Physical Activity and Bone Health:

10/18/2012 Physical Activity and Bone Health Wendy M Kohrt, PhD University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Medicine, Division of G...
Author: Rosanna Edwards
4 downloads 0 Views 793KB Size
10/18/2012

Physical Activity and Bone Health

Wendy M Kohrt, PhD University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine Aurora, Colorado

Physical Activity and Bone Health: Conventional Wisdom, Contemporary Ideas ƒ Primer on osteoporosis, bone biology ƒ Conventional wisdom – mechanocentric ƒ Contemporary ideas – metabolic factors ƒ NSAIDs, inflammatory cytokines ƒ Disruption of serum calcium homeostasis

1

10/18/2012

Osteoporosis ƒ The major bone disease that is influenced by  physical activity ƒ Defined by the WHO as a bone mineral density  (BMD) 2.5 SD or more below the mean peak  BMD of young, healthy adults OR the presence of a fragility fracture

Common Sites of Osteoporotic Fractures

Wrist

Spine Hip

2

10/18/2012

Facts About Osteoporosis: ƒ 20% of those who have a hip fracture die  within 1 year and many more need long‐term  nursing home care ƒ 50% of women and 25% of men over the age  of 50 years will have a fracture ƒ It is a sneaky disease ƒ Overt warning sign:  SHRINKING

Trends in Hip Fracture Rate Incidence per 100,000 Men

2000

Men

1800

85+ y

1600 1400 1200 1000 800

75-84 y

600 400

65-74 y

200 0

1986

1990

1994

1998

2002

2006

Year

Adapted from:  Brauer CA et al. JAMA 302:1573‐1579, 2009

3

10/18/2012

Trends in Hip Fracture Rate Incidence per 100,000 Women

3500

Women

3000

85+ y

2500 2000 1500

75-84 y

1000

65-74 y

500 0

1986

1990

1994

1998

2002

2006

Year

Adapted from:  Brauer CA et al. JAMA 302:1573‐1579, 2009

Trends in Osteoporosis Medication Use Bisphosphonates

Medication Use, %

20

15

Estrogens

10

5

SERMs

Teriparatide

0

1992

1996

2000

2004

Denosumab

2008

2012

Year

Adapted from:  Brauer CA et al. JAMA 302:1573‐1579, 2009

4

10/18/2012

Pharmacologic Prevention of Hip Fracture Alendronate Risedronate Zoledronic Acid Denosumab Estrogens Raloxifene Teriparatide

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

Relative Risk of Hip Fracture Drug vs Placebo Adapted from:  Hopkins RB et al. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 12:209, 2011

Physical Activity and Hip Fracture Risk Gregson 2010 Robbins 2007 Feskanich 2002 Hoidrup 2001 Boonyaratavej 2001 Farahmand 2000 Gregg 1998 Jaglal 1995 Cummings 1995 Paganini-Hill 1991

Women

Women + Men

Benetou 2011 Wickham 1989

Men Mackey 2011 Michaelsson 2007 Hoidrup 2001 Kujala 2000 Kanis 1999 Mussolino 1998 Paganini-Hill 1991

0.0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

Relative Risk of Hip Fracture Most Active versus Least Active

5

10/18/2012

Prevention of Osteoporosis ƒ Strong evidence from RCTs for the anti‐fracture  efficacy of several pharmacologic therapies ƒ Moderate evidence from observational studies  that physical activity reduces risk for hip  fracture ƒ On average, drugs are more effective at  increasing BMD than exercise training

ƒ WHY BOTHER PRESCRIBING EXERCISE?

1. Physical activity is a lifelong therapy High

Bone Mass

1

Low

2

3

Physical activity can: Drug therapy 1 increase peak bone mass 2

maintain bone mass

3

attenuate age‐related bone loss

Young

Elderly

6

10/18/2012

2. Physical activity may be more effective  than drugs at increasing bone strength +14%

800

BMC and BMD

5000

Control Risedronate Alendronate

+20%

4000

600

3000

+11%

400

2000

FU and U

1000

+15% 200

1000

0

0

BMC (mg)

BMD (mg/cm2)

U (Nmm)

FU (N)

Adapted from: Mashiba T et al. Bone 28:524, 2001

2. Physical activity may be more effective  than drugs at increasing bone strength 2500

2000

94% 5%

60 64%

1500

7% 40

1000

FU and U

BMC and BMD

80

Nonloaded Loaded

20

500

0

0

BMC (mg)

BMD (mg/cm2)

FU (N)

U (mJ)

Adapted from: Turner CH, Robling AG Exerc Sport Sci Rev 31:405, 2003

7

10/18/2012

3. Physical activity can reduce fall risk physical activity

bone mineral density

balance mobility muscle strength

stronger bones

reduction in falls

reduced risk of fracture

Regulation of Bone Mass by Loading Stress:  loading force (N) Strain:  deformation resulting from stress (µε) Wolff’s Law:  Skeletal tissue responds and adapts to its  prevailing mechanical environment Wolff J. Das Gesetz der Transformation der Knochen.  Bei Hirschwald, Leipzig, 1892  

8

10/18/2012

Frost’s Mechanostat Theory

50‐200 µε

Low

Strain

F  R Bone Gain

Frost, HM. Bone “mass” and the “mechanostat”: A proposal. Anat Rec 219:1–9, 1987

In Vivo Peak Tibia Strain in Humans Jumping, Hopping, Rebounding (max=9096) Jogging, Running, Uphill, Downhill, Stairs (max=5532) Cycling Walking Physiological Window

0

1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

Strain, µε

9

10/18/2012

Physical Activity and Bone Health: Conventional Wisdom, Contemporary Ideas ƒ Primer on osteoporosis, bone biology ƒ Conventional wisdom – mechanocentric What types of physical activities have  beneficial skeletal effects?

Skeletal Adaptions to Mechanical Loading Key Factors ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Site specific High loading intensity Novel strain distribution Few repetitions High strain rate Multiple sessions, rest intervals  (not yet evaluated in humans)

10

10/18/2012

Loading Intensity Change in Bone Mass (%)

60

40

“Although the peak strain magnitude  was similar in the natural and artificial  loading situations, the position of the  neutral axis during artificial loading was  rotated approximately 90 degrees.”

20

0

-20 0

1000

2000

3000

4000

Microstrain Adapted from: Rubin CT et al. Calc Tissue Int 37:411, 1985

Change in Bone Mineral Content (%)

Loading Repetitions 150

0 cycles/day 4 cycles/day 36 cycles/day 360 cycles/day

140 130 120 110 100 90 80 0

7

14

21

28

35

42

Time (days)

Adapted from: Rubin CT et al. Bone Joint Surg 66A:397, 1984

11

10/18/2012

Strain Rate New Bone Volume 3 6 µm x 10

900

*

750 600 450 300 150 0 Low

Moderate

High

Strain Rate Group Adapted from: Mosley JR, Lanyon LE Bone 23:313, 1998

Single vs Multiple Loading Sessions 800

* P < 0.05 vs 360x1

rBFR/BS (µm3/µm2/yr)

*

*

600

400

200

0

0x0

360x1

180x2

90x4

60x6

Adapted from:  Robling AG et al. J Bone Miner Res 15:1596‐1604, 2000

12

10/18/2012

Rest Intervals

Saxon LK et al. Bone 36:454‐464, 2005

BMC Difference Between Limbs (%)

Effects of Increasing, Steady, or Decreasing Loading Forces on Changes in BMC 25 20 15 10 5 0 -5 -10

Control

Adapted from:  Schriefer JL et al. J Biomech 38:1838‐1845, 2005

13

10/18/2012

Current Clinical Recommendations on  Physical Activity to Prevent Osteoporosis National Coalition for Osteoporosis & Related Bone Diseases American Society for Bone and Mineral Research National Osteoporosis Foundation

Regular weight‐bearing, balance, and  strengthening exercises 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans  Department of Health and Human Services, 2008 http://www.health.gov/paguidelines/Report/pdf

American College of Sports Medicine Position Stand:  Physical Activity and Bone Health  Med Sci Sports Exerc 36:1985‐96, 2004 Kohrt WM, Bloomfield SA, Little KD, Nelson ME, Yingling VR

ƒ Mode: Weight‐bearing endurance and resistance activities ƒ Intensity: Moderate to high, in terms of bone‐loading forces ƒ Frequency: Weight‐bearing endurance – 3 to 5 days/week Resistance – 2 to 3 days/week ƒ Duration: 30 to 60 minutes/day of a combination of weight‐ bearing endurance and resistance activities

14

10/18/2012

Exercise, HT, and BMD in 60‐ to 72‐yr‐old Women 8 Control HT

Change in BMD (%)

6

Exercise Ex+HT

Main effect of exercise, p

Suggest Documents