellow for blue). ο If there are no Connectors, nothing happens.

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Reroute a Connector Path When you move a symbol, its Connectors shift automatically to stay connected to the moved symbol and avoid overlapping other symbols in the display. Connectors can overlap each other. If a drawing becomes complex, you can request that all Connectors be rerouted by clicking the Reroute button. If you select specific Connectors and click Reroute, only those Connectors are rerouted. Connectors crossing each other may be unavoidable but should be minimized. Do not move Connectors manually. The object avoidance feature in PI ProcessBook can either ignore or take Connectors into account when looking for the shortest path from the source to a destination. This behavior is controlled by the ConnectorsAvoidConnectors setting in the ProcBook.ini (page 210). Note: Object avoidance does not occur after you drag and drop a Connector’s line segment. If you modify the position of a Connector manually, the center point and end points on the Connector change from green to red, indicating that automatic object avoidance is turned off and you are responsible for all further updates to that Connector.

Rerouting can consume significant system resources (CPU and Memory) to solve complex problems. Factors that can increase complexity include: •

A very large display



Large numbers of Connectors on a single display



Large numbers of symbols to be avoided



A high number of "Lines per Screen Unit" (set in "Arrange", "Grid Size…", "Lines per Screen Unit"—1 equals the largest cell size; 30 gives the smallest cell size)



Routing multiple displays on the same PC

Item Definition

Use the Item Definition button in either Build or Run mode when you want to see what tags and formatting options were used in any symbol that uses a dialog box for basic configuration. It is the same as double-clicking on the item with the Build mode pointer. If the symbol does not have a definition dialog box, the button is dimmed. You can change the selections and save the new definition. This button does not open any of the formatting dialogs (for example, Font or Color).

Display or Change Item Definition 1. In either Build or Run mode, open a display.

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2. Double-click the dynamic symbol whose definition you would like to change (such as a value, bar, trend, or button). -orClick the symbol, then on the Formatting toolbar, click the Item Definition button. A definition dialog box displays that corresponds to the symbol you selected: Note: If the Item Definition button appears dimmed the symbol you selected may not have a definition dialog box.

3. In the appropriate dialog box, make your changes to the item's definition, and then click OK. These changes are saved with the symbol. These changes are saved with the symbol.

Status Report for Dynamic Symbols The Status Bar at the bottom of the PI ProcessBook application shows whether dynamic symbols in a display are updating normally. The Status icon is a green circle when there are no errors. It is a blue circle containing a question mark (?) if the display shows questionable data or a yellow arrow for substituted data. It contains an X in a red circle if a dynamic symbol is reporting bad data (or shutdown status). As you shift focus from one display to another, the icon may change. If you shift back to the Table of Contents, the status icon remains from the last display in focus. or The Status Report dialog appears when you have a display in focus and double-click the Status icon. This report lists all the symbols in a display that have data associated with them. You see the tag to which the symbol is connected and, if there is an issue, the error message appears. You can sort the list by any of the column headings.

For troubleshooting purposes, the Message Log button shows you the SDK Log file. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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You can save this report as a .csv file by using the Save to File button. Note: The Status Bar can be displayed or hidden from the View Status Bar item on the View menu.

Status Flags for Data In addition to the Error indicator shown in the Status Bar (page 161), PI ProcessBook has three types of flags to indicate that the data is valid but additional information is available. Each dynamic symbol can display an icon when there is additional status information available. When you hover the mouse over a flagged symbol, you see a ToolTip with the status message. In trends, status messages appear to the right of the tag values in the legend, if the status is associated with the last value on the plot. The icons are shown below: •

Questionable—indicates that there is some reason to doubt the accuracy of the value.



Annotated—indicates that there is a comment about a value. Text annotations are shown in symbol ToolTips. Use the Details window (page 139) to view and add annotations.



Substituted—used to indicate that the value has been changed from its original value. This value is set only by the PI Server when an existing value is changed.

If a tag has more than one flag, the highest priority status will be shown. The priority from high to low is: Error, Questionable, Annotated, Substituted. To view all the flags associated with a PI Tag on the display, use the Details window, Data option. If you clear the Show Value Attributes check box in your Start Preferences, you do not see these icons. You might disable the icons to improve ProcessBook performance if you have very high speed sub-second data.

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Data Sets In PI ProcessBook you can build dynamic symbols using data retrieved from data sets just as you can from specific points in the PI Data Archive. A data set is basically the set of results of a query that addresses a specific data source. You can use placeholders to link PI tags and ODBC data within a query. Data sets are defined at the Book level so that they can be defined once and then shared among different displays within that ProcessBook. If you create an independent display (a .PDI file), the data set is defined only for that display. Trends including data sets can be manipulated, saved, moved, and copied in the same fashion as other trends. Whenever a display is updated, if a trace or value using a data set is configured using relative times, then the trace or value is updated. No updates occur if the data set is configured using absolute times. You can edit an existing data set, either from the Tools menu or from a symbol that uses the data set. However, if you have attached the data set to more than one symbol, editing the data set affects all the symbols. If you move a PI ProcessBook display containing a data set to another machine, you may need to reconfigure the data set or the machine's connection to the data source.

Three types of data sets are available to provide data to displays: •

PI Calculation (page 164) data sets (including PI Expression and PI Summary data sets) from PI Universal Data Server equations.



ODBC (page 168) (Open Database Connectivity) data sets obtained from a relational database. ODBC client capability means that without writing vendor-specific code, you can access data from certain relational databases outside the PI System and include that

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data in your PI ProcessBook displays. The outside data source must be ODBC-compliant; for example, it must provide an ODBC Driver. An outside ODBC data source might include laboratory results, cost tables, or other sets of information that can be obtained through SQL queries. Since access to ODBC sources is configured on a particular computer, moving a display file that uses an ODBC data set may require the data source to be configured on the new computer. The data source has to have the same name on the new computer, or the data set will need to be reconfigured in the display. •

Custom (page 167) data sets built as COM objects supplied by Visual Basic or C++ programs as Add-Ins to PI ProcessBook. Custom data sets exist at the PI ProcessBook application level, so they don't need to be defined for each processbook or display. However, they do need to be installed on any client machine where they are used.

PI Calculation Data Sets PI Calculation Data Sets include PI Summary Data Sets and PI Expression Data Sets. These are drawn from the PI Universal Data Server and plotted dynamically. Use the PI Calculation dialog to create, edit, or delete data sets. You can select predetermined calculations or create your own expressions. A similar dialog is used to link to ODBC data sets (page 168). •

PI Summary Data Sets PI Summary Data Sets enable you to use pre- determined functions to retrieve aggregated PI data for a tag. ο ο ο ο

ο ο

The AVG function calculates the average of the tag values for each interval. The MIN function selects the minimum of the tag values for each interval. A timestamp associated with the minimum value is also available. The MAX function selects the maximum of the tag values for each interval. A timestamp associated with the maximum value is also available. The PCTGOOD function determines the percentage of time for each interval, when the tag’s archived values are good (that is without errors, such as out of range errors or shutdown flags). It is not applicable for digital tags. The RANGE function calculates the difference between the tag’s maximum and minimum values for each interval. The STDEV function calculates the population Standard Deviation of the tag values for each interval.

These functions are fully described in the Performance Equations chapter of the PI Server Applications User Guide. •

PI Expression Data Sets PI Expression Data Sets enable you to create your own function or expression in PI Performance Equation syntax. These expressions can include tag variables with mathematical and logical operations as described in the Performance Equations chapter of the PI Server Applications User Guide. This syntax is also documented on the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, http://techsupport.osisoft.com

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(http://techsupport.osisoft.com), under the hierarchy Support > Downloads > Documentation for the PI Server.

Create a PI Calculation Data Set 1. Click Tools > Data Sets. The Data Sets (page 163) dialog appears. Note: You can also create a PI Calculation data set by clicking the drop-down arrow next to the Tag Search button in the Define dynamic symbol dialogs. By accessing the PI Calculation Data dialog this way, you have the additional option of selecting a previously created PI Calculation Data set, as well as the ability to create a new one as outlined below.

2. Click New > PI Calculation. The PI Calculation Data dialog appears.

3. Enter values for the following fields: ο ο ο

Server—Select a PI Server. Name—Enter a name for your data set. The name must be unique for the current .piw or .pdi file. PI Tag or Expression—Enter a tag name or a PI expression. Use the Tag Search (page 57) button to search for PI Tags. If you choose to type an expression, be sure to use PI Performance Equations syntax, such as one of these:

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ο ο ο

ο ο

ο

‘sinusoid’ * 2 (‘cdt158’+‘sinusoid’)/2 log(‘cdt158’) ((‘sinusoid’) –tagzero (‘sinusoid’))/tagspan(‘sinusoid’)

Description—This description appears on trends of this data set in the tag descriptors area. Calculation Interval—The interval (minutes, hours, days) for the calculation. Interval Sync Time—This is the absolute time of day at which the periodic calculations are done. For example, if the Interval Sync Time box is set to 12:00:24 PM and the time in the Refresh Interval box is set to ten minutes, then the calculation for each period is executed at the following times: 12:10:24, 12:20:24, 12:30:34, etc. Value Column Name—The name that represents the time-value pairs of the calculated data. Refresh Interval—The interval at which you want to automatically update the data set. You can also type a number between 0 and 999. If you select 0, data is not automatically updated. Stepped Plot—Selected by default. Clear the check box if you want a point-to-point plot.

4. Click OK to save your changes. ο ο ο ο

The data set name must be unique for the current .piw or .pdi file. The node name and tag name must be valid. The interval must be a valid PI time. The sync time must be a valid PI time.

5. Your new data set appears in the Data Sets dialog.

Intervals and Time Value The calculated value for each interval is plotted at the start of the interval. For example, if the tag "t_min" has the following time-value pairs in a 10 minute interval, then the calculated value for this interval would be plotted at time 1:00:00. 1:00:00 1 1:01:00 2 1:02:00 3 1:03:00 4 1:04:00 5 1:05:00 6 1:06:00 7 1:07:00 8 1:08:00 9

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1:09:00 10 1:10:00 11 The calculated value for the AVG, STDEV, and PCTGOOD functions includes the tag value at the lower interval boundary time and excludes the tag value at the upper interval boundary time. For the example above, the tag value "10" at time 1:09:00 is excluded in the function calculation, therefore the calculated value for AVG is 4.5 and the calculated value for STDEV is 2.872281. The calculated value for the MIN, MAX and RANGE functions includes the tag value of both the lower and upper interval boundary times. For the example above, the calculated value for MIN is 1, the calculated value for MAX is 11 and the calculated value for RANGE is 12.

Plot a Moving Average in a Trend You can plot additional statistics in a trend using data sets derived from PI tags. For example, you can plot both a tag and its moving average to show a smoothed version of the same curve. The moving average is built from the source tag using a data set that recalculates an average point value over recurring intervals. To create a moving average in a trend: 1. In Build mode, double-click on the trend to open the Define Trend dialog. 2. Click the Tag Search arrow and choose PI Calculation to create a data set based on a tag. 3. Click New to add the data set and specify a Name and Description for the data set that calculates the moving average. 4. Click Tag Search and select the tag you want to use as the basis for the calculation. 5. In the Interval field, choose the calculation period for the average. A new average tag value is computed at each interval over the plotted time range. 6. Click Average in the Columns panel to select an average calculation, and click OK. 7. Click OK to close the Define Trend dialog.

Custom Data Sets A custom data set is one provided through a VBA add-in to PI ProcessBook. It is a COM object that acts as an interface between PI ProcessBook and the custom data provider. The source of data could be a data store (like MS SQL Server) or a data calculation engine. PI ProcessBook requests updates to the data every few seconds and adjusts its display accordingly. Before you can access custom data sets in a display, the Data Set add-in must be installed and loaded through the Add-In Manager (page 11) dialog. Later, as you build a display, you select the data set and column to be used for a symbol on a display through the symbol

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definition dialogs. Once a custom dataset is loaded, it is available throughout the application. These data sets are not display or processbook specific. Information on building a custom data set is beyond the scope of this user guide. It is discussed in Creating a Custom Data Set, a white paper available through the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, http://techsupport.osisoft.com (http://techsupport.osisoft.com).

ODBC Data Sets PI ProcessBook uses the term ODBC data set for the concept of an ODBC query that retrieves data from a relational database to produce a group of data values organized into rows and columns and used to build a trend or other element in a ProcessBook display. A data set is identified within a ProcessBook by a unique name. The data set name refers to the combination of an SQL query statement and an ODBC Data Source with which to execute the query. The results of the SQL query are organized into rows and columns. You may select any column of the results for a display. For example, in a trend, each column in the data set that you select appears as a different trace. A SQL query statement may be written so that it executes based on other data in a display, such as PI tags or the start or end time. This is done using SQL placeholders (parameters); a tag, time, or text string is then substituted for each placeholder at run time. For more information on ODBC, see ODBC (page 201).

Create an ODBC Data Set 1. Click Tools > Data Sets. The Data Sets (page 163) dialog appears. 2. Click the New button, then select ODBC. The ODBC Data dialog appears.

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3. In the Name box, type a name for the data set. 4. In the Description box, type a description if you like. This text is displayed in the Description legend for the trace, if configured. 5. In the Refresh Interval list, enter the interval at which you want to automatically update the data set. -orType a number between 0 and 999. Note: The default for the Refresh Interval list is zero minutes. This means the data set only refreshes when the trace is first drawn or when you click the Revert Time Ranges button on the standard toolbar. If a tag placeholder is used, the Refresh Interval box list is disabled.

6. From the Data Source drop-down list, click the appropriate ODBC data source. If you do not already have an ODBC Data Source configured on your computer (using the Control Panel), click the Setup button to create or modify one. 7. Click the Design button. The Microsoft Query application is displayed. Note: If Microsoft Query is not installed, then the Design button is disabled. You can key in the query manually. You can also copy and paste a query from another query building tool.

8. Choose your ODBC data source and design your query.

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Note: Click the Help button, if necessary, and follow Microsoft's instructions for completing the query.

9. Click OK to return to the ODBC Data dialog box. To verify if the query can be understood by the ODBC data source, click the Check Syntax button. 10. Click OK. 11. If you want to use placeholders in the query, enter the appropriate WHERE clause, use question marks (?) to denote the location of placeholders, and click the Placeholders button. Placeholders are defined in the order in which they are encountered in the SQL statement. Clicking the Placeholders button causes the syntax of the query to be checked. If the syntax is not valid, the invalid query message is displayed. 12. Click OK.

Placeholders A Placeholder in an SQL query identifies a value that is to be provided when the query is run. You can validate a query before the actual values are provided. The standard SQL placeholder character is (?). Placeholders are numbered in their order of appearance, from left to right, in the query statement. For example, the following query statement has two placeholders, one for a text string for a sample ID and the other for a sample time. Select value, sample_time from Lab_data where sample_ID=? and sample_time>? PI ProcessBook allows text, start times, end times, or tag values as substitutes for placeholders.

Processing of Placeholder Queries Text placeholder values are substituted into a query when it is run. Start and End times are determined when a display is opened and are substituted into queries at execution. Processing of Tag Placeholder Queries Tag values can also be used as placeholders. With a Tag placeholder, a join is processed between the ODBC data source and the PI data source. When a display is opened, PI ProcessBook obtains tag values between the start and end time and substitutes these values into the SQL query, one at a time (in effect, executing the query for each PI Tag value returned). The use of a tag placeholder is shown in the SQL query statement below: Select target from specs where product_code=?

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In this example, the values of the tag in the PI System that records the current product code are retrieved. The result set of the ODBC query is built by executing the query once for each placeholder value. In the case of this example, that would be one query execution for each product code found between the start and end times of the symbol.

Design Placeholder Queries Placeholders can be customized for a symbol. You can create an ODBC data set with a set of default placeholders. When that data set is attached to a specific symbol, the query’s placeholders can be customized for that symbol without affecting the placeholders defined for any other symbol using that data set.

Add or Edit Placeholders To open the Placeholders dialog, click the Placeholders button in the ODBC Data Sets (page 168) dialog, or click the Custom Placeholders button on a symbol definition dialog. In this dialog box, you can rename placeholders, change their type or specify values. Note: PI ProcessBook allows you to create custom placeholders for a symbol based on a summary Data Set or a PI Tag placeholder in an ODBC data set. Placeholders are not allowed for expression Data Sets. The Custom Placeholders button in symbol definition dialog boxes allows you to specify different PI Tags for a PI Summary Data Set or ODBC data set with a PI Tag placeholder. The change applies only to the configured symbol.

1. In the Placeholder Name box, select the parameter you want to configured. The parameters are in the same order as found in the data set query. The list is limited to the number of parameters found in the query.

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2. In the Placeholder Properties group, select the Type for the selected parameter. There are four possible types, Text, PI Tag, Start Time, and End Time. You can optionally change the name of the placeholder to make its purpose clear. 3. Selecting a type transforms the dialog to allow you to enter the settings for the selected type, if any. If the query uses: ο ο ο

Text input—Type the replacement text value in the Text field. Tag values—Type a node ID and tag name or click the Tag Search button to open the Tag Search dialog. Start and/or end times—No additional configuration is used.

4. Click the Set button. 5. To configure another parameter, select it and repeat the previous steps. 6. Click OK.

Is a Data Set in Use? Before you modify a data source or data set, it is important to determine whether it is being used in another display or symbol. PI Calculation data sets and ODBC data sets are established for an entire ProcessBook (or an independent display). Custom data sets are installed with the PI ProcessBook application and are available to any display that you open. 1. Click Tools > Data Sets. The Data Sets dialog appears. 2. Under Data Sets, click the data set name, then click the Show Use button. The Data Set Use dialog appears and displays where the data set is being used.

Data Set Details Each Data Set is initially determined from a Data Source that must already be configured. If the Data Source you need is not listed, click the Setup button to add it. Once the Data Source is selected, add the query. If the Design button is unavailable you must type in the query. If MS Query is installed correctly, the Design button will not be unavailable. Click it to design the query. You can check syntax after you add the query. Including question marks (?) in the query allows placeholders to be defined. If you wish to use placeholders from PI in your query, establish them by clicking the Placeholder button and completing the process on the Placeholder dialog.

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Add a Data Set to a Trend Just as you would add tags in defining a trend, you can add columns chosen from a data set. Each column is plotted as a separate trace, however, the data set columns that appear on your trend do not appear in the Point Properties dialog. If the query returns a null value, the trace displays the discontinuity. Information from more than one data set, or more than one column from the same data set may be plotted on the same trend. The trend assumes the first time column found in the data set provides the time stamps for the column(s) selected for trending. You can manipulate trends containing data from data sets just as you would other trends, by using functions such as: •

Trend Zoom



Scrolling



Trend Cursor



Time Range



Revert Time Ranges



Autorange



Markers

To add a data set to a trend: 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Trend button

.

3. Click in the display where you want to add the trend and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the trend will be placed. 4. When you release the mouse button, the Define Trend (page 85) dialog appears. 5. Click the Tag Search arrow, and then click PI Calculation. 6. The PI Calculation Data dialog appears. Note: If you want to display the ODBC Data dialog instead of the PI Calculation Data dialog, then click the Tag Search arrow, and then select ODBC.

7. Under Saved Data Sets, click the data set you want to add to the trend. 8. Under Data Set Columns, select a column(s) to be plotted in the trend (use the SHIFT or CTRL keys to select more than one column). Value - value of the expression for the calculation interval and type as of the timestamp. In the case of summary data sets, this column holds the value of the tag. Total - the totalized value (time integral) of a tag over a given time, according to values stored in the archive. Average - average value of the expression for the calculation interval and type. Minimum - minimum value of the expression for the calculation interval and type. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Maximum - maximum value of the expression for the calculation interval and type. PctGood - the time percentage, over a given range, when a tag's archived values are good (not digital states). Range - the difference between a tag's maximum and minimum values during a given time, according to values stored in the archive. StdDev - the time-weighted standard deviation of a tag over a given time, according to values stored in the archive. PStDev - the standard deviation of two or more arguments, where those arguments represent the whole population. Count - the number of events for a point over a given time. 9. Click OK. Note: Until you select a data set and at least one column, the OK button is dimmed.

10. The selected data set/column(s) is now listed under Tags in Plot in the Define Trend dialog. Select tags as desired and format the trend. If you wish to see or edit the definitions of placeholders, click the Custom Placeholders button in the Define Trend dialog. 11. Click OK. Data displays on the trend. Note: If you select the Description check box, on the Display Format tab in the Define Trend dialog, then the description of the data set is taken from the PI Calculation Data dialog and repeated for each column that is plotted. There are usually no engineering units for a data set column.

Time Intervals for Plotting Tags and Data Sets The Start and End plot times on the Define Trend (page 85) dialog are used to determine the time range for plotting tags. However, a data set may have different time boundaries than the plot time start and end for the tags. If the time range for the data set starts later than the time range for the tags, the data set traces begin with X marks.

Refresh a Trend Containing a Data Set In a display containing only data from data sets, the data is refreshed based on the Data Set Refresh Interval, which is configured in the data set. The trend does not update again until the Data Set Refresh Interval has expired, at which time it requests another set of values and redraws itself. A PI tag in a display, on the other hand, receives exception notifications from the PI System and is updated on the display whenever the polling period elapses (every five seconds by default).

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Add Data Sets to Bars or Values in a Display

If both PI and data set data are to be plotted on the same trend, then the latest data set value is continued toward the end time axis with changing PI exception data points until the refresh interval expires and new data are received from the data set. If a data set has a PI Tag placeholder, then the data set is refreshed every time a new value is received for the PI Tag placeholder.

Add Data Sets to Bars or Values in a Display A single value from a data set may be added to a display as either a Value or a Bar. In general, queries can return many rows of results. The Value or Bar uses only the data from the last row of the results for the column you select; the rest of the results are discarded. In many cases, you can use an “order by” clause to control which rows are returned first. For example, the following query guarantees the most recent sample appears in the ProcessBook Value field: Select lab_val from Lab_Data where last_ID = “BW” Order by Sample_time asc

Run PI ProcessBook When Data Sets Are Included When you start PI ProcessBook and open an updating display, it connects to your PI System and remains connected until you close PI ProcessBook. If you have configured data sets in a ProcessBook, PI ProcessBook connects to a data source as soon as you open a display using data set results. The first time you use a particular data source, the external database may ask you for login information through a login dialog. After a successful connection, PI ProcessBook retains this information for use throughout the session. When you close the session, PI ProcessBook does not store your password locally because it would be a security risk to store a password locally. If your data source is configured to use Windows Authentication, then your network credentials are used to gain access to the data and you are unlikely to be prompted.

Edit a Data Set You may change the Data Source, the Data Set Refresh Interval, the Description, or the query. However, when you change a data set, you may affect other queries that use the same data set. 1. Click Tools > Data Sets. 2. The Data Sets (page 163) dialog appears. 3. Under Data Sets, click the data set you want to edit, and then click the Edit button.

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4. Either the PI Calculation Data dialog or the ODBC Data dialog displays depending upon the data set you selected. 5. If the PI Calculation Data dialog displays, then make your changes in the appropriate fields. 6. If the ODBC Data dialog displays, then do the following: Note: To determine if Microsoft Query is installed, the application checks your MSDOS path for the existence of msquery.exe)

If the Design button is enabled, then: 1. Click the Design button. An instance of Microsoft Query is started using the current data source and query. 2. Edit the data set in the MS Query environment. 3. Click File > Return to ProcBook when you are finished. Note: Microsoft Query cannot edit query statements that contain placeholders.

If the Design button is disabled, then: If Microsoft Query is not installed, the Design button is disabled; however, you can type the query in the query text box. You can also copy and paste a query from another query building tool. 1. Add or edit the appropriate WHERE clause in the query to edit a placeholder data set or existing placeholders (question marks represent placeholders in the query statement). 2. Click the Placeholders button. This action causes the syntax of the query to be checked. 3. If the syntax is valid, then the Placeholders dialog displays with the current placeholders. If the syntax is invalid, then an invalid query message is displayed. 4. Click the Check Syntax button, to complete a syntax check of your query. The status of the query is returned. 5. When you have finished modifying the data set, click OK. If the data set is in use in a display, the Confirm Data Set Modification dialog displays. 6. If you wish to proceed, click Continue. The Data Sets dialog appears. 7. Select the column(s) to be used and click OK to return to the dialog.

Delete a Data Set Before you can remove a data set from the PI ProcessBook list, you must remove it from any symbols that use it. If the Data Set is a custom data set, which is a COM object, remove it through Add-in Manager dialog box. Otherwise, use the following steps to delete a data set first from all displays in which it is used and then from the ProcessBook altogether. 1. Click Tools > Data Sets. The Data Sets (page 163) dialog appears.

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Copy a Data Set to Another ProcessBook

2. Under Data Sets, click the data set name, and then click the Show Use button to determine if any display or symbol is using the data set. 3. Close the Data Sets dialog. 4. Open each display in which a data set is being used and delete the data set from the appropriate dialog box, such as the Define Trend or Define Value dialog. 5. Save each display. 6. Reopen the Data Sets dialog. 7. Under Data Sets, click the data set you want to delete, and then click the Delete button. 8. The data set is removed from under Data Sets in the Data Sets dialog. If the data set is in use, then the Can't Delete Data Set dialog appears.

Copy a Data Set to Another ProcessBook While data sources are configured for a computer, data sets are established for only one ProcessBook or independent display file. 1. Open the new or target ProcessBook or independent display file. 2. Open the old or source ProcessBook or independent display file. 3. From the Tools menu, select Data Sets. The Data Sets (page 163) dialog appears. 4. Under Data Sets, click the data set you want to copy, and then click the Copy button. The Copy Data Sets dialog appears.

5. From the To Open Workbook drop-down list, select the correct target, and then click OK.

Loading Custom Data Sets Before you can access a custom data set in a display, you must create a data set add-in and install it on your computer. Then you must select it through the PI ProcessBook Add-In Manager (page 11) dialog.

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Chapter 10

PI Notifications in PI ProcessBook PI Notifications provides PI users the ability to configure rules that deliver notifications by email and other delivery channels when certain conditions are met. These conditions are configurable and are normally dependent on a number of data inputs. Additionally, PI Notifications can be configured to deliver various content types to the notification contact, such as an attached PDI file or a path to a PDI file. For further information, see the PI Notifications User Guide. PI ProcessBook includes a PI Notifications add-in that retrieves notifications subscribed to from your PI System, and lists them in a window. This add-in also supports viewing and managing Contacts (page 182), which allows users to communicate and collaborate with other users from within PI ProcessBook without having to launch a separate application.

Launch PI Notifications Click View > Notifications to manually open the Notifications window. The Notifications window (page 179) is automatically opened at startup if it was left open when you previously shutdown PI ProcessBook. You can also launch PI ProcessBook to view a notification by opening a PDI file attached to a notification email. Note: the add-in only loads in PI ProcessBook if the appropriate PI Notifications client software is already installed separately.

Notifications Window The Notifications window provides controls for viewing PI Notifications in PI ProcessBook (page 179).

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The title bar displays the number of active, open notifications. This number appears in parentheses to the right of the Notifications window title, for example Notifications(2). Use the controls at the top of the Notifications window to receive notifications (page 180) and view notifications (page 181). A Notification rule is a set of conditions that leads to the creation of notifications. Notification rules and their associative notifications appear in the bottom half of the Notifications window. For more information on how to create Notification rules, see the PI Notifications User Guide. Note: Use the pin icon to lock the docking window to your screen. Click the pin icon again to unpin the window and minimize it along the border of your PI ProcessBook window. When a docking window is unpinned, a button appears along the side of the screen. Hover over it to re-expand the window. The size and position of the Notifications window is saved so that it opens the same way the next time you open PI ProcessBook.

Receive Notifications Use the icons at the top of the Notifications window (page 179) to begin, pause, or resume receipt of notifications.

180



Play icon



Pause icon

indicates that incoming notifications are halted. indicates that you are receiving notifications.

Notifications Window

View Notifications If set to receive notifications (page 180), the Notifications window (page 179) automatically provides a list of notifications that correspond to your notifications subscription list. You can further filter this list with the controls available at the top of the Notifications window: 1. In the View Notifications drop-down list, click one of the following options: ο ο

ο

Active—displays all open notifications. Timerange—select either the Start Time or End Time text box and enter a PI Time (page 3) string. Click the corresponding drop-down arrow to launch a calendar to help you find a specific date. Recent—enter a time period to search within the last x-number of seconds, minutes, hours, or days.

2. Click the Go button

to view your list of filtered notifications.

Open Displays Associated with a Notification Click the Open Display icon

in the Notifications window (page 179),

-orRight click a notification and click Open Associated Display(s). This opens or creates displays for the content associated with the notification(s) selected in the list. The displays are opened and have the union of the selected time ranges applied to each symbol contained therein. This button is enabled if the selected notification items do not have all their associated content already open in PI ProcessBook; otherwise it is disabled.

Work with Notifications Click a notification in the Notifications window (page 179) to have its time range applied to the active display. Right click a notification to see a context menu providing the following options: •

Acknowledge Instance to acknowledge that action has been taken regarding the notification, and that no further escalation is needed.



Acknowledge Subscription to acknowledge receipt of a notification you are subscribed to.



Add Comment to comment on a notification.



Show Contact Events to toggle the display of contact events for each notification.



Show TimeSelector to toggle the display of filter options.



Expand All/Collapse All to expand or collapse a notification grouping.



View Notification Rule Summary to display the properties of the notification rule that triggered a selected notification.

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Set Time for All Displays sets the time range of all open displays to the time range of a selected notification, or union of time ranges for multiple selected notifications.



Set Time for Associated Displays sets the time range of displays associated with the notification rule to the time range of the notification.



Open Associated Display(s) opens the displays corresponding to the selected notifications and applies the union of the selected time ranges to each.

Contacts Window The Contacts window allows you to view and manage contacts from within PI ProcessBook. It is split into two panes and provides the following: •

Notification Contacts (page 182)



MS Office Communicator Contacts (page 183)

You do not need PI AF or PI Notifications to use most features of Contacts. However, to view the Contacts window you must have Office Communicator installed and be logged in at the time you launch PI ProcessBook. See the Microsoft Office Communicator home page for further information. Note: Use the pin icon to lock the docking window to your screen. Click the pin icon again to unpin the window and minimize it along the border of your PI ProcessBook window. When a docking window is unpinned, a button appears along the side of the screen. Hover over it to re-expand the window.

Open Contacts Window Click View > Contacts to open the Contacts docking window. The Contacts Toolbar is located at the top of the window and displays: •

User Status—displays your full user name and current availability. This field cannot is not editable from within PI ProcessBook.



Connection button—displays your connection state to Office Communicator.

Notification Contacts The Notification Contacts panel displays the list of contacts that are subscribed to the notification you have selected in the Notifications window (page 179).

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Contacts Window

Contacts are grouped according to type: Escalation Group, Group, and Individual. The group heading displays the icon associated with its type in PI AF. This contact list is not sorted, but appears in the order listed in PI AF to preserve the escalation order for an escalation group. The first entry in the escalation list has the highest priority. A contact's presence (page 184) is shown with an icon to the left of the contact name.

MS Office Communicator Contacts The MS Office Communicator Contacts panel displays your contacts from MS Office Communicator. Groups are sorted alphabetically. Contacts are sorted alphabetically within groups. Offline contacts are placed at the end. A contact's presence (page 184) is shown with an icon to the left of the contact name. Filter MS Office Communicator Contacts

Enter text in the Contacts Filter text box to search for contacts. Filter results appear in this panel. Click the Clear button to clear your filter parameters.

Work with Contacts Right click a contact to bring up a context menu that enables you to: •

View calendar availability (not available with MS Office Communicator 2005)



Send an instant message (page 184)



Send email (page 184)



Sort contacts (page 184)



View contact information (page 184)

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Send an Instant Message to a Contact Right click a contact in the Contacts window and click Send Instant Message. This launches an MS Office Communicator conversation window with the selected contact(s). Multiple contacts are not supported with Office Communicator 2005. Send Email to a Contact Right click a contact in the Contacts window and click Send Email. A new email message for the selected contact is composed. A submenu provides the following options: •

No attachments—creates a blank email.



Display Screen Capture—attaches a screen capture of the active display. Any changes made to the display while it has been open are included in the screen capture; you do not need to save the file first.

Note: You must have Microsoft Outlook XP or greater installed on your machine to send email to a contact.

Sort Contacts Right click a contact in the Contacts window and click Sort. A submenu provides the following options: •

Alphabetically



By Availability—sorts contacts by contacts' presence (page 184). Selected by default.

View Contact Information Right click a contact in the Contacts window and click View Contact Card. The Office Communicator Contact Card window appears where you can view contacts from MS Office Communicator.

Contacts Presence The PI ProcessBook PI Notifications add-in allows you to view personalized presence attributes from Office Communicator while working in PI ProcessBook. For more information on presence, see the Microsoft Office Online Help.

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Chapter 11

Embedding and Linking Overview of PI ProcessBook OLE Compound Documents ActiveX is Microsoft technology used for developing reusable object oriented software components. Container applications are those that can contain ActiveX objects. Compound Documents are documents that contain parts from more than one application. The parts may be spreadsheets, word processing documents, ProcessBook displays, etc. A compound document consists of a container document plus sub-documents that are 'served' by other applications PI ProcessBook compound document functionality has two aspects: •

ProcessBook displays can be containers for objects from other applications, such as databases, spreadsheets, or documents.



ProcessBook displays may be used to exhibit dynamic data within other container applications. In this case, the ProcessBook or display is considered an object.

OLE Automation in PI ProcessBook OLE Automation of PI ProcessBook means that an application or program outside PI ProcessBook can manipulate PI ProcessBook objects such as displays or symbols. Currently, applications with OLE capability include Microsoft Excel, Access, and Visual Basic (VB), among others. A specific set of properties and methods are associated with each object type. Data from PI ProcessBook can be retrieved or manipulated according to scripts originating outside PI ProcessBook. For example, with the proper scripts in place, you could: •

Obtain a PI ProcessBook object, such as a display, from PI ProcessBook and print it in an Excel spreadsheet. In fact, you can write the script to retrieve the display only when certain tag values or other conditions are met.



Write a Visual Basic program to start PI ProcessBook, assess a particular display, and then alter it in some way.



Click a button in ProcessBook to make an Excel spreadsheet show the average and raw data of the current trend in ProcessBook. Then you could change the time range of the ProcessBook, click the button again, and see the Excel spreadsheet update with the new time range.

Although Automation scripts are not required to use a dialect of Visual Basic, at the present time, that is the most common approach. OSIsoft is using Visual Basic as the standard testing language for OLE Automation. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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For more information on how to write Visual Basic scripts for use with PI ProcessBook, click Help > PI Processbook VBA Language Reference.

Object Linking and Embedding An object application may be connected to a container application by either embedding (page 186) or linking (page 186). The distinctions between the two have to do with the ways in which the object is stored and updated.

Embedded Objects Embedded objects are copied from an existing file or created and then stored as an integral part of the container application, such as PI ProcessBook. Using an embedded object increases the file size of a ProcessBook significantly. Formats not natively supported by PI ProcessBook, such as Windows metafiles, can now be pasted from the Windows clipboard as objects in a ProcessBook display. To change the contents of an embedded file, double-click it. The source application software is invoked, and you can edit the object with the source application's commands. ProcessBook is a time-based application. When ProcessBook is used as an embedded object, it updates dynamically whenever you double-click it. If you rename a ProcessBook or move it to another directory, drive, or PC, any embedded objects in displays can still be changed as long as your system can locate the appropriate source application software.

Linked Objects Linked object information is not stored as a part of the destination application. Instead, the destination file stores only the location of the linked source file. No matter how many links it has, only one version of the linked file is stored and maintained. Using a linked file increases the file size of a ProcessBook less than using an embedded object. In establishing an OLE link, you may update the: •

Contents of the object dynamically whenever the source file changes



Update the object only by manual command

To change the data in a linked file, such as which tags you have selected, you switch to the source application and open the file. Changes are then reflected in the container display according to the update method you selected. Alternatively, if you double-click the object, the source application and the actual file open, allowing you to edit the object. If the source application supports in-place activation, you can edit within the container window; otherwise a source application window opens.

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ActiveX Controls

If you rename a ProcessBook or move it to another directory, drive, or PC, any links from displays to source files can break. These broken links need to be re-established if you wish to continue using them.

Should You Link or Embed? •

Embed—If you want to update the object data within the target document or if you want to store all the source data within the container application. This option is also better if you plan to link files to different locations.



Link—If you want the data to update dynamically or when you need to minimize file size. The source application and linked files must continue to be available.

Note: When you link to a ProcessBook container, there is a risk of accidentally changing the source file.

ActiveX Controls You can insert ActiveX controls that are installed on your PC into PI ProcessBook displays. If you move the displays to other machines, then you must also install the controls there. Some ActiveX controls are self-contained and will work without further scripting. Most require additional VBA code before they function correctly.

Add a Control 1. In Build mode, open a display. 2. On the Drawing toolbar, click the Control button

, or

Choose Draw > Control. The mouse pointer changes to a control pointer. 3. Click in the display where you want to add the control and drag the pointer to form a rectangle into which the control will be placed. When you release the mouse button, the Insert Control dialog appears. 4. Under Controls, click the appropriate control, and then click OK. For example, if you add a calendar control to a display, it might look like this:

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In Run mode, a user could change the month and date. A programmer could incorporate the calendar into scripts associated with the display.

Example of Embedded and Linked Objects in a ProcessBook Display In the example below, a ProcessBook display includes a process schematic, an embedded list of equipment parts, and a link to lab results.

The equipment parts list is stored with the ProcessBook display. If your PC has an installed copy of MSWord, you can peruse or modify the list at any time simply by double-clicking it. The lab results are stored by the source application, not in the ProcessBook display. The display can be set to update lab data dynamically whenever the results in the source application changed, or it can be set to update lab data when you click an Update Now button on the Edit Links dialog.

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Icons vs. Graphics

Icons vs. Graphics You may choose to have embedded or linked objects displayed either as graphic representations or as icons. An icon uses the minimum area of your display and would be appropriate for reference material, such as definitions. The icon for the source application appears unless you select another one. Choosing an icon to represent a linked file results in a slightly smaller ProcessBook file size. Choosing icons for embedded objects does not reduce ProcessBook file size.

Embed in PI ProcessBook Objects may be created within a PI ProcessBook display by the source application and then stored as embedded objects. Alternatively, you may create objects from existing files or parts of files. In addition, you can embed an object by dragging or pasting it from another application. You must be in Build mode in order to insert a new object. Click Insert > Object to launch the Insert Object dialog.

Embed an Existing File in a Display 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, click Insert > Object. The Insert Object dialog appears. 3. Select Create from File. 4. Click the Browse button. The Browse dialog appears. 5. Browse and locate the file you want to embed and then click the Open button. The file name is displayed in the File box, or In the File box, type the path where the file is located. 6. If you want to display an icon rather than a graphic, click the Display as Icon check box. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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7. Click OK. The object appears on your display.

Embed a New File in a Display 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, click Insert > Object. The Insert Object dialog appears. 3. Leave Create New selected (the default position). 4. Under Object Type, click the type of object you want to embed. Note: If you want to display an icon rather than a graphic, select the Display as Icon check box.

5. Click OK. The object appears on your display. 6. Adjust the size and positioning of the object. 7. Commands for the source application are available on the menus. Create the contents of the new object and click elsewhere on the display to return to ProcessBook. 8. Save the display.

Windows Drag and Drop Use the Windows drag and drop feature to move or copy an object from another OLE application or display into a ProcessBook display or vice versa. To move an object, simply drag it. To copy an object, press CTRL and drag it. PI ProcessBook must be in Build mode to successfully have an object dragged or dropped. Note: if you open a display and drag an object elsewhere, the display is permanently changed, regardless of whether you save it or simply close it.

Link a File to a Display You can create a link from a ProcessBook display to an existing file. The linked object appears in a rectangle within your display. It is updated whenever the source file changes, unless you change the link setting from Automatic to Manual. You must be in Build mode to insert a linked object, however you may move or resize linked objects in either Build or Run mode. You may also edit the contents of a linked object, but you are actually editing the original source file, not simply the image in the ProcessBook display. 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, click Insert > Object. The Insert Object dialog appears.

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Dynamic and Manual Updates of a Linked Object

3. Select Create from File. 4. Click the Browse button. The Browse dialog appears. 5. Browse and locate the file you want to embed and then click the Open button. The file name appears in the File box, or In the File box, type the path where the file is located. Note: If you want to display an icon rather than a graphic, select the Display as Icon check box.

6. Select the Link check box. 7. Click OK. The object appears on your display. 8. Adjust the size and positioning of the object.

Dynamic and Manual Updates of a Linked Object The default setting for a link is automatic updates, meaning that whenever the source data are changed, the data in your display changes. You can change this updating frequency to manual through the Links dialog. Manual updates are also initiated through this dialog.

Edit, Update, or Break Links If you have created an automatic link to another object, it updates whenever you open the entry. If you have created a manually updated link, use the Update Now button on the Links dialog to update your linked object. When you move a display, you may need to change the sources for linked objects by breaking the links and re-establishing them. 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, click Edit > Links. The Links dialog appears. 3. Click the link you want to change. Note: You can select several links at once by pressing the CTRL key and clicking each link.

4. Choose one of the following options: ο ο ο

Select Manual—Updates the linked data manually Click Update Now—Updates the linked data immediately Click Open Source—Edits the linked data

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ο

Click Break Link—Permanently breaks the link. The object is converted to a picture (metafile).

5. Click OK.

How Links Are Stored When you establish a link between a ProcessBook display and a source file, the link is stored in two ways, the relative path for the link, and the absolute path for the link. The relative path is the relationship between the location of the source file and the location of the target file in the directory tree. The absolute path includes the drive, directory, and file name of the source file.

Select a New Source Link When you move a ProcessBook or display that contains links to source files, if both the absolute and the relative paths change, you need to reestablish the links. To reestablish these links: 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, click Edit > Links. The Links dialog appears. 3. Click the Change Source button. The Change Source dialog appears.

Edit the Appearance of an OLE Object Once an OLE object appears in a display, you can resize it, move it around on the display, or copy it. There are, however, a few differences in how OLE objects respond to ProcessBook commands, compared to native objects such as symbols. Although you must be in Build mode to insert an OLE object or edit links, you can edit OLE objects from either Run mode or Build mode. When you select an OLE object, switching modes does not cancel the selection.

Commands That Ignore OLE objects

192

Command

Location

Action

Select All

Edit menu

Does not include OLE objects.

Zoom/Fit All Symbols

View menu

Ignores OLE objects.

Align

Arrange menu

Does not work because you cannot select more than one OLE object at a time.

Placement of OLE objects

Command

Location

Action

Forward

Arrange menu

Does not work because you cannot select more than one OLE object at a time.

Backward

Arrange menu

Does not work because you cannot select more than one OLE object at a time.

Group

Arrange menu

Does not work because you cannot select more than one OLE object at a time.

Rotate

Arrange menu

Does not work with OLE objects.

Flip

Arrange menu

Does not work with OLE objects.

Placement of OLE objects OLE objects appear to obscure other elements of the display, such as text or symbols, if the OLE objects were created before the native symbols. The most recently created OLE object appears on top of older OLE objects and native symbols.

OLE Object Colors You may wish to use a background within an OLE object in a contrasting color to the display. To change the colors used in an OLE object, go to the source application. ProcessBook Color Preferences do not apply to OLE objects.

Edit the Contents of OLE objects Some source applications permit in-place activation, which means that if you double-click the OLE object, the source application opens, displays its menus and commands through the ProcessBook menu bar, and permits you to edit the object in place within PI ProcessBook. Other source applications open a new window for editing when you double-click the OLE object. You can edit OLE object contents in either Run or Build mode.

Edit the Contents of an Embedded Object You cannot edit an embedded object by opening the source application first because the embedded object is not a separate file. Instead, open the source application from within the embedded object in the ProcessBook display.

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Edit the Contents of a Linked Object To edit the contents of a linked object, either double-click the object or open the source application and make changes. These are immediately reflected in the ProcessBook display if it is open; otherwise the changes appear the next time you open the ProcessBook display. Note: When editing a linked object file, remember that the file may also be an object in other applications besides PI ProcessBook.

In addition, you can reach the source application through the Links dialog. 1. Click Edit > Links. The Links dialog appears. 2. Click the appropriate link. 3. Click the Open Source button to open the source file.

Edit Contents of OLE objects 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, double-click the OLE object you want to edit. 3. Refer to the following table: If

Then

The source application permits in-place activation, menus and commands for the source application appear on your screen, temporarily replacing ProcessBook menus.

Edit the object. Save it if it is a linked file. Click elsewhere on the display to return to ProcessBook or press the ESC key.

The source application does not permit in-place activation, a new window containing the source application appears.

Edit the object. Save it if it is a linked file. Close the window and return to ProcessBook.

Delete an OLE Object from a Display 1. In Build mode, click the OLE object you want to delete. 2. Click Edit > Clear.

Display an OLE Object with an Icon To save space on a ProcessBook display for a linked object use an icon, rather than a graphic representation of the data. You may select to display an icon when you are creating the object by selecting the Display as Icon check box in the Insert Object dialog.

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Convert Objects to Icons

Later, you can switch between an icon and a graphic representation of the object, as described below. If you have made the graphic representation other than a square shape, the icon may be distorted.

Convert Objects to Icons 1. Open the display. 2. In Build mode, click the object you want to change. 3. Click Edit > Object (at the bottom of the menu) > Convert. The Convert dialog appears.

4. Select the Display As Icon check box 5. Click OK. The object switches from a graphic to an icon. Note: To switch from an icon to a graphic, clear the Display as Icon check box.

6. To select the icon to use, click the Change Icon button. The Change Icon dialog appears.

ο

If you want to return to the default icon, then select Default.

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ο ο ο

If you want to select a new icon from the available group, select From File and choose a new icon. If you want to select a new file to provide the icon, click the Browse button. If you want to change the name of the label that displays beneath the icon, then type the new name in the Label box.

7. Click OK to return to the Convert dialog. 8. In the Convert dialog box, click OK.

Share ProcessBook Displays with Other Applications You can embed a ProcessBook display within another OLE application, or you can link an entire ProcessBook. In embedding, the display is called a PI Display Document. Although applications with OLE functionality use similar commands, they are not exactly alike. The following general procedure uses examples from an Excel spreadsheet. The procedures for linking are similar to those for linking objects to ProcessBook displays.

Embed a New Display in Another OLE Application 1. Open the container application. For example, open a spreadsheet and select a cell in which you want to place a display. 2. Click Insert > Object. The Object dialog appears. 3. On the Create New tab, under Object type, click PI Display Document. Note: If you want to display an icon rather than a graphic, select the Display as icon check box.

4. Click OK. 5. The display is embedded in the container application.

Embed an Existing Display in Another OLE Application 1. Open the display you want to embed. 2. Open the container application. For example, open a spreadsheet and select a cell in which you want to place a ProcessBook display. 3. In Build mode, click Edit > Select All, and drag the objects in the display into the other application. 4. Save the file.

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Link a ProcessBook to Another Application

Note: When you activate the dragged contents, the entire original display is drawn, regardless of which objects were dragged to the new container.

Link a ProcessBook to Another Application 1. Open the container application. For example, open a spreadsheet and select a cell in which you want to place a display. 2. Click Insert > Object. The Object dialog appears. 3. Click the Create from File tab. 4. In the File name box, type the path. -orClick the Browse button and locate the ProcessBook file (.piw) that you want to link to. 5. Select the Link to File check box. 6. Click OK. The ProcessBook icon is displayed in your application. Note: If you select the Display as Icon check box, then the Object Packager icon is used by default, rather than the ProcessBook icon.

OLE Container/Server A ProcessBook display may be shown in another application. For example, you could include an updating trend in an incident report produced in a word processing application such as Microsoft Word. Or, you could prepare a presentation for a group by using Microsoft PowerPoint to prepare slides and including embedded displays from PI ProcessBook. To do this, use the Insert Object command in the second application and insert an object of type PI Display Document.

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Appendix A

Visual Basic for Applications in PI ProcessBook OSIsoft licenses Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) from Microsoft in order to provide an integrated development environment within PI ProcessBook. This is the same VBA environment that is used in Microsoft Office, Visio, AutoCAD, Great Plains Dynamics, and many other applications. In PI ProcessBook, each display has a VBA project associated with it. You can write scripts that execute in response to events in PI ProcessBook, either based on user actions or data updates. You can also use VBA to automate routine tasks or to cause changes in a display when data changes. In addition, you can insert other ActiveX controls obtained through Microsoft Office software or from outside sources.

VBA Commands Access VBA through the VBA toolbar, or by choosing Tools > Macro: Visual Basic Editor

Switches to VBA Editor window

Run Macros

Opens the Macros dialog, which provides a way to select, debug, and run existing VBA scripts

Design Mode

Stops any scripts that may be running or may start running. Useful for debugging

ActiveX Automation ActiveX Automation refers to the technology of placing ActiveX controls (independent software modules) within applications and using scripts to manipulate the application and/or the controls.

What You Can Do with ActiveX Automation in PI ProcessBook Data from PI ProcessBook can be retrieved or manipulated according to scripts originating either within or outside PI ProcessBook. For example, with the proper scripts in place, you could: •

Obtain a PI ProcessBook object, such as a display, from PI ProcessBook and print it in an Excel spreadsheet. In fact, you can write the script to retrieve the display if and only if certain tag values or other conditions are met.

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Write a VB program to start PI ProcessBook, access a particular display, and then alter it in some way.



Click on a command button in ProcessBook to make an Excel spreadsheet show the average and raw data of the current trend in ProcessBook. Then you change the time range of the ProcessBook, click the button again, and see the Excel spreadsheet update with the new time range.



Use a mouse click within a PI ProcessBook display to initiate updates or adjustments in the display.



Update a PI ProcessBook display by typing new tag names into a spreadsheet.

Although Automation scripts are not required to use a dialect of Visual Basic, at the present time, that is the most common approach.

Automation Vocabulary Understanding OLE automation requires some technical vocabulary. Terms used in the PI ProcessBook VBA Language Reference Guide are defined below.

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Automation

Accessing an object in an application and changing it or using it without using the user interface.

ActiveX Automation Server

The application that provides data. PI ProcessBook is an OLE Automation Server. It provides access to its internal objects from other applications.

ActiveX Automation Container

The application that initiates changes through scripts. PI ProcessBook is an Automation container, as are Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access, and a few other commercial products.

Object

A specific item that may be manipulated by a script. For example, a ProcessBook, a display, or a symbol may be the object of a VB or VBA script.

Property

An attribute of an object. An object with read-write properties can have variable information assigned to it by the script. A read-only property cannot be changed.

Method

An action that can be performed on an object and may or may not return a value. Sometimes called a function.

Event

A procedure that executes whenever a particular action occurs, such as a mouse click.

Appendix B

ODBC ODBC Driver Manager PI ProcessBook sends queries to a standardized interface from Microsoft called the ODBC Driver Manager. The Driver Manager forwards ODBC queries to appropriate vendorprovided drivers, which access the outside databases and return the requested data to your ProcessBook display.

ODBC Drivers Each DBMS (database management system), such as Microsoft SQL Server, requires a specific ODBC Driver, provided by the vendor of the DBMS or a third party. Each driver is a Dynamic Link Library (.dll) that implements a set of subroutine calls to retrieve data from a particular database. The Microsoft ODBC Driver Manager is included as a part of PI ProcessBook installation.

ODBC Data Sources An ODBC data source identifies a database a user wants to access and the information needed to connect to that data. Examples of ODBC data sources are: •

A SQL Server database, the server on which it resides, and the network protocol used to access that server.



An Excel spreadsheet on a file server.



A directory containing a set of dBASE files you want to access.

ODBC data sources have an explicit name, are configured for a particular computer, and may be used by any ODBC- compliant application installed on that computer.

ODBC Data Access PI ProcessBook stores relational queries in data sets within ProcessBook files. The data sets are created, stored, and accessed by name. PI ProcessBook symbols can then access the data sets. The columns in the data set make up the items that can be assigned to the trend, value, or

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bar. The SQL needed to retrieve data for PI ProcessBook can be configured once and used by many displays and symbols. PI ProcessBook must return a time and value pair(s) for display within a symbol (trend, value, or bar). Placeholders act as parameters to an SQL function call. They are evaluated at run time. Placeholders can take three forms: text, start/end times, or a PI tag name. Use the start and end time placeholders when the time limits of the query should be determined from the trend symbol where the query is used. The PI tag name placeholder can be used to join PI data with relational database data. A PI Value is retrieved for the PI tag and then substituted into the query. Using ODBC requires that you install the Microsoft ODBC Driver Manager and drivers (most operating systems already have the Driver Manager and some standard drivers installed). You must then configure data sources (page 203) for ProcessBook and define individual queries, called data sets.

ODBC Data Source Administrator 1. On the Windows Start menu, point to Settings, click Control Panel, double-click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Data Sources (ODBC). The Microsoft ODBC Data Source Administrator dialog appears, or Click Tools > Data Sets. The Data Sets (page 163) dialog appears. 2. Click the New button, and then click ODBC. The ODBC Data Sets dialog appears. 3. Click the Data Source drop-down list to see what ODBC data sources you have already configured, if any. 4. Click the Setup button. The Microsoft ODBC Data Source Administrator dialog appears.

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Prepare for ODBC

Prepare for ODBC In order to use ODBC within your ProcessBook, you must install an ODBC driver and configure the corresponding ODBC data source on your computer. Open the ODBC Data Source Administrator (page 202) and click the Drivers tab to view the ODBC drivers that are already installed on your system. See your System Administrator if you require additional ODBC drivers.

Configure the ODBC Data Source Once any necessary ODBC drivers are installed, you need to configure the ODBC data sources available to the computer. 1. Open the ODBC Data Source Administrator (page 202) dialog. 2. On the User DSN tab, under User Data Sources group, click the name of the ODBC data source you plan to use and then click the Configure button. The Setup dialog box for the data source you selected displays. 3. Add the ODBC data source. Note: Click the Help button, if necessary, and follow Microsoft's instructions for completing the dialog box.

4. When you have completed configuring the data source, click OK to return to the Microsoft ODBC Data Source Administrator dialog.

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Note: To create data sources for any user of the computer, use the System DSN tab instead of the User DSN tab. You can set up data sources on the System DSN tab that are available to all users on the computer, but you must have elevated permissions on the computer.

Use MSQuery to Build Data Sets You can use Microsoft Query (MS Query) for writing queries. It is not distributed with PI ProcessBook, but if you click the Design button in the ODBC Data dialog, then PI ProcessBook searches the registry in your computer to locate MSQry32.exe when the ODBC data sets dialog is opened. Note: The MS Query application does not work with an ODBC query that includes placeholders. Consequently, the Design button in the ODBC Data dialog may be disabled.

Assumptions about Timestamps and Data Sets When a trend receives data from an ODBC data source, it receives the data as a Time / Value pair. The Value is generated by the query. The Time, however, may be obtained in one of two ways: •

If a Tag placeholder (page 170) is used, then the time will be the time returned by the Tag. This time will supersede any timestamps returned by the query.



One or more of the columns returned by the query may contain a date and/or time. If more than one timestamp column is returned, the first one as ordered by the SQL query is used.

Stored Procedures in Queries Stored procedures can be used in ODBC data sets. They may contain placeholders as long as your database accepts the stored procedures call as a text string. The common syntax for this is: execute procname ('arg', 22, ?) Check the documentation of your database management system for details. Stored procedures generally return results in rows and columns, just as a normal SQL query does. The only way to determine the columns returned by a stored procedure is to perform a test execution. When you are building the data set, because ProcessBook needs to know the columns returned, it executes the procedure. If the procedure call includes placeholders, the following defaults are used:

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Troubleshoot ODBC Data Sets

Text

Actual text placeholder string

StartTime

Current time

EndTime

Current time

Tag

0

An ODBC data set is created with a set of default placeholders. When it is attached to a specific symbol, the query's placeholders can be customized for that symbol, without affecting the placeholders defined for other symbols using that data set. For example, you can create a query for a database of laboratory data using a text placeholder for the sample name. You can then use a different sample name for every trend, bar, or value, rather than defining a new data set query for each sample name.

Troubleshoot ODBC Data Sets Data sets may be added, deleted, copied, or edited by selecting the New, Delete, Edit, or Copy buttons in the Data Sets dialog. Columns are defined by the data set query. To see the columns returned by the query, select the dataset when configuring a symbol to use it. The dialog shown from the Data Sets dialog opened from the Tools menu does not show the columns. The Show Use button opens a dialog that indicates what displays and symbols include data from this data set.

Trace ODBC Calls The ODBC Driver Manger provides an option for recording a log of all calls to the Driver Manager from all ODBC clients. The default options for ODBC are set to omit tracing and logging ODBC calls If you choose to trace ODBC calls, you may suffer some degradation in system performance.

Initiate Call Tracing 1. Click Tools > Data Sets. The Data Sets dialog appears. 2. Click New. Click ODBC. The ODBC Data dialog appears. 3. Click Setup. The ODBC Data Source Administrator dialog appears. 4. Select the Tracing tab. 5. To change the file where tracing is logged, choose a new file path in the Log File Path text box. Use the Browse button to search for files. 6. To initiate tracing, click the Start Tracing Now button. The label changes from Start Tracing Now to Stop Tracing Now, and the Log File Path text box becomes unavailable. 7. To stop tracing, click the Stop Tracing Now button. PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Delete an ODBC Driver If you have deleted all data sources using a particular driver, you may unistall it from your system. To do this, you must use the setup program for the ODBC driver. Note: If you delete the wrong driver you need to reload it from the vendor.

Delete an ODBC Data Source If you remove data sources while they are in use, displays that use them fail to retrieve data. Consequently, before you remove a data source, remove all data sets in which it is being used. PI ProcessBook cannot prevent users from removing a needed data source from the computer. 1. Open the ODBC Data Source Administrator (page 202) dialog. 2. On the User DSN tab, under User Data Sources, click the name of the ODBC data source you want to delete and then click the Remove button. A confirmation message is displayed. 3. Click the Yes button to delete the data source. 4. Click OK to close the Microsoft ODBC Data Source Administrator dialog, then close the ODBC Data dialog. The data source is removed from under Data Sets in the Data Sets dialog.

Edit an ODBC Data Source Occasionally you may want to use a different computer to access an existing ProcessBook display. If the display contains data from a PI Calculation Data Set, the display works correctly unless the new machine does not point to the same PI Server as the previous one. If this display contains data from an ODBC data set, you will need to reconfigure the correct ODBC data source on the new computer. Essentially this means establishing the same ODBC data source name that was used on the original computer. Follow the steps under Installing ODBC Drivers, and Configuring the ODBC Data Source (page 203). If the display contains data from a custom data set, then you must install that PI ProcessBook add-in on the new machine.

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Appendix C

Installation System Requirements For system requirements, see the OSIsoft Tech Support site: http://techsupport.osisoft.com/Products.htm (http://techsupport.osisoft.com/Products.htm)

Upgrade from a Previous Version of PI ProcessBook If you have a previous version of PI ProcessBook installed on your computer, you should upgrade that version rather than uninstall it. During the installation of PI ProcessBook, your previous version of PI ProcessBook is removed; however, .ini file settings are retained. If you have created or edited displays and ProcessBooks with other versions of PI ProcessBook, those files will still work. Note: if your existing version is significantly older, you may need to migrate the displays through intermediate versions to ensure successful migration.

Other PI System Client Products •

If you have other client products, such as PI DataLink, PI ODBC-PC, PI SDK, or PI API, the same root path is used for installation, often C:\Program Files\PIPC. Otherwise, incompatibilities in the .dll files shared by the applications could occur.



If you have PI BatchView installed on your system, Setup installs a PI ProcessBook Batch group symbol that is compatible with the current version of PI ProcessBook. You can also install PI BatchView after installing PI ProcessBook, and the correct Batch Trend symbol is loaded.



PI SQC is installed with PI ProcessBook.

Installation Test You can view the results of the installation process by examining the setup log: PIPC\DAT\SetupProcessBook.log PI ProcessBook User Guide

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This log also contains information pertaining to the directory structure, node, .dlls, user name, and installation of various PI ProcessBook files. If the log file is not found in the \PIPC\Dat folder, look in the root directory of your system drive (e.g., C:\). Once you install PI ProcessBook, you can see the words PI System on the Windows Start menu under Programs. At this point, you are ready to use PI ProcessBook. Call OSI Technical Support (page 231) if you experience problems with your software.

Installed Files Upon completion, Setup installs PI ProcessBook under the root directory PIPC. Setup also installs online help files and Release Notes. See the Release Notes (readme.htm) for a complete list of files. The Release Notes are normally installed at: C:\Program Files\PIPC\procbook\readme.htm

You can look at SetupProcessBook.log in the Dat directory of your PI ProcessBook installation to see a list of files installed by PI ProcessBook's Setup on your computer. SetupProcessBook.log does not show the files installed by VBA.

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Appendix D

System Administrator Notes PI ProcessBook Connection to Windows NT or UNIX Servers Each PI ProcessBook user creates a new connection to a single PINETMGR process on the PI node. PI Server connections are managed through the PI SDK on the machine running PI ProcessBook. See PI Server documentation for information on security and troubleshooting.

Read/Write Data Access for Users Although most data features in PI ProcessBook require read-only access (writing annotations (page 141) from the Details add-in being one notable exception), the PI System Administrator can configure a user's setup for read-only, read/write, or no access. For more information, refer to PIBuild:PIServer.txt on your PI Server node. If you want to restrict read and/or write access to PI data, make changes in the CLIENTACCESS section of the file pisysdat:piserver.dat. For example: [USERDATABASE] DEFAULT=PI [CLIENTACCESS] DEFAULT=RW DYAN=R ERIC=R JOHN=NONE

The above entries in piserver.dat result in: •

The machines named DYAN and ERIC have only read access to PI data.



The machine named JOHN does not have any access to PI data.



All other machines have both read and write access to PI.

The value for the DEFAULT entry is initially set to RW. Otherwise, existing PINet nodes will not function properly. If you want to restrict write access from PCs, set the default CLIENTACCESS to R and add entries to accommodate your PINet Nodes. For example: [USERDATABASE] DEFAULT=PI CLIENTACCESS DEFAULT=R BRIAN=RW PI ProcessBook User Guide

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The preceding entry allows the PINet node BRIAN to read and to write data to the PI System. All other nodes have read- only access. TCP/IP node names are case-sensitive. In addition, the values for the entries in the CLIENTACCESS section (for example, R and W) are also case-sensitive.

Machine Address Because PI ProcessBook is a client/server application, the communication setup is essential. The machine address, which allows the PI System to recognize your machine, is a key item. Often, the address may be found as an alias in the TCP host file. The Network Administrator should resolve any questions or difficulties regarding the network and addressing.

PROCBOOK.INI The PROCBOOK.INI file contains configuration and preference settings for PI ProcessBook. This file generally resides in two places, the user's default location, C:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\PISystem\PIProcessBook\, and the PIPC\DAT\ directory (on the local drive where PI ProcessBook is installed). When PI ProcessBook is installed on an individual PC using SETUP.EXE, the procbook.ini file in PIPC\DAT\en is created (for the base, English installation). The file in C:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\PISystem\PI-ProcessBook\ is only created once settings are changed in the PI ProcessBook Preferences dialog for the first time. The values in C:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\PISystem\PI-ProcessBook\language override the values in PIPC\DAT\ unless an administrator creates Registry entries to override userspecific settings. The following is a list and brief explanation of the most significant sections and keywords in the PROCBOOK.INI file. The settings used are examples and not necessarily the default values.

Startup Section Initializations for startup of PI ProcessBook Possible entries: StartupProcessBook—Specifies file (with full path) to be opened on start of the application. May be blank. DefaultFileLocation—By default, clicking File > Open displays the local user's My Documents directory. Specifying a different directory in this entry changes the File > Open and File > Save commands to start with a different folder when ProcessBook starts.

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PROCBOOK.INI

ModeBias—R=run-mode, B=build-mode RetainAspectRatio—1=preserve aspect ratio for displays, 0=do not Symbol Library—Specifies a workbook that is opened by selecting the Book of Symbols button from a customized toolbar. MakeBackupFile—1=make backup files while using ProcessBook, 0=do not make backup files Author—Sets the default author for created displays and workbooks ToolTipsEnabled—Setting this entry equal to Y enables ToolTips on dynamic symbols. Setting equal to N disables them. The default (if this entry is not in the .ini file) is Y. International Date Format—Specifies date/time format. 1=Windows format, 0=PI Time format PromptForConversion—1=prompt user when opening a file created with an earlier version, asking whether or not to convert to new format, 0=do not prompt (default) MaxUndoStackSize—Maximum number of elements in the Undo stack (default is 200) Build/Run Scroll Mode—For each mode, set the scrolling: 0=off, 1=on, 2=automatic. GridSize—Sets the Grid Size, in lines per screen unit. Default is 12. File Access Entries—FileAccessTimeout and FileAccessInterval entries, described below, the common INI file (in \PIPC\Dat) is checked first for these settings as opposed to the private INI files. FileAccessTimeout—Number of seconds PI ProcessBook attempts to open a locked file (default is 5 seconds) FileAccessInterval—Number of intervals, in tenths of seconds, between attempts to open a locked file (default is 1/10 of a second) COMTimeOut—This is the number of seconds that the ProcessBook container waits before showing a timeout dialog. The default is 30 seconds. RunSelectorColor—Red, Green, Blue, values can range from 0 to 255, sets the color of the selector rectangle in run mode. MacroProtectionLevel—Specifies how ProcessBook handles macros per display. Possible settings: Level 0—No macro protection (default if entry is not defined) Level 1—Prompts user to disable macros when VBA code is opened Level 2—Prompts user as in Level 1, except when macros are disabled, VBA code is opened and locked in design mode Level 5—Same as Level 1, except no dialog appears when display is opened (can toggle between run and design modes) Level 6—Same as Level 2, except no dialog appears when display is opened (locked in design mode) Toolbar Configuration Entries—Typically the toolbar INI file (PBToolbarConfig.ini) is generated by ProcessBook in the same folder as the private PI ProcessBook User Guide

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System Administrator Notes

PROCBOOK.INI file, and is persisted there. However, you can assign toolbar configurations to other INI files by setting the entries below (in order of precedence, from first to last): TBFilePath—Location and filename that the user's toolbar configuration data will be persisted (this file must have both read and write access). This will also be the first location looked for when loading the toolbar configuration. UserDefaultTB—Read-only location and filename of a toolbar configuration that is searched for, when the file in TBFilePath is not found. This could be a default company, or group, configuration. PBDefaultTB—Read-only location and filename of a toolbar configuration, used only when the two entries above are not found, and there is no toolbar configuration data persisted in the Windows registry. SymbolDLLs—Filenames of additional add-in libraries to load when starting ProcessBook (such as SQC.DLL or BTREND32.DLL). These entries are automatically added when separate components are installed. References—Filenames or paths to VBA references, separated by semicolons (;) URL Home—Specifies the website navigated to when a user clicks the ProcessBook icon in the Help\About box. Default link is to the OSIsoft Website (http://www.osisoft.com/) MaxBitmapMB—Maximum file size (in megabytes) that bitmap images may be loaded in displays. If embedded bitmaps are larger than the specified maximum, ProcessBook scales the images down to lower resolutions. The current default maximum is 16.0 MB. ServerTimeZone—1=Show times and time spans based on the time zone of the server where the tags originate, 0=Show times and time spans based on the time zone of the local machine. 1 is the default. ProcessBook—Setting this value equal to PRIMARY allows users to view ProcessBooks, but not change them. The user has access to the Standard toolbar, including the trend displays command to create ad hoc trends, but cannot save an ad hoc display. EnableScreenSaver—Indicates whether the platform's screen saver should be displayed while ProcessBook is running. A value of 1 enables the screen saver and is appears if it is defined at the operating system level. A value of 0 prevents the screen saver from appearing while ProcessBook is running, even if the screen saver is enabled at the operating system level. The default value is 1. If this entry is not in procbook.ini, the application assumes a value of 1. ConnectUsingAPI—0 = (default)do not connect on startup using the PI API, only use the PI SDK. 1 = connect using the PI API (and the PI SDK). This setting is used to support legacy VBA code in displays/add-ins. Show Value Attributes—Indicates whether value attribute flags (substituted, questionable, annotations) are shown for tags. 1 = Yes (default setting) 0 = No PB2TraceCompatibility—Indicates whether all snapshot values are retained for trend traces or discarded when a new archive event is received on updating trends.

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1 = Yes (default setting). Do not replace snapshot values when a new archive event is received. 0 = No. Use snapshot value filtering/removal logic so that only archive values and any snapshot values since the last archive event are shown on the trend. EnableConnectorAttachments—controls whether symbols drag and dropped on top of a connector are made into connector attachments 1 = true - allow 0 = false - do not allow ConnectorsAvoidConnectors—controls whether connectors are treated as obstacles to be avoided when performing object avoidance 1 = true - connectors are avoided in object avoidance 0 = false - connectors are not avoided in object avoidance AutoEnableScripting—when set to True, new dynamic symbols are automatically enabled for scripting. If set to False, new dynamic symbols are not automatically enabled for scripting. The False setting may improve performance for very complex displays with many symbols. Startup Example [Startup] Startup ProcessBook=PIDEMO.PIW DefaultFileLocation="C:\Program Files\PIPC\Procbook" ModeBias=R Retain Aspect Ratio=0 Symbol Library=SYMLIBRY.PIW PromptForConversion=[PB_PROMPTFORCONVERSION] Show Value Attributes=1 PB2TraceCompatibility=1 MakeBackupFile=0 ToolTipsEnabled=Y Author= International Date Format=1 MaxUndoStackSize=20 Build Scroll Mode=1 Run Scroll Mode=1 GridSize=12 FileAccessTimeout=5 FileAccessInterval=1 COMTimeOut=30 RunSelectorColor=0,0,0 MacroProtectionLevel=0 TBFilePath= UserDefaultTB= PBDefaultTB= References= URL Home="http://www.osisoft.com/" MaxBitmapMB=16 ServerTimeZone=1 PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Processbook=PRIMARY EnableScreenSaver=1 ConnectUsingAPI=0 EnableConnectorAttachments=1

ProcessBook View Section The ProcessBook View section of the .INI file should be modified through the Tools > Preferences dialog and should resemble this example: [ProcessBook View] BookView = 1

BookView controls the view in which a ProcessBook is displayed when opened (0 = Outline, 1 = Book). To change the font for the tabs in book view, add a section similar to this example: [BookTab_Font] Height=-13 Weight=0 Italic=0 Underline=0 PitchAndFamily=0 FaceName=Arial

The FaceName should be a True-Type font so that it can be rotated.

Conversion Section The Conversion section of the .INI file identifies resources for importing other file formats and resembles this example: [Conversion] Import0 = PIDisDIFF Files, impd32.dll, dat Import1 = PI-Graphics Files, impp32.dll, dat

ImportN identifies the file types used when converting VAX-formatted trends or graphics. N increments by one for each file type. The second field is the name of the file type to be imported and will appear in the List Files of Type drop-down box in the Import File dialog box. The third field is the DLL used to import the file type. No path is necessary, since the files reside in the same directory as Procbook.exe. The fourth field is the default extension for the file type. You may have more than one extension for each import type, separated by semicolons.

Data Manager Section The Data Manager section of the .INI file should be added by the System Manager and should resemble this example.

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PROCBOOK.INI

[Data Manager] TIMER = 5000

TIMER sets the poll timer, in milliseconds, for checking whether PI ProcessBook should perform any time-related task. Time-related tasks include retrieving exception reports from PI and re-querying sources. (60,000 is the maximum setting; the default is 5000.)

Trend Definition Section Trend initializations. Possible entries: Autoscale—1=yes, 0=no Value/Description/Plot Title/Grids/Scale Inside Axis/Tag Name/Eng Units/Correlation Coefficient/Linear Correlation/Connecting Lines—1=enable feature, 0=disable feature Background Null—1=sets to have no background color, 0=have background color specified under Elements Start Time/End Time—Default start and end time range (must be a valid PI string) UpdateTimeRange—Maximum time period, in seconds, to support updates. The default is 604,800 seconds, equal to 7 days. If the time range is greater than this value, it does not update automatically even when the end time is '*'. Note that the maximum update range is different from the update rate, which is the frequency with which the computer displays new data from the server, typically every 5 seconds. MarkerWarning—ProcessBook has the option of showing a warning dialog whenever a trend has found too many marker values to display them on the plot. 1=enables this option, 0=disables this option. Default value is 1. RequeryThresholdFactor—Base the max values for each trace on a "factor" of the interval RequeryHoldoffTimeout—Minimum time for re-query since last requery in milliseconds Max Traces—the maximum number of traces per trend. Element—These 16 entries are the main drawn properties of trends. For each of 16 trend elements, you can change the color and shape properties. This is the entry format: ElementX = Name, Color, LineStyle, MarkerStyle Color—Decimal conversion of the color to draw the element. ex. Pen 1 has a color of 65280, this converts to 0x00ff00 in hex -->00ff00 = 0 red, 255 green, 0 blue ==> Green LineStyle—Line style of the element. Key is as follows: -1=no line, 0=solid, 1=dashed, 2=dotted, 3=dash-dot, 4=dash-dot-dot MarkerStyle—Marker style of each trace. Key is as follows: -1=no marker, 0=closed circle, 1=open circle, 2=closed diamond, 3=open diamond, 4=closed square, 5=open square, 6=closed triangle, 7=open triangle, 8=cross Tag Name/Server Name—1=show on legend by default, 0=do not show on legend by default PI ProcessBook User Guide

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Example: [Trend Definition] Autoscale=1 Value=1 Description=0 Markers=0 Plot Title=1 Grids=1 Scale Inside Axis=1 Tag Name=1 Server Name=0 Eng Units=1 Background Null=0 Start Time=*-8 Hour End Time=* MarkerWarning=1 UpdateTimeRange=604800 ;MaxValues=2000 RequeryThresholdFactor=6 RequeryHoldoffTimeout=300000 Max Traces=50 Element1=Horz. Axis,0,0,-1 Element2=Background,8421504,-1,-1 Element3=Horz. Major Grid,0,0,-1 Element4=Horz. Minor Grid,0,0,-1 Element5=Pen 1,65280,0,0 Element6=Pen 2,16776960,0,1 Element7=Pen 3,65535,0,2 Element8=Pen 4,16711935,0,3 Element9=Pen 5,255,0,4 Element10=Pen 6,16777215,0,5 Element11=Pen 7,16711680,0,6 Element12=Pen 8,0,0,7 Element13=Text,16777215,-1,-1 Element14=Vert. Axis,0,0,-1 Element15=Vert. Major Grid,0,0,-1 Element16=Vert. Minor Grid,0,0,-1

Colors Section Defines the 16 colors in the ProcessBook palette. Parameters: ColorX = Red, Green, Blue, values can range from 0 to 255 Example: [Colors] Color1=255,255,255 Color2=255,0,0 Color3=0,255,0 Color4=0,0,255 Color5=0,255,255 Color6=255,0,255 Color7=255,255,0 Color8=0,0,0 216

PROCBOOK.INI

Color9=192,192,192 Color10=128,0,0 Color11=0,128,0 Color12=128,128,128 Color13=128,0,128 Color14=0,0,128 Color15=128,128,0 Color16=0,128,128

Time Range Scroll Section Possible entries: TimeRangeMin/TimeRangeMax—set the minimum/maximum time that can be scrolled using the time range scroll bar (must be valid PI time strings) PageScrollNonlinearity—sets the factor by which clicking on and holding the mouse button down in the page scroll area will increase the speed that the thumbwheel of the scrollbar moves. A value of 0 indicates no acceleration. LineScrollNonlinearity—sets the factor by which clicking on and holding the mouse button down in the line scroll area will increase the speed that the thumbwheel of the scrollbar moves. A value of 0 indicates no acceleration. ThumbScrollNonlinearity—sets the factor by which clicking and holding the thumbwheel of the scrollbar will increase the speed that the thumbwheel moves Example: [Time Range Scroll] TimeRangeMin=*-100d TimeRangeMax=*+10d PageScrollNonlinearity=20 LineScrollNonlinearity=100 ThumbScrollNonlinearity=20

ProcessBook Level Section Font settings for book levels in outline view. Possible entries: Underline—1=underline, 0=no underline FaceName—Font for specified level Height—Height of the font (almost equivalent to font point size) Weight—Boldness factor of the font Italic—1=italic, 0=no italic [PB Level 1] Underline=0 FaceName=MS Sans Serif Height=-16 Weight=700 Italic=0 PitchAndFamily=34 PI ProcessBook User Guide

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[PB Level 2] Underline=0 FaceName=MS Sans Serif Height=-13 Weight=700 Italic=0 PitchAndFamily=34

Display Colors Section Possible entries: DisplayBackgroundColor—Red, Green, Blue, values can range from 0 to 255, sets the background color for any newly created display SymbolFillColor—Red, Green, Blue, values can range from 0 to 255, sets the fill color for newly created symbols SymbolLineColor—Red, Green, Blue, values can range from 0 to 255, sets the line or text color for newly created symbols SymbolBackgroundColor—Red, Green, Blue, values can range from 0 to 255, sets the background color for newly created symbols, for example, the empty portion of a bar symbol takes on this color. Example: [Display Colors] DisplayBackgroundColor=192,192,192 SymbolFillColor = 0,0,255 SymbolLineColor = 255,255,255 SymbolBackgroundColor = 192,192,192

XYPlot Definition Section Modify this section to determine the default formatting of an XYPlot. Autoscale—1=yes, 0=no Value/Description/Plot Title/Grids/Scale Inside Axis/Tag Name/Eng Units/Correlation Coefficient/Linear Correlation/Connecting Lines—1=enable feature, 0=disable feature Background Null—1=sets to have no background color, 0=have background color specified under Elements Start Time/End Time—Default start and end time range (must be a valid PI string) UpdateTimeRange—Maximum time period, in seconds, to support updates. The default is 604,800 seconds, equal to 7 days. If the time range is greater than this value, it does not update automatically even when the end time is '*'. Note that the maximum update range is different from the update rate, which is the frequency with which the computer displays new data from the server, typically every 5 seconds. Element—These 17 entries are the main drawn properties of XYPlots. For each of 17 XYPlot elements, you can change the color and shape properties. This is the entry format:

218

PROCBOOK.INI

ElementX—Name, Color, LineStyle, MarkerStyle Color—Decimal conversion of the color to draw the element. LineStyle—Line style of the element. Key is as follows: -1=no line, 0=solid, 1=dashed, 2=dotted, 3=dash-dot, 4=dash-dot-dot MarkerStyle—Marker style of each XY pair. Key is as follows: -1=no marker, 0=closed circle, 1=open circle, 2=closed diamond, 3=open diamond, 4=closed square, 5=open square, 6=closed triangle, 7=open triangle, 8=cross

Macro Protection The primary purpose of the macro protection feature is to prevent misbehaved VBA event code from executing. Whenever a ProcessBook display (either standalone .pdi file or table of contents entry) is opened, ProcessBook determines whether the display has any VBA code present. MacroProtectionLevel may be set in the [STARTUP] section of Procbook.ini at one of the following levels: Value

Description

0

Display is opened with macros enabled.

1

User is prompted when display is opened; project is set to design mode if user selects .

2

User is prompted when display is opened; project is opened with macros disabled if user selects .

5

User is prompted when display is opened; project is always set to design mode when opened.

6

User is prompted when display is opened; project is always opened with macros disabled.

The default value for this setting is 0, so that if it is not present at all in the .ini file, then PI ProcessBook always executes macros.

View Only Mode Installations of PI ProcessBook can be configured so that users on a network may only view ProcessBooks and not change them. The user has access to the Standard toolbar, including the Trend Display feature, but cannot save an ad hoc display. To put PI ProcessBook into view-only mode, add the line ProcessBook=Primary

to the Startup section of your ProcBook.ini file. Alternatively, if you use Windows Authentication security, you could set the file permissions to read-only for those users who should not modify ProcessBooks. Those users could make a copy of the file locally and modify it.

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System Administrator Notes

INI Security Any string or integer value in PROCBOOK.INI can be overriden in the registry. Overrides can be provided in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\PISystem\PI ProcessBook\Security key. Under that key there is a key for the INI file section. The values are in that section. For example, to override the EnableScreenSaver setting in the STARTUP section of PROCBOOK.INI, a DWORD value EnableScreenSaver with a value of 1 would be created in HKLM\SOFTWARE\PISystem\PI ProcessBook\Security\Startup. If a value is found in the Security overrides section of the registry, the PROCBOOK.INI files will not be accessed. The PI ProcessBook setup kit does not create these registry keys; it is up to each site administrator to create the keys if they want to override the PROCBOOK.INI settings. The purpose of the Registry keys is to lock down a system configuration so that users cannot accidentally change it.

IMPPIGP.INI The IMPPIGP.INI file contains configuration settings used by the Import utility in PI ProcessBook. The file generally resides in the PIPC\DAT directory. As with other .INI files, SETUP.EXE creates this file with default settings. When you import VAX-formatted graphics and graphics that include trends, the import utility uses the settings found in this .INI file to convert items such as color, line style, and fonts. You can edit the .INI file if you want to change these default settings. Before you edit this file, you should make a backup copy so you can restore PI ProcessBook to its original settings. Note: The settings in this .INI file affect graphics and trends included in graphics only. When importing trend displays, the format specified in the Trend Preference setting is used.

The following is a list of the keywords in the IMPPIGP.INI file. The values shown are examples and not necessarily the default settings shipped with PI ProcessBook: The Color section of the .INI file maps VAX colors to PI ProcessBook colors: [Color] Clear=0,0,0 Black=0,0,0 White=255,255,255 Red=255,0,0 Green=0,255,0 Blue=0,0,255 Cyan=0,255,255 Magenta=255,0,255 Yellow=255,255,0 Orange=255,128,0

220

IMPPIGP.INI

GreenYellow=128,255,0 GreenCyan=0,255,128 BlueCyan=0,128,128 BlueMagenta=0,0,128 RedMagenta=255,0,128 DarkGray=128,128,128 LightGray=192,192,192

The values shown to the right of the equal sign are the red, green, blue values. Refer to “Creating Your Own Colors” in the Windows documentation for more information on changing these values. The Line Style section maps the VAX line format to the PI ProcessBook line format: [Line Style] Supress=5 Solid=0 XShortDash=2 DotShortDash=3 LongDash=1 XLongDash=1 TwoDotDash=4 LongDotDash=3 ShortDash=1

The PI ProcessBook values to the right of the equal sign represent: 0 1 2 3 4 5

= = = = = =

solid dash dot dash dot dash dot dot suppress

The Font section maps the VAX supported fonts to PI ProcessBook fonts: StandardFont=35,400,0,0,34,Arial SmallVector=-29,400,0,0,34,Arial MediumVector=-52,400,0,0,34,Arial LargeVector=-77,400,0,0,34,Arial Note: These default values are based on resolutions for VT340 terminals. If you are using a terminal other than these, appearances may be different.

The values to the right of the equal sign represent these font characteristics. Position

Font Characteristic

Definition

1

Height

Specifies the height of the font. If the value is greater than zero, it specifies the cell height. If the value is less than zero, it specifies the character height, which is the cell height minus the leading.

2

Weight

Specifies the weight of the font (for example, light, medium, bold). Values can be from 0 to 900 in increments of 100. 100 equals the lightest; 900 the darkest.

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System Administrator Notes

Position

Font Characteristic

Definition

3

Italic

Specifies an italic font if the value is not zero (for example, 0 = non-italic; 1 = italic).

4

Underline

Specifies an underlined font if the value is not zero (for example, 0 = non-underlined; 1 = underlined).

5

Pitch and Family

Specifies the pitch and family of the font. Pitch can be fixed, variable, or default. Font families, such as Old English, describe the look of a font in a general way. They are intended for specifying fonts when the exact typeface desired is not available.

6

Face Name

Specifies the typeface name of the font.

The Marker section of the .INI file maps the VAX trend markers to the markers provided in PI ProcessBook: [Markers] NoMarker=9 Dot=0 SmallPlus=6 LargePlus=7 Asterisk=0 Circle=1 LargeX=8 Box=5 Diamond=3 BoxWithDot=4 DiamondWithDot=2 BoxWithDiamond=4

The values to the right of the equal sign represent these marker types in PI ProcessBook: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

= = = = = = = = = =

filled circle open circle filled diamond open diamond filled square open square filled triangle open triangle cross none

The Display section in the .INI file specifies the supported terminals in PI ProcessBook: [Display] Terminal Type=VT340

Keywords for supported terminals are shown below. The horizontal and vertical dimensions are also shown. VT340 = 800 x 500 Reflection = 800 x 500 Tektronix = 4095 x 3130 X1024 = 880 x 640 X800 = 560 x 448

222

SETUPProcessBook.LOG

If your terminal is not included in the list of keywords, you can create your own. The syntax is: Terminal Type=Custom,X,Y

where X equals the horizontal dimension and Y equals the vertical dimension.

SETUPProcessBook.LOG This log tracks the setup of PI ProcessBook on your system and holds information pertaining to directory structure, user-entered information for Node, .DLL, and User name, and the installation of the various ProcessBook files.

Migrate a Module Relative Display (MRD) to an Element Relative Display (ERD) As of version 3.2, PI ProcessBook supports Element Relative Displays (ERD) (page 71). If a Module Relative Display (MRD) is opened in the latest version of PI ProcessBook, the add-in attempts to automatically convert the display to an ERD display. Symbols on converted displays no longer display data when reopened with a prior version of PI ProcessBook. Note: In order to convert a legacy Module Relative Display (MRD) to an Element Relative Display (ERD) you must first migrate modules in the Module Database to elements in the AF database. This migration is contingent on the version of PI Server to which you connect. Check the PI Server documentation for further details.

Follow these steps to migrate your display: 1. Remove the MRD add-in from your computer using the Add/Remove Programs Control Panel applet.

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System Administrator Notes

1. In PI ProcessBook, open an MRD display. The display is shown and the migration process occurs at the point where the display would normally retrieve data. Once the migration process is complete, the ERD docking window appears with a status icon in the title bar notifying you whether or not the migration completed successfully. The display successfully migrated. The display successfully migrated, but there were some issues. The display was not migrated and will not work. Note: In the case of a partially successful migration, the symbols and/or contexts that could not be migrated are left the way they were. If you save your display and then reopen it, the migration is reattempted. Following a successful migragion you may see a dynamic symbol display No Data. This occurs when the Module database is migrated to an AF database, but the element corresponding to the module cannot be found on the AF database.

2. Click the icon to display the Migration Results dialog.

224

Migrate a Module Relative Display (MRD) to an Element Relative Display (ERD)

3. (Optional) Click the Save to File button to save the results as a tab-delineated file that can be exported into a spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel. This file contains additional migration information.

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Appendix E

Troubleshooting Tips Display Can't Find Data When a display does not receive data, the problem may be one of the following: •

The network is down.



A display has been moved from one PC to another and Node Identifiers to the Server(s) need to be re-established through the Connections dialog (page 7).



An ODBC Data Source may have been altered, causing the dataset to fail to return data.



An ODBC database might have been restructured, invalidating your dataset.

Trend Cursor Does Not Appear If the trend is part of a display, select it. If that doesn't enable the Trend Cursor (page 91), the trend is probably too small. Double-click to make the trend larger.

Trend Legend Does Not Appear Make the trend larger. If that doesn't help, check the default Trend Format settings.

Can’t Change or Save a Display If your PI ProcessBook is part of a View-only installation, you are unable to save any ad hoc trends or alter displays or ProcessBooks. If you cannot alter a display or ProcessBook, you may be in either View mode or Run mode. If you are in View mode, you have only one toolbar. If you are in Run mode, the Run mode button

on the Drawing toolbar is depressed. Switch to Build mode

.

Is an XYPlot Updating? When an XYPlot is updating, the updating tags are shown with an arrow indicator in the legend. An XYPlot is updating if the following conditions exist: PI ProcessBook User Guide

227

Troubleshooting Tips



The end time for the X tag is indicated as the current time (by using *) or is in the future (*+N)



At least one of the Y tag end times is indicated as the current time (by using *) or is in the future (*+N) and is not synchronized or matched with the X tag (if X is not updating).

If both the X tag and the Y tag are updating, an arrow indicator is shown in each legend entry. Updates for retrieval methods Recorded and Interpolated are received from an event pipe that provides the application with snapshot values. For this reason, when a tag is using recorded values, you may see many more values while the plot is updating than are actually recorded. Once the plot is regenerated or reverted, only recorded values are shown. When using the interpolated retrieval method, values on the plot are interpolated using the snapshots coming in through the event pipe.

Is an OLE Object in a Display Linked or Embedded? To determine if an object is linked or embedded, look at the border around it. Linked objects are surrounded with dashed lines; embedded objects are surrounded with solid lines. Depending on the colors used, sometimes the border of an object is difficult to see. If so, select the object and click on the Edit menu. The last entry in the menu appears as: xx object for embedded objects or Linked xx object for linked objects where xx is the object type, such as document, spreadsheet, etc.

Linked Object Data Isn't Updating If your linked data doesn't update when you open a display, click Edit > Links.

228



If the Edit > Links choice is unavailable, the link is permanently broken and your object has become a picture. It can't update from the source. Re-create the object.



On the Links dialog, if the file is set to Manual Update, click Update Now, and the file should update.



On the Links dialog, if the entry for the file says Unavail, the source file is not where the application expects to find it. Use the Change Source button to locate the file and reestablish a path for the link.

ODBC Problems

ODBC Problems Missing ODBC Trace If no values are found for one of the selected columns in a query, the trace will not be drawn and the value in the legend reads No Data. If the necessary time value is not defined in the query, either by a date/time column or by a placeholder tag, the trace is drawn as a straight line using one value.

Missing ODBC Data Sources Occasionally, an ODBC data source cannot be found. This can occur because the data source was deleted or because the ProcessBook .piw file has been moved to a machine that does not have the same data source defined. To resolve the problem, re-define the data source. The following figure shows what happens when a Trend attempts to display a trace for which the data source no longer exists.

Trend Display after a Data Set failure

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Appendix F

Technical Support and Resources You can read complete information about technical support options, and access all of the following resources at the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site: http://techsupport.osisoft.com (http://techsupport.osisoft.com)

Before You Call or Write for Help When you contact OSIsoft Technical Support, please provide: •

Product name, version, and/or build numbers



Computer platform (CPU type, operating system, and version number)



The time that the difficulty started



The message log(s) at that time

Help Desk and Telephone Support You can contact OSIsoft Technical Support 24 hours a day. Use the numbers in the table below to find the most appropriate number for your area. Dialing any of these numbers will route your call into our global support queue to be answered by engineers stationed around the world. Office Location

Access Number

Local Language Options

San Leandro, CA, USA

1 510 297 5828

English

Philadelphia, PA, USA

1 215 606 0705

English

Johnson City, TN, USA

1 423 610 3800

English

Montreal, QC, Canada

1 514 493 0663

English, French

São Paulo, Brazil

55 11 3053 5040

English, Portuguese

Altenstadt, Germany

49 6047 9890

English, German

Manama, Bahrain

973 1758 4429

English, Arabic

Singapore

65 6391 1811 86 021 2327 8686

English, Mandarin Mandarin

Perth, WA, Australia

61 8 9282 9220

English

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Technical Support and Resources

Support may be provided in languages other than English in certain centers (listed above) based on availability of attendants. If you select a local language option, we will make best efforts to connect you with an available Technical Support Engineer (TSE) with that language skill. If no local language TSE is available to assist you, you will be routed to the first available attendant. If all available TSEs are busy assisting other customers when you call, you will be prompted to remain on the line to wait for the next available TSE or else leave a voicemail message. If you choose to leave a message, you will not lose your place in the queue. Your voicemail will be treated as a regular phone call and will be directed to the first TSE who becomes available. If you are calling about an ongoing case, be sure to reference your case number when you call so we can connect you to the engineer currently assigned to your case. If that engineer is not available, another engineer will attempt to assist you.

Search Support From the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, click Search Support. Quickly and easily search the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site's Support Solutions, Documentation, and Support Bulletins using the advanced MS SharePoint search engine.

Email-based Technical Support [email protected] When contacting OSIsoft Technical Support by email, it is helpful to send the following information: •

Description of issue: Short description of issue, symptoms, informational or error messages, history of issue



Message logs: See documentation for your PI System for information on obtaining message logs pertinent to the situation.

Online Technical Support From the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, click Contact us > My Support > My Calls. Using OSIsoft's Online Technical Support, you can:

232



Enter a new call directly into OSIsoft's database (monitored 24 hours a day)



View or edit existing OSIsoft calls that you entered



View any of the calls entered by your organization or site, if enabled



See your licensed software and dates of your Service Reliance Program agreements

Remote Access From the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, click Contact Us > Remote Support Options. OSIsoft Support Engineers may remotely access your server in order to provide hands-on troubleshooting and assistance. See the Remote Access page for details on the various methods you can use.

On-site service From the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, click Contact Us > On-site Field Service Visit. OSIsoft provides on-site service for a fee. Visit our On-site Field Service Visit page for more information.

Knowledge Center From the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, click Knowledge Center. The Knowledge Center provides a searchable library of documentation and technical data, as well as a special collection of resources for system managers. For these options, click Knowledge Center on the Technical Support Web site. •

The Search feature allows you to search Support Solutions, Bulletins, Support Pages, Known Issues, Enhancements, and Documentation (including user manuals, release notes, and white papers).



System Manager Resources include tools and instructions that help you manage: Archive sizing, backup scripts, daily health checks, daylight savings time configuration, PI Server security, PI System sizing and configuration, PI trusts for Interface Nodes, and more.

Upgrades From the OSIsoft Technical Support Web site, click Contact Us > Obtaining Upgrades. You are eligible to download or order any available version of a product for which you have an active Service Reliance Program (SRP), formerly known as Tech Support Agreement (TSA). To verify or change your SRP status, contact your Sales Representative or Technical Support (http://techsupport.osisoft.com/) for assistance.

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233

Index . .piw • 28

A ActiveX Control • 187, 189 Ad Hoc Trend • 97, 98 Create • 98 Save • 98 Add-In Manager • 11 Add-Ins • 11, 181 Alias • 75 Module Database • 75 Aligning Multiple Symbols • 150 Annotations • 139, 141, 142 Add • 142 Arc command • 131 Archive • 2 Assign Layers dialog • 69 Attributes Changing • 60 Color • 61, 62 Font • 60 Line • 62, 63 Autorange • 94

B Background color • 62 Bar • 125 Create a bar • 126 Book View • 35, 36, 37 Preferences • 19 Section of Procbook.ini file • 212 Browser Toolbar • 13, 14 Browsing Displays from Internet Explorer • 50 Build Mode • 10, 29 Button Adding a Button • 124

C Call Tracing • 207 Cascade • 50 Circle • 131 Close a ProcessBook • 40

PI ProcessBook User Guide

Color • 20, 61, 62, 87, 222 of plot elements • 87 Pen • 23 section of the imppign.ini file • 222 Trend Element Preferences tab • 23 COM object • 169 Compound Documents • 187 Configuring the Data Source • 165, 203, 208 Connection Points • 151, 153 Add • 153 Delete • 154 Connections • 151, 153 Connectors Dialog • 155 Failure • 9 Connector Symbols • 151 Container • 187, 189 Context for Module Relative Displays • 75, 76, 77 Change at Run • 77 Continuous trace • 96 Control • 189 Convert • 196 VAX-formatted trends and graphics • 99 Copy • 39 a data set to another ProcessBook • 178 Correlation Correlation Coefficient for XY Plot • 113 Cursors • 91 Missing • 227 Custom Data Sets • 169 Custom Menus • 12 Custom Toolbars • 12

D Data • 2, 5 Data Manager in Procbook.ini file • 212 Not in Display • 227 Data Archive • 2 Data Set • 165, 166, 170, 174, 176, 177, 178 Adding to a column • 174 Adding to Bars or Values in a Display • 176 Copying a • 178 Custom • 169 Edit a • 177 Is it in Use? • 174 ODBC • 170 PI Calculation • 166 Running in ProcessBook • 177 235

Index

Data Source • 170, 203, 204, 229 Configuring the • 205, 208 Definition of • 170 Delete a • 208 Edit a • 208 Troubleshooting • 229 Default Preference settings • 17 Trend Format • 85 Delete • 40, 85, 178, 196, 208 a Data Set • 178 a Plot within a Trend • 85 an Entry • 40 an ODBC Data Source • 208 an ODBC Driver • 208 an OLE Object • 196 Deselect a Symbol • 147 Design Mode, VBA • 6, 201 Details Window • 139, 141 Open • 141 Digital values • 121 Disabling macros • 221 Discrete trace • 96 Display • 10, 47 as an Embedded Object • 198 Can't Find Data • 227 Connection Failure • 9 Data sources for • 1 Elements of • 104, 108, 109 Manage multiple displays • 50 Point Attributes • 59 Reducing to Icon • 52 Resizing • 50 Saving • 52 Display Entry • 29 Linked Display Entry • 30 Text or Display • 30 Displaying an Item's Definition • 160 Displaying an OLE object with an Icon • 196 Drag and Drop Embedding • 192 Draw • 54, 55, 103, 131, 132, 133 Drawing Area • 55 Drawing Grid • 56 Drawing Tools • 54 Free-form Objects • 132 Line • 131 Polylines • 133 Rectangle, Square, Arc, Ellipse, or Circle • 131 XYPlot • 103 Driver Manager • 203

236

Dynamic Symbol • 47, 81, 125, 127, 160, 193 Bar • 125 Button • 123 definition of • 160 Multi-State symbol • 127 Status of • 161 Trend • 81 Value • 121 XYPlot • 101

E Edit • 177, 194, 195, 208 a Data Set • 177 a text box • 130 an ODBC Data Source • 208 Embedded Objects • 195 Linked Objects • 195 Element Relative Displays • 71 Migrate from Module Relative Display • 225 Ellipse • 131 Embed • 188, 198 discussion of • 188 Example of • 190 Existing ProcessBook Display in Another OLE Application • 198 ProcessBook Display in Another OLE Application • 198 vs. Link • 189 Entries • 29, 35, 39 Arranging • 35 Change the Name of • 37, 39 Creating • 29 Placement in ProcessBook • 29 Rearranging • 39 Types of • 37 Expanding a Trend • 90

F File

How to Import • 44 Sharing • 45 Flags for Data • 162 Flip command • 149 Floating Point values • 121 Font • 60 Font section of the imppign.ini file • 222 Format • 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 Color • 61, 62 Editable Formatting Attributes • 60 Font • 60

Line • 62, 63 Trend • 85, 86, 87 Formatting Paintbrush • 63 Full Screen • 51 Full Timestamp • 95 Future Trends • 147

G Graphics • 99, 134 Convert from VAX to PC • 99 Graphic Symbol • 134 Icons vs. Graphics • 190 Grid • 56 Grid Lines • 93 Size • 56 Group Symbols • 151

H Handles • 147, 148 Horizontal flip • 149 How Trends Refresh • 92

I Icons • 52 Graphics vs. Icons • 190 impg32.dll • 212 Import • 44, 99 Files • 44 VAX-formatted trends and graphics • 99 imppigp.ini • 222 Independent Display files • 50 Saving • 52 Installation • 209 Testing • 209 Integers • 121 Internet Explorer • 50 Interpolated data retrieval method • 103, 104 Interval • 103, 104 Invisible line on a trend • 23 Item Definition • 160, 161

K Keyboard Shortcuts • 16, 17

L Layers • 67, 69, 70 Adding a Layer • 67 Assign symbol to • 69 PI ProcessBook User Guide

Composite symbols • 69 Working with • 67 Z Order • 67 Layout tab • 84, 87 Legend • 103, 104, 108, 109 Level of an Entry • 37 Line • 23, 62, 87, 130, 131, 222 Draw • 131 Ends • 63 Style • 22, 23, 62, 87 Weight • 62, 87 Linear Correlation Line • 108 Linear Regression by Least Squares Method • 112 Link • 188, 189, 192, 193, 198 Existing File into a ProcessBook Display • 192 ProcessBook to Another Application • 198 Re-establishing • 194 vs. Embed • 189 Linked Displays or ProcessBooks • 30 Add • 31 Logarithmic scales • 81, 94

M Macros • 6, 201, 221 Markers • 22, 97 Shapes • 23 Menu • 12 Minimize • 50 Missing Data Sources • 203, 229 Missing Trace • 229 Mode, Run and Build • 10, 28, 29 Move • 32, 45, 70, 85 a Display to another PI Server • 70 a Plot • 85 a ProcessBook to another PC • 45 MSQuery • 206 Multiple Objects • 148, 149, 150, 151 Align Multiple Symbols • 150 How to Select • 148 Stacking Order • 149, 150 Ungroup • 151 Multi-State Symbol • 127, 128

N Name • 27, 37, 67 a ProcessBook • 27 of a layer • 67 Network Connections • 7, 8, 9 Network Errors • 8 237

Index

New • 10 ProcessBook • 27

O ODBC • 170, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 229 Data Access • 203 Data Sets • 170 Data Sources • 203, 208 Driver Manager • 203 Drivers • 203, 208 Preparing to Use • 205 Troubleshooting • 229 OLE • 187, 188, 189, 190, 194, 195, 196, 198, 199, 228 Edit • 193, 194, 195 Embed • 188, 191 Link • 188, 192, 193, 194 Overview • 187, 188, 189 Troubleshooting • 228 Open • 28, 49, 50 a Display • 49 Independent Display Files • 50 Multiple entries • 50 ProcessBook • 28 Several Displays at Once • 49 OpenVMS Trends and Graphics • 99 Organizing Symbols • 55, 56, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151 OSIsoft Developer Network (DevNet) • 6 Out of Range Indicators • 117 Outline View • 37, 38, 39

P Pages • 36 Turning in Book View • 36 Partial Timestamp • 95 PI Data Archive • 2 PI ProcessBook • 1, 7 PI Server • 2, 7, 8, 9 Connect/Disconnect • 7 Updates to • 2 Pisysdat • 211 Placeholders • 172 Playback • 64, 65, 66 Plot • 81, 84, 85, 104 Plot Title • 103, 104 Point • 57, 59, 81 Pointers Build Mode • 29 Run Mode • 28 Polygon • 132 238

Preference Settings • 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 23 General Preferences • 18 Trend • 22 Trend Elements • 23 Preserve aspect ratio • 50 Print • 24, 25 Procbook.ini • 212 ProcessBook • 9, 27, 28, 29, 35, 40, 41, 44, 45 Basic Steps to Build a • 27 Book View • 35, 36, 37 Entries • 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34 File Sharing Capability • 45 Import Files to • 44 Mode, Run and Build • 28, 29 Open • 28 Outline View • 37, 38, 39 Overview • 9 Properties Dialog • 41, 43 Save and close • 40 Properties • 41, 137 Display • 41 of a ProcessBook or Display • 41, 43 of Symbols in the Symbols Library • 137

Q Queries • 172, 206 Questionable Data Flag • 162

R Rectangle • 131 How to Draw • 131 Re-establishing Links • 194 Refresh Interval • 92, 170, 176 Refresh Timer section of Procbook.ini file • 212 Regrouping a Composite Symbol • 151 Relative paths • 193 Relative Timestamp • 95 Remove a Trend Cursor • 91 an Entry • 40 Reset • 145 Resize • 36, 50 a Display • 50 a ProcessBook Window • 36 Retain Aspect Ratio • 212 Rotate a Symbol • 148 Run • 49 Entry • 49 Macro • 6 Mode • 28

S Save • 40, 52, 98 Ad Hoc Trend Display • 98 Preferred View of Your Entries • 40 ProcessBook • 40 ProcessBook Displays • 40, 52 Scripting • 6, 201 Scrollbars • 54, 92, 145, 146, 147 Search • 51, 57 for a Specific Display • 51 for a Tag • 57 Select Available Modules dialog • 76 Selected Modules list • 76 Selection handles • 54, 85, 139, 148, 151 Server • 7, 8, 9 Connect to a • 7 Setup procedure • 25, 212, 225 setup.exe • 212 setup.log • 225 Single Scale for the Vertical Axis • 94 Snap to grid • 56 Span • 94 Square • 131 How to Draw • 131 Stacking Order • 149, 150 Starting PI ProcessBook • 7 Startup section of Procbook.ini • 212 Static Symbols • 47 Status Report • 161 Stored Procedures in Queries • 206 Substituted Data Flag • 162 Summary Information • 41 Symbol Attachments Dialog Box • 158 Symbol Library • 212 Symbols • 47, 121, 129, 136, 139 Connect • 151, 152 Delete • 149 Details and Annotations • 139, 141, 142 Dynamic • 47 Flip • 149 Rotate • 148 Select • 147, 148 Stacking • 149, 150 Static • 47 System Administration • 211, 212, 222, 225

T Tags • 57, 59 PI ProcessBook User Guide

Text Symbol • 129, 130 Tile Windows • 50 Time • 145, 146, 147 Time Forward and Back • 147 Time Range Toolbar • 145 Time range • 145, 146, 147 Changing • 146 Revert • 145 Toolbar • 145 Timestamp • 95 Title of a trend • 93 of ProcessBook or Display • 41 Too Many Points • 117 Toolbars • 12, 13 Add Buttons to • 13 Customize • 12 ToolTips • 20, 63 Trace • 87, 96, 97, 207 Definition of • 96 Hiding • 96 Markers • 97 Missing • 229 Trace ODBC Calls • 207 Trend • 22, 23, 81, 85, 90, 91, 92, 93, 97, 98, 99, 174, 217, 227 Ad Hoc • 97, 98 Analysis tools • 90 Cursors • 91, 227 Data Sets in • 174 Default Format • 85 Default Preferences • 22 Definition section of procbook.ini • 212 Delete a Plot • 85 Expand • 90 Formatting a • 85 Grid Lines and Labels • 93 Horizontal Scale Grid Lines • 95 Importing VAX-Formatted • 99 Invalid data • 9 Multiple Plots • 84 Preferences • 22 Refresh rate for data • 92 Refreshing data from a data set • 176 Tool • 84, 98 Zoom 2x In or Out • 90 Trend Scale Grid Lines • 95 formatting • 87 Troubleshooting • 225, 227, 228, 229 Cant save a display • 227 239

Index

Display Has No Data • 227 Legend Missing on Trend • 227 ODBC Problems • 229 Setup.log • 225 Trend Cursors Missing • 227 Updating Linked Objects • 228

U Ungroup Symbols • 151 Updates • 193, 228 Break Links • 193 by Exception • 2 for Future Trends • 147 for Trend data • 92 Links • 193 to Linked Objects • 193 to PI Data • 2 Troubleshooting • 228 Update dynamically • 188 Upgrades • 209

V Value • 121 Value Scale • 22, 81, 94, 95 VAX • 44, 99, 216, 222 VBA • 1, 6, 189, 201, 202 View Only Mode • 221 Views • 35, 37 Book • 35 Outline • 37 Visible Layer • 67 VMS • 99

W Workspace • 9

X XY Plot • 101, 103, 104, 108, 109, 110, 112, 113, 116, 117 Change Time Range • 116 Draw • 103 Examples • 117, 118, 119 Interpreting • 113 Legend • 103, 104, 108, 109 Plot Format Tab • 103, 104, 109 Plot Title • 103, 104

Z Zoom • 50, 90, 114 240

2x • 90 Display Size • 50