Phase 1 Taking Stock Final Report

Phase 1 – “Taking Stock” Final Report City of Coquitlam Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan January 5th, 2009 Submitted to: City of Coquitlam ...
Author: Lucy Greene
0 downloads 0 Views 1MB Size
Phase 1 – “Taking Stock” Final Report City of Coquitlam Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan

January 5th, 2009

Submitted to: City of Coquitlam Attn: Cathy van Poorten 3000 Guildford Way Coquitlam, BC V3B 7N2

Submitted by: Trevor Van Eerden & Jody Johnson Principals Pacific Employment & Education Resources - PEERS [email protected] / [email protected]

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  

Contents  Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 3  Recruitment and Orientation.......................................................................................................... 4  The City of Coquitlam – Diversity and Multiculturalism Timeline .................................................. 4  Demographic Trends and Facts ...................................................................................................... 7  Best Practices ................................................................................................................................ 18  Identification of Community Initiatives ........................................................................................ 45  Next Steps ..................................................................................................................................... 46  Appendix 1 – Summary of MAC Minutes...................................................................................... 47  Appendix 2 – BCAMP Projects 2008 / 2009.................................................................................. 61  Appendix 3 – Vancouver Multicultural Advisory Committee Mandate & Terms of Reference ... 63  Appendix 4 – Key Community Stakeholders................................................................................. 64  Appendix 5 – Key Community Stakeholders................................................................................. 73  Appendix 6 – Consultation Questions .......................................................................................... 75  Appendix 7 – Community Consultation Summary Tables ............................................................ 76     

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 2 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Introduction  Over the past two decades, Coquitlam has experienced tremendous demographic shifts and in 2009 is a  diversely populated community. Nearly 40% of its population was born outside of Canada and at least  37 first languages are spoken in the homes of Coquitlam residents. Multiculturalism within the city has  presented both opportunities and challenges. The 2006 Corporate Strategic Plan recognized the need  for the City to become more responsive and to work more collaboratively with community stakeholders  and the public to ensure the development of Coquitlam as a welcoming and inclusive community.     In 2007, the City applied for and received a grant from Heritage Canada to develop a Multiculturalism  Strategy and Action Plan. In July of 2008, Pacific Employment & Education Resources (PEERS) was  awarded the contract for consulting and the development of the Plan.  The contract for service was  finalized on August 8th and services under the contract are scheduled through to July 31st, 2009.    The ultimate goal of the plan is to create a community based multicultural vision and strategies for  achieving this vision. As stated in the Request for Proposals, the “Strategy and Action Plan will be the  starting point for reviewing and ultimately improving how the municipal and community system  responds to cultural diversity.”   As outlined in the original Request for Proposal, the work has been divided into three phases:    ƒ Phase 1 – “Taking Stock”;  ƒ Phase 2 – “Development of Community Vision”; and  ƒ Phase 3 – “Strategy and Action Plan Development”    Phase 1: “Taking Stock” has involved just that, the project team has taken stock of the City’s activities  and strategies related to multiculturalism and diversity, provided an overview of key demographic  trends and facts, introduced best practices from other municipalities and provinces, consulted, compiled  and analyzed input from key community stakeholders, and identified all currently delivered programs  and services specifically designed for new immigrants and refugees within Coquitlam. This information  and data that has been collected is comprehensive and will inform and guide the work of the next two  phases.    To date, all Phase 1 activities are proceeding as scheduled and the project has garnered significant  response and generous support from community stakeholders.  Specifically, Phase 1 activities have  included:   ƒ The Recruitment and Orientation of the Project Team;  ƒ The Development of a Diversity and Multiculturalism Timeline for the City of Coquitlam;  ƒ A Review of Demographic Trends;  ƒ A Review and Analysis of Best practices;  ƒ City and Community Consultations; and  ƒ The Identification of Community Initiatives Serving Immigrants and Refugees.    The data, analyses, descriptions, inventories and findings that have resulted from the completion of the  above activities are all provided within this report and its appendices.  

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 3 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Recruitment and Orientation    In consultation with the City, PEERS expanded its project team to include an additional researcher /  consultant. Dr. Iris Sun was recruited and provided orientation to the project in August.  Iris brings an  extensive professional background in social research as well as the perspective of a new immigrant to  Coquitlam to the project.  Since project inception, Iris has been involved in consultations with the City’s  Multicultural Advisory Committee, the identification of community initiatives and the review and  analysis of City and community data.   

 

The City of Coquitlam – Diversity and Multiculturalism Timeline    The City of Coquitlam has addressed the topic of multiculturalism and its role in providing a welcoming  environment to all its residents for over 15 years.  Like many other Canadian municipalities, Coquitlam  developed and adopted a multiculturalism policy in the early 1990’s as the demographics of its residents  began to change. Since the implementation of that policy the City has endorsed a number of  multiculturalism practices and pursuits both within the City and externally for its residents.  Based on  the available documentation, the following timeline provides a summary of key events related to  multiculturalism and the City’s role in providing and promoting an inclusive and welcoming  environment.    1994  ƒ City of Coquitlam drafts and unanimously adopts its Multiculturalism Policy, recognizing the  cultural diversity of its residents, and promoting understanding, inclusion, sensitivity and  participation.  ƒ City department heads complete a multicultural inclusion checklist identifying needs, concerns  and issues related serving an increasingly diverse population.  ƒ Community Planning and Leisure and Parks jointly complete a review of the “checklist”  responses and recommends a “comprehensive City approach that will help ensure the  development of a community that not only recognizes the benefits of a diverse population, but  embraces it and provides opportunities to invite participation in community life by all  residents.”  ƒ An interdepartmental City staff group is proposed to review the City’s approach to promoting  and implementing Council’s Multicultural policy.  1995  ƒ ƒ

A cross‐departmental Multiculturalism Committee is formed and charged to implement the set  of recommendations outlined in the terms of reference documents.  A multiculturalism awareness training session was held for all levels of City staff (front line,  middle and upper management, as well as Council and the Mayor). 

1996  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 4 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ

 January 2009 

Phase II of the “Multiculturalism Outreach Project” is proposed.  Targeted participants in the  project are “residents whose mother tongue is not English.”  The project proposes a community  participatory process that will gather information to form the basis of its multiculturalism model  for Leisure and Parks Services.   

1998 – 2001  ƒ The City establishes and convenes a Multicultural Advisory Committee to Council.  The  Committee meets three times per year to review and advise on a number of City practices  relating to multiculturalism including the adoption of the Multiculturalism Policy (revisions).   In  1999/2000 the MAC provides the City with a series of 16 recommended actions to inform the  City’s participation and development of a diverse workforce and a representative example of  multicultural integration for the community.  The 2001 MAC meetings minutes indicate a focus  on organizing and hosting a multicultural community event or open house, but do not state  whether the event was held.   1999  ƒ

2005  ƒ

2006  ƒ

2007  ƒ

ƒ

The MAC’s recommendations lead to the formation of a voluntary City language bank for onsite  translation and language assistance.  Over 30 staff representing 18 languages are identified for  participation.    The City explores and conducts a review of the efficacy of translation of City documents /  publications into other (and multiple) languages.  Due to the restrictive costs of translation and  the predominance of English in Coquitlam, the City determines to maintain publication in English  only. 

Development and Council approval of Coquitlam 2021, 2006 Strategic Plan – acknowledged the  value of diversity and a welcoming community which provided an important corporate strategic  direction regarding multiculturalism and diversity 

The Multicultural Advisory Committee (MAC) is convened as an advisory committee to City  Council     In the fall of 2007, the City of Coquitlam received a grant from the Department of Canadian  Heritage to develop municipal and community systems that are responsive to and  representative of increasing cultural diversity, foster cultural inclusion and social cohesion,  respect diversity and recognize the value of global citizenship. A key component of this process  is the development of a community based multicultural strategy and action plan. This project  supports Corporate Objectives of building community and organizational capacity and  enhancing customer and citizen relations. 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 5 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

2008  ƒ

ƒ

ƒ

 January 2009 

“Tri‐Cities Solutions by Design” project is initiated by community partners Share Family and  Community Services Society, Douglas College, and SUCCESS to develop a comprehensive  community strategy to address the economic, social, cultural and environmental concerns of Tri‐ Cities residents.  Mayor Wilson and Neal Nicholson represent the City on the Advisory Steering  Committee.    Leisure and Parks Services and Community Planning partner with the Soroptimists of the Tri‐ Cities and Council’s Multiculturalism Advisory Committee to host community forums on  challenges and opportunities for newcomers    Pacific Employment and Education Resources (PEERS) was selected through an RFP process to  work with the City and community stakeholders to prepare the Multiculturalism Strategy and  Action Plan. Submission of this report marks the completion of Phase 1 of the Canadian Heritage  project.  

Although the City has clearly taken an ongoing role in exploring the topic of Multiculturalism in  Coquitlam, it is also clear that the events and practices have lacked a sustainable plan and that the City’s  role in the pursuit of helping newcomers to integrate and creating a welcoming and inclusive community  have not been wholly defined. One of the key initiatives that has been recognized by both internal and  external stakeholders as a very positive step towards inclusion, was the formation of the current  Multicultural Advisory Committee (MAC) in 2007.     Throughout 2007‐08 the MAC met to review and explore the priorities, key elements, local and  provincial initiatives related to multiculturalism and the requirements for Coquitlam to reach out to all  its residents.  A summary of the MAC’s dialogues, discussions and identified priorities are attached as  Appendix 1 to this report.    In the fall of 2008, the MAC fulfilled its two year term and has been reconvened in 2009. 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 6 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Demographic Trends and Facts    A literature review was conducted to summarize key demographic trends in Coquitlam as they relate to  the development of a welcoming and inclusive community. The following section provides demographic  information that is relevant to the development of initiatives, programs and services that enhance the  successful integration of new immigrants and refugees and the data collected will inform the work of  Phase 2 and Phase 3 of this project.    Since the submission of the PEERS proposal for the development of Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism  Strategy and Action Plan, the City has completed a significant amount of demographic analysis. This  analysis is readily accessible on the City’s website and was reviewed by the research team. In addition to  the demographic analysis provided by the City, additional data has been reviewed and analyzed. This  included:  1. Additional Census 2006 data;  2. BC Statistical Analysis – Profile of Immigrants in BC Communities 2006, Coquitlam   3. Community Airport Newcomers Network Arrival and Destination Data; and  4. Refugee Data provided by the Immigrant Services Society of BC.    The analysis is provided by BC Stats in its Profile of Immigrants in BC Communities 2006 for Coquitlam is  complimentary and thorough and has been included with this report as a separate document. It is also  available at  http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/growing_your_community/trends/2006/pdf/immigration/Coquitlam.PDF    The following section provides an overview of key trends and facts for consideration during the  development of the Strategy and Action Plan.     Immigration Numbers  39.4% of Coquitlam’s population is foreign born; currently, 44,750 of Coquitlam’s residents are  immigrants and 66,995 are Canadian born. According to Census data, until 2000, the number of  immigrants to Coquitlam had been steadily increasing. In the last Census period (2000 – 2005), the  number of immigrants to Coquitlam dropped slightly; 9,535 arrived between 1996 and 2000 and 8,925  arrived between 2001 and 2005. It is impossible to predict rates of in‐migration to a particular  community; however, given the relatively steady rate of immigration to BC, it is likely that Coquitlam will  continue to see a steady rate of new immigrant residents.1    Immigrants to BC by year2    1999 – 35,993  2000 – 37,125  1

  The City of Coquitlam, Coquitlam’s Immigrant Pattern, URL http://www.coquitlam.ca/NR/rdonlyres/05A361E0‐ A513‐40A7‐BF65‐A3BB7B064212/83188/immigration.pdf, Accessed December 2008.  2

 BC Stats, Migration and Immigration, URL http://www.bcstats.gov.bc.ca/data/pop/migration.asp Accessed  December 2008. 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 7 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

2001 – 38,289  2002 – 34,053  2003 – 35,239  2004 – 37,045  2005 – 44,734  2006 – 42,208    It is important to note that 40% of Coquitlam’s immigrant population is classified as “new immigrant”— those having arrived within the last 10 years. It is also interesting to note that although the number of  new immigrants to Coquitlam declined in the last Census period, the foreign born population of  Coquitlam increased while the native or Canadian born population declined.3    Ethnicity  The City of Coquitlam website lists the top 10 countries of origin of immigrants to Coquitlam. These  countries account for 77% of all immigrants settling in Coquitlam between 2001 and 2006.4     2006 Top Ten Source Countries to Coquitlam  1. People’s Republic of China  2. South Korea  3. Iran  4. Philippines  5. Romania  6. Taiwan  7. Afghanistan  8. Russian Federation  9. Hong Kong  10. USA    It is important that of the languages spoken by these new residents, only those individuals from  Romania use a language with a similar script to English; that is, all others (with the exception of those  immigrating from the US) use languages that are written with a different script than English. This is  noteworthy, as the acquisition of English becomes far more challenging when learners must not only  acquire the spoken word but must also learn a new writing system.     Mother Tongue  As stated on the City of Coquitlam’s website, the concept of mother tongue is a “useful indicator of  cultural heritage”. It is also an important piece of data for program and service planning related to  settlement and integration. Within the last Census, 37 languages were identified as being spoken as first  languages by Coquitlam’s residents.  See Chart 1, next page, Non‐official languages spoken in Coquitlam  by percentage of total population.     *N.O.S. means “not otherwise specified” and Bisayan languages are spoken by people from the  Philippines.    3

 Ibid  Ibid Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  4

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 8 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 9 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 January 2009 

 10 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

According to the data compiled by BC Stats, more than 50% of Coquitlam’s residents reported speaking  only their first language at home.5    For program and service planning, the top 10 non‐official languages spoken in Coquitlam have been  analyzed and charted by neighbourhood.      Chart 2, Main Mother Tongue Population in Coquitlam’s Profile Areas – 2006, depicts what percentage  of the population of each neighbourhood speaks an official language, both official languages, both  official languages and an unofficial language or only an unofficial language as their main language.  Figure 1 provides a map of the community profiles addressed in Charts 2 and 3.   

5

BC Stats, Profile of Immigrants in BC Communities 2006, URL  http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/growing_your_community/trends/2006/pdf/immigration/Coquitlam.PDF, Accessed  December 2008 Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 11 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Figure 1 

  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 

 12 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Chart 2 * See below for neighbourhood abbreviations     

NE =  H / N =  WP =  TC = 

Northeast  Hockaday / Nestor  Westwood Plateau  Town Centre 

ER =  RP =  RH =  CQ = 

Eagle Ridge  Ranch Park  River Heights  Central Coquitlam 

CH =  AH =  MV =  CB = 

Cape Horn  Austin Heights  Maillardville  Cariboo / Burquitlam 

    Chart 3, Main Non Official Language Population in Coquitlam’s Profile Areas – 2006, depicts the  top 10 non‐official languages spoken by residents of each neighbourhood. 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 13 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Chart 3 * See below for neighbourhood abbreviations   

NE =  H / N =  WP =  TC = 

Northeast  Hockaday / Nestor  Westwood Plateau  Town Centre 

ER =  RP =  RH =  CQ = 

Eagle Ridge  Ranch Park  River Heights  Central Coquitlam

CH =  AH =  MV = CB = 

Cape Horn  Austin Heights  Maillardville  Cariboo / Burquitlam 

Education  Overall the education level of immigrants in Coquitlam is high. Of immigrants aged 25 to 64 in  Coquitlam, 92.7% hold a high school certificate (19.8%), apprenticeship or trades certificate (9.1%)  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 14 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

college diploma (16.8%) or university degree (47%).  By percentage, immigrants hold more degrees  (bachelors and advanced degrees) than the native born population.    Income  According to BC Stats, 20.2% of Coquitlam’s residents experience a low income. For immigrants within  Coquitlam, the percentage increases to 29.1%.6     Government Assisted Refugees  Immigrants arrive in BC in different categories or classes: Business, Family, Skilled Worker, Refugee and  Others. Others include live‐in caregivers, provincial nominees, retired immigrants, etc. The vast majority  of new immigrants arrive within the Skilled Worker, Family or Business classes. About 5% are refugees.     With the introduction of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act in June 2002, Canada has focussed  on assisting refugees in urgent need of protection and resettlement. This has meant that communities  throughout the country have seen an increase in special need refugee cases; individuals who require a  wide range of long term services to successfully integrate into Canadian Society. Therefore, for program  and service planning, it is critical to consider the numbers of GARs, their countries of origin and first  languages spoken.    Between January 2003 and December 2006, the Tri‐Cities welcomed 376 Government Assisted Refugees  (GARs) or 12% of all GARs to BC. This made the Tri‐Cities the fourth largest recipient of refugees in the  province. Data for Coquitlam only does not exist.    Chart 4 

6

 BC Stats, Profile of Immigrants in BC Communities 2006, Accessed December 2008.  Low income (before tax) is  the income level at which families or persons not in economic families spend an average of 20% more before tax  income on food shelter and clothing. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 15 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

In 2007 and 2008, the Tri‐Cities welcomed an additional 206 GARs. From 2003 to 2007, most of the GARs  to the Tri‐Cities arrived from Afghanistan and Iran. In 2008, refugees to the area came from a wider  range of countries. See Charts 5 and 6.     Chart 5   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 16 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Chart 6 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 17 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Best Practices    In recent years immigrant integration, multiculturalism awareness and action, and diversity issues have  moved from the agenda of activities of local settlement agencies to become key topics for government,  business and industry, media and numerous cities and municipalities across Canada. Baby boom  demographics and the importance of immigrants to the country’s economy have raised the profile of  multiculturalism to a mainstream topic.  Therefore, given the demographics of the Lower Mainland, it is  not surprising to find several initiatives underway that are working to not only enhance the settlement  and employment needs of immigrants, but also to establish community wide collaboration and service  provision to address the full range of practices and supports required to truly become inclusive  workplaces, neighbourhoods and communities. It is, however, still early days for many of these  community‐wide practices and several of the community, government, and business driven initiatives  below are still in their formative stages and some, like Coquitlam, are currently immersed in the  planning and developmental stages.     For the purposes of the development of Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan, the  following initiatives have been selected as examples of current best practices. Those that have been  identified have been selected for inclusion within this report based on a demonstration, in whole or in  part, of the following:  ƒ A focus on the development of welcoming and inclusive communities   ƒ The development of collaborative community initiatives that engage multiple and diverse  stakeholders  ƒ The provision of information, resources and / or training to the community and its stakeholders  ƒ Increased awareness and /or the provision of education on the challenges to immigrant  integration  ƒ Providing broad‐based solutions to multiculturalism, diversity and immigrant integration  ƒ Demonstrated success in the development of internal corporate or municipal practices that  have addressed or impacted the corporate climate and approach towards diversity for the  organizations’ staff and staff and stakeholders.     

Local Community / Municipal Initiatives    Burnaby Intercultural Planning Table  On January 17, 2007 sixty five Burnaby stakeholders attended a Community Mobilization Meeting  hosted by Burnaby Family Life. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss issues related to the social  inclusion and the integration of immigrants and refugees in Burnaby and New Westminster.  Inspired by  the will of the community expressed at this meeting, a planning committee was established.  Burnaby  Family Life and its partners, Immigrant Services Society, South Burnaby Neighbourhood House and the  Burnaby School District worked collaboratively on a grant application to the United Way of the Lower  Mainland. In April 2007, the United Way awarded BFL $35,000 a year for three years to coordinate the  Burnaby Intercultural Planning Table project.     The BIPT is made up of 25 members representing a wide variety of community agencies including health,  education, parks, recreation and culture, the library, the City, volunteerism, immigrant serving agencies  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 18 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

and multi‐purpose agencies.  The BIPT is led by a Steering Committee and a Project Coordinator. In its  first year, the BIPT developed a draft community wide Strategic Plan which will result in enhanced  resources and services ensuring a greater continuum of service delivery. In the upcoming two years, the  BIPT will work with community stakeholders to execute the Strategic Plan.  The Strategic Plan is  available on the BIPT’s website at www.bipt.ca.7    Vision  Burnaby will distinguish itself as a welcoming and inclusive community.    Mission  To support the integration of immigrants and refugees.     Purpose  The BIPT will:  ƒ create better sources of information and resources;  ƒ increase awareness of existing information and resources;  ƒ identify and resolve gaps in services;  ƒ enhance community interagency collaboration and coordinated pursuit of funding and the  sharing of best practices;  ƒ provide information and data to influence and inform government and stakeholder policy and  program planning; and   ƒ create opportunities for engagement of the whole community.    In its first year of United Way funding the BIPT:  ƒ Established its membership of twenty five individuals representing a wide range of community  agencies;  ƒ Developed a two year Strategic Plan;  ƒ Conducted research, a literature review, three focus groups and 12 consultations with key  community stakeholders on topics related to immigrant integration, multiculturalism and  diversity;  ƒ Established an email distribution list to keep BIPT members apprised of BIPT activities, relevant  literature, new programs, services, and initiatives, relevant conferences and other forums  related to community capacity building;  ƒ Published a regular column entitled “Divercity” in the Burnaby Now. These articles were  republished in other parts of Canada – for example, the TRIEC website has posted one of these  articles.   ƒ Created a website: www.bipt.ca. BIPT members and the public in general can visit the website to  learn more about the activities of the BIPT, to obtain information and learn about issues related  to the integration of newcomers in Burnaby; and   ƒ Worked with the Burnaby School District to develop the Settlement Workers in Schools (SWIS)  Advisory. Eight members of the BIPT volunteer to sit on the Advisory.    Goals for Year Two and Three 

7

URL http://www.bipt.ca, Accessed December 2008.

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 19 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

1. Increase awareness among Burnaby Stakeholders of the BIPT and its purpose, initiatives and  activities;  2. Increase understanding and improve Burnaby’s competencies related to multiculturalism,  settlement and social inclusion; and  3. Establish the BIPT as Burnaby’s repository for information, data, and resources related to  multiculturalism, settlement and social inclusion.      North Shore Welcoming Action Committee  Similar to the BIPT, the United Way has funded a community convening table on the North Shore ‐ North  Shore Welcoming Action Committee (NSWAC). The purpose of the NSWAC is to facilitate the successful  integration of new immigrants and refugees and to enhance the welcoming and inclusive nature of the  communities of the North Shore. NSWAC is managed by the North Shore Multicultural Society in  partnership with the North Shore Neighbourhood House.     The Table has recently contracted a Project Coordinator, to assist the membership to identify, facilitate,  and execute the work of the Table. The NSWAC is currently finalizing its strategic plan and is working to  engage the members and additional stakeholders of its three communities (West Vancouver, the District  of North Vancouver, and the City of North Vancouver). While still in its planning stages, the NSWAC has  established the following Vision, Mission and Purposes to guide its activities.    Motto   The North Shore – you belong here!    Vision  The North Shore is a welcoming community where everyone has a sense of belonging.    Mission  To support the inclusion of immigrants and refugees.     The six main purposes of the Table are:  1. To increase awareness of diversity and multicultural issues;  2. To ensure service provision is relevant and meeting the needs of immigrants and refugees on  the North Shore;  3. To support collaboration and coordination of service provision;  4. To increase awareness of existing information and services;  5. To increase cultural competency within the community; and   6. To increase engagement of the whole community.      Safe Harbour  The Safe Harbour Program was initiated in Nanaimo in 2004.  The purpose of Safe Harbour is to engage  businesses, agencies, municipalities to work collaboratively to build safe and inclusive communities. The  initiative is coordinated by the Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies of BC (AMSSA).     “AMSSA’s not‐for‐profit partners deliver Safe Harbour in their local communities to help businesses,  agencies, and institutions create an environment where people of diverse backgrounds know that they  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 20 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

will be respected and safe. A free two‐hour orientation session provides managers and staff with  practical information about the different ways people, particularly members of marginalized groups,  might experience living in our communities. The curriculum explores stereotyping, the definition of  diversity, and what demonstrates respect to people of different backgrounds. Safe Harbour identifies  simple steps for providing equitable treatment for all and a temporary refuge for those facing  discrimination.    Upon completion of the orientation, participants receive a Safe Harbour window decal and other  promotional materials to display as a visible marker of their respect for all cultures, ethnicities, religions,  classes, ages, abilities, genders, and sexual orientations.    Throughout BC, a wide range of ‘community organizers’ in 34 communities have trained over 450 Safe  Harbour businesses, not‐for‐profit agencies, government offices, and institutions.”8  The vision is to have  Safe Harbour become as recognizable as the Block Parent program.    In Coquitlam, SUCCESS is the Safe Harbour training provider. According to the Safe Harbour website, no  organizations in Coquitlam have received the training to date.  http://www.amssa.org/safeharbour/communities/organizations.cfm      City of Vancouver ‐ Mayor’s Task Force on Immigration (MTFI)  In November 2006, then Mayor, Sam Sullivan re‐established the City of Vancouver’s Working Group on  Immigration as the Mayor’s Task Force on Immigration, with a mandate:  1. “To recommend key policy and program directions to Mayor and Council regarding immigration  issues at a local level;  2. To act as a reference group to advise on issues coming out of the FCM Big Cities Mayors Caucus  Immigration Working Group;  3. To set the context for City of Vancouver and community partners to have a voice in the  development of government policies and programs related to immigrants and refugees.”9    The task force, comprised of the Mayor, a member of Council, an independent Chair and 12 sectoral  / expert stakeholders from the community met several times throughout 2006‐07 to establish its  recommendations for the City.  Eight of the recommendations made are as follows:     1. Council adopt a “Vision and Value Statement Concerning Immigrants and Refugees”;  2. The City explore different ways of providing input to other levels of government, and continue  to network and engage with other cities, jurisdictions and interested groups on immigration‐ related issues;  3. The Mayor convene a Summit meeting with key business leaders, employer and sectoral groups  to discuss the feasibility of launching a multi‐sectoral Immigrant Employment initiative;  8

 The Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies of BC, Safe Harbour: Respect for All, URL  www.safeharbour.ca, Accessed December 2008.  9

 Report of the Mayor’s Task Force on Immigration, November 2007. URL  http://vancouver.ca/COMMSVCS/socialplanning/initiatives/multicult/PDF/0711_MTFI_report.pdf, Accessed  December 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 21 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

4. The City ensure that the 311 Access Vancouver Municipal Services meets the needs of  newcomers to the city, especially in the areas of staff training and service delivery; further, that  the City develop Protocol and Guidelines for the provision of translation and interpretation  services;  5. The City urge Metropolis British Columbia to conduct research on refugee issues, especially in  the area of access to affordable housing;  6. The City consider sponsoring an annual event commemorating World Refugee Day (June 20);  7. The City continue to host the March 21st event ( International Day To Eliminate Racial  Discrimination), with more involvement from community stakeholders, and include more  information on the City’s work on anti‐racism and diversity initiatives; and   8. The City will distribute the Task Force report to other governments, jurisdictions and concerned  stakeholder groups.10    Upon submission and acceptance of its recommendations the Task Force’s mandate was seen as fulfilled  and the direction and responsibilities laid out within the recommendations were seen as sound  assurance that “Vancouver would continue to be a welcoming city to all newcomers, and that  newcomers will have access and opportunities to participate fully in the social, cultural and economic  life of the city.”    Since the delivery of the above recommendations, the City has continued its leadership role and has  acted upon many of the recommendations including organizing and hosting several cross‐sectoral  consultations that have led to the formation of a Metro Vancouver Leaders Summit on Immigrant  Employment (see next section).  

  The Vancouver Foundation  In its 2008 Vital Signs for Metro Vancouver report11, the Vancouver Foundation highlights immigrant  integration as two of its highest citizen priorities for “Getting Started in Vancouver and our “Changing  Demographics.” Within each of these categories respondents to the report’s survey recognized  Vancouver is not only increasingly diverse in its ethnic make‐up, but that failure to respond to the  integration, education and employment of our newest citizens has significant impacts for the entire  populace of Greater Vancouver.    Following up the work conducted by the Mayor’s Task Force on Immigration, the Vancouver Foundation  recently organized and hosted (October 2008) the Vancouver Leaders Summit on Immigrant  Employment.  The Summit, attended by over 150 representatives from business and industry,  government, education, other municipalities (including Coquitlam), and immigrant service providers,  served as a platform to review the case for a more coordinated approach to the employment and  mentorship of immigrants in Metro Vancouver. The Summit also served as the official launch of the BC  Immigrant Employment Council, for which Bob Elton, President  & CEO of BC Hydro, accepted the role of  Chair.  Based on participation of the Summit and with funding support from the Ministry of Advanced  Education and Labour Market Development and the Vancouver Foundation the Council “will develop  strategies to help immigrants find and retain employment in their field while working with different  10

Report of the Mayor’s Task Force on Immigration, November 2007. URL  http://vancouver.ca/COMMSVCS/socialplanning/initiatives/multicult/PDF/0711_MTFI_report.pdf, Accessed  December 2008. 11  The Vancouver Foundation, Vitals Signs for Metro Vancouver, November 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 22 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

levels of government to influence public policy and programs.”12 In recent weeks the Council has worked  to solidify its top working priorities (development of a mentorship program similar to TRIEC,  development of information and resources, and coordinated communication), and to recruit members  from the broad range of stakeholders who will spearhead the development of the Council’s services.     

BC Government Funding Programs    The BC Government provides numerous funding opportunities, and programs and services for the  integration of immigrants and newcomers to BC. Historically, these funding initiatives have concentrated  on settlement, language and employment services.  Recently, however, the BC Government has brought  forward support for broad‐based community initiatives aimed specifically at enhancing community  inclusiveness, understanding multiculturalism and raising awareness of diversity.     Welcoming and Inclusive Communities and Workplaces Program  Within the Ministry of Attorney General’s WelcomeBC program, the Welcoming and Inclusive  Communities and Workplaces Program (WICWP) has been developed and tendered to service providers  across BC to support the development of “inclusive, welcoming and vibrant communities across BC.”13   The program is divided into four phases including:  1. Community Partnership Development  2. Knowledge Development and Exchange  3. Public Education  4. Demonstration Projects    “Community Partnership Development  Communities may obtain support to identify and coordinate key sustainable partnerships and  collaborations with diverse groups and stakeholders to work towards achieving a common vision  around fostering welcoming and inclusive communities. Examples of key partners: government,  Aboriginal, Métis and First Nations organizations, business, lnabour and non‐profit organizations.    Knowledge Development and Exchange  Communities may obtain assistance to promote knowledge development and sharing among diverse  groups and stakeholders, and with the community members at large. Examples of activities: gap  analysis/needs assessment, advanced asset mapping, community forums, presentations, workshops,  consultations and conferences.    Public Education  Communities may obtain assistance to facilitate cross‐cultural understanding and increase public  awareness among community members at large. Examples of activities: development and  distribution of materials, resources and toolkits, production of digital media and online resources,  visual and performing arts focused on WICWP outcomes.    12

 The Canadian Immigrant, Call for Council, URL   http://www.canadianimmigrant.ca/careers/employmentlaw/article/2552, Accessed December 2008. 13   URL http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/service_providers/wicwp.html, Accessed December 2008.  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 23 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Demonstration Projects  Communities, groups or stakeholders may obtain support to design, implement, deliver and  evaluate projects that explore strategic and innovative approaches to fostering welcoming and  inclusive communities.”14  The program is a three year pilot and is currently in its first phases.  In the summer of 2008, RFP’s for the  program’s 1st phase ‐ Community Partnership Development were released and subsequently eight  communities were selected for this round of funding.  Of note, Surrey was the only Lower Mainland  municipality identified for funding in this round. A second round of funding was offered in October, and  both the BIPT and NSWAC have applied and been granted funding for this phase. Activities for this phase  have either only recently begun or will begin in 2009.    In December 2009 the Ministry also announced the release of its WICWP dialogue initiative.  This  initiative will “provide funding for convening local dialogues to a maximum of 10 communities  throughout British Columbia. The local dialogues will explore themes related to multiculturalism, the  elimination of racism and supporting welcoming and inclusive communities.”15    The British Columbia Anti‐racism and Multiculturalism Program (BCAMP)  For the past three years the BC Ministry of Attorney General has funded the British Columbia Anti‐ racism and Multiculturalism Program (BCAMP) through its Welcome BC initiative.  This funding stream  supports the development of welcoming and inclusive communities. The primary goal of the BCAMP is  to prevent and eliminate Racism by enhancing community understanding of multiculturalism and  cultural diversity in BC.    “BCAMP supports the development of welcoming and inclusive communities. The primary goal of the  BCAMP is to prevent and eliminate racism by enhancing community understanding of multiculturalism  and cultural diversity in BC. Its objectives are to:  ƒ provide multiculturalism and anti‐racism education;   ƒ develop community partnerships and facilitate cross‐cultural dialogue; and   ƒ provide critical responses to racism and hate.”16  Funding for BCAMP projects is divided into 2 streams:    “Stream A: Provides financial contributions to BC registered non‐profit societies for projects that meet  the above goals and objectives.  Stream B: Provides funding for branch‐initiated activities that present leadership and community  capacity building through multicultural and anti‐racism initiatives.    Stream B funding is available to non‐profit societies, community‐based organizations (including ad hoc  committees, coalitions, umbrella organizations, associations or centres), public institutions,  municipalities, private enterprises, and individuals.”17  14

 Welcome BC Information Sheet, URL  http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/service_providers/pdf/wicwp_information_sheet.pdf, Accessed December 2008. 15  URL, http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/diversity/dialogues.html, Accessed December 2008. 16 URL http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/service_providers/bcamp.html, Accessed December 2008. 17  URL http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/service_providers/pdf/bcamp_infosheets.pdf, Accessed December 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 24 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  Program Outcomes  “Proposed projects must demonstrate at least one of the following outcomes:  ƒ increased public awareness and understanding of multiculturalism, racism or cross‐cultural  relations leading to the reduction of views, behaviours and practices that are racist and/or  discriminatory;   ƒ effective responsive mechanisms supporting concrete actions by individuals, organizations and  governments to combat racism and build safer communities; and   ƒ communities promote multiculturalism and eliminate racism through effective partnerships.” 18    In 2008/09 the BC Ministry of Attorney General funded 20 BCAMP programs / projects in communities  throughout the province. Funding for the proposed projects is available through a Request for Proposal  process, and is offered to a maximum of $30,000 per project.  A list of the 2008‐09 projects is attached  as Appendix 2.  At the time of this report, funding for 2009‐10, BCAMP project has yet to be announced. 

  Other Provinces and Canadian Municipalities    TRIEC  Often cited as a key Canadian initiative in immigrant integration, the Toronto Region Immigrant  Employment Council (TRIEC) continues to serve as an example of the strength of community‐based  approaches in assisting immigrants. Established in September 2003, following the identification of  immigrant employment as critical regional issue, TRIEC is comprised of members representing various  groups: employers, labour, occupational regulatory bodies, post‐secondary institutions, assessment  service providers, community organizations, and all three levels of government.  “TRIEC's primary goal is to find and implement local solutions that help break down the barriers  immigrants face when looking for work in the Toronto Region. To achieve this goal, the council focuses  on three objectives:  1. Increase access to and availability of services that help immigrants gain access to the labour  market more efficiently and effectively;   2. Change the way stakeholders value and work with skilled immigrants;   3. Work with governments to help build greater coordination and collaboration around this  issue.”19  Of note, TRIEC does not compete with service providers, but rather works with partner organizations to  deliver its immigrant services.  Programs are employer focussed, and emphasis is placed on enhancing  existing services and addressing gaps.  As of 2007 TRIEC provided five key services or functions as  follows:  1. hireimmigrants.ca  The hireimmigrants.ca program provides employers with the tools and resources to accelerate the  integration of skilled immigrants into their organizations. In 2007 focus was placed on reaching  small‐ and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).  18

 URL http://www.welcomebc.ca/en/service_providers/bcamp.html, Accessed December 2008.  TRIEC Website, URL http://www.triec.ca/about/TRIEC, Accessed December 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  19

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 25 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  2. The Mentoring Partnership  The Mentoring Partnership (TMP) is a collaboration of community organizations and corporate  partners that brings together skilled immigrants and established professionals in occupation‐specific  mentoring relationships. The program is delivered by community organizations in the City of  Toronto and the regions of Halton, Peel and York.  In 2007 TMP completed over 1150 matches, bringing the total number to more than 2,600. By  adding three new community partners, and 11 new corporate partners, the program is now able to  serve more immigrants than ever before.  3. Immigrant Success Awards  The Immigrant Success (IS) Awards are given to employers in the Toronto Region with a proven track  record of achievement in recruiting, retaining and promoting skilled immigrants in the workplace.  Individual awards are also presented to an HR professional and individual champion who has gone  above and beyond to assist skilled immigrants in the workforce.  The IS Awards have two objectives: to recognize and celebrate employers and individuals that  demonstrate excellence; and, to build employer awareness of the issues and the solutions that they  can participate in.  By showcasing the success of the IS Award winners TRIEC hopes to inspire more local employers to  consider the benefits of bringing immigrants on board.  4. Education and Awareness  Getting the message out ‐ An important part of TRIEC’s work focuses on educating the public and  other groups about the barriers immigrants face when finding work in their fields, and the solutions  everyone can take part in.    In addition to various interviews with local, national and international media, in 2007 TRIEC was  pleased to continue its partnership with the Toronto Star by helping to release the second annual  New Home New Job special section. The section featured many of our corporate and community  partners, profiled employers that include skilled immigrants in their workforces and captured the  experiences of new immigrants searching for work in their profession.    20 Journeys: A visual essay of the immigrant experience ‐ 20 Journeys is a traveling exhibit of  powerful photographs of immigrants and their stories of finding success in Canada. It details the  experiences of skilled immigrants, their journeys to achieving success, and the programs and  employers that have shared in their milestones. The exhibit profiles immigrants from India, China,  the Philippines, Singapore, Bangladesh, Lebanon, Israel, Ghana, Nigeria, Dominica, Mexico,  Argentina, the Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.  In 2007, as part of TRIEC’s ongoing public awareness work, 20 Journeys was exhibited at the Toronto  Board of Trade, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as part of Citizenship Week, and the  Workers Arts & Heritage Centre in Hamilton. The exhibit has garnered tremendous media coverage  and continues to be requested for other venues.  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 26 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Visit www.triec.ca/20Journeys  to view the portraits and read the stories.  Best Employers for New Canadians ‐ Launched in 2007, the Best Employers for New Canadians  competition is a new national award presented by Mediacorp Canada, editors of Canada’s Top 100  Employers, in partnership with TRIEC. This special designation recognizes employers with the best  initiatives and programs to assist recent immigrants in making the transition to a new workplace –  and a new life in Canada.  TRIEC partnered with Mediacorp on this award in order to bring a national spotlight to the  organizations with promising practices in the field. The inaugural awards received significant media  coverage in publications across Canada, including: The Toronto Star, The Vancouver Sun, The Ottawa  Citizen, The Edmonton Journal, The Calgary Herald, Canadian HR Reporter and Canadian Immigrant  Magazine.  5. Intergovernmental Relations Committee  TRIEC’s Intergovernmental Relations (IGR) committee brings together representatives from the  three levels of government to share information, discuss new strategic interventions, and enhance  coordination on the issue of immigrant employment in the Toronto Region. In 2007 IGR focused its  work on three main areas:    Inventory of workplace‐related programs ‐ Mapping Toronto Region employment‐related services  and programs with a work experience component in order to analyze possible gaps to be addressed.    Qualifications “Passport” for skilled immigrants ‐ Investigating the feasibility, potential  effectiveness, and recognition by employers of a standard documentation process including  academic, language and competency assessments.    Alternative work experience programs ‐ Exploring a range of interventions that facilitate work  experience opportunities (e.g. co‐op, wage subsidies, tax credits) to assess their applicability for  skilled immigrants.20    A final distinguishing feature of TRIEC, is its desire to assist and offer its model to other jurisdictions,  cities and communities. Based on its strong business base and ethos of achieving early wins and  pursuing action, TRIEC has not only assisted other Ontario communities implement similar services, but  is currently supporting and providing information to the Vancouver Foundation’s efforts to establish its  Immigrant Employment Council. Its report, the Story of TRIEC ‐ The Learning Exchange Disseminating  Good Ideas: Skilled Immigrants in the Labour Market21 provides a useful overview of TRIEC’s history,  successes, philosophical approaches, outcomes and recommendations for implementation.      Halifax Regional Municipality – Immigrant Action Plan  20

 Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council, 2007 Annual Review, Pgs. 7 – 15. URL  http://www.triec.ca/files/47/original/TRIEC_2007_AnnualReview.pdf, Accessed December 2008. 21 Toronto Region Immigrant Employment Council, The Learning Exchange Disseminating Good Ideas: Skilled  Immigrants in the Labour Market, URL  http://www.triec.ca/files/49/original/TheTRIECStory_LearningExchangePaper.pdf, Accessed December 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 27 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

In May 2005, Halifax Regional Council adopted the following vision: “Halifax Regional Municipality is a  welcoming community where immigration is supported and encouraged. Halifax Regional Municipality  (HRM) will work with other levels of government and community partners to increase our collective  cultural, social and economic diversity by welcoming immigrants to our community.”22 In response to  the Municipal Region’s poor retention and integration of immigrants, the City of Halifax is determined to  provide a more responsive and inclusive environment.  Following an immigration Forum, hosted by the  City’s Chief Administrative Officer and attended by over 200 delegates from across government,  education, service provision and business, the City established a short and long‐term action plan  highlighting actions to be undertaken by the HRM.    The plan is available in it’s entirety at  http://www.halifax.ca/Council/agendasc/documents/ActionPlanSept05_WebRes.pdf    The following is a summary of the plan provided as a component of the full report.23 

22

 Halifax Regional Municipality, Immigrant Action Plan, pg. 3. URL  http://www.halifax.ca/Council/agendasc/documents/ActionPlanSept05_WebRes.pdf, Accessed December 2008. 23  Ibid, pg. 9. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 28 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  Action Plan Summary    Communications ‐ External Focus  Organizational ‐ Internal Focus  Phase  ƒ Host citizenship ceremonies.  ƒ Fulfill HRM’s diversity mandate to  I  ƒ Provide welcome letters to  ensure employees represent the  newcomers from the Mayor and  population they serve.  Councillors.  ƒ Develop a list of potential  ƒ Website improvements.  interpreters within the HRM  ƒ Develop a “Newcomers’ Guide to  workforce.  HRM”.  ƒ Establish a “Where in the World”  ƒ Create an advisory group of staff and  section in the HRM News employee  citizens to identify the challenges and  newsletter.  needs of diverse communities.  ƒ Utilize HRM access centres to link  immigrants with existing services.  Phase  ƒ Work with community partners to  ƒ Enhance cultural diversity training for  II  provide HRM service information in  customer service and front‐line public  multiple languages.  facing employees.  ƒ Develop additional versions of the  ƒ Encourage appropriate behaviour and  “Newcomers’  create staff performance  ƒ Guide to HRM” in Arabic, Mandarin,  accountabilities for recognizing  Spanish, Farsi and Russian and French.  diversity.  ƒ Increase diverse community  ƒ Enhance emergency service protocols  representation on municipal  for dealing with diverse languages.  committees and in policy & event  planning.  ƒ Improve staff training in  communications, in particular in  providing plain language  correspondence.  ƒ Explore opportunities for the three  levels of government to co‐locate  service centres.  ƒ Collaborate with Halifax Regional  School Board to provide information to  students on civics and by‐laws.  ƒ Promote culture in HRM.      Hamilton’s Centre for Civic Inclusion  “Hamilton's Centre for Civic Inclusion was formed by joining two initiatives, the Strengthening  Hamilton’s Community Initiative (SHCI) and the Civic and Resource Center (C&RC). C&RC was an  initiative that the Settlement and Integration Services Organization (SISO), a Hamilton settlement  agency, had been working on for the last four years to create an environment that is inclusive and meets  the needs of immigrants and refugees.    Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 29 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

SHCI was a city initiative catalyzed by the tragic events of September 11, 2001. HCCI continues building  on the achievements of the past four years and support efforts from across the city to realize the vision  of an inclusive community, free of racism and hate.    Hamilton’s Centre for Civic Inclusion (HCCI) assists the City, major institutions, businesses, service  providers, and others to initiate and sustain transformative processes to create racism‐free and inclusive  environments. It develops and shares training and education resources, and enables easier access to  relevant research and information. HCCI is also a source of support and information to newcomer  immigrant and refugee communities, diverse ethno‐racial and ethno‐cultural groups and Aboriginal  communities. It helps to build community leadership and enable productive dialogues and partnerships  between marginalized and ‘centralized’ communities, organizations and institutions.”24    In its first year of its three year mandate, the Centre is working to fulfill its promise to the community,  based on the following mission, vision, goals, strategies and approaches.  The Centre has developed a  number of community outreach services and resources including Community Mobilization Teams, a  Youth in Motion program to promote inclusive civic participation and a variety of community‐based  forums, speaking events and focus groups aimed at engaging several sectors of the Hamilton  community.    Mission  A community‐based network, mobilizing all Hamiltonians to create an inclusive city, free of racism and  hate.    Vision  A united community that respects diversity, practices equity, and speaks out against discrimination.    Goal  To create in every sector, and among youth, effective and sustainable ways of integrating all  Hamiltonians into the civic life of the community, using their contributions to create a strong and vibrant  city.    Strategic Directions:  ƒ Promote the safety and security of all Hamiltonians  ƒ Develop broad‐based strategies to eliminate racism and hate  ƒ Foster inter‐faith and inter‐cultural understanding and respect  ƒ Foster civic leadership across the diverse communities, particularly with youth  ƒ Facilitate youth leadership and engagement    Approaches:  ƒ Build relationships across the community  ƒ Challenge and respond to incidents of discrimination  ƒ Foster inclusive, equitable and enduring civic participation  ƒ Facilitate opportunities for on‐going public education and awareness  ƒ Set strategic priorities using community input and sound research  24

 Hamilton’s Centre for Civic Inclusion, A Report to the Community, pg. 2. URL  http://www.hcci.ca/pdfs/report_pdf/Booklet‐_Report_to_Community_‐_2008.pdf, Accessed December 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 30 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 31 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Internal Municipal and Corporate Practices      City of Vancouver  In addition to the Mayor’s Task Force on Immigration (cited above), the City of Vancouver has developed  practices and provided numerous services related to diversity to both its internal and external  stakeholders.  Like most municipalities and organizations working to embrace diversity, the City’s beliefs  and values are reflected in its policies.  In 1988, Vancouver City Council adopted a Civic Policy on  Multicultural Relations that recognizes diversity as a strength and promotes freedom from prejudice and  access to civic services for all residents regardless of background, including residents who speak English  as a second language.25 Vancouver’s City planning process also included outreach to the many cultural  and ethnic communities in the City to ensure that their perspective and needs were included in the final  plan.    Internally, the City of Vancouver has taken many strong steps to ensure that diversity is addressed.   Perhaps foremost of these, is the recognition of Diversity and Multiculturalism as a civic issue worthy of  dedicated staffing.  Within the Social Planning department, the City of Vancouver has established the  position of Multicultural Social Planner with responsibility for:  ƒ “to provide recommendations to Council and other stakeholder groups concerning inclusive  civic policies and strategies;   ƒ to work with Council's Special Advisory Committee and other levels of government and  jurisdictions to identify emerging issues concerning culturally diverse communities and their  needs and to recommend appropriate actions or responses;   ƒ to liaise or work with other civic departments and staff on issues related to cultural diversity and  its challenges;   ƒ to liaise with and assist diverse communities and organizations to address current and emerging  trends and needs in this area;   ƒ to recommend funding or seek resources to address critical and emerging issues concerning  diverse communities.”26    Diversity in the workplace is further supported by the City’s Equal Employment Opportunity program. As  indicated on their website (http://vancouver.ca/eeo/hiringdiverseworkforce.htm), this long standing  initiative provides City staff with useful guidelines on how to hire a diverse workforce and approaches in  screening, interviewing, and orienting new employees. Of note, the City of Vancouver’s website also  provides numerous links, pages, and descriptions of the diversity initiatives within the City and the  departments that support them.  Clearly, substantial efforts have been made to communicate diversity  and multiculturalism as a priority within the City.    The Hastings Institute, the City’s wholly owned non‐profit entity, provides a variety of training and  development offerings to City employees and management, as well as on a consulting basis to other  organizations.  These offerings include:  ƒ Diversity In Our Workplace;   ƒ Service Across Cultures; and  25

City of Vancouver, City of Vancouver Celebrates Diversity and Inclusiveness, June 24th, 2008, pg. 1. City of Vancouver, Social Planning, Role of Social Planning in Multiculturalism and Diversity, URL http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/socialplanning/initiatives/multicult/role.htm, Accessed Feb. 2009. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 32 | P a g e     26

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

The Workplace Language Program.27  “Diversity In Our Workplace” and “Service Across Cultures” are targeted towards and available to all City  employees, while the Workplace Language Program has been especially designed and implemented for  those employees who may benefit from enhanced English language and communication skills as a  means to better functioning and advancement within the workplace.  Of note, this program receives  joint support from the City, the Union locals (CUPE) and the Vancouver School Board.    Like the City of Coquitlam, Vancouver Council is supported by a Multicultural Advisory Committee.  In  past years multicultural issues were represented by the Diversity Committee, however, it was felt that  this broad‐based committee was not able to represent all its numerous stakeholders, and therefore, a  more refined committee structure was established.  The Vancouver Multicultural Cultural Committee’s  Terms of Reference are attached as Appendix 3 to this report.    Numerous diversity and multicultural supports are also available to Vancouver residents and the City’s  stakeholders.     1. The Newcomers Guide  The City of Vancouver publishes a Newcomer’s Guide that provides information about the City of  Vancouver and other levels of government, as well as community agencies and services. The guide is  intended for newcomers to the city, but also provides information useful to many community,  immigrant and settlement agencies supporting immigrants and refugees in Vancouver.  The guide is  available in print, PDF and online (http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/socialplanning/newtovancouver/)  and is available in five languages:  ƒ English  ƒ Chinese  ƒ Punjabi  ƒ Spanish  ƒ Vietnamese    2. Multilingual Phone Lines – 311 information services  Currently, the City of Vancouver provides information services through its multilingual phone line  service.  This service provides basic information about City of Vancouver Services in  Mandarin/Cantonese, Punjabi, Spanish and Vietnamese. However, Vancouver will soon be  implementing a 24 hour 311 information and referral service that will address newcomers’ inquiries  on City information and non‐emergency services in multiple languages, seven days a week.    3. Vancouver: A Guide to Municipal Services ‐ http://vancouver.ca/publications/index.htm  This compact guide provides an overview of services the City provides to its residents. It includes  descriptions, phone numbers and websites for everything from libraries and community centres to  licences and permits, garbage and recycling. Translated versions in Chinese and Vietnamese are  available in PDF and exist on‐line at the City’s website.    4. Events, celebrations and awards  ƒ

27

City of Vancouver, The Hastings Institute, URL http://vancouver.ca/Hastingsinstitute/training.htm, Accessed Feb. 2009.

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 33 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Vancouver acknowledges, supports and celebrates numerous community cultural events and  festivals including:  ƒ International Women’s Day;   ƒ International Day for Elimination of Racial Discrimination;   ƒ National Aboriginal Day;  ƒ Cultural Harmony Awards;  ƒ Diwali;  ƒ Pride Week; and   ƒ International Day for Disabled Persons.  In 2008, the City held its first celebration of World Refugee Day (June 20) in partnership with the  Vancouver Public Library and numerous community organizations.28      City of Burnaby  Burnaby is one of the most ethnically diverse communities in the Lower Mainland. It has both a rich  history of newcomer settlement, but also a strong social service provider presence which actively works  to better coordinate immigrant and refugee programming and services and address gaps in service to  newcomers (see BIPT above). The City of Burnaby takes an active role in the planning and development  of services for its community, and like many other Metro Vancouver municipalities, it actively engages  with many stakeholder and agency partners to address the needs of its newcomers. Currently, the City  Planning department is represented on the Board or Advisory committees to the:  ƒ The BIPT;  ƒ The Burnaby Settlement Workers in Schools program; and the   ƒ Pilot Project for Settlement Focused Early Childhood Services for Refugees in Burnaby.     “In 1986 the City of Burnaby adopted its Multicultural policy, and established an interdepartmental staff  team working group to coordinate the Policy’s implementation.”29 More recently, Burnaby has  recognized the value of diversity and multiculturalism in its 2007 Burnaby Economic Development  Strategy (EDS) 2020. Within its economic development strategy Burnaby has listed “Nurturing a Strong,  Diverse, Welcoming, Caring Society”30 as one of its 11 general strategies. Burnaby further articulates its  strategy by stating that it will undertake the following actions:    1. Socio‐demographic Community Profile  Consider preparing a detailed socio‐demographic profile of Burnaby to establish baseline indicators  of crime and safety, health, education, income, homelessness, language, and social welfare.    2. Monitoring  Continue to monitor socio‐demographic trends and conditions to see which improving, stable, or  deteriorating.    3. Provincial Funding  

28

City of Vancouver, City of Vancouver Celebrates Diversity and Inclusiveness, June 24th, 2008, pg. 2. Joanna Ashworth, Simon Fraser University, Creating Welcoming & Inclusive Communities: What Will It Take?, July 2008, pg. 16. 30 City of Burnaby, Burnaby Economic Development Strategy (EDS) 2020, March 2007, pgs.66 – 69. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 34 | P a g e     29

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Pursue using Burnaby’s influence with regional and provincial governments in a strategic,  cooperative, and coordinated manner to tackle obvious social problems, such as homelessness, child  welfare, and drug abuse.    4. Diversity  Consider signalling Burnaby’s openness to diversity through translation of City documents, increased  support for ESL programs, advocacy for immigration groups, and staging of celebrations/events.    5. Employment  Assess showing leadership in hiring people who need assistance in entering the workforce.    6. Not‐for‐profits  Explore ways in which the City can better assist not‐for‐profit agencies in Burnaby that are engaged  in helping citizens become more able to participate in the local economy.31    Burnaby has provided its staff with a number of opportunities for diversity training and cross cultural  awareness workshops, and in the 1990’s introduced mandatory two‐day diversity training retreats for all  senior exempt employees.32 The Parks and Recreation Department has an established Inclusive Service  Committee which meets twice a year to:  ƒ address programming and training issues around diversity and inclusive services; and  ƒ provide cultural diversity workshops for staff in conjunction with Burnaby‐based immigrant  support service agencies.33    The City of Burnaby also provides information sessions and tours of City hall for newcomers.      City of Richmond  The City of Richmond has endorsed diversity and multiculturalism, both through its staff and committee  structures.     Like other municipalities, Richmond has an advisory committee to Council – the Richmond Intercultural  Advisory Committee (RIAC). RIAC is City appointed and supported by the Planning and Development  Department of the city. RIAC’s stated vision, which has been endorsed by Council, is to “be the most welcoming, inclusive and harmonious community in Canada"34. As defined in their Terms of  Reference, RIAC’s role is to carry out the following functions:  ƒ advise City Council by providing information, options and recommendations regarding  intercultural issues and opportunities;  ƒ respond to intercultural issues referred to RIAC by Council or the community  ƒ assist Council and the community to:  o develop a vision for improved intercultural relations in Richmond  o determine appropriate goals, objectives, policies and guiding principles to enhance  31

Ibid, pgs. 67-68. Joanna Ashworth, Simon Fraser University, Creating Welcoming & Inclusive Communities: What Will It Take? July 2008, pg. 16. 33 Ibid, pg. 16. 34 City of Richmond, Parks and Recreation - Intercultural Experience, URL http://www.richmond.ca/parksrec/about/access/intercultural.htm#, Accessed Feb. 2009. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 35 | P a g e     32

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

intercultural harmony  o periodically review City policies and procedures pertaining to intercultural issues  o encourage and co‐ordinate public participation and networking in the identification and  development of solutions to intercultural issues  o enhance public awareness of and involvement in intercultural issues  o liaise with other levels of government to address Richmond intercultural issues.35    RIAC Projects undertaken and underway include:    ƒ Intercultural Forums, called “Bridges To Community”, bring cultural and faith groups together to  share ideas, meet each other and build bridges between communities. These forums have been  held at Richmond City Hall with the idea of bringing newcomers into municipal buildings and  creating greater Community ownership of these facilities.    ƒ Newcomers Guide to Richmond: Official Municipal guide for new immigrants to living and  working in Richmond and accessing City services. This guide in the process of gaining Council  endorsement and it will be translated into community languages.    ƒ Canadian Citizenship Ceremony: RIAC is in the process of organizing a Citizenship Ceremony at  Richmond City Hall. This event will bring new immigrants in to City Hall.    ƒ RIAC Intercultural Strategic Plan 2004 ‐ 2010: A City Council endorsed Vision, strategic  directions and action plan to promote intercultural connections.36    The Parks Recreation and Cultural Services department (PRCS) have dedicated diversity staffing in its  Diversity Services Section. This service section is mandated to work within the City and with community  partners and agencies to eliminate barriers and ensure appealing, liveable and well‐managed recreation  and cultural services for all Richmond residents. To improve access to parks and recreation services and  opportunities the City produces an Easy Guide to Recreation (available in print, on‐line, and in PDF  formats) in six languages: Chinese, English, Korean, Russian, Spanish and Tagalog. The guide is designed  to make it easier for new immigrants to access recreation and cultural opportunities and access subsidy  and support.    In addition, Richmond has produced a number of resources and toolkits to support both staff and  citizens to fully involve new immigrants and understand diversity.  These include a toolkit for City staff  that will aid them in including immigrants and newcomers in community consultations and a Translation  Toolkit/ Translation Pilot Project with Richmond Senior Services.37 The toolkit will assist staff in  determining how and what to translate and how to use interpreters. Further work is being done with  Richmond Senior Services to test out a large‐scale translation of information, set up telephone  information lines, and to develop a rationale for the translation of information and evaluate the results.   

35

City of Richmond, Terms of Reference Richmond Intercultural Advisory Committee, URL http://www.richmond.ca/__shared/assets/RIAC12980.pdf, Accessed Feb. 2009. 36 Joanna Ashworth, Simon Fraser University, Creating Welcoming & Inclusive Communities: What Will It Take? July 2008, pg. 22. 37 Ibid, pg. 22. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 36 | P a g e     File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Ongoing diversity Training and Community Development and Training is provided in three main areas:  ƒ Communication skills and cultural awareness for front line staff;  ƒ Best practice sharing between staff and other partners; and  ƒ Presentations by community groups re: community needs.38    Like Burnaby, the City of Richmond provides tours for new immigrants and non‐profit groups supporting  them to introduce them to Parks Recreation and Cultural facilities and City Hall, City staff and the work  and vision of Richmond PRCS.    During elections the City Clerks Department provides translated materials and available translators to  assist those with little or no English language skills to participate in voting.      City of Surrey  The City of Surrey has incorporated diversity and multiculturalism into its strategic and civic planning.   Both its Action Plan for the Social Well‐Being of Surrey Residents and the Cultural Opportunities Work  Plan focus on integrating social and diversity issues into the City’s policies, actions and endeavours.     “The Plan for the Social Well‐being of Surrey Residents (Social Plan) was adopted by Surrey City Council  in February 2006 to provide strategic direction for the City’s actions on social issues in the City of Surrey.  Community Development and Diversity is one of the Social Plan’s five themes or priority social issue  areas. Key gaps identified in the Social Plan that relate to the City’s cultural and ethnic diversity  include:  ƒ Need for more culturally sensitive approaches to service delivery within municipal programs and  greater promotion of the benefits of cultural and ethnic diversity.  ƒ Need for recreation and library programs inclusive of the specific needs of Surrey’s diverse  population, including ethno‐specific programs for children, youth and families.  ƒ Need for ethno‐specific and ESL childcare programs and services.”39    Council adopted the plan and approved a $650,000 annual Social Plan budget with an emphasis on  making their services more inclusive and accessible to all residents, especially people of diverse  multicultural backgrounds and vulnerable children and youth. The majority of the funds were directed  towards the Parks, Recreation and Culture Department and the Surrey Public Library for use in the  following initiatives, services and programs:    Parks, Recreation & Culture Services  ƒ Hiring an Intercultural and Youth Outreach Worker;  ƒ Development of a Gateway to Understanding Website that will provide information on various  programs and events that are taking place to reflect and celebrate Surrey’s cultural  communities;  ƒ Partnerships with community organizations to deliver special events, such as the 2nd Annual  Multicultural Resource Fair;  ƒ Development of a multilingual (six languages) recreation guide which provides an overview of  Parks’ facilities and a step‐by‐step guide to program registration; and  38

Ibid, pg. 22. Ibid, pg. 23. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  39

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 37 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ

 January 2009 

Outreach to the South Asian community in Newton which has included hiring multilingual facility  attendants for the Newton Wave Pool and conducting health and wellness workshops in Punjabi  and Hindi at the Guru Nanak Nivas Temple Senior Centre. 

  Surrey Public Library  ƒ “Storytimes to Help Learn English”, a new program launched to help children and their  caregivers learn about the Library and to develop confidence in their English language abilities.  ƒ One‐to‐one tutorials and classes that provide basic computer literacy skills in English, Punjabi  and Mandarin;  ƒ Improved services for multicultural residents through the purchase of Press Display (a database  of online newspapers available in 65 languages), better collections, and programs in languages  other than English; and  ƒ Continued outreach to the Chinese speaking community with numerous programs offered in  Cantonese and Mandarin in partnership with SUCCESS.    “The Cultural Opportunities Work Plan was developed to assist the City in achieving an integrated  corporate policy to create an organizational culture that is welcoming of diversity and inclusive of all  people, regardless of ethnic background, race, gender, abilities/disabilities, religious beliefs or sexual  orientation. To build awareness and expand the cultural knowledge of City of Surrey employees, five  cultural events a year are selected to be recognized and celebrated by City staff. These celebrations  provide the opportunity for all employees to understand, accept and respect cultural differences.”40    The City of Surrey has also established (2007) a Multicultural Advisory Committee.  Its mandate is to  enhance multicultural harmony and intercultural cooperation in the City of Surrey. One of the  Committee’s primary activities was to host Surrey’s first ever multicultural festival ‐ Fusion ’08.     In 2008, the City of Surrey identified the need to provide city workers with increased awareness of  issues related to multiculturalism and diversity. Throughout 2008, the City has provided a series of  workshops to over 400 employees and managers.  Sessions were requested, customized and delivered  to various city employees including Program Coordinators and Managers in the Parks and Recreation  department, City Hall employees, members of the local RCMP detachment, community volunteers and  members of the Advisory Councils for Surrey’s seniors’ centres.     The Community Development Department of Surrey hosts an “Intercultural Outreach” section on the  City website. This site  (http://www.surrey.ca/Living+in+Surrey/Community+Development/Outreach+Initiatives/Intercultural+ Diversity/default.htm) provides links to many of the City’s diversity resources as well as to a number of  external Surrey resources beneficial to a multicultural community.  While many of the links are still  under construction as part of the Gateway to Understanding Website, the information is well laid out  and presented in a graphic and easy to use format.      BC HYDRO  BC Hydro provides many examples and key lessons in implementing diversity within a corporation.  Like  the Cities of Vancouver and Richmond, BC Hydro has identified diversity and multiculturalism within its  40

Ibid, pg. 23. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 38 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

workforce as a strategic priority and has dedicated management staffing to lead and enhance the  potential for diversity within the company. BC Hydro has established the position of Diversity Manager  within its corporate offices to lead, create initiatives and document progress in creating a more diverse  workforce. Direction and strategy for the position are established by the Chief Executive Officer and the  Executive team, and much of the communication on the importance of diversity and its necessity for the  company comes directly from the CEO.    BC Hydro’s Diversity Manager emphasizes that diversity cannot be perceived as a “program”, but rather  that it must be seen as way of operating that is embedded in all levels of the organization, including its  values, strategic planning, communication, training and development and practices and process.   Diversity at BC Hydro is seen as part of its business case and central to its ongoing operations and  recruitment.  As a result, the Diversity Manager’s focus is on how to live diversity as a company, rather  than how to do it just as another item on the list of things to do.    To that end, BC Hydro is willingly examining many of its processes and practices to ensure that they are  fulfilling the strategic and business goals.  Recruitment and hiring practices have been examined and  revised to make certain that hiring managers are using techniques and approaches that do not exclude  capable candidates from diverse backgrounds.  This has included revising initial telephone screening  techniques to ensure that English as Second Language speakers are not prematurely screened out,  revising interview questions to a competency based assessment approach rather than a localized  experience emphasis, and revising hiring panels to include diversity. Training and professional  development opportunities are available in understanding diversity and cross cultural communication as  these can also be applied during the recruitment and hiring of diverse candidates.    BC Hydro puts strong emphasis on measurement and reporting of its progress towards diversity, and the  Diversity Manager is responsible for providing senior management with a report on several metrics of  diversity each month. This information is not presented as a performance report of departmental  practices, successes or failures, but rather as an indicator of progress towards the overall goal of  establishing a diverse workforce that reflects the communities that BC Hydro works in.    Throughout its approach, BC Hydro recognizes and promotes the use of communication to support its  diversity strategies and goals. Again, senior management and the CEO are instrumental in supporting  and profiling the company’s diversity strategy, and the president’s reports, strategy bulletins, and  company newsletters are all used to emphasize its importance.    BC Hydro employees have also established their own approach to cultural diversity through the Hydro  Employees Multicultural Society (HEMS).  Started by Hydro employees several years ago, HEMS plays a  dual role in the celebration and creation of diversity within the company. Firstly, with over 200 members  it provides an outlet for employee driven action on multiculturalism, and how it is acknowledged and  practiced within BC Hydro.  Secondly, it provides advice and information to the overall corporate  strategy and diversity planning.  HEMS is supported with resources from the Diversity Manager’s office  diversity training, but does not receive corporate direction for its activities. Rather it is seen as an  example of how BC Hydro can “live diversity” rather than practice it.      Safeway Inc.  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 39 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Safeway has embedded diversity into the company’s philosophy.  Its corporate home page  (http://www.safeway.com/IFL/Grocery/About‐Us) lists diversity as one of three elements to its overall  corporate philosophy with this direct and uncomplicated statement: “At Safeway, we feel that our team  should reflect the diversity of the people who shop in our stores.”41    Safeway supports its philosophy with full day management workshops for all management levels.  These  workshops are developed specifically to address and develop:  ƒ an understanding of bias and prejudice towards those different from us; and  ƒ how those same differences can be of great value to the organization if managed effectively.     Diversity Advisory Boards are also established on a regional basis to ensure that the company’s  philosophy is actively embraced and acted upon.  Like BC Hydro, Safeway reviews the diversity of its  employee base and prepares and analyzes comparison reports on staff ethnicity versus the localized  census data to ensure that the company reflects its customer base.    In addition, Safeway takes on a number of diversity related activities and events as part of its corporate  commitment to the community, but also to its employees and management.  These include:  ƒ Diversity Calendar (world‐wide celebratory events)  ƒ Management involvement in community   ƒ Trade talks to new immigrants through societies and community agencies  ƒ Regular participation in job fairs designed for new immigrants  ƒ New hire ‘buddy system’  ƒ Special focus on the promotion and mentoring of visible minority management  ƒ Annual corporate diversity assessment42      TRIEC Award Winners ‐ Best Employers for New Canadians  As mentioned in the above section of Best Practices ‐ Other Provinces and Canadian Municipalities,  TRIEC annually awards a number of Canadian Employers for their support of hiring New Canadians into  their workforces. Their success stories and awards highlight many of the approaches and practices listed  above and demonstrate the importance of leadership, the power of incremental steps and individual  contributions, as well as the extensive value and benefits gained from employing a diverse workforce.   The award summaries for 2008, 2007, and 2006 are attached as Appendix 4 of this report.     

41

Safeway, About Us: Our Philosophy, URL http://www.safeway.com/IFL/Grocery/About-Us, Accessed Feb. 2009. Safeway, Our Neighbourhood and Yours, PowerPoint presentation to the Vancouver Foundation, Nov. 2008. Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                 40 | P a g e     42

File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Community Consultations    Thirteen consultations were conducted with key community stakeholders within the Coquitlam / Tri‐ Cities. A list of the individuals interviewed has been attached as Appendix 5.     Identification and selection of the stakeholders included the following steps:    ƒ All sectors of the community were reviewed to ensure a complete representation of the  community.  Service sectors identified:   o settlement  o family and youth  o library  o community/civic  o education (including K to 12, Continuing Education and post‐secondary)  o health  o business  o women  o early childhood development  o parks and leisure  o government  ƒ Consultations were conducted with Cathy van Poorten and Nadia Carvalho (City of Coquitlam  Planning Department) to obtain their input and recommended contacts.  ƒ City documentation (minutes, strategic plans, multicultural advisory committee reports, etc.)  was reviewed for key participants and membership.  ƒ Research was conducted to identify the most appropriate representative agency and contact  person.    The consultations were conducted throughout October 2008.  Each of the identified community  stakeholders was sent an “overview of the project and a request for participation” as well as a copy of  the consultation questions via email. A copy of the consultation questions has been attached as  Appendix 6.  All of the community stakeholders identified and contacted responded to the request and  willingly offered their time. The consultations were conducted either face to face or over the telephone  and in all cases, individuals had reviewed the questions and were prepared to share their opinions,  insights and suggestions.     The willingness of the participants to give their time and thought to the process was noteworthy. As  mentioned in the initial proposal, these individuals should also be considered for the Project Advisory  Group which will provide input during Phase 2, Development of Community Vision and Phase 3, Strategy  and Action Plan Development.        Key Themes and Observations    The input provided through the community consultations has been reviewed and summarized and the  responses provided by the participants have been organized and categorized by question into tables.   The ten tables have been attached as Appendix 7. The thematic categories were determined from an  initial analysis of the responses. To capture all information provided by participants, responses outside  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 41 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

of the selected categories have been placed in an “Other” category. The information collected and  entered into the tables has not been prioritized as participants were not asked to weight or rank their  responses. Below is a brief overview of the issues most frequently raised during the consultations.     Two overriding issues were noted by many of the stakeholders consulted: 1. the complexity of the Tri‐ Cities’ municipal structure and regional boundaries and, 2. the growth of diversity within the Tri‐Cities,  particularly within the last two decades.     Stakeholders repeatedly stated that Coquitlam cannot be considered in isolation from the Tri‐Cities;  furthermore, it was noted numerous times not only must the Tri‐Cities be considered, but that Belcarra  and Anmore must also be considered. One stakeholder stated, “The Tri‐Cities is a complicated structure  and collaboration is important in the region due to the spread out nature of the municipalities. It is hard  to see the differences or the borders between the municipalities”. As a result, service coordination and  collaboration amongst the municipalities and other stakeholders was noted as critical. One participant  stated, “How well Coquitlam does depends on how well the Tri‐Cities does.”     Participants also recognized the growth of diversity within the Tri‐Cities. In recent years, Coquitlam and  the Tri‐Cities have welcomed new immigrants from a growing range of countries. The Tri‐Cities has also  become the third largest recipient of refugees in British Columbia.  As a result, the issues related to  multiculturalism and diversity have become more complex and the need for first language supports in  multiple languages and a wider range of programs and services has emerged.    In addition to these two overarching issues, other issues or themes arose repeatedly throughout the  consultations. The following is an overview.    Collaboration and Service Coordination  All of the participants mentioned collaboration and service coordination as being critical to the  development of Coquitlam as a welcoming and inclusive community. Many noted that the community  has been quite successful in establishing a culture of collaboration. The City’s recent support of diversity  and multiculturalism issues was noted as having been key to raising awareness and encouraging  collaborative efforts. Several collaborations were mentioned including:  ƒ A number of agencies were a part of the development of the Early Childhood Development  Refugee Pilot Project  ƒ Several programs at the library have been delivered in partnership with the School District,  SUCCESS and ISS  ƒ Settlement services are delivered collaboratively by MOSAIC, ISS and SUCCESS  ƒ SUCCESS has provided cultural awareness training to many community agencies  ƒ The library and SHARE partner to deliver conversation classes   ƒ SHARE and Fraser Health partner to deliver parenting classes and a mentorship program  ƒ MCFD has partnered with SUCCESS, ISS and the School District to obtain funding  ƒ MCFD holds a contract with SUCCESS and the Family Resources Centre to deliver counselling  supports  ƒ Tri‐Cities Women’s Resource Society works with immigrant serving agencies for interpretation  and translation    Although a culture of collaboration is in place, it was also noted repeatedly that collaboration and  service coordination are essential and must be encouraged and facilitated. Several individuals noted that  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 42 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

the City could do more to support collaboration by encouraging and supporting collaborative initiatives,  by providing more sources of information, by providing more shared facilities / meeting spaces, etc.     It was also noted that more needed to be done to engage business; collaboration with local employers  might include more employment attachment initiatives, mentorship opportunities, more support for  community events, co‐location of services, etc.     Information and Resources  The need for more information and the development of community resources was mentioned by many  as critical. Stakeholders shared that without up to date information and resources, collaboration and  service and program coordination becomes very difficult. Without collaboration and service  coordination, competition for funding and program and service duplication arises.     Information and resource suggestions included:  ƒ Census Data analyses be conducted and better distributed or promoted  ƒ A community resources guide for immigrants and refugees be developed and promoted  ƒ Existing programs and resources within the community be better promoted   ƒ A Welcome Centre – either physical or virtual – be developed  ƒ Activities that take information out into the community at a neighbourhood level (block parties,  firemen and RCMP neighbourhood visits, etc.) be supported  ƒ A welcoming resource package be developed and distributed through the network of  community agencies   ƒ More on‐line resources in both English and in other languages be created and promoted  ƒ A “Welcome Wagon” approach that provides information, event invitations, free passes, etc. to  new residents be established    First Language Supports  Many stakeholders spoke of the need for additional funding to provide first language supports. Given  the increasing number of first languages spoken and the needs of some of the area’s newest residents,  some agencies have struggled to provide adequate services. Health, legal, parenting, and family violence  are examples of subject areas that often require first language communication. Many stakeholders  stated a requirement for funding to translate promotional, instructional and other vital materials and to  provide bi‐lingual courses, programs or counselling. Some stakeholders stated that if Coquitlam was to  become a truly welcoming community, there would be more “bilingual signage”.    Community Capacity  As stated above, many stakeholders noted the growth of diversity within Coquitlam and the surrounding  communities and the challenges they face “keeping up” with the changing demographics. In addition to  increasing first language supports, many stated a need for more training for service providers to  increase their capacity to design, develop and deliver services and programs that meet the needs of the  diverse residents of Coquitlam.  More training is required to increase awareness of the issues related to  multiculturalism, diversity and successful settlement and integration and to enhance cross‐cultural  communication and understanding.     Community Engagement  The need to connect the resident community with newcomer communities was noted by a number of  stakeholders. The Coquitlam Public Library, the School District, the Mayor and Council and the  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 43 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Multicultural Advisory Committee, Fraser Health, the Parks Board, local media, ESL providers were all  mentioned as examples of agencies and individuals who have made efforts to increase community  support and engagement. Some suggestions for increasing community engagement and community  connection included:  ƒ More mentoring type programs – workforce mentoring and parenting mentors  ƒ More shared meeting places  ƒ More programs and services established in malls and other “common” areas to increase  community awareness and involvement  ƒ Increased support of festival and ethnic events    Reflection of Diversity  Many of the stakeholders consulted noted the lack of ethnic diversity on City Council and on other  community and business councils and boards and within the RCMP. It was stated that Parks and  Recreation could do more to provide services and programs that meet the needs of Coquitlam’s diverse  population.     Diversity Awareness and Value  Although nearly 40% of Coquitlam’s population is immigrant, some stakeholders stated that Coquitlam  is not seen as being a multicultural or a culturally diverse community. Many stated a need to do a better  job of promoting and celebrating the community’s cultural diversity.      

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 44 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Identification of Community Initiatives    As proposed, research and community consultations were conducted to identify the current  multicultural, immigrant and refugee programs and services available to newcomers in Coquitlam. The  data collected has been compiled into a “directory” and has been included with this report as a separate  document.  In Phase 2: Development of a Community Vision, the directory will be reviewed as a  component of the proposed gap analysis to identify missing service and program elements in the City of  Coquitlam.    To capture information on programs and services specific to the needs and requirements of new  immigrants and refugees in Coquitlam, the programs and services selected for inclusion within the  “directory” had to meet the following criteria:    1. Critical to the settlement process –  2. A focus or emphasis on services, programs, resources for newcomers (some services target a  generic population, but are important for newcomers and the program or service  accommodates newcomers)  3. Within Coquitlam     It is recognized that there are also numerous community, education, business and health etc., supports  and services provided to the whole population that certainly apply to Coquitlam’s newcomers; however,  these services do not fit within the intent or scope of this project.    To collect the information an email or fax back form was developed and a thorough canvass of  immigrant serving, social, education and community agencies and resources was conducted.   Stakeholders were asked to not only provide information on their own initiatives, but to provide  reference to other services and / or programs available in the Coquitlam (Tri‐Cities) vicinity.    In total, 46 programs and initiatives addressing the needs of immigrants and refugees were identified  within the following categories:  ƒ English as a Second Language Programs (ESL);  ƒ Skills Training and Upgrading;  ƒ Employment Programs;  ƒ Translation & Interpretation Services;  ƒ Settlement Services;  ƒ Personal, Family Counselling;  ƒ Immigrant Support Groups;  ƒ Legal Services;  ƒ Tax Services;  ƒ Recreation and Community Activities; and  ƒ Volunteer Opportunities.     

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 45 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Next Steps  As outlined within the original Request for Proposals, Phase 2 – Development of a Community Vision will  involve working with the City, multiple stakeholders and the public to determine what a culturally  inclusive and welcoming community will look like for Coquitlam. Once defined, a vision will be  developed. To do so, the project team will conduct further consultations, lead focus groups and a  community forum, conduct a gap analysis and guide the development of a multiculturalism vision. 

  Phase 2 work will begin in February 2009.

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 46 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 1 – Summary of MAC Minutes    Summary of Coquitlam Multicultural Advisory Committee meeting minutes and discussions –  Feb. 2007 to May 2008    February 6, 2007  MAC discussion notes from a session led by the Manager Corporate Planning.   

Vision (for the Community)  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Social cohesion  Vibrant multicultural community  Celebration of diversity  Model in Canada and the world  Acceptance  Respect  Everyone achieving maximum potential  Community of Cultures  Working harmoniously for the future 

 

Opportunities  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Grants  Networking  Provide greater support of non‐profits / SUCCESS  Dialogue / Communication  Newsletter  Raise awareness of differences  Showcase different heritages; celebration of different cultures  Strength of cultural diversity  Opportunities to learn different languages  Economic opportunity  Education 

 

Actions to remember  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Employment Equity program at the City of Coquitlam  Job Fair  Translation of City documents  Newsletter  Multicultural research within Coquitlam  City programming  Need to focus on certain issues going forward 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 47 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

    March 6, 2007  MAC round table discussion: Summary of “Review of Major Themes Identified as Barriers to Coquitlam  being a Welcome and Inclusive Community”.    * Note: it appears from the responses that some participants have contributed suggestions to address  the barriers, rather than specifically identifying the barriers and challenges.   

1. Language and communications  ƒ ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

ESL in general  Program reviews in schools;  o Not meeting requirements  o Greater hurdle / increased workload  o Effectiveness of the program  Translation programs for adults / seniors  Translation and access to interpreters when required  Community involvement difficulties  Have newcomers feel welcome and not fearful of the English language  Access to learn English or French  Provide guidebooks or workshops to reduce culture shock and language barriers. 

 

2. Social isolation/exclusion and social cohesion/inclusive  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Self induced social segregation  Organize social events that promote social collaboration and cooperation  How long is the adjustment period?  Access to community activities  Provide opportunity to network outside of the ethnic society  Planned social gatherings of different ethnic backgrounds together  o Chamber of commerce  o Not for Profit groups  o Local politicians  o Police   o Fire 

 

3. Lack of opportunity to participate in community and economy  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Less employment opportunities due to lack of social connections  Recognition of foreign credentials  Language plays a role  Group effect 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 48 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

Personal preference  Presentations from different ethnic communities to City hall  Employment and job fairs 

 

4. Misunderstandings and stereotyping  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Sensationalizing media stories regarding crimes involving immigrant groups  Social labelling  Broad generalizations  Language  Attitude  Cultural Values  Provide guidebook outlining Canadian (North American) culture, attitude and behaviours 

  May 8, 2007  MAC round table discussion: Summary    

1. How do we reach out to various communities?  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Festivals / multicultural festivals (x 3 )  Sporting events  Ethnic and local newspapers (x 3)  Showcasing ethnic group’s arts and crafts  Use children’s events to promote diversity  Through religious institutions (x 2)  Directories and books targeted to various groups  Through organizations that maintain data banks  Having more languages than the major five (translation?)  Through education 

 

2. What role can the committee play in enhancing communications?  ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Recommend to council  o Promote City Soup, and  o Translate City Directory in various languages  Each member to connect with personal network and translate needs back to the committee  Contact schools to direct people to services  Committee members may be able to bring to the committee’s attention whatever specific  concerns they may have encountered in their dealings with the wide community.  Present strong advice to council  Identify needs for outreach – use limited resources  Network from this committee  Using neighbourhoods to outreach 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 49 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ

ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

Youth and migration 2008:  o Promote acceptance of migrants by expanding host societies knowledge of their earlier  migration history  o Youth camps and household exchanges  Reach out to the community leaders  Act as facilitator / coordinator 

  June 5, 2007  MAC round table discussion: Summary   Answers are summarized from four break‐out groups, not all of whom identified five priorities.   

What are the top five priorities for this Advisory Committee?    Ranking  Suggested Priority  1  Reception Centre for new immigrants  2  Heritage Canada grant for Multicultural Strategic Plan  3  Promote the formation of a closer community and friendlier neighbourhood  through:  ƒ Cultural events  ƒ

Heritage events 

ƒ

Actively involved residents, and 

ƒ

Congregate together and meeting other people in the community 

Frequency 4  4  1 

3  3  3  4  4  4  5  5 

Remove fees from civic facilities for cultural events  1  City flashcards in multiple languages  1  Reinforce and monitor Employment Equity Policy  1  Active contact program with ethnic media  1  City hall mouthpiece and multicultural radio station  1  Educate community leaders with “Cultural sensitivity training”  1  City Open House  1  Enhance the profile of the Multicultural Advisory Committee and multicultural  1  events        The Committee recommended that Council Support;    1. The development of a Multicultural Strategic Plan if funding for such a study is approved  through a grant application from Heritage Canada;  2. The City collaborate with community partners in planning a grant application to the Provincial  Attorney General’s office to develop a needs analysis and a business case for a one stop shop  Reception service Centre for newcomers.  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 50 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  July 4, 2007  Business arising: The Manager Corporate Planning reported that Council has adopted the two  recommendations put forth by the committee (see above).  MAC round table discussion: Summary    

What are ways to promote delivery and inclusiveness for Festivals and Cultural Events?    ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Centrally organized festival (Fusion or Harmony festival)  All ethnic groups displaying specific talents  Involvement for all ages (seniors to youth)  Integrate generations  Universal festivals  Showcase mutual interests  Youth‐led event  Specifically invite other ethnic groups to events (i.e. Korean to Highland games)  International women’s forum and highlight women in many different ethnic cultures  Rent booths / space to other ethnic groups during the designated festivals (i.e. Korean booth at  Highland games)  Business and non‐profit booth sharing  Provide translators  Provide multilingual pamphlets 

  September 5, 2007  MAC round table discussion: Summary   * Note: this item appears to be a repetition of the very similar Top 5 priorities discussion in June 2007.   

1. What are the priorities of the Multiculturalism Advisory Committee?  Group 1  1. Reception Centre to include services such as:  ƒ Training and assistance in understanding of Canadian society and culture  ƒ Centre should be approachable with the feeling of inclusiveness  ƒ Provide essential information such as social norms, behaviour and social expectations  ƒ Shorten the period of culture shock by getting new immigrants to be more active  ƒ Use the term reception centre as a broader initiative    Group 2  1. Population density – updated census data for the smaller less represented groups  2. Language:  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 51 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

ƒ Basic services must be provided to solve the language barriers that may arise  ƒ Facilitate language translation services for the fundamentals (i.e. Low income).  3. Venue or space for organizing events bringing different people together at the same time educating  newcomers regarding important information  4. Research and find out what major festivals can be used to organize these events.   

2. How can the Multicultural Community Leaders assist with promoting multiculturalism?    ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Clarification or define what “leaders” mean  Goal is to engage new immigrants / newcomers to become more proactive in the community.   Leaders can provide inspiration and persuasion.  Get them out there  Leaders should give information, workshops and provide mentoring for Community Leaders  should be appointed by the City (those who contribute to the Reception Centre)  Leaders should represent different ethnic groups and should provide leadership information in  their respective communities  Function like a liaison leader  Where is the limit?  Encourage and motivate people in the community to volunteer and give back  Remind them why they came to Canada  Show them that they belong and instil a sense of close‐knit community  Promote through media channels and social events 

  October 2, 2007  The Manager Corporate Communications presented the MAC with an overview of the City’s translation  policy.    MAC discussion and suggestions: Summary    

Suggestions for Translation Services  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Interpreter joint data bank involving community members and City employees  Use of pictures rather than translated text  Cantonese should be replaced by Traditional Chinese and Mandarin replaced by Simplified  Chinese  What are the items that new residents “really” need to know  Utilizing community resources for translation and proofing  If information is newsworthy, local ethnic papers will pick it up. 

  It was suggested that the Committee members provide staff with the following information:  ƒ What are other group databases that are available?  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 52 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

What are the other trends and needs?  What is the core information that new residents need to know?  What should the criteria for translation be?  What criteria should be used to determine the languages for translation? 

  March 4, 2008  MAC round table discussion: Summary    

1. Identify the stakeholders  ƒ

ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Korean community  o C3 – Korean Co‐Active (x 2 )  o North Road Business Improvement Association  UBC, SFU and Douglas College – ethnic and cultural student groups, foreign students, student  associations, etc.  o Student groups  o Foreign students  o Student association  o Iranian student association  o Youth Political Action  o J.J. Moon  SUCCESS – staff and groups (x 2)  ISS – staff and groups (  French Community  Fraser Valley Métis Association  Maillardville Residents’ Association  Aboriginal Community – Kwikwetlem (x 2)  Persian Parents group at Pinetree Secondary School   Charles Best language classes (Taiwanese Group – TZU CHI x 2)  Chamber of Commerce  Pasta Polo  Hindi Community  Persons who are currently not working including housewives  Major cultural groups – Korean, Iranian, Chinese, etc.  Professional groups ( x 2)  Groups with common issues and interests (eg. Problems with credential recognition)  People who could be more mentors  Long‐time residents  Youth  Newcomers who don’t know the language  Economic immigrants 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 53 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

Tri‐City Asian Community Association  Tri‐City Asian Parents association  Kurdish Cultural Society (Coquitlam)  Korean parents of Autistic Children  Afghan Cultural Society  Russian Cultural group  Iranian Radio Show  Girl Guides / Scouts  Mandarin Scouts  New West Labour Council  Greater Vancouver Chinese Language School  Elite Education (Scott Creek)  Societe Uni Maillardville  B’hai Community  Tri ‐Cities Overseas Chinese Association  Tri‐Cities Islamic Temple  Tri‐Cities Ismaili Temple 

 

2. How can the City connect with those stakeholders?  ƒ

ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Media  o Canadian immigrant newspaper (Safeway, Canadian Tire, etc.)  o Real estate Magazines  o Ethnic media – write an article about accessing City services (x 2)  Popular gathering places  o Restaurants  o specialty store bulletin boards (T & T)  Persian New Year – March 21st – 23rd  Pars ballet – March 23rd   Buddhist Celebration (Tzu Chi Foundation)  Churches / temples – Korean Community  Rogers Multicultural Channel (M)  Professionals (how to set up a business)  Professional Groups  Heads of organizations (teachers, doctors etc,)  Series of workshops with knowledgeable people at Community centres  Connect with realtors  School District  PACs – Korean Chinese, etc.  Teachers who are immigrants themselves  Persian Women’s Network  Soroptomists – Women’s multicultural forum 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 54 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

Small business owners – North Road Business Improvement Association  Key community personalities  Tzu Chi Academy of Humanistic Studies in Coquitlam  Intercultural learning classes at SUCCESS  ESL Classes  Concentrate on language, custom, sports, etc.  Financial institutions  Information fair  Attend their monthly meetings  Hot line number  Direct contact  Attend their facilities to connect 

 

3. What are the key questions to pose during the Community Engagement Event?  ƒ ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

How can the City assist newcomers?  Conduct general survey to find out needs  o Background information  o What do you need?  How can the City help?  Welcome Wagon style for informing basics about City services  Consult with SUCCESS and ISS in terms of questions to ask  Simple, limited questions and preliminary survey  How do people who have been able to overcome the issues do it?  Shared learning experiences  How do we as a community better accommodate community integration?  What has your settlement process been like?  Different questions for different sectors – youth, seniors, etc.  Customs  School Experiences and challenges  Focussed groups – ESL  language barriers – how these create other barriers  o Common barriers for newcomers  o What are their expectations??  o Need for standardized questions  What are the difficulties in meeting these expectations  What type of employment are they engaged in? Sector?  Why did you choose the Tri‐Cities area?  Where did you come from?  What is your home country?  What can make the City do to make it more welcoming?  What are your concerns in Coquitlam – safety, transportation, employment, etc.?  What kind of relationship do you have with the Canadian culture? 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 55 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

How do you deal with the intercultural relations within your neighbourhood?  Most needed item to gain City services – language services  What is the most challenging part of accessing City services or Community?  How do they identify problems, challenges and social services?  How do you find out information?  How can we get you involved in City government?  How can we get you involved in Community events?  How do you solve your language barriers?   

4. Other ideas:  ƒ ƒ

Expand the Coquitlam Passport to include basic information regarding how to access City  services  Coordinate a mini‐expo  o Each ethnic group with booth/tent, food, entertainment  o Harmony festival – simply for enjoyment  o Town Centre location – joint project with Evergreen  o Free admission 

  April 1, 2008  MAC discussion: Summary   In response to a presentation from the Social Planner and Planner Analyst regarding the  Multiculturalism Strategic Plan Process the MAC responded and discussed:    ƒ Research on best practices and initiatives, as well as networking is the first stage  ƒ Integration of newcomers into the community was recognized as a key theme from the  perspective of multiculturalism  ƒ “Coquitlam – the city that works with multicultural harmony” could be a focus goal for the  visioning portion of the process.    MAC brainstorm / discussion: Summary    

1. What does it mean to be a Canadian in the context of a global village?  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Being Canadian means you can find ingredients to make any culture’s traditional recipes  Cultures are mixed in relationships  Different religions can be neighbours  Different ways of doing things are accepted – diversity teaches tolerance and humility  Children will have a better future in this country  Multicultural festivals include various foods, costumes etc.  People who come to Canada should be encouraged to reach the qualifications to become  Canadian as soon as the law allows (adapt rather than fight over differences) 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 56 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

 January 2009 

Need all people with all skills – professional and otherwise  Rise above the differences and recognize / celebrate the similarities  It is like Battlestar Galactica – everyone on the ship is different but lives and works together for  the well‐being of the planet.  Diverse population – Canada is the most globalized country population‐wise  Other countries are wrestling with the same issues  Immigrant populations have not been ghetto‐ized in Canada, but have spread out into the  general population  Commonalities: notions of acceptance and respect, and community pressure to be accepting of  others  Good beginning point in Canada for civil respect  “visible minority” is a discriminating term which is anti‐multiculturalism  Being Canadian means equal opportunities  “attracting people” is different from “accepting people”  Canada is an open society, but there are some barriers  Canada is unique with respect to freedom and rights, but they should be more than just policy  and must become common practice 

 

2. What is a harmonious community?  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

The need to create constants on shared value across cultural groups, requires flexibility for the  good of the larger group  Looking forward under a shared set of laws is an important part of harmony  Multiculturalism is a process where people live comfortably as part of the community  Multiculturalism without equal opportunities is meaningless  Multiculturalism is an urban phenomenon  The process is: arrival, survival, revival with equal opportunities 

  The following purpose statement was reviewed and discussed:    “To develop a community vision and strategy for Coquitlam to be a culturally inclusive and  prosperous community that is respectful of diversity and recognizes the value of global  citizenship.”    Committee members were asked to review and rewrite the purpose statement.    * Note: The future minutes do not indicate a revised statement.    May 6, 2008  The meeting was dedicated to planning and discussion for the June 2008 MAC Welcoming New  Canadians event.    Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 57 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Responses to June 17, 2008 Creating a Welcoming Community    Summary of Welcoming New Canadians event collected data.    Ques. 3. Part A ‐ What helped you when you arrived in the Tri‐Cities?   

                            Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 58 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

              Ques. 3. Part B ‐ What things did you need when you first arrived in the Tri‐Cities?   

    Ques. 4. ‐ What kind of help do newcomers need the most?   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 59 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 60 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 2 – BCAMP Projects 2008 / 2009      BC Anti‐Racism and Multiculturalism Program   Request for Proposal Competition Results   List of Successful Proponents   For contracts occurring between April 2008 ‐ March 2009  Community Organization  Campbell River and Area  Multicultural and  Immigrant Services  Association   Abbotsford Community  Services   Inter‐Cultural Association  of Greater Victoria  

City  Campbell River 

Immigrant and  Multicultural Services  Society of Prince George   The Family Education and  Support Centre  

Prince George 

Skeena Diversity Society  

Terrace 

Kamloops Cariboo  Regional Immigrant  Society   Cowichan Valley  Intercultural and  Immigrant Aid Society  

Abbotsford  Victoria 

Maple Ridge 

Kamloops 

Duncan 

Mission Community  Services Society  

Mission 

Victoria Immigrant and  Refugee Centre Society  

Victoria 

Project  A racism inventory tool will be created to assess racism issues  in the Campbell River area. A theatre project is planned for  local secondary schools.   Workshops will help young people to understand cultural  differences.   A series of training workshops is planned for students taking  the youth ambassador curriculum. The workshops will promote  diversity in schools and neighbourhoods.   A peer mentorship and leadership model will be used to  empower youth to create awareness and promote diversity in  the community.   A game show will educate youth about multicultural issues and  anti‐racism awareness. The show will lead to a youth  mentorship program to encourage youth to educate their peers  about multiculturalism.   A grade 7 forum on bullying and racism, a fine arts session and  a project to enable youth to share their stories through  photography will be used to develop youth leadership on  diversity and inclusiveness.   A conference for youth from diverse backgrounds will be  organized to promote cross‐cultural understanding and racism  awareness.   A team of youth and adults from diverse backgrounds will  develop an education toolkit to train teams to co‐facilitate  diversity education, promote multiculturalism and build  inclusive communities.   The society will develop multicultural education learning  strategies targeted to youth through the use of fine art, visual  art and structured experience and interaction with peers in the  district of Mission.   Youth Strides is a summer training project that will add a new  component that engages up to 15 immigrant and refugee  youth. The project involves workshop participation and  leadership development in the form of presentations, theatre,  music, dance forum, art and media interfacing that will explore  themes of identity and personal experience. It will facilitate  discussion about multiculturalism, ant‐racism and cross‐cultural  learning experiences.  

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 61 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

Kelowna Community  Resources Society  

Campbell River and Area  Multicultural and  Immigrant Services  Association   Inter‐Cultural Association  of Greater Victoria  

Kelowna  

Campbell River 

Victoria 

The 411 Seniors Centre  Society   Collingwood  Neighbourhood House  Society   Kelowna Community  Resources  

Vancouver 

Kamloops Cariboo  Regional Immigrant  Society   Cowichan Valley  Intercultural and  Immigrant Aid Society   Mission Community  Services Society  

Kamloops 

Powell River Employment  Program Society  

Vancouver 

Kelowna 

 January 2009 

The society will develop an initiative to provide anti‐racism  leadership training for high school youth. Twelve high school  students will be recruited to be youth ambassadors and  facilitate the workshops.  A discrimination action committee will identify community  needs, develop multiculturalism action plans and offer diversity  and cultural awareness education.   Diversity training will be provided to organizations, including  businesses and post‐secondary institutions, to encourage them  to build and support inclusive and welcoming workplaces.   The project will record oral histories of elders from diverse  cultures.   Events and activities will be used to bring neighbours together  to celebrate and share cultural experiences.   The organization will provide diversity education and  experiential opportunities and build appreciation of cultural  diversity.   A teachers’ educational resource kit will help meet the unique,  multicultural education needs of rural communities.  

Duncan 

Community members will be invited to share their experiences  of their own cultures.  

Mission 

A community map will highlight areas of cultural minorities and  related demographics. The agency will develop an inventory of  organizations that plan and co‐ordinate actions that intersect  with Aboriginal or immigrant communities.   Community dialogues will focus on diversity, while enhancing  multiculturalism and anti‐racism education.  

Powell River 

  Multiculturalism Services Branch   Ministry of Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Multiculturalism 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 62 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 3 – Vancouver Multicultural Advisory Committee Mandate & Terms of  Reference    Multicultural  To enhance access to full participation in City services for multicultural communities.  Terms of Reference    ƒ providing input to civic departments in addressing racism and discrimination issues, e.g. hate  crime, graffiti, civic rental policy;  ƒ addressing issues of concern, e.g. housing, youth and seniors, culture and recreation, and  community outreach;  ƒ working with City staff on civic events which celebrate diversity, e.g. Cultural Harmony Awards,  City Hall Lights Program, International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination;  ƒ contributes to City programs and policies to ensure that the needs of multicultural communities  are considered;  ƒ views City programs and policies through a variety of lenses including racial origins;  ƒ works co‐operatively with other civic agencies whose activities affect multicultural communities;  ƒ engages in outreach to the multicultural communities to disseminate information and  encourage participation;  ƒ acts as a conduit for feedback from multicultural communities on civic matters affecting them;  ƒ acts as a resource for staff doing public involvement processes in multicultural communities, e.g.  civic elections and Community Visions;  ƒ supports groups endeavouring to initiate and develop projects to assist multicultural  communities;  ƒ attends City‐sponsored public forums to provide information on City programs and receive  public input on diversity issues;  ƒ brings to the City Council matters identified by it as requiring action by the City;  ƒ deals with any matters which may be referred to the Committee by Council;  ƒ produces an annual work plan with specific objectives by no later than March of each year, in  consultation with its Council and staff liaisons, for distribution to Council and civic departments  for information;  ƒ submits an annual report to Council describing its accomplishments for the year, including  reference to each objective set out in the work plan and any arising issues to which the  Committee has responded. 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 63 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 4 – Key Community Stakeholders43     

2008 Immigrant Success Award Winners   

RBC Best Immigrant Employer Awards    Nytric Limited    Nytric Limited has found global success through the cutting‐edge ideas of its diverse workforce ‐ more  than two‐thirds of their employees are skilled immigrants.    Located in Mississauga, Ontario, this innovation‐consulting and venture technology firm turns back‐of‐a‐ napkin ideas into marketable products. With big clients like EA Games, Pratt & Whitney and video‐game  manufacturer Global VR, Nytric generates about $4 million per year in revenue. Ninety per cent of their  products are exported.    To compete in the international market, Nytric leverages the brain power of its twenty‐seven  employees. In the engineering department, for example, the ratio of immigrants to Canadian‐born  employees is two to one. Immigrants also hold executive positions: Av Utukuri, President and Chief  Technology Officer, was born in India; Ted Chen, Director of Product Development is from Taiwan; and  Anthony Gussin, Director of Business Development is a native of the United Kingdom.    Because Nytric's management team can personally relate to other skilled immigrants struggling to find  work, the company welcomes candidates with international credentials and experience. "From our  perspective, Canadian experience is irrelevant ‐ if someone is a good engineer, he's a good engineer. It  doesn't matter where he came from," Anthony says. "That's one of the key components of our hiring  strategy."    This inclusive policy has helped skilled immigrants like Riddhesh Raval. He came from India in 2001 with  a bachelor's degree in electronics engineering and experience with a multi‐national software company.  After working a general labour job for $8 an hour and volunteering in his field, Riddhesh found a  position with Nytric as a senior software engineer.    In addition to valuable experience, Nytric's diverse team brings a knowledge bank of various languages  and cultures. With input from their Indian‐born staff, for example, Nytric changed the trivia questions in  a family DVD game to reflect the colloquialisms of South Asian cultures. This savvy marketing strategy  enhanced the product's appeal of overseas. Employees fluent in Mandarin and Cantonese have also  helped the company negotiate with Chinese suppliers and oversee international manufacturing ‐ both  assets that were highlighted during Nytric's delegation to Asia last year.   

43

TRIEC Employer Award Winners, URL http://www.triec.ca/programs/is/winners, Accessed Feb. 2009.

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 64 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

"Nytric is a very innovative organization," Anthony says, "And I don't think we would have this unique  approach to innovation if we didn't have different people from different walks of life."    CH2M HILL Canada Limited    When tradition and history are coupled with innovation and vision, the results are often remarkable.  That's one way to describe what happened when engineering firm CH2M HILL Canada Limited formed a  unique new partnership with a local non‐profit organization that serves the unemployed, including  newcomers.    CH2M HILL is an 85‐year‐old engineering and construction company with expertise in industries such as  energy, water and wastewater, and transportation. Three hundred employees work at their Toronto  headquarters ‐ almost 70 per cent are immigrants.    In 1997, CH2M HILL partnered with Community MicroSkills Development Centre, which offers  settlement, training, employment and self‐employment services to women, youth and immigrants.  CH2M HILL provides two‐month work placements for MicroSkills graduates from across the globe in the  company's information technology, business administration and facilities departments.    Larisa Skorishchenko is one of many MicroSkills graduates. Born in the eastern European country of  Moldova, Larisa moved to Toronto in 1998 with a masters degree, a background in science and hopes  for a rewarding career in Canada. Through MicroSkills, she enrolled in English classes and an information  technology program. Just two years later, she landed a placement with CH2M HILL and she is now  employed as a PC Systems Specialist, responsible for the firm's servers and back‐up operations.    "The benefits of partnering with MicroSkills are abundant; paramount of these is the opportunity to  work with highly skilled and dedicated people," says Bruce Tucker, President and Regional Manager of  CH2M HILL. "MicroSkills provides the opportunity for graduates to gain valuable work experience, and  CH2M HILL is given the chance of introducing, developing and promoting talented individuals."    The firm sponsors the CH2M HILL Resource Centre of Excellence for Women and Newcomers at a  MicroSkills' facility nearby. The centre, staffed by an employment consultant, is equipped with  computers for use by jobseekers, and has information about the labour market and the Canadian  workforce. Staff volunteer at the centre to conduct seminars, offer career advice and mentor clients  from MicroSkills. For example, Peter Vale, IT manager at CH2M HILL, instructs an English Conversation  Café every Thursday with several internationally‐trained supply chain management professionals.    "CH2M HILL embraced MicroSkills in a way which is helping individuals to build brighter futures," says  Kay Blair, Executive Director of MicroSkills. "It makes a big difference when a corporation, through their  leadership, is prepared to work with the community to create opportunities."     

Canadian HR Reporter Individual Achievement Award    Jane Lewis, Country Human Resources Manager, Procter & Gamble    Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 65 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

For over 10 years, Jane Lewis has been at the helm of Procter & Gamble's (P&G) efforts to nurture a  diverse workforce including skilled immigrants.    As Country Human Resources Manager in Canada, Jane has a broad range of responsibilities, from  shaping the company's recruitment strategy to overseeing compensation and benefits for P&G's 3,000  employees. She joined P&G in 1984 after graduating from Queen's University with two degrees. Jane  worked in Finance and Product Supply before moving to the HR team in 1991.    In addition to HR, Jane also leads the organization's national diversity initiatives. "I think there is a huge  amount of power in building diversity directly into P&G's business strategy." Jane says. "It's great to lead  diversity in my role. It facilitates making things happen." And she certainly has.    In 2004, Jane attended a conference and heard about Career Bridge, a paid‐internship program that  helps professional‐level immigrants gain Canadian work experience while employers benefit from the  skills of this diverse talent pool. Jane didn't hesitate to get involved. She joined the founding advisory  committee for Career Bridge and became a champion of the program. Soon, P&G became a host  organization. "Under Jane's leadership, P&G began hiring interns from the program. This has been a key  source of new immigrants coming into the company," says company president Tim Penner.    Jane has been instrumental in building the capacity of employee networking groups which offer  networking, coaching and learning opportunities to diverse staff, says Claudia Alvarez, an immigrant  from Columbia and co‐leader of the Latin Network.    Thanks to Jane, P&G opened its first prayer room at its head office in Toronto and diversity calendars are  widely distributed to ensure key meetings do not conflict with key holidays and religious observances.    Jane is committed to delivering measurable results for P&G so she introduced a Diversity Leadership  Assessment Tool to track the company's progress on creating an environment where all staff can thrive.  Each year, employees rate managers in twenty‐two different areas from their cross‐cultural  communication skills to how supervisors foster team work among staff from different backgrounds.    Jane's passion to heighten awareness and inclusivity has not been confined to P&G. She has presented  at the Internationally Educated Professionals (IEP) Conference and is a member of the Council on  Inclusive Work Environments, exemplifying her leadership and dedication to the inclusion of immigrants  in the Canadian workforce.     

CBC Toronto Business Leadership Award    Fiona Macfarlane, Americas Chief Operating Officer, Tax, Ernst & Young    When Fiona Macfarlane arrived in Canada from South Africa in 1987, she had a wealth of knowledge and  experience. Trained as a lawyer, Fiona held four degrees including a master of law from Cambridge  University. Yet she struggled to find work until she was hired by Ernst & Young.   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 66 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Fiona moved up the ranks to become the first woman at a ‘big four' accounting firm to lead a Canadian  Tax Practice. Last year, she was appointed America's Chief Operating Officer, Tax, where she is  responsible for a region with over $3‐billion in annual revenues.    Never forgetting the challenges she faced as a newcomer, Fiona has made it her mission to help others,  including immigrants, flourish in their careers. "Immigrants represent a tremendous opportunity for us  to work together and compete on the global business stage," she says. "At Ernst & Young we seek to  create teams of productive, smart people who can work across barriers of distance, language and  culture. We need diverse teams to serve global clients. It's that simple."    Fiona has challenged search firms to increase the percentage of immigrant candidates presented to  Ernst & Young for key positions, and it is now more common for human resources to recruit from a  broader talent pool. At the Toronto practice, 25 per cent of employees are immigrants, and 60 per cent  of these are visible minorities.    Fiona has also turned her lived experience into valuable lessons for others. Through TRIEC's Mentoring  Partnership she has offered career advice to professionals from Nigeria and India and has reviewed  resumes, inquired about job openings and helped mentees understand the Canadian business  environment. She has also successfully persuaded senior colleagues to participate in the program.    A true pioneer, Fiona was the driving force behind Ernst & Young University (EYU), which gives staff  access to coaching and a curriculum that outlines the professional experience needed to excel in the  company. According to Fiona's colleague, Charles Marful, the impact of EYU is profound: "It allows all  employees ‐ whether immigrant or Canadian born ‐ an equal opportunity to grow professionally." By  creating a level playing field, all employees have a fair chance to excel.    "Fiona has helped to change the operating business model in the tax practice to establish a deliberate  approach that enhances the opportunity for immigrants to succeed," says Marful. "I admire her passion  and leadership in opening doors for new immigrants."     

2007 Immigrant Success Award Winners    Small Employer Award    Steam Whistle Brewing    Since Steam Whistle Brewing was founded in 1999, the company has prided itself on making great beer  and hiring talented employees ‐ including skilled immigrants.    Just ask Stefan Atton, the company's director of marketing. The Sri Lankan native came to Toronto five  years ago after working for companies such as Carlsberg, Procter & Gamble, and Guinness. He had been  a brand manager overseas and hoped to find the same job in Canada.    Stefan sent out over 700 resumes with no success, so he applied to Steam Whistle Brewing as a driver  and sales representative. He thought he would have to start in entry‐level positions and work his way up  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 67 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

because he didn't have any Canadian experience. Luckily, he was wrong. Steam Whistle recognized  Stefan's talent and he was awarded the position he currently holds. Over five years, he's steered the  company through a growth rate of 130% by retaining their retro‐style branding strategy and through  unique marketing opportunities.    Steam Whistle promotes career advancement of its staff by paying for the full cost of courses that will  add to an employee's skill set, from writing to computer classes. Steam Whistle even hired a newly‐ landed immigrant as their chief financial officer and paid the tuition toward his Certified General  Accountant designation.    More than half of the company's management team is comprised of skilled immigrants, including staff  from the Czech Republic, Sri Lanka, Portugal, Russia, Japan, and Cuba. Steam Whistle welcomes referrals  for potential candidates from existing employees in an effort to attract more skilled immigrants. With an  employee retention rate of 90%, it's a recipe for success.     

Mid‐size Employer Award    Xerox Research Centre of Canada    The Xerox Research Centre of Canada has employed a high percentage of skilled immigrants since its  establishment in 1974. Currently, the company has 137 employees from over 35 countries. Twenty‐eight  per cent of their employees graduated from university in their home countries ‐ almost half have  doctorate degrees. They contribute to the Centre's expertise in areas such as chemistry and chemical  engineering. Dr. Hadi Mahabadi, the Centre's current vice president and centre manager says, "I came to  Canada because the country respects multiculturalism. I did my homework and saw that Xerox respects  diversity of thought by hiring researchers with different backgrounds. As a scientist, this is very  important to me."    Encouraging a diversified workforce is embedded in the company's hiring practices. For example, there  are typically 8 ‐12 employees ‐ including skilled immigrants ‐ on each team that interviews potential new  hires. The Centre promotes professional development among its employees by providing English as a  Second Language courses on public speaking and writing. To assist skilled immigrants in attaining  leadership positions, the Centre offers management training up to the vice president level, and other  development programs for new managers and emerging leaders.    The Centre has a cooperative education program and offers employment to skilled immigrants from the  Yorkdale Adult Learning Centre, Dufferin‐Peel Adult Learning Centre, and Brian J. Fleming Catholic Adult  Learning Centre. Since 2001, the Centre has hosted 32 candidates from these agencies ‐ many of whom  were later hired full‐time or on contract.    Bringing skilled immigrants on board has been a winning formula for the Centre: In 2006, they were  awarded their 1000th U.S. patent, a remarkable feat for any research facility. The Centre's top  performers include three skilled immigrants ‐ each has surpassed the 100 patent mark.     

Large Employer Award  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 68 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

  Toronto and Region Conservation Authority    The Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) is constantly developing new opportunities for  skilled immigrants and expanding programs to diversify its workforce. TRCA offers the Professional  Access and Integration Enhancement (PAIE) Program, funded by the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and  Immigration, which is a one‐year program for internationally educated environmental professionals.  Through training, mentorship, and paid placements, participants gain Canadian experience that can help  them find work. In 2006/2007, the PAIE Program focused on working with internationally trained  geoscientists and planners. TRCA is developing a similar program for environmental engineers.    TRCA also spearheaded the Diversity Network, a group of 22 community agencies and environmental  organizations working to improve access to environmental work for new Canadians. Their  Environmental Volunteer Network has provided work experience and education to 500 new Canadians  since 2002; several immigrant volunteers have been hired.    TRCA participates in the YMCA's Newcomer Work Experience Program and The Mentoring Partnership.  The organization also works with World Education Services to assess international education credentials.  TRCA disseminates job openings through immigrant service organizations, organizes environmental  career expos for new Canadians, and hosts an annual Canadian Multiculturalism Day to promote greater  awareness of the challenges and opportunities created by an increasingly diverse workforce. Ten per  cent of their 713 employees are considered skilled immigrants.    TRCA created a diversity committee, which has delivered cultural competence training to 400 full‐time  staff and volunteers. It is currently exploring new strategies to include members of diverse cultural  backgrounds in leadership roles and to ensure that all employees are part of the organization's  developing culture. In addition, TRCA has exported its very own Diversity Training Toolkit, offering  guidance to other environmental organizations about creating a comfortable environment where new  Canadians can thrive.     

Influencer Award    George Brown College    George Brown College (GBC) is a leader in systemic change on the issue of integrating skilled immigrants  into the labour market. As one of the largest and most diverse colleges in the country, the organization  has made it a priority to help newcomers successfully transition from the classroom to the workforce.    GBC worked with other colleges in the province to develop Colleges Integrating Immigrants to  Employment (CIITE), a three‐phased project funded by the provincial government that seeks to  eliminate barriers for immigrants in Ontario's college system. CIITE aims to improve services and support  provided to immigrants across the province in various areas, from admissions to employment  preparation.    GBC is also co‐chair of the national Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC) Affinity Group  on Immigrant Integration. Post‐secondary colleges across the country use the group to share best  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 69 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

practices and advocate for greater support to new Canadians. GBC is participating in an ACCC pilot  project to assist and effectively prepare immigrants before they arrive in Canada.    In partnership with the Institute for the Advancement of Teaching in Higher Education (IATHE), GBC  launched the College Teachers' Bridging program last year. Unique in Canada, it encompasses a paid  internship and classroom study. The program is a win‐win situation: skilled immigrant teachers get  Canadian experience, while employers get job‐ready candidates from diverse backgrounds. GBC has  hired 35 per cent of recent graduates. Their five other fast‐entry bridging projects range from computer  programming to early childhood education.    In 2004/2005, GBC created a comprehensive immigrant strategy, which has been shared with other  institutions. Part of that strategy included the establishment of a new Immigrant focused‐team on  campus to help newcomers into the workforce.     

2006 Immigrant Success Award Winners   

Small Employer Award    i 3 DVR International Inc.    i 3 DVR International Inc. relied on skilled immigrants to become a premier provider of digital video  technologies. In fact, i 3 DVR's entire Research and Development department ‐ over 20% of i 3 DVR's  entire workforce ‐ is comprised of skilled immigrants.    i 3 DVR recently expanded its R&D department to develop and launch a new digital video management  system. They harnessed funding from the National Research Council of Canada's Industrial Research  Assistance Program (IRAP) to hire several software engineers ‐ all skilled immigrants. i 3 DVR found it did  not need to go abroad to find skilled immigrants; it instead recruited its new staff through the HRDC Job  Bank, Workopolis, Monster.ca, Yahoo.ca and its own website.    Jobs are first posted internally to offer their own staff opportunities for promotion and self‐ development. Internal postings also generate referrals for new positions from existing staff.    i 3 DVR selects candidates with the most relevant education and work experience ‐ regardless of where  it was obtained. A candidate's English proficiency is evaluated according to the needs of the position. For  example, a receptionist's English proficiency would be scrutinized more closely than a software  developer's.    i 3 DVR also offers ESL training at their headquarters, covering everything from basic greetings to oral  presentations. Hosting monthly company luncheons, annual company vacations and holiday events,  enables employees to practice their English and foster a family‐like atmosphere with their peers.     

Mid‐size Employer Award    Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 70 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Family Service Association of Toronto    How can a community service agency truly be "of service" to the most multicultural city in the world? By  reflecting that multiculturalism in every aspect of its work.    Family Service Association of Toronto (FSA) provides services in nearly 20 different languages. Clients  come to FSA at their most vulnerable moments, and they find counselors who share their language,  culture and experience. This quality has made FSA the "go to" agency for clients and for partnerships by  organizations serving smaller or emerging ethno‐cultural groups.    In the early 1990s, FSA reformatted its job postings, abandoning detailed lists of required skills and  training to open the door to applicants with international training. FSA also decided to avoid the use of  the phrase "only those applicants selected will be contacted" and began to personally thank and inform  all candidates of their status. Job postings are made available on FSA's website and through many  community agencies, and every posting notes that "FSA Toronto welcomes diversity and is committed to  a policy of anti‐oppression."    FSA's anti‐oppression philosophy informs its hiring and its training practices as well. Interview panels  frequently include immigrants who not only understand the candidate's experiences, but also  demonstrate that immigrants hold a variety of positions in the agency. Candidates are asked about their  thoughts on FSA's anti‐oppression policies. As one FSA employee said, "That said to me that FSA is  genuinely concerned about helping all people."    FSA allots each employee $300 for professional development, and encourages staff to further their  education both through internal training programs and external professional development  opportunities. Its new Learning and Innovation Fund also provides seed money to explore fresh ideas.    FSA does not consider its success to be the result of "going out of our way" to bring immigrants into the  organization. Rather, it simply welcomes the most talented people it can find, and nurtures them to  create a strong, effective workforce.     

Large Employer Award    Ernst & Young LLP    It is no wonder Ernst & Young (EY) is a leader in supporting immigrants on the job ‐ almost one‐quarter  of the 3,400 people working for EY in Canada are skilled immigrants. Over the last two years in the firm's  Assurance and Advisory Business Services practice, almost 45%of experienced hires ‐ candidates who  have already held at least one job ‐ were international.    At EY, support for inclusiveness comes straight from the top. Canadian chairman and CEO Lou Pagnutti  sponsored the firm's Ethnic Diversity Task Force. He also chairs the Inclusiveness Steering Committee,  which oversees the policies and practices that create an inclusive and supportive workplace for all  employees.    Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 71 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

All EY recruiters receive inclusiveness training, and each recruiting team has a Diversity Champion. EY  also holds inclusiveness awareness workshops across Canada, attracting over 1,100 employees ‐ 85% of  eligible participants. The firm's online calendar makes it easy for managers to plan meetings that won't  conflict with religious or national holidays. Since the early 1990s, EY has created many programs that  support, integrate and promote skilled immigrants.  For example:  ƒ Over the past two years, EY has offered five one‐day workshops for international hires and their  spouses.   ƒ EY offers business communications skills training ‐ everything from presentations to small talk.   ƒ A pilot Experienced New Hire Coaching program offers one‐on‐one coaching to help  international new hires integrate more quickly into their new jobs and life in Canada.   ƒ The firm's Career Watch program identifies high‐potential minorities and women to ensure they  have equitable opportunities to become partner. EY's Learning Partnership offers a formal year‐ long mentoring program that pairs minority managers and senior managers with partners. The  program is designed to retain visible minority professionals and foster career development. EY's  initiatives have been recognized as best practices by the Conference Board of Canada, and  featured in a cover story in Workplace Diversity Update.    

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 72 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 5 – Key Community Stakeholders  1. Immigrant Services Society of BC   Chris Friesen  Director of Settlement Services  (604) 684 7498  [email protected]  2. S.U.C.C.E.S.S.   Kelly Ng   Program Director   Family & Youth Services   (604) 408 7267   [email protected]  3. Coquitlam Public Library   Rhian Piprell   Deputy Director   [email protected]   (604) 937 4132   4. Share Family and Community Services Society   Joanne Granek   Executive Director   (604) 540 9161   [email protected]   5. Continuing Education, Coquitlam School District #43   Alison Whitmore  Educator, Continuing Education   (604) 936 4261  [email protected]   6. Fraser Health   Denise Fargey   Manager, Tri‐Cities   Health Promotion and Prevention   (604) 949 7201   [email protected]   7. Ministry of Children and Family Development   Dan Bibby   Tri‐Cities Community Services Manager   Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 73 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

(604) 927 2651   [email protected]   8. Chamber of Commerce   Jill Cook   Executive Director    (604) 464 2716   [email protected]    9. Tri‐Cities Women’s Resource Society  Carol Metz Murray  Executive Director  (604) 941 7111   execu[email protected]    10. Tri‐Cities ECD Community Development  Susan Foster  Manager  (604) 777 8706  [email protected]    11. Douglas College  Bob Cowin  Director of Institutional Research  (604) 777 6221  [email protected]    12. Douglas College, The Training Group  Bob McConkey  Director  (604) 777 6102  [email protected]    13. Tri‐Cities Literacy Table  Julie Rioux  Literacy Coordinator  [email protected]   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 74 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 6 – Consultation Questions 

Coquitlam Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    The City of Coquitlam is currently developing a Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan.  The goal of  this project is to develop a community‐based multicultural vision, strategy and action plan for Coquitlam  to become a more culturally inclusive and socially cohesive community that is respectful of diversity and  recognizes the value of global citizenship. 

 

Stakeholder Consultations    Research Question  What does Coquitlam need to do to be a more welcoming, culturally inclusive and socially  cohesive community? 

  Organizational profile and input  1. What are your organization’s priorities or mandate as they relate to newcomer integration?    2. What services does your agency provide to support the integration of newcomers?    3. What does your organization require to be more effective in the integration of newcomers?  ƒ Support, funding assistance, information, resources, etc. 

  Community Information  1. What is working well to facilitate the integration of newcomers?   2. What are the service, program or resource gaps to newcomers?  3. What barriers exist that affect newcomer integration in Coquitlam?    4. Are you aware of any new or emerging programs, services, resources, funding streams or  initiatives that support the development of Coquitlam as a welcoming community? 

  Future Direction and Planning  1. If Coquitlam were a truly “welcoming community”, what would that look like?    2. What is your role / contribution in the development of Coquitlam as a welcoming community?    3. What is the City’s role?    4. What are the top three priorities related to creating a welcoming and inclusive community that  should be addressed in Coquitlam?    Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 75 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Appendix 7 – Community Consultation Summary Tables 

Organizational profile and input   3.  What does your organization require to be more effective in the integration of newcomers?   

Funding 

1  Funding support – staff is stretched – especially for  women’s and seniors’ programs 60‐70% of funding  comes from government and 30% from fundraising.  SUCCESS traditionally serviced Chinese but now  expanding to serve other groups which requires  funding 

Information / Resources  Community awareness of  what Coquitlam Continuing  Education  offers 

Collaboration  Collaboration with other service  providers (too much duplication) 

 

 

 

Community Capacity  Readiness and capacity of community –  primary role is to facilitate integration  but success of work is limited by  capacity of community and how ready  are the Service Providers to receive /  assist in supporting integration. How  ready are SPs to spend resources that  meet the needs of demographics and  do they have a strategic plan i.e.  newcomers really want to access  services in their own language and so  SP’s have to respond 

Other  Space – even if we had money,  we have no space 

 

  2  Resources to support the acquisition of English   

Badly needed community  resource list – an up to date  one 

 

Partnerships and the will to work  collaboratively. SUCCESS has been  an excellent partner and has  provided training opportunities  (cultural sensitivity training).  SUCCESS honor culture and works  towards supporting individuals  integrate into mainstream 

We need to develop a vision regarding  what we want to do. 

Need to reflect diversity on the  board and in our membership 

 

  3  Language Lab – currently can only support two  stations 

Need to connect to ethnic  business associations 

 

 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 76 | P a g e  

More staff training related to diversity  (East vs. West training provided by  SUCCESS was excellent) 

Need to be seen as more eclectic  in order to truly represent the  community 

 

 

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Organizational profile and input   3.  What does your organization require to be more effective in the integration of newcomers?   

Funding 

4  Funding for more translators / translations; 

Information / Resources   

important to provide info in other languages and  have multi‐lingual staff 

 

Collaboration  More collaboration / support from  the City in creating a profile for the  funders and showing funders why  this is the right program for the  region.  

Community Capacity 

Other 

 

 

 

 

  5  Funding to hire culturally competent and 

 

linguistically competent  

 

Better community based network  especially with business so  individual programs aren’t doing  this on their own; i.e. community  based labour exchange /  mentorship programs. Need to  identify core businesses within the  Tri‐Cities and then get them to  “buy‐in” 

  6  Funding to have brochures translated into several 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

languages and offer more interpretation   

7  More funding is required – we are seeing  considerable growth in the newcomer population of  kids. Currently all funding is provincial    

8  Funding for expanded programs and resources to be  able to translate more info (brochures) – barrier as  newcomers are not aware of services   

9  Funding: applied for WIWPP $ to build an inventory  of resources and do a community needs assessment 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 77 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Organizational profile and input   3.  What does your organization require to be more effective in the integration of newcomers?   

Funding 

Information / Resources 

Collaboration 

Community Capacity 

Other 

and to start to develop a larger group of  stakeholders 

 

Community Information  1. What is working well to facilitate the integration of newcomers?    1 



Collaboration 

Community Support and Engagement 

Specific Initiatives 

Other 

Community partnerships (Cathy V is  passionate about this) 

Commitment to Multiculturalism from the  Mayor and Council 

ELSA is of prime importance (i.e. the  acquisition of language) 

In Vancouver – the Welcome Guide available in different  languages (initially only in hard copy but now on line) 

 

 

 

 

Collaboration / partnerships 

The library is very active 

Cultures are mixing together well in Coquitlam 

 

 

Host mentoring program – run by SUCCESS  and ISS 

 

  3 

Collaboration and partnerships i.e. SHARE  gives space to ISS and SUCCESS and the  English practice group partnership  between the City and the library 

Fraser Health is looking at providing service in  additional languages 

 

A multitude of services that re multi‐faceted 

 

Perhaps organized sport works well.  

 

  4 

Tri‐Cities is a complicated structure and  collaboration is important in the region  due to the spread out nature of the  municipalities. It is hard to see the  differences or the borders between the  municipalities. This can be confusing; for  example, I live here (Coquitlam) why can’t  my kids play soccer in Port Moody? 

CSD increasingly realizing and forcing change  (i.e. moving toward a Welcome Centre, taking  on the SWIS program – now 7 workers) 

 

 

  5 

Agency collaboration 

The Parks Board has been very active 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

   78 | P a g e  

One of the best Services Canada offices is located in 

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Community Information  1. What is working well to facilitate the integration of newcomers?   

Collaboration   

Community Support and Engagement 

Specific Initiatives 

“phenomenal” (example: Joyce Fordyce) 

Other  Coquitlam; it is open to innovative ideas and has a strong  focus and understanding of the communities it serves. 

 

  6 

The collaboration that has been occurring  between SUCCESS / SD / government /  library etc. People are really beginning to  understand how they can pool their  resources and expertise  

Community Media wants to play a larger role  (example: Diane Strandberg – has done a piece  on refugees) 

 

 

Well‐positioned as a bedroom community; i.e. nice  community to live in and easy to get to downtown for  work.  

 

  7 

The support of festivals and other ethnic  events 

 

Fraser Health has done a lot of analysis (Denise  Fargey) 

 

Lots of great programs 

 

 



 

The library! 

 

 



 

Coquitlam is quite determined to develop  strategies. There is an awareness of importance  of MC issues from the Mayor and at other levels   

 

 

10   

Some ESL providers are doing a very good job  (conversation circles becoming support groups  – fostering positive and health attitudes)   

 

 

11   

Champions exist in the community 

 

 

12   

MAC with the Mayor Wilson – she is very  committed and it is working well 

 

 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 79 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

 

Community Information  2. What are the service, program or resource gaps to newcomers?   

First Language Supports 

1  Lack of first language  supports (organizations can’t  keep up with demand and  changing / growing language  groups)   

2  Lack of translated materials    

3  More bi‐lingual programs for  young parents   

4  Lack of translated  information   

Reflection of Diversity 

Refugee Services 

Networking / Community  Attachment  

Other 

Parks and Rec is a little behind  – seems to have a low  awareness of the programs  and services needs of diverse  communities   

Lack of services for refugees   

Services are not seamless;  there are various service  providers and they are not  always referred on to the right  services. Example, at a recent  conference of service  providers only 30% were  aware of ELSA.   

Need more neutral shared  meeting places   

Lack of childcare – this lack is tied  to City licencing requirements.  City needs to look at its policies  through an immigrant lens in  order to build W and I  Communities   

RCMP has a low profile so  people are not aware of  services and the detachments  do not reflect the diversity of  the community    

Coquitlam second in receiving  GARS (schools have been  caught off guard) 

A lack of some means for  “understanding the Tri‐Cities”  and ensuring congruency  between communities   

“Parenting mentoring” – older  immigrants mentor newer  immigrants   

Child minding services   

Lack of ethnic representation  on council and on various  boards   

A lot of refugee families are  not accessing services  therefore the refugee ECD  program is a good thing   

Increase awareness of ELSA  (ELSA Net recently started a  promotional campaign – bus  stops and sky train station  advertising)   

Mentorship style programs   

Just at the beginning of  developing services – social  services are under developed  (violence awareness, family,  parenting, etc.)   

Encourage a campaign to get  diversity to run for council   

 

A Welcoming Centre (even if it  is virtual); this could be  supported by City, ISS,  SUCCESS, MCFD.   

Malls are isolated – move  towards more community  involvement / more  complimentary activities and  planning – i.e. put Practice Firm  right in the mall = integration.   

Not enough programs for older  children; lots for 0 to 6   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Information and Resources  / Awareness 

 80 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Community Information  2. What are the service, program or resource gaps to newcomers?   

First Language Supports 

Reflection of Diversity 

Refugee Services 

Information and Resources  / Awareness 

Networking / Community  Attachment  

Other 

5   

 

 

Community should be able to  mobilize better ex. If we know  100 families are about o arrive  – prepare.   

Need more social networking  opportunities among  newcomer groups   

Lack of affordable housing and the  Evergreen line will cause housing  prices to climb and the number of  low cost housing units is not being  guaranteed.   

6   

 

 

Lack of operating at the  neighbourhood level – should  be more “out there” and a  “less come to us” attitude –  have block parties, get the  firemen out, etc.   

Need ways to connect resident  communities with newcomers  communities   

Youth settlement services – SD  has applied for $300,000   

7   

 

 

Lack of awareness of programs  and services   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource package – through  library, schools, public health   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Utilization of technology  (therefore should be moving  toward a virtual hub)   

 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 81 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

 

Community Information   3. What barriers exist that affect newcomer integration in Coquitlam?   

Reflection of Diversity  

Cultural and Linguistic  Competencies 

First Language Supports /  Language Barriers 

Information and Resources 

Other  



Lack of diversity on Council and so  Council does not reflect the  community   

Cultural difference – lack of  competencies to manage    

Lack of first language supports   

It is a challenge to create awareness of  programs, services and resources. Need  to get to ethnic community leaders.   

Lack of a recognizable downtown core;  community appears fragmented, poses  difficulty for finding work, etc.   



Lack of reflection of Coquitlam’s  diversity on council / boards / etc.   

More cultural awareness training is  required – like the SUCCESS  training East vs West   

Lack of programs in other languages   

Analysis of Census Data and an  understanding of demographics (i.e.  look at CSD ESL data and first language  spoken at home) Sylvia Russell ESL  initiator of Welcome Centre idea)   

Underutilization of the schools as  “community centres” – schools can be  the hubs of neighbourhoods and be used  as a lever for social integration. 



Local government doesn’t reflect  community demographics   

Lack of orientation of community  professional to be more effective   

Translation   

Lack of information (in English – on‐line  translated documents don’t always  work i.e. not all computers have the  ability to download Farsi)   

Newcomers need someone to take them  by the hand and this is not happening   



 

Lack of awareness of general public   

Lack of multi‐language facilitators in  programs which would help  individuals avoid feeling isolated  which would avoid depression etc   

Lack of awareness of programs and  services   

Lack of responsiveness   



 

Lack of language competencies  within parks and recreation and  other services   

Language – bigger problem than it  ever has been 

Unless you connect with an agency, it is  unclear what happens with newcomers   

Transportation   



 

 

Language acquisition 

Need more of a “Welcome Wagon”  approach except neutral and not  marketing – offer info and invitations 

Poverty    

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 82 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Community Information   3. What barriers exist that affect newcomer integration in Coquitlam?   

Reflection of Diversity  

Cultural and Linguistic  Competencies 

First Language Supports /  Language Barriers 

Information and Resources 

Other  

and free passes   



 

 

 

 

Language acquisition   

 

 

 

 

 

Employment   



 

 

 

 

Need to review allocation of resources.  In number per capita, Coquitlam is 3rd  largest recipient of immigrants /  refugees (which one???) but does not  receive the resources to match. 



 

 

 

 

No obstretrical or pediatric care in Tri‐ Cities.    

10   

 

 

 

Lack of resources for agencies like ISS /  SUCCESS to provide services required   

11   

 

 

 

Isolation   

12   

 

 

 

Lack of housing / social, affordable  housing   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 83 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

   Future Direction and Planning  1. If Coquitlam were a truly “welcoming community”, what would that look like?   

Community Support and  Connectivity 

Diversity Noted and Valued 



Seamless / coordinated support  from non‐English speaking residents  which would incorporate the  broader community not just gov’t 

Recognition that diversity is  positive – this message needs to  get out   

Welcoming Centre   

More info / signs in more languages   

Coquitlam has developed into a spread  out / disjointed area i.e. where is the  Centre? No real core.    



People in neighborhoods would be  mixing well together   

We would see appreciation of  diversity through festivals and  other events 

Places where newcomers make first  contact would be easily identifiable  (ISS, SUCCESS, SD, etc.)   

Easier to navigate if you come with a  different language   

More reflection   



A two way street would have been  developed – MC communities are  working to meet mainstream  halfway   

We would see more choices and  individuals would be encouraged to  maintain their own culture –  Coquitlam would honor that   

There would be seamless referral  and some follow up to ensure  newcomers had received the  assistance they required.   

More multilingual signs/ pamphlets and  info   

The barriers listed above would be gone   



New neighborhood “help start”  programs at the neighbourhood  level   

See the difference i.e. community /  enclaves of specific ethnic groups   

Provide support in own language  with a plan to transition into  mainstream   

Would see more bi‐lingual signage   

 



We wouldn’t have “ghettoized”  (Burquitlam and parts of Poco) areas  and we would subsidize fees etc to  provide access to recreation etc.   

We would be doing more than just  tolerating and allowing people to  do their own thing; it would mean  we were doing things together –  enjoying the same things and  valuing the same things.   

Would have a Welcome Centre –  offering employment info, daycare  info, service inof, academic info, ESL  info as well as assessments – would  make referrals and links to services   

 

 



The Cities would run services (parks  and rec etc.) that would serve  everyone 

Profile would be a little different –  quite conservative with a few  immigrants – cultural diversity is 

Program visibility   

 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Sufficient and Accessible  Settlement Support 

 84 | P a g e  

First Language Supports and  Information 

Other  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Future Direction and Planning  1. If Coquitlam were a truly “welcoming community”, what would that look like?   

Community Support and  Connectivity 

Diversity Noted and Valued 

Sufficient and Accessible  Settlement Support 

First Language Supports and  Information 

Other  

 

really profiled and celebrated   



See an effort related to inclusion   

Heightened awareness   

Going into the community to  identify gaps   

 

 



Building on the capacity of existing  immigrant populations   

 

 

 

 



Conscious of all people being  welcomed not just new immigrants   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10  More outreach into community to  find leaders and champions   

11  What does the City do to welcome  new residents?    

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 85 | P a g e  

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

 

Future Direction and Planning   4. What is the City’s role?    



Leadership 

Key leadership role 

 

Service  Collaboration and  Coordination  To be a partner 

 

Information Provision 

Supporting the “virtual  hub” 

Funding 

Resourcing 

 

  2 

Leadership 

 

To support the  network of SPs to  build awareness 

 

Space 

To consider the development  of cultural centre 

 

Important notices  should be stamped with  a “Please read” or  “Must read” (Vancouver  does with property tax  notices, etc.) translated  into multiple languages 

Put money up to  show support of  developing a  welcoming  community 

Other 

Needs to ensure that immigrants and refugees feel  welcome   

To increase awareness of  existing space that might be  used for meetings, group  sessions, etc 

To employ more people from diverse cultures   

To create healthy spaces 

To be aware of different needs of diverse cultural  groups (for example, understanding that some,  Iranians, have a bigger need for park space and a  smaller need for organized sports.    

 

  3 

Do something about civic engagement 

 

To play nice with  others 

To take a lead in  translating key  documents 

Provide  subsidized  programming 

 

 

Stop not for profits  from competing with  the City for funding 

To support translations  of vital settlement  related info 

 

 

 

 



Show leadership  

 

 

To develop more common  places (these places could be  shared by MCFD, FH etc to  provide more seamless  service delivery) for  community connectivity 

To support housing   

  5 

Take a lead role – initiate partnerships  and collaboration – use resources to  develop media strategies, etc. 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

To develop a resource  list 

 

   86 | P a g e  

Coordination related to  Welcome Centre to partner  with various levels of 

To be active regarding MC issues 

 

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Future Direction and Planning   4. What is the City’s role?    

Leadership 

Service  Collaboration and  Coordination 

Information Provision 

Funding 

Space 

Other 

government 

 

  6 

To determine profile of the  community and then create a profile  of Coquitlam (an identity) 

To support a volunteer  program; something like  a “welcome wagon”  with a municipal focus  and not a marketing  focus 

 

 

 

To promote community value of diversity (funding  may come from province or from feds but local  government needs to mobilize and advocated or else  the money does not come) 

 

 

  7 

To become a catalyst for these kinds  of changes because the City holds the  mandate for the whole community. 

 

 

 

Support ideas that come from smaller communities 

 

 

  8 

To be a strong voice / lobby to  funders; get a plan in place and then  help community to get the funds. 

 

 

 

Attend to social housing 

 

 

  9 

To have an influence over the  involvement of other groups – like the  RCMP 

 

 

 

To recognize diverse needs when program planning 

 

 

  10  Social planning role   

 

 

 

To ensure equitable access (maybe different  approaches are required to meet unique needs) 

 

  11  To provide facilitation   

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 

   87 | P a g e  

 

 

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

 

Community Information  3. What are the top three priorities related to creating a welcoming and inclusive community that should be addressed in Coquitlam?   

Government Awareness and  Accessibility 

Service and Resource Identification /  Provision 



First language community forums welcome  to newcomers – open up the council and  the city offices 

First language welcoming / access to info on the  web / brochures, etc. 

Awareness 

Other 

Build awareness of diversity as positive: 

Pushing for change / Be a change agent 

 

 

Have an initiative and name it and have  stickers/ ads / posters (like – you matter, we  care) 

Influence RCMP and other groups 

 

  2 

Share what government does – through  the web, papers, brochures, etc. 

Other resources 

 

 

 

  3  4 

Accessibility of the City and of services 

Ensure the website reflects the community 

 

 

To increase awareness of importance of  political office 

Newspapers can have first language  supplements 

 

 

Profile immigrant success stories / have  newcomer awards 

Housing (x2) 

Many ESL kids don’t graduate so have an  award recognizing ESL students what are  successful 

Jobs 

   

  5 

Civic Engagement 

 

To provide more community forums to provide  a voice for diverse groups 

Increasing awareness amongst SPs 

More ESL (particularly for women and children) – 

 

  6 

More visibility of the MAC 

 

Ensuring contact with newcomers to ensure  they are getting the services required 

 

Respect for different cultures – developing a  belief we can learn from each other; therefore,  we need more training opportunities. 

Enhanced cultural competencies for social / health  /educational professionals and the general public 

 

  7 



 

 

Provision of accurate and up to date  information  

More MC events to raise awareness (like  Winnipeg’s Folkarama) 

 

 

More links to mainstream programs – more  bridging programs like the Parent Ambassador 

Develop ethnic festivals like Folkarama (the  best MC festival).  

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 88 | P a g e  

A better reflection of the community 

  Don’t re‐invent the wheel – work with what is  working within the community and take a look at 

Taking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Community Information  3. What are the top three priorities related to creating a welcoming and inclusive community that should be addressed in Coquitlam?   

Government Awareness and  Accessibility 

Service and Resource Identification /  Provision  program managed by SUCCESS. This program  trains parents to be mentors of newcomer  parents.  

Awareness   

Other  best practices 

 

  9 

 

Welcome Center   

 

Work collectively with other municipalities and  across municipalities (challenge of working with all 5  municipalities in “Tri‐City region) 

  10    11   

More support services   

 

More multilingual info books, pamphlets, info  etc 

 

Re‐profile as a diverse community 

  Program integration into business (without  immigrants are isolated) 

  Package of resources re: services etc   

 

13   

Use resources within the community – data for  example   

 

 

14   

Awareness of Programs   

 

 

15   

First language community forums (information /  orientation – hear from the community first  hand)   

 

 

16   

Program Accessibility   

 

 

12   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

Engaging newcomers and residents 

 

 89 | P a g e  

aking Stock, Phase 1 Coquitlam’s Multiculturalism Strategy and Action Plan    

 January 2009 

Organizational Profile and Input    1. What are your organization’s priorities or mandate as they relate to newcomer integration?    ƒ A full range of settlement related services   Chris Friesen  Director of Settlement    Services  Immigrant Services  Society  ƒ A full range of settlement related services  Kelly Ng    Program Director  Family and Youth  Services  SUCCESS  ƒ To provide info service to all citizens (have an especially important role  Rhian Piprell  related to newcomers related to settlement info etc)  Deputy Director  ƒ One of first places newcomers come   Coquitlam Public    Library  ƒ Multi‐service agency – family support / poverty reduction  Joanne Granek  ƒ Providing outreach to ensure the engagement of newcomers (esp  Executive Director  Mountainview and Stibbs areas)  Share Family and  ƒ Working with partners to understand what newcomers need using  Community Services  translators when required.  Society    ƒ See programs below  Alison Whitmore    Program Coordinator  Coquitlam Continuing  Education  ƒ To promote health for the whole population to reduce disease and illness  Denise Fargey    Manager, Tri‐Cities  Health Promotion and  Prevention  Fraser Health  ƒ Community development focus / intervention  Dan Bibby    Tri‐Cities Community  Services Manager  Ministry of Children  and Family  Development  ƒ Chamber wears several hats as tourism / info provider and as a “portal” of  Jill Cook  information to members   Executive Director    Chamber of  Commerce  ƒ To be able to reach out to newcomers – mainstream agency with focus on  Carol Metz Murray  newcomers / aware of needs of newcomers / have clients from all different  Executive Director  backgrounds – male and female  Tri‐Cities Women’s    Resource Society  acific Employment and Education Resources                                                               { PAGE   \* MERGEFORMAT |890 | P a g e    

Susan Foster  Coordinator, Tri‐Cities  ECD Community  Development Table  Bob Cowin  Director of  Institutional Research  Douglas College  Bob McConkey  Director, The Training  Group  Douglas College  Julie Rioux  Coordinator  Tri‐Cities Literacy  Table   

ƒ Vision: every child has the right to develop to their full potential  ƒ Mission: ensuring all programs and services are accessible and available to  all children under the age of 6  ƒ Two streams – the credit stream which includes higher level ESL to prep for  academic studies and the Training Group Programs and services which  provide new immigrants career preparation, training and placement.    ƒ Primary goal is transitional training; core business – training and upgrading.  

ƒ Have subcommittees including: ESL, Adult Literacy, ECD Mandate:  ƒ No direct service but goal to ensure accessibility  ƒ Ensures communication between members (SUCCESS/ISS/SHARE/School  District Library, etc)  ƒ Raises awareness within the community  ƒ Facilitates collaboration  ƒ Identifies gaps in service 

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 91 | P a g e  

Organizational Profile and Input    2. What services does your agency provide to support the integration of newcomers?  The responses listed below may not include all of the services, programs and resources provided  by these agencies.     Chris Friesen  ƒ First language settlement delivered in collaboration with SUCCESS and  Director of Settlement  MOSAIC. ISS provides Chinese, Korean and E. European languages and  Services  refugee services.  Immigrant Services    Society  ƒ In Coquitlam – ELSA, After school support, Youth employment program,  Kelly Ng  Career Programs, translation services, Host Program, some settlement  Program Director  services, some counseling and support services, some legal clinics, some  Family and Youth  tax services, a volunteer program  Services    SUCCESS  ƒ Partnering with ELSA / SUCCESS / ISS to offer programs in native languages  Rhian Piprell  ƒ ECD refugee pilot will be supported by the library  Deputy Director  ƒ Offer huge children’s story time with parents (sometimes grandparents)  Coquitlam Public  and kids many are newcomers  Library  ƒ Works with SHARE to offer ESL conversation group  ƒ Supports Tri‐Cities Asian parents association   ƒ Works with many groups to faciltitate integration; for example, Korean  “Mother Goose” program  ƒ Visited food banks to welcome people to library and supplies books to the  food bank   ƒ Has applied for funding to get a driver for a van that would target areas like  Cottonwood (a mobile “hub”)  ƒ Started a “cooking together” group to teach newcomers how to cook  Joanne Granek  foodbank food  Executive Director  ƒ Created a language bank  Share Family and  ƒ Work very closely with ISS and SUCCESS – they do the settlement and we  Community Services  provide support  Society  Free Programming:  Alison Whitmore  Program Coordinator  ELSA / Settlement  Coquitlam Continuing  ABE (new Foundations Curriculum good for those who are too high for ELSA  and so @80 immigrants)  Education  High School Completion Credits (many are immigrants)  Two Fee Paying ESL Classes – for those not eligible for ELSA  ƒ Translation services in‐house through Fraser Health (3 way conversation)  Denise Fargey  ƒ All languages sometimes telephone translation and sometimes face to  Manager, Tri‐Cities  face  Health Promotion and  ƒ Work in partnership with SUCCESS to lead parenting / food prep classes –  Prevention  provision of a nutritionist who helped to develop the program  Fraser Health  ƒ In partnership with SHARE provides parenting and mentorship at  Moutainview  Dan Bibby  ƒ Conscious of 38% of community is MC – involved in many community  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 92 | P a g e  

Tri‐Cities Community  Services Manager  Ministry of Children  and Family  Development  Jill Cook  Executive Director  Chamber of  Commerce 

ƒ

ƒ ƒ ƒ

Carol Metz Murray  Executive Director  Tri‐Cities Women’s  Resource Society  Susan Foster  Manager  Tri‐Cities ECD  Community  Development  Bob Cowin  Director of  Institutional Research  Douglas College  Bob McConkey  Director, The Training  Group  Douglas College  Julie Rioux  Coordinator  Tri‐Cities Literacy  Table 

ƒ

initiatives (ECD Community Development Table, Middle Years, Youth  Advisory – MCFD is partnered with SUCCESS, ISS and SD on the RFP)  Holds contract with SUCCESS and Family Resources Centre (delivers  services out of centre – SHARE provides therapist / SUCCESS provides  counselor  Nothing specific but sits on homelessness task force, literacy task force,  poverty task force etc  Focus is place on specific business areas like the North Road corridor with  is very Korean  Has the goal to increase awareness of the Chamber and what it can do for  business owners  Partner with immigrant serving agencies for translating (MOSAIC and  LMVFSS) 

  ƒ No direct service provision   

ƒ Coquitlam campus has done little to integrate into the community. There  are some club activities in NW but not much in DL probably due to scale  and the there has not been a full range of students and so they go  between campuses.    ƒ Working Solutions  ƒ Essential Skills  ƒ Career Builder  ƒ Self Employment  ƒ No direct service (see above)   

     

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 93 | P a g e  

Future Direction and Planning    2. What is your agency’s role / contribution in the development of Coquitlam as a welcoming  community?    Chris Friesen  ƒ Work with the Mayor and the City to develop framework for Heritage  Director of Settlement  Canada Proposal  Services  ƒ Sharing promising / best practices  Immigrant Services    Society  ƒ SUCCESS and Kelly himself are very active on various Tables (the Fraser  Kelly Ng  Region Committee and the Tri‐Cities Community Planning Committee) –  Program Director  our role is to advocate for new immigrants and refugees and ensure their  Family and Youth  needs are being met  Services    SUCCESS  ƒ Central Role  Rhian Piprell  Deputy Director  Coquitlam Public  Library  ƒ This is the core of SHARE’s business  Joanne Granek  ƒ Leadership role as a large agency with some capacity  Executive Director  ƒ Start initiatives / lead conversations   Share Family and  ƒ Maximize use of resources across the Tri‐Cities  Community Services    Society  ƒ To provide education and language services / ELSA is a critical point of  Alison Whitmore  first contact  Program Coordinator  Coquitlam Continuing  ƒ To refer (from ELSA) to other service providers    Education  ƒ To be a partner / to collaborate  Denise Fargey  ƒ To be culturally aware and sensitive  Manager, Tri‐Cities  Health Promotion and    Prevention  Fraser Health  ƒ Improve cultural competencies of our staff  Dan Bibby  ƒ Staff that reflects community demographics  Tri‐Cities Community  ƒ Adjust our contract to ensure that competencies are acquired  Services Manager  ƒ Continue to work with city on MC issues  Ministry of Children  ƒ Keep government apprised of community demographics and needs  and Family  Development    ƒ Continue to support our business and educate our businesses  Jill Cook  ƒ Training for newcomers related to business in Canada  Executive Director  ƒ Be a good community citizen – work in partnership  Chamber of    Commerce  Carol Metz Murray  ƒ Raising awareness of family conflict  Executive Director  ƒ Raising awareness that violence is not acceptable  Tri‐Cities Women’s  ƒ Raising awareness around creating better relationships  Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 94 | P a g e  

Resource Society  Susan Foster  Manager  Tri‐Cities ECD  Community  Development  Bob Cowin  Director of  Institutional Research  Douglas College  Bob McConkey  Director, The Training  Group  Douglas College  Julie Rioux  Coordinator  Tri‐Cities Literacy  Table 

  ƒ As a partner – we have representation from the City at the ECD Table   

ƒ The demographics of Coquitlam have shifted significantly and the College  should have a vision for this – we need to have a role; it should be part of  the mandate of a community college.    ƒ Important role – shifting and positioning Coquitlam as an educational  destination – Health Sciences is a move in the right direction.  ƒ Become a part of community / economic development   ƒ Increase awareness of college but specifically the Training Group and how  that fits within the community  ƒ To raise awareness of literacy issues and ensure access to resources   

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 95 | P a g e  

 

Pacific Employment and Education Resources                                                                  File #: 05-1855-20/01-001/2 Doc #: 766582.v1

 96 | P a g e