Option Booklet Option Choices for

Aylsham High School Option Booklet Option Choices for 2016-17 Your choice at 12/13+ Subjects to study in Key Stage 4 Option Booklet – 2016-17 Ay...
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Aylsham High School

Option Booklet Option Choices for 2016-17

Your choice at 12/13+

Subjects to study in Key Stage 4

Option Booklet – 2016-17

Aylsham High School

WELCOME TO THE 2016-17 OPTIONS BOOKLET This booklet is for you. As a member of Key Stage 4, from June 2016 you have the opportunity to choose some of the subjects you will study.

Contents

Section 1 INTRODUCTION ADVICE and HELP Pages 3-8 Section 2 COMPULSORY SUBJECTS Pages 9-24 Section 3 OPTION SUBJECTS Pages 27-82

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Section 1: INTRODUCTION, ADVICE AND HELP This booklet is designed to give parents and students information about courses at GCSE, BTEC, Cambridge Nationals, City & Guilds, Entry Level and off-site courses. This is an important time for all students as they progress on to Key Stage 4. Up until this point in their education all students have studied all parts of the curriculum but now they start to choose the subjects that interest them. The National Curriculum stipulates the subjects which must be taught for much of the allotted time. However, there is an element of choice involved which enables students to choose particular GCSE and vocational courses which may be suited to their abilities and interests. They should also bear in mind their possible future career although at this stage the aim is to keep as many options open as is possible. We have a very broad range of options subjects which we believe will allow all students to reach their potential. When making your decision, try to talk to as many people as possible and consider subjects that interest you the most and will provide you with the best preparation for when you leave AHS.

Mr P. Brockington

Director of Learning

Mr D. Spalding

Headteacher

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WHO CAN HELP YOU TO UNDERSTAND ALL THIS?

Any of the following people will be happy to advise or help you at any time. Do not be afraid to ask; being happy with your studies is very important.

Mr E Clarke

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Head of Blickling

Miss C Hoggett

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Head of Felbrigg

Ms K Harris

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Heads of Holkham

Mrs H Martin

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Head of Mannington

Mr T McKechnie

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Head of Wolterton

Mrs J Ward

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Director of Learning

Mr S Askew

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Director of Learning

Mr C Bridge

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Director of Learning

Mr P Brockington

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Director of Learning

Mr D Sweatman

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Head of Nurture

Mrs D Wade

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CEIAG Co-ordinator

Mrs K Garnham

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SENCO

Remember, the more time you give to making your choices, the more likely you are to enjoy them.

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Option Booklet – 2016-17

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IF YOU WANT FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT A COURSE The following people will be happy to help and advise you. Subject Areas - Compulsory English Mathematics Science Business Enterprise (Year 9 only) Physical Education Philosophy and Ethics Personal, Social, Health, Citizenship & Economic Education (PSHCEE)

Teacher Mrs Allen Mr McElwee Mrs Beale Mrs Auber Mr Claxton Miss Jacquet Mr Sexton

Computing (Year 9 only)

Mr Askew

Subject Areas - Options Art - Fine Art GCSE Graphic Communications GCSE Business Studies - GCSE Catering GCSE Computing GCSE ICT GCSE Creative iMedia Cambridge National Dance BTEC Design & Technology - Resistant Materials GCSE Design & Technology - Resistant Materials Entry Level Design & Technology - Engineering GCSE Design & Technology - Textiles GCSE Drama GCSE Level 2 Project and Duke of Edinburgh Award French GCSE Geography GCSE German GCSE Hair & Beauty City & Guilds Health & Social Care Cambridge National History GCSE Music GCSE Music BTEC Physical Education GCSE Physical Education Foundation Course Triple Science Work Related Courses/Foundation Learning Outdoor Learning Extended Projects

Teacher Miss Homewood Miss Homewood Mrs Auber Mr Baxter Mr Askew Mr Askew Mr Askew Mr Askew Mr Brown Mr Whiting-Smith Mr Whiting-Smith Miss Tartt Mrs Martin Mrs Wiseman Miss Shepheard-Walwyn Miss Hoggett Miss Hebditch Mr Askew Mrs Wiseman Mrs Connor Miss Allan Miss Allan Mr Claxton Mr Claxton Mrs Beale Mr Askew Mrs Goodliffe Mr Stek

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Aylsham High School

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY FROM YEAR 9 ONWARDS?

By law the majority of pupils in Key Stage 4 at Secondary Schools in England and Wales must study:        

English Mathematics Science Business Enterprise (Year 9 only) Physical Education (non-examination) Philosophy and Ethics Personal, Social, Health, Citizenship and Economic Education (PSHCEE) Computing (Year 9 only)

Together these subjects are called the COMPULSORY CORE CURRICULUM

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WHAT DO SOME OF THE MORE DIFFICULT WORDS AND PHRASES MEAN? Each subject description will explain to you what you will be expected to do in the course. Some courses require you to produce coursework, others require you to sit a final examination or complete controlled assessments throughout the course. Where a course says - controlled assessment, this means that your teacher will mark your work. Where a course says - external assessment or external moderation, this means that your teacher’s marks will be checked by other people. You will also be told which Examination Board sets your tests, exams or moderates your coursework. Each Exam Board requires high standards, although sometimes they want different things from you, which is why different subjects choose different Exam Boards. The following abbreviations also appear: GCSE This is the exam qualification you will take in the majority of your courses. It stands for the General Certificate of Secondary Education. It tests the full range of ability and is suitable for all learners. Old style GCSE awards grades from A* - G whereas the new style reformed GCSE grades from 9-1 (where 9 is high and 1 low). The amount of coursework and controlled assessment has been reducing in GCSE in recent years to the point where many GCSEs are assessed by exam only. This means that if students are to perform at a good level there is a necessity for them to both learn and apply the core knowledge in each subject. Teachers have produced core knowledge questions and answers to help with this and many successful students use parents and other family members to help them learn this knowledge. Once that has been done past paper questions then need completing to ensure this knowledge can be applied correctly. BTEC, OCR, Cambridge National, City and Guilds, OCN These are work-related qualifications suitable for a wide range of students, built to accommodate the needs of employers and allow progression to university. They are recognised by schools, colleges, universities, employers and professional bodies across the United Kingdom and in over 100 countries worldwide. They provide a practical, real-world approach to learning without sacrificing any of the essential subject theory. BTEC courses are at Level 2, Cambridge Nationals cover both Level 1 and 2 and C&G is Level 1. Level 1 courses focus on providing the skills and attributes for the world of work. These courses are all offered at the next Level at our post 16 colleges.

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It is the approach to learning which is the main difference between these and GCSE. They currently place great emphasis on the Key Skills of: o o o o o o

communication; application of number; and use of information technology improving own learning and performance working with others problem solving

There is far more reliance on you, the student, taking responsibility for your own target setting and learning than you will find in most Single Award GCSE courses. The regular assessment of your work against key criteria is another significant difference in the way in which these courses run. This assessment model allows you to track your performance month to month to set yourself new targets for achievements and work components to complete. There is also a greater emphasis upon providing evidence of achievement in a variety of formats, using photos, video and other visual evidence, as well as the written word. There is, however, one external examination equivalent to at least 25% of your final mark in the Level 2 courses.

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Aylsham High School

Section 2: COMPULSORY SUBJECTS

First let us look at the compulsory subjects - those you have to take.

Page Numbers  English

10-14

 Mathematics

15-16

 Science

17-18

 Business Enterprise (Year 9 only)

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 Physical Education

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 Philosophy and Ethics

21-22

 Personal, Social, Health, Citizenship and Economic Education (PSHCEE)

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 Computing (Year 9 only)

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NAME OF SUBJECT - English Language GCSE First teaching 2015 - First Award 2017 This qualification is 100% final examination. There will be two papers, carrying 50% weighting each. Paper 1 – 1hr 45 mins – 80 marks Section A: Reading of one literature fiction text and answer 4 questions Section B: Writing either a descriptive piece or a narrative piece. Paper 2 – 1hr 45 mins – 80 marks Section A: Reading of one non-fiction text and one literary non-fiction text linked in theme. Answer 4 questions. Section B: Writing to present a viewpoint Spoken Language 0% of GCSE. Result reported separately. One presentation with questions. English Language - Scope of study This GCSE specification in English Language will require students to study the following content: Critical reading and comprehension Critical reading and comprehension: identifying and interpreting themes, ideas and information in a range of literature and other high-quality writing; reading in different ways for different purposes, and comparing and evaluating the usefulness, relevance and presentation of content for these purposes; drawing inferences and justifying these with evidence; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence within the text; identifying bias and misuse of evidence, including distinguishing between statements that are supported by evidence and those that are not; reflecting critically and evaluatively on text, using the context of the text and drawing on knowledge and skills gained from wider reading; recognising the possibility of different responses to a text .

Summary and synthesis: identifying the main theme or themes; summarising ideas and information from a single text; synthesising from more than one text

Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, form, grammatical and structural features: explaining and illustrating how vocabulary and grammar contribute to effectiveness and impact, using linguistic and literary terminology accurately to do so and paying attention to detail; analysing and evaluating how form and structure contribute to the effectiveness and impact of a text

Comparing texts: comparing two or more texts critically with respect to the above.

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Writing Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively for different purposes and audiences: to describe, narrate, explain, instruct, give and respond to information, and argue; selecting vocabulary, grammar, form, and structural and organisational features judiciously to reflect audience, purpose and context; using language imaginatively and creatively; using information provided by others to write in different forms; maintaining a consistent point of view; maintaining coherence and consistency across a text.

W riting for impact: selecting, organising and emphasising facts, ideas and key points; citing evidence and quotation effectively and pertinently to support views; creating emotional impact; using language creatively, imaginatively and persuasively, including rhetorical devices (such as rhetorical questions, antithesis, parenthesis). Spoken language Presenting information and ideas: selecting and organising information and ideas effectively and persuasively for prepared spoken presentations; planning effectively for different purposes and audiences; making presentations and speeches.

Responding to spoken language: listening to and responding appropriately to any questions and feedback. Spoken Standard English: expressing ideas using Standard English whenever and wherever appropriate.

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Option Booklet – 2016-17

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NAME OF SUBJECT - ENGLISH LITERATURE GCSE First teaching 2015 - First Award 2017 PAPER 1 Shakespeare and the 19th century novel 1 hr 45 mins - 64 marks - 40% of GCSE Section A Shakespeare – students will answer one question on their play of choice. They will be asked to write in detail about an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole. Section B The 19th Century Novel: Students will answer one question on their novel of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole. Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry Written exam: 2hr 15 mins - 96 marks - 60% of GCSE Section A Modern texts: students will answer one essay question from a choice of two on their studied modern prose or drama text. Section B Poetry: students will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from their chosen anthology cluster. Section C Unseen poetry: Students will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with a second unseen poem. Choice of texts for English Literature: Shakespeare:  Macbeth  Romeo and Juliet  The Tempest  The Merchant of Venice  Much Ado About Nothing  Julius Caesar.

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Option Booklet – 2016-17

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19C novel: Choose one of the following:       

Robert Louis Stevenson - The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens - Great Expectations Charlotte Brontë - Jane Eyre Mary Shelley - Frankenstein Jane Austen - Pride and Prejudice Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - The Sign of Four

Modern texts: Choose one of the following: Drama  JB Priestley - An Inspector Calls  Willy Russell - Blood Brothers  Alan Bennett - The History Boys  Dennis Kelly - DNA  Simon Stephens - The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (play script)  Shelagh Delaney - A Taste of Honey Prose      

William Golding - Lord of the Flies AQA Anthology - Telling Tales George Orwell - Animal Farm Kazuo Ishiguro - Never Let Me Go Meera Syal - Anita and Me Stephen Kelman - Pigeon English

Poetry: Present. There is a choice of two clusters, each containing 15 poems. The poems in each cluster are thematically linked and were written between 1789 and the present day. The titles of the two clusters are:  

Love and relationships Power and conflict

Students should study all 15 poems in their chosen cluster and be prepared to write about any of them in the examination.

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Skills In studying the set texts students should have the opportunity to develop the following skills. Reading comprehension and reading critically Literal and inferential comprehension: understanding a word, phrase or sentence in context; exploring aspects of plot, characterisation, events and settings; distinguishing between what is stated explicitly and what is implied; explaining motivation, sequence of events, and the relationship between actions or events. Critical reading: identifying the theme and distinguishing between themes; supporting a point of view by referring to evidence in the text; recognising the possibility of and evaluating different responses to a text; using understanding of writers’ social, historical and cultural contexts to inform evaluation; making an informed personal response that derives from analysis and evaluation of the text. Evaluation of a writer’s choice of vocabulary, grammatical and structural features: analysing and evaluating how language, structure, form and presentation contribute to quality and impact; using linguistic and literary terminology for such evaluation. Comparing texts: comparing and contrasting texts studied, referring where relevant to theme, characterisation, context (where known), style and literary quality; comparing two texts critically with respect to the above. Writing Producing clear and coherent text: writing effectively about literature for a range of purposes such as: to describe, explain, summarise, argue, analyse and evaluate; discussing and maintaining a point of view; selecting and emphasising key points; using relevant quotation and using detailed textual references. Accurate Standard English: accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar. BOTH ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE WILL RECEIVE A NUMBER GRADE RATHER THAN A LETTER. THE NUMBERS RUN FROM 1 – 9, WITH 9 BEING EQUIVALENT TO A*.

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Option Booklet – 2016-17

Aylsham High School

NAME OF SUBJECT : MATHEMATICS

Level of Qualification: GCSE Examination Board: AQA

GCSE Mathematics Mathematics at GCSE builds upon the foundations that have been laid down in Years 7 to 9. Students will now have 7 lessons a fortnight and will revisit many of the topics they have met before, increasing their level of confidence before moving on to master the more demanding concepts and techniques they will now require. By the end of the course students should demonstrate that they are able to: 

develop fluent knowledge, skills and understanding across a range of mathematical methods and concepts



acquire, select and apply the correct mathematical techniques to solve a variety of problems



reason mathematically, make deductions and inferences, draw conclusions and pass comment on the work of others



comprehend, interpret and communicate mathematical information presented in a variety of formats appropriate to the information and context.

Setting and Assessment Students are placed into 1 of 8 sets based upon their performance in tests throughout the previous year and teacher recommendation. Sets B1, B2, B3 & B4 will initially study GCSE Mathematics at the Higher Tier whilst B5, B6, A1 & A2 will study Foundation Tier GCSE. Final decisions regarding tiers of entry will be made after the mock exams in Year 11. There is no coursework component in GCSE Maths, both tiers are assessed entirely by written examination at the end of Year 11. There will be 3 papers which each carry a weighting of 33⅓%, the 2nd and 3rd papers require the use of a calculator.

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Parental Support We know that parental support has a major impact upon how well children do at school. Parents want their children to behave in school, to try their best and to be successful; parents are also keen to help their children but may be unsure about the best way to do this. We appreciate any form of parental support – parents taking an interest helps to reinforce the partnership that should exist between home and school. Parents can take practical steps to ensure their child is prepared for their Maths lessons by checking they have a scientific calculator and geometry set (available for £6 and £1:50 respectively from the Maths department). Parents can also help by ensuring that their child is encouraged to revise for assessments throughout the course. Revision resources are available from a variety of sources including the core knowledge section of the school website. If at any stage you have any questions about this GCSE, please do not hesitate to contact your child’s Maths teacher.

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Option Booklet – 2016-17

Aylsham High School

NAME OF SUBJECT : SCIENCE

Level of Qualification: Double Award Science GCSE Pupils will be awarded TWO GCSE’s in Science – one grade from the work completed in Year 10 and an entirely separate GCSE grade for the work completed in Year 11. Pupils will be set based on assessments throughout KS3 and an ‘End of Year 9’ exam covering all Key Stage Three topics. Assessment Methods Internal Controlled Assessments Pupils need to complete 1 controlled assessment in Biology, Chemistry or Physics. This controlled assessment makes up 25% of their GCSE grade. Pupils plan and carry out an investigation. They then write up an analysis of their results. These are internal exams and are timetabled to best suit the ability and progress of the class. External Assessments Pupils’ knowledge of the content of their GCSE is examined with structured written papers. There are two tiers of entry – Higher and Foundation; the class teacher will advise pupils on the appropriate tier for them. There are three exam papers to sit, one exam each for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. External assessments are carried out in May/June of each year. Core Science (Year 10) During Year 10, pupils will cover topics ranging from inheritance and hormones in Biology; Materials obtained from Earth and fuels in Chemistry and The Universe and generating electricity in physics. These topics follow on from the science topics they covered in years 7, 8 and 9. Additional Science (Year 11) In this year, pupils deal with more advanced scientific ideas. These include chemical bonding and reactivity in Chemistry, human growth and development in Biology and nuclear physics and forces in Physics. What can I do with my GCSE in Science? When you receive your results you may wish to continue your study of science. The options open to you depend on the results achieved and your own interests, your teacher will be able to help you select the appropriate course.

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You may wish to study a GCE AS or A level in Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry or Physics. Students who take the Double Science option will be sufficiently prepared to take A-Level Sciences. Alternatively, you may wish to consider studying science in a more vocational context such as a Vocational A level in Science or Health and Social Care. In addition, there are many openings in science-based courses such as BTEC qualifications for animal nursing, dental technology or electronics. There are many jobs and careers that build on from a GCSE Science qualification, such as all areas of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, environmental studies, teaching, engineering and computing.

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Option Booklet – 2016-17

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NAME OF SUBJECT: BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (Yr 9 only)

You will have 2 Enterprise lessons over a two week period. The Year 9 Core Enterprise scheme of work builds on the work completed in both Year 7 and 8. After successfully establishing a good understanding of the key Enterprise Skills, Year 9 aims to provide a practical simulated environment in which to test and apply the Enterprise Skills with affect.

The course will involve the completion of 3 projects to include   

running a business a job related study the economy and personal finance

There will be a variety of group work and independent tasks to complete. Students will be assessed related to their attitude, effort and outcome.

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Name of Subject: Core Physical Education

Level of Qualification There is no qualification for compulsory core PE. You will have 4 lessons per fortnight.

Course of Study In core PE you will develop your skills, knowledge and understanding in the traditional sports as well as having the opportunity to try new activities. In years 10 & 11 you will be able to select practical activities to study throughout the course and will be encouraged to achieve as higher standard as possible. If you select not to opt for the Aylsham High Sports Leaders Award some activities will be compulsory.

Personal Qualities and Aptitudes Required  Enthusiasm and willingness to improve you skill, knowledge and understanding of the activities  Organisation with kit

Usefulness of the Course for Further Education & Careers  To develop co-operation, communication and leadership skills  To develop you practical skills, performance and confidence  To give you the confidence to continue a healthy, active lifestyle outside of school

Aylsham High Sports Leaders Award The award will be offered to pupils in year 10 as an option during core PE. The teaching and assessment of the award will take approximately 1 term. Pupils are required to complete volunteering hours as sports leaders to pass the course.

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NAME OF SUBJECT : Religious Studies B: Beliefs in Action

???

Level of Qualification RS - Full Course GCSE. Grades 9-1 will be awarded. Examination Board Edexcel Course of Study including homework All students will study a Full Course in this subject as is required by law and by the belief that R.E.'s contribution to the curriculum at Key Stage 4 is important for student development and maturity. At the time of writing, the course is still awaiting accreditation by Ofqual. Based on the outcomes from the accreditation process there may be changes made to the course information below. The course consists of three areas of study, from which we must choose two. Each of these will be assessed externally by examinations at the end of the course when the students are in Year 11. Each area of study focuses on a different religion, and provides an opportunity to examine some of today's biggest questions and the answers provided by the world's major faiths. They also allow students to reflect on their own ideas about the issues covered. At the present time our chosen areas of study are: 2: Religion, Peace and Conflict with Islam as the main religion studied:    

Section 1: Belief in Allah Section 2: Crime and Punishment Section 3: Living the Religious Life Section 4: Peace and Conflict

And 3: Religion, Philosophy and Social Justice with Christianity as the main religion studied:    

Section 1: Belief in God Section 2: Religious Experience Section 3: Living the Religious Life Section 4: Equality

Each Area of Study forms 50% of the final grade and is assessed via a 1 hr 45 minute written paper. Students will be required to learn core-knowledge and keywords throughout the course, and additional homework tasks may be set by teachers to consolidate learning from lessons. 21

Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course: All pupils can study this subject. All pupils will have opinions and experiences that will be useful. An open mind, a determination to complete the tasks set and to make the most of this opportunity to pick up a good grade - these are all important. The lessons are varied and aim to encourage discussion. Usefulness of the course for further education: Excellent preparation for further study at college in Religious Studies, Philosophy, Psychology, Media Studies, Sociology, Drama, English, Health and Social Care as well as vocational qualifications to do with Leisure and Tourism or working with people of all faiths. Usefulness of the course for careers: Excellent preparation for careers in, Community work, Education, Carework Medicine, Church and Charity, Travel, Law, Communications and the Media.

Thoughts of students who have studied GCSE Religious Studies: ‘I’ve really enjoyed doing the RS Full Course – it’s made me think about things I wouldn’t otherwise have thought about.’ ‘There’s always loads to debate in RS, so as long as you can argue, you’ll be fine!’ ‘I like the fact that you get to give your own opinion and nobody preaches to you or tells you what you should think’. ‘I think it’s really important these days to understand more about religions like Islam because you hear so much about them’.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: PERSONAL, SOCIAL, HEALTH, CITIZENSHIP and ECONOMIC EDUCATION (PSHCEE)

Course of Study This course will focus on your continuing personal development. You will work on PSHCEE topics during form time and during curriculum collapse days. The course will be supported by form tutors and external providers with expertise in a wide and varied range of topics.

The course will cover the following topics: 

Aspects of the Law



Careers education and guidance



Enterprise and economic awareness



Environmental issues



Citizenship



Health



Drugs



Sex Education

To help with course topics, but also to aid your studies in other school subjects, key skills, action planning and brain based learning techniques will be employed and you will be encouraged to use these skills as frequently as possible.

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NAME OF SUBJECT : COMPUTING (Yr9 only)

The name and emphasis of this subject area changed in September 2014. It is no longer called Information and Communication Technology (ICT) but has been re- launched as Computing. The name also shows the change in emphasis from being consumers of IT products to creators of software programs. Level of Qualification There is no qualification for Core Computing. You will have three lessons per two- week timetable cycle. However, the year 9 course covers the national curriculum requirements for KS4. Course of Study In Key Stage 4 you must have the opportunity to follow examination courses which will enable you to progress to higher levels of study post 16. Our option programme offers these courses. In the year 9 core programme you will have an opportunity to develop your capability, creativity and knowledge of computer science, digital literacy and information technology. You will develop and apply your analytical, problem-solving, design and computational thinking skills. You will also understand how changes in technology affect your safety, including ways to protect your online privacy and identity and how to identity and report concerns. Questions to consider before opting for this course None. It is a compulsory course. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers Computational thinking has been a major tool in our country’s economic success. Whether or not these skills are accompanied by a formal qualification, many employers, whilst valuing ICT skills, prefer employees who are able to influence the software design process through their ability to understand abstraction, algorithms, logic and data representation.

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Section 3: OPTION SUBJECTS Now let us consider the Option Subjects.

Subject Areas Art - Fine Art GCSE Art - Graphic Communications GCSE Business Studies - GCSE Catering GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition GCSE Computing GCSE ICT GCSE Creative iMedia Cambridge National Dance BTEC Design & Technology - Resistant Materials GCSE Design & Technology - Resistant Materials Entry Level Design & Technology - Engineering GCSE Design & Technology - Textiles GCSE Drama GCSE Level 2 Project and Duke of Edinburgh French GCSE Geography GCSE German GCSE Hair & Beauty (City & Guilds) Health & Social Care Cambridge National History GCSE Music GCSE Music BTEC Physical Education GCSE Aylsham High Sports Studies Diploma (PE Foundation) Triple Science Work Related Courses/Foundation Learning Outdoor Learning Extended Projects Summary of Options

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Page No. 27-29 30-32 33-34 35-37 38-40 41 42 42-43 44-45 46-47 48-49 50-51 52-53 54-55 56 57-58 59-61 62-64 65 66 67-68 69-70 71 72-73 74 75 76 77 78-79 80-82

YOUR CHOICES We try to ensure that all students will follow a broad and balanced curriculum throughout Key Stage 4 and beyond. We expect that the majority of students will study with the aim of achieving the English Baccalaureate which means they will choose a Modern Foreign Language GCSE course (French or German) and a humanity GCSE course (Geography or History). In addition, Computing GCSE is now part of the English Baccalaureate suite of subjects. For some students, this curriculum diet is not appropriate and the range of available courses reflects this.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: FINE ART

Level of Qualification GCSE Examination Board EDEXCEL

Course of Study: The Fine Art course places emphasis on the processes by which artwork is produced as well as the finished work. The programme of study is presented as a means of gathering a broad understanding of Art practices whilst providing the opportunity for indepth study through thematic projects. Drawing is an essential part of all aspects of the course. In addition you will be expected to experiment with a variety of traditional and digital media including painting, printmaking, collage, photography and computer software to develop ideas on this course. Taught lessons make up a large part of the course, but you will also be expected to develop your own ideas independently in any media which you feel is appropriate. You will also be expected to study the work of other artists and to make relevant connections with your own work. You will be set formal homework tasks initially during the progression of each new project and later, towards the final stages of the project, you will be expected to initiate your own personal homework tasks according to your chosen research area. This will include general investigation of the theme, observational drawing and photographs, sketchbook presentation, studying the work of other artists, generating ideas and experimenting with media and techniques. It is essential that this personal study commitment is taken seriously as all students are expected to spend at least 3 hours per week keeping their sketchbook up to date. Course Structure: Component Name 1. Coursework 2. Terminal Examination

Requirements 1 Unit: Personal Portfolio Unit 2: Externally set Assignment

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Duration 23 weeks

Weighting 60%

7wks + 10 hour exam

40%

Component 1: Coursework Students will work on three thematic projects to develop the attitudes, skills and knowledge required to successfully undertake the Unit1: Personal Portfolio. Each thematic project consists of 7 weeks preparation and 2 weeks to complete a realization under controlled assessment in class time. This makes up 60% of the final grade. Component 2: Terminal Examination In February students respond to an externally set theme for 7 weeks followed by a 10 hour exam. The externally set assignment accounts for 40% of the final grade. Preparatory work: This should be presented in sketchbooks and will be required for all projects including the terminal examination project. You will be responsible for providing and maintaining these sketchbooks in which you will present detailed evidence of your studies through each unit. It should be noted that 75% of the total marks for Unit 1 and 2 are awarded for preparatory work presented in your sketchbooks. Exhibition After the terminal examination has been completed, you will be expected to mount an exhibition of your work for internal assessment and external moderation. Your exhibition will consist of your Personal Portfolio work and your Externally set assignment work. Equipment and storage requirements: You will need to provide 3 sketchbooks to complete all units, including the externally set assignment. You will also need an A2 portfolio to keep your work in and to transport work to and from home. Whilst working at home, you may need various media such as watercolour paints, brushes, oil pastels, acrylics and a good set of colouring pencils etc. Completed coursework units will be kept at school and stored safely, ready for final moderation and exhibition. There will be a one off charge for sketchbooks, watercolour, quality paper, acrylic paint and an A2 portfolio of £20 payable to Aylsham High School at the beginning of the course. For a further £10 you can purchase a set of acrylics as an optional extra. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers: There are numerous careers which can be followed in which Art and Design (Fine Art) would be an advantage (if not essential); ranging from hairdressing to architecture, photography to web design, illustration to product design. If you hope to work in the visual arts or design industries you will almost certainly need to study at college and possibly university. To progress to this level you will need a portfolio of artwork and this course provides the best opportunity to start building this body of work. A combination of Fine Art and Graphic Communication taken during the 3 year option choices would be an excellent foundation for those hoping to make college applications in this area of the curriculum. It is also worth noting that this course encourages both analytical and creative thinking skills and would be of benefit to anyone with an interest in the subject regardless of their career pathway. Speak to Miss Homewood, Mr. Kent or Miss Porter for advice.

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Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course: If you are thinking of taking GCSE Art and Design (Fine Art), you should:        

enjoy developing your own ideas independently in response to a given theme enjoy recording visual information through observational drawing show an enthusiasm and a desire to improve your own skills in a variety of media be able to communicate your thoughts and ideas both visually and in written form enjoy undertaking personal research using various resources e.g. libraries, internet, books, gallery visits. enjoy presenting work to a high standard have a strong work ethic and commitment to homework be prepared to meet strict deadlines.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION Level of Qualification GCSE Examination Board EDEXCEL

Course of Study The Graphic Communication GCSE offers students the opportunity to develop a range of photographic and desktop publishing skills in response to a series of commercial design ‘briefs’. Students will have access to digital still cameras and use Adobe Software including Photoshop, Illustrator, Bridge for various printed media briefs. Traditional media such as collage, drawing and printing will also be encouraged. Key to this course is the use of visual imagery to communicate a message to an audience. Briefs will include studying advertising, illustration and typography. Project briefs will provide opportunities for students to develop their own interests and potentially make very real links with their activities in other subjects such as D&T, Business Studies, ICT, Music, Drama, English, Hairdressing, Catering and Art. Taught lessons make up a large part of the course, but you will also be expected to develop your own ideas independently in any media which you feel is appropriate. You will also be expected to study the work of other artists and to make relevant connections with your own work. You will be set formal homework tasks initially during the progression of each new project and later, towards the final stages of the project, you will be expected to initiate your own personal homework tasks according to your chosen research area. This will include general investigation of the theme, observational drawing and photographs, sketchbook presentation, studying the work of other artists, generating ideas and experimenting with media and techniques. It is essential that this personal study commitment is taken seriously as all students are expected to spend at least 3 hours per week keeping their sketchbook up to date. After school club is provided once a week so that students can use the industry specialized software to complete any ‘catch up’ work.

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Course Structure: Component Name 1. Coursework 2. Terminal Examination

Requirements 1 Unit: Personal Portfolio Unit 2: Externally set Assignment

Duration 23 weeks

Weighting 60%

7 weeks and a 10 hour exam

40%

Component 1: Coursework Students will work on two design project briefs in the first 23 weeks to develop the attitudes, skills and knowledge required to successfully undertake the Unit1: Personal Portfolio project which will be completed by February. The first project of 10 weeks duration introduces key skills and awareness of the GCSE assessment objectives. This is followed by a thematic project consisting of 13 weeks preparation and 2 weeks to complete a realization under controlled assessment in class time. This makes up 60% of the final grade. Component 2: Terminal Examination In February students respond to an externally set theme for 7 weeks followed by a 10 hour exam. The Externally set Assignment accounts for 40% of the final grade. Preparatory work: This should be presented in work journals which will be required for all projects including the terminal examination project. You will be responsible for providing and maintaining these work journals in which you will present detailed evidence of your studies through each unit. It should be noted that 75% of the total marks awarded for both coursework and the terminal examination depends on work presented in your work journals.

Equipment requirements: You will need to complete two work journals for the personal portfolio and one for the externally set assignment. You may also need an A3 portfolio to keep your work in and to transport work to and from home. Whilst working at home, you would be at a distinct advantage if you have access to a digital camera as this would create greater flexibility in terms of where and when you could take photographs. It should be noted that this camera does not need to be of a high specification and if a new purchase is being made your teacher will be happy to give advice. There will be a one off charge for sketchbooks, glue sticks and mounting board of £15 payable to Aylsham High School at the beginning of the course.

Usefulness of the course for further education and careers: This course is relevant to numerous careers from graphic designer, photographer, filmmaker, web designer, brand manager, art director in an advertising agency to working in any small business requiring promotional material. If you hope to work in the visual arts or design industries you will almost certainly need to study at college and possibly university. To progress to this level you will need a portfolio of artwork and this course would create an excellent opportunity to start building this body of work. Fine Art and Graphic Communications, taken over the 3 options years, would be an excellent combination for those hoping to make college applications in this area. In terms of attitude and ways of thinking this course is relevant to anyone interested in a career that involves problem solving, working in teams and communicating ideas visually. Speak to Miss Homewood and Miss Porter for advice. 31

Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course: If you are thinking of taking GCSE Graphic Communication, you should:          

enjoy developing your own ideas in response to a client’s needs enjoy recording visual information through observational drawing and photography show an enthusiasm and a desire to improve your own skills in a variety of digital media be able to communicate your thoughts and ideas both visually and in written form enjoy undertaking personal research using various resources e.g. libraries, internet, books, gallery visits. enjoy presenting work to a high standard be prepared to make a firm commitment to hard work, including 3 hours per week of homework have good organizational skills enjoy working in teams be prepared to meet strict deadlines.

Taught lessons make up a large part of the course to start with, but you will also be expected to develop your own ideas independently using media appropriate to the task. You will also be expected to study the work of graphic designers, photographers and other visual artists to make relevant connections with your own work. Homework: You will be set formal homework tasks initially during each new project and later, towards the final stages of the project, you will be expected to set and carry out tasks to meet the requirements of the brief and the assessment objectives. This will include general investigation of relevant themes, observational drawing/photography, work journal presentation, studying the work of other practitioners, generating ideas and experimenting with media and techniques. It is essential that this personal study commitment is taken seriously as all students will be expected to spend at least 3 hours per week keeping their work journal up to date. It is unlikely that you will have the Adobe software at home and so it is expected that some personal study is carried out in Room 19 and 19a at lunchtimes or at an after school club that will run once a week.

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GCSE Business Studies Level of Qualification: GCSE Level 2

Examination Board: OCR

Our course OCR GCSE in Business Studies About the qualification The GCSE in Business Studies aims to give you a wide opportunity to study the theory of business. It will give you the broad foundation of business theory that will adequately prepare you for further study at A-Level and beyond. The core is set around 3 units of the study of business knowledge, literacy and function. The topics we cover are indicative of today’s business environment. Key skills The GCSE actively engages you in the study of business in order to develop as effective and independent students and as critical and reflective thinkers. Using an enquiring, critical approach to analysing facts and opinions, you will build arguments and make informed judgements. You will develop your knowledge, understanding and skills to a range of business contexts, at home and abroad. Also looking at the extent to which business activity can be ethical and sustainable. Unit and description Unit 1 Marketing and Enterprise Market Research and collection The Marketing Mix Marketing in the wider environment Enterprise and the entrepreneur The business plan

Controlled Assessment 10 hours of research 6 hours of report writing 25% of final grade

Unit 2 Business and People The need for business Business ownership, trading, growth and location Employment and retention Organisation and communication

Written Examination 1 hour 25% of final grade

Unit 3 Production, Finance and External Environment Written Examination Types of production methods 1 hour 30 minutes Management and control of production and costs Pre-seen Case Study Sources of finance, financial forecasting and analysis 50% of final grade Competitive environment Environmental influences and ethics Government and the UK Economy Globalisation and UK business

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Being a B&E College the study of Business is so important to our culture. This qualification will allow you to gain an understanding of the issues facing UK businesses in the 21st century. Pre-requisites: 

Good literacy skills, with the focus on effective note taking and exam answering technique.



Global news awareness, reading around current business models and media stories.



Good organisational skills to cope with deadlines.



A common sense approach.



A good work ethic with a great attitude to realise your potential.

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GCSE Catering One year, single award Examination Board: WJEC Do you enjoy…       

Working as part of a team? Learning new cooking skills? Researching recipes? Meeting people? Would you like to… Work with professional chefs? Play a real part on real event catering? Enter national competitions?

Please note: Due to educational reforms of current GCSE qualifications, a new qualification will replace all current GCSE food-related qualifications, first award will be May/ June 2018. Therefore, June 2016 will be the last date for registration on the existing GCSE Catering Award, for the 2017 exam and award. Course description: The catering Industry is one of the U.K.’s biggest industries and is part of the bigger hospitality, leisure and tourism industries. On this course you will have many opportunities to extend and apply your skills and knowledge of the catering industry within a variety of situations. It will concentrate on the areas of food production and food service as an introduction to the hospitality and catering industry. You will be given opportunities to experience the catering industry on a large scale. The Department’s success has generated demand for ‘event catering’, including the Aylsham Food Festival, Rotary events, Aylsham Town Council and School receptions. These events require the provision of food items or food and drink, often with students producing and serving the refreshments outside the normal School day. Our students are also encouraged to enter catering/cooking competitions and we have had great successes at both the national Springboard UK ‘FutureChef’ and Rotary ‘Young Chef’ competitions at regional and national levels. This results in students having to cook and prepare meals in college kitchens and being mentored by professional chefs. These achievements not only contribute to coursework assignments but also make the course meaningful, building self-confidence and organisational skills to enable you to make worthwhile connections with employers and colleges.

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Areas of study:        

The industry – food and drink. Job roles, employment opportunities and relevant training. Health, safety and hygiene. Food preparation, cooking and presentation. Nutrition and menu planning. Costing and portion control. Specialist equipment. Communication, teamwork and record keeping.

Progression Routes: We are lucky to have a good working relationship with City College Norwich and local employers and the wider community. Historically, many students secure part time employment or apprenticeships with local companies as a result of employer engagement activities. This results in our students being better prepared for further education in related subjects such as:        

Travel and tourism Leisure Public Services Hospitality and Catering Business, Administration and Finance Enterprise Manufacturing and Product Design Society, Health and Development.

Life Skills: During the period of study, we focus on valuable life-skills such as:       

Managing time effectively Planning and organising work/ working to deadlines Self-motivation Working as part of a team Numeracy, literacy and Information technology skills Presentation skills Communication

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Practical Work: The Catering GCSE requires students to undertake practical work as an essential part of the course. Typically, 50-60% of the time is dedicated to hands-on activities relating to cooking tasks. The remaining time is spent with coursework and research. To maximise the learning opportunity, students must:      

Bring ingredients or contributions towards costs for practical lessons Plan practical work and assignments in a timely manner Be flexible; some students may be invited to assist with evening or weekend activities Respect each other’s abilities Wear chef whites that will be either loaned by the school or can be purchased at cost Work safely at all times following both School and legislative requirements.

Prior Learning: The course builds on the programs of study for Food Design and Technology, the Licence to Cook Program completed in Key Stage 3.

Coursework: Internal Assessment: 60% Two practical assessments relating to two pre-set projects from the WJEC. Internally assessed, externally moderated. External Assessment: 40% One 1 ½ hour paper, externally set and assessed by WJEC.

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GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition (one year GCSE) Subject lead: Mr J Baxter Syllabus: Edugas (WJEC) ** This option will commence in June 2017 for first award 2018. **

Key employability skills: The Food Industry is one of the U.K.’s biggest industries and also include the Catering, hospitality, leisure and tourism related industries. On this course you will have many opportunities to extend and apply your skills and knowledge of the food industry within a variety of situations. It will concentrate on the areas of food production and food service as an introduction to the hospitality and catering industry. You will be given opportunities to experience the food industry on a large scale. The Department’s success has generated demand for ‘event catering’, including the Aylsham Food Festival, Rotary events, Aylsham Town Council and School receptions. These events require the provision of food items or food and drink, often with students producing and serving the refreshments outside the normal School day. Our students are also encouraged to enter catering/cooking competitions and we have had great successes at both the national Springboard UK ‘Future Chef’ and Rotary ‘Young Chef’ competitions at regional and national levels. This results in students having to cook and prepare meals in college kitchens and being mentored by professional chefs. These achievements not only contribute to coursework assignments but also make the course meaningful, building self-confidence and organisational skills to enable you to make worthwhile connections with employers and colleges.

The course: This exciting brand new course from Eduqas (WJEC) offers a GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition. It will equip learners with the knowledge, understanding and higher level skills required to cook and also to apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. Following this qualification will encourage learners to cook at higher levels and enable them to make informed decisions about food and nutrition in order to be able to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life. It will allow the students to understand the huge challenges that we face globally to supply the world with nutritious and safe food

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Areas of Content 1. Food commodities e.g. Cereals, fruit and vegetables, sugars, dairy, fats, meat/fish and vegetarian alternatives. The course will look at their value in the diet, their working characteristics and experiments to understand changes occurring during cooking and also current recommended guidelines for a healthy diet 2. Principles of nutrition - the role of the main nutrients in the diet, their sources, function and deficiency diseases 3. Diet and good health 4. The science of food 5. Where food comes from 6. Cooking and food preparation

Assessment of the course COMPONENT 1: Principles of food preparation and nutrition Written examination (50% of qualification) to be taken at the end of key stage 4, comprising of short and extended answers

COMPONENT 2: Food preparation and nutrition in action - controlled assessment (50% of qualification) Two parts to be undertaken in one year, to include: 1. An investigative assessment worth 15%. (8 hours) e.g. find the most suitable ingredients to produce a crisp pastry or investigate the different methods used to thicken sauces. A report of 1500 words will be produced 2. A food preparation assessment worth 35% (12 hours) Plan, prepare, cook and evaluate 3 dishes to suit a specific dietary need such as the cuisine of another country or a special diet such as vegetarianism. Duration of practical will be 3 hours, together a report will be produced of 15 sides. Dishes cooked will include a wide range of dishes main meal dishes, vegetable dishes, pastries, cakes, sauces, dishes for special diets, starters, desserts etc. It is expected that students will cook every week in order to develop their practical skills and to produce a wide range of high quality dishes. This may amount to an average of £2 a week across the first two terms. It is generally expected that 39

students will opt to purchase a uniform and course handbook, total price around £25, although nearly new uniforms may be borrowed on an individual basis.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: COMPUTING Courses on offer:  GCSE Computing (OCR)  GCSE ICT (Edexcel)  Creative iMedia Cambridge National (Level 1 and 2)

The Subject Computing is increasingly changing the way we work. 85% of current jobs require a good level of computing skills and this figure is even higher for newly created jobs. The courses on offer at Aylsham enable all students to choose an appropriate course to their individual needs. During Years 7 and 8 all students follow a programme of Computing covering computer science, communicating, modelling and handling data. These programmes provide a sound basis for year 9 where all students follow a computing programme delivering the KS4 National Curriculum in Computing In addition, students can choose from three further option subjects to follow. GCSE Computing (OCR) (Year 10 and 11 students only) This exciting GCSE gives students an excellent opportunity to investigate how computers work and how they’re used, and to develop computer programming and problem solving skills. It involves some fascinating in-depth research and practical work; for example some of the current investigations look at Javascript, encryption and assembly language programming. The course is delivered through 3 units designed to enable students to have an indepth knowledge of computer technology and what goes on ‘behind the scenes’. The computer systems and programmes unit will teach students the theory about a wide range of issues such as hardware and software, the representation of data in computer systems, databases, computer communications and networking, programming and more. The practical investigation is all about engaging with computing in the real world. Students look at a computing topic in more depth and carry out a personal investigation into a computing issue. The programming project will call on students to design, code and test a solution to three tasks using a suitable programming language. The assessment The first unit is assessed by an external one and a half hour examination and units 2 and 3, being practical, are completed during Controlled Assessment. The balance of marks is 40% examination and 60% practical activities.

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Entry requirements As a GCSE, grades A* to G are available to all students, however there is a need for students to be good at maths and logical thinking if they are to benefit from this course. No prior knowledge of programming is necessary. It is strongly recommended that all students following this course have access to a computer at home. How could this help in the future? If you take a GCSE in Computing and then go on to study the subject at A Level or university you’ll have an advantage over fellow students who are picking up the subject at these higher levels. The increasing importance of information technologies means they’ll be growing demand for professionals who are qualified in this field. The course is also an excellent preparation if you want to study or work in areas that rely on the skills you’ll develop, especially where they are applied to technology. In addition, year 9 (along with year 10 and 11) students can choose from three further options subjects to follow. GCSE ICT (Edexcel) Similar in style to other GCSE courses the assessment in ICT is through a combination of Controlled Assessments and Final Examinations. The course on offer is the EDEXCEL GCSE in ICT. It is comprised of two units. Unit 1 is worth 40% of the final mark and is assessed by a 1 hour 30 minute examination, externally marked. This will be sat in May towards the end of the 1 year course. The unit explores how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society. It covers learning and earning, leisure, shopping and money management, health and well-being and looks at the risks associated with using ICT and the features of safe, secure and responsible practice. Unit 2 is a practical unit and is worth 60% of the final mark. It is internally assessed and takes a nominal 40 hours to complete. The unit helps students broaden and enhance their ICT skills working with a range of digital tools to produce effective solutions in a range of contexts. This qualification, awarded at grades A* to G, is appropriate for all students who are motivated and wish to further their understanding of how modern communications and information technology impact our lives. It is highly recommended that all students have access to a mobile device that can access the internet such as an ipad, ipod or android smart phone. Cambridge National Creative iMedia This is a level 2 course awarded at Distinction*, Distinction, Merit and Pass, Level 1 Distinction, Level 1 Merit and Level 1 Pass equivalent to Grades G-A* in GCSE Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia are media sector-focused, including film, television, web development, gaming and animation, and have IT at their heart. They provide knowledge in a number of key areas in this field from pre-production skills to digital animation and have a motivating, hands-on approach to both teaching and learning. Cambridge Nationals deliver skills across the whole range of learning styles and abilities, effectively engaging and inspiring all students to achieve great things. Students will be expected to have completed a Key Stage 3 ICT programme to be ready for this programme.

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The course consists of 4 units, 2 core and 2 optional, each taking a nominal 30 guided learning hours. Unit 1 is assessed externally through a written examination and is worth 25% of the final grade. In this unit students look at the techniques used in pre- production. On completion of this unit, learners will understand the purpose and uses of a range of pre-production techniques. They will be able to plan pre-production of a creative digital media product to a client brief, and will understand how to review pre- production documents. The second core unit is the development of digital graphics. On completion of this unit, learners will understand the purpose and properties of digital graphics, and know where and how they are used. They will be able to plan the creation of digital graphics, create new digital graphics using a range of editing techniques and review a completed graphic against a specific brief. Two further practical units follow covering development of digital animation and digital sound. On completion of the digital animation unit, learners will understand different types of digital animation techniques, know where they are used, be able to plan and create a digital animation and test and review a completed animation against a specific brief and on completion of the digital sound unit, learners will understand the purpose of digital audio products and where they are used. They will be able to plan a digital sound sequence, create and edit a digital sound sequence and review the final sound sequence against a specific brief. Progression Opportunities Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia lead to a wide range of general and vocational Qualifications including  Other level 2 vocational qualifications in graphics or media  Level 3 qualifications, such as in IT or an IT/Creative Media apprenticeship.  Employment within the information technology and/or areas within the creative industries, such as computer animations.

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Name of course: BTEC FIRST AWARD IN PERFORMING ARTS: DANCE Level of Qualification:

LEVEL 2

Examination Board:

EDEXCEL

What are BTEC qualifications? BTECs are work-related qualifications suitable for a wide range of students, built to accommodate the needs of employers and allow progression to university. They are recognised by schools, colleges, universities, employers and professional bodies across the United Kingdom and in over 100 countries worldwide. They provide a practical, real-world approach to learning without sacrificing any of the essential subject theory. During the BTEC Dance course you will have the opportunity to attend workshops lead by local dance artists, groups and theatre companies as well as watching professional shows. This will give you a realistic experience of what it might be like to work in the performing arts industry. What will I study? The course is delivered by slanteddance, a professional dance company based in Norfolk. The slanteddance education team are qualified and highly experienced in delivering BTEC Performing Arts Level 2 and 3 courses and GCSE Dance. The company run the course as near to a fully functioning dance company as possible, allowing all students to taste what the life of a dancer is like. The units studied on the course are: Individual Showcase This unit is geared towards preparing you with all the skills you need to undertake the next stages in the dance industry. Through workshops, rehearsals and lectures in dance technique and performance skills, career pathways, preparing applications/letter and choreographic devices. This will ensure you are prepared for the next stages in your career and the completion of the unit. You will complete 2 externally assessed assessments to demonstrate your work. This will include a letter of application, a timed exam where you will express your passion, skills and career aims to the examiner. You will then explore your creativity through choreographing, preparing and presenting audition performance pieces. Preperation, Performance and Production In this unit you will become a member of a performance company. You will learn how to create a performance piece as a dancer. You will take on a specific performing role as a performer. All members of the company will be required to research and contribute to the choreographic process as well as performance, which will be presented to an invited audience. You will be assessed throughout the rehearsals as well as the performance.

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Dance skills This unit is all about developing your versatility as a dancer. Throughout the lessons you will learn contrasting styles of dance and techniques, building physical skills to help you become a stronger and more flexible dancer. The unit will end in a final performance where you will showcase your new skills. You will be required to keep a logbook where you review your work, set targets and monitor your progress so you can improve.

How is the course assessed? This course consists of 3 units. 2 are marked internally and 1 unit is externally marked. This is made up of assignments completed throughout the year which show evidence that you have met the specification criteria. The externally marked unit will consist of a timed written exam and a practical performance. Coursework will take the form of notebooks, logbooks, tutor observation, peer observation, witness statements, audio and video, plans, drawings and sketches. Coursework is internally assessed and externally moderated. The course is a level 2 qualification. All individual units are graded as Pass, Merit, or Distinction. An overall Pass is equivalent to 1 C at GCSE, Merit to 1 B, Distinction to A and a Distinction* to 1 A*. Learners who do not achieve at Level 2 maybe graded at Level 1. Where will this take me? The BTEC First Award in Performing Arts: This dance qualification is recognised by colleges and universities and therefore allows progression via many pathways. The course acts as a foundation for further Level 3 vocational routes (BTEC Nationals/Diplomas) or for A level style courses. You would then have the opportunity to study at University if you chose to do so. This course should be considered if you are interested in any career in performing arts but is directly related to jobs such as a dancer (theatre, TV, music videos, film) choreographer, dance teacher or dance therapist. What sort of person should study this course? This course consists of both written and practical assessments so it is important that you are enthusiastic and dedicated to all parts of the course. It will be physically demanding so it is essential that you are comfortable being active and are happy to maintain a reasonable level of fitness. Previous dance experience is preferable but not entirely essential if you have developed good coordination through other sporting activities. Ideally you should be creative and experimental as you will be required to choreograph from a stimulus (e.g. an image, piece of music). Other skills that will be useful are the ability to communicate, listen and work well as part of a team. You need to have focus and be willing to work hard. It is essential that you are organized and can manage your time so that you can keep to deadlines. If you need any further information or you have questions about this course please see a ‘slanteddance’ Tutor (Mr Askew can organise this) or email [email protected] I look forward to seeing you in June!

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NAME OF SUBJECT: DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY Resistant Materials

Level of Qualification GCSE Examination Board AQA

Course of Study The Resistant Materials course is essentially a study of design and practical making in a studio/workshop setting. At the beginning of the course you will be taught all of the skills that you will need to successfully complete this qualification. Through a variety of design situations and practical make activities you will learn how to use tools and machinery so that you can manufacture a quality product. Each project is designed to build upon your skills and knowledge of Resistant Materials in preparation for your major project work later in the year. During the second part of the course you will undertake a major project which will consist of a design/written folio and a practical outcome, this coursework is worth 60% of your overall GCSE grade. Tools and Materials Working with a range of resistant materials mainly wood, metal and plastic you will understand that working characteristics, physical properties and cost are factors which influence the choice of materials in design solutions. You will learn to use a wide range of hand tools and machinery including Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacture systems to enhance your design and production quality. Design and Communication Throughout the course you will be expected to develop your own design and communication style through your design folio. This will include having a theme throughout your work, adopting sketching styles, making 3D models, verbally explaining your designs, making proposals and evaluating your own work. Health and Safety You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting, these working practices and procedures will be strictly adhered to at all times. Homework Homework will be set weekly. This could be research, carrying out investigations, completing design work, revising and making outside lesson time.

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Assessment Procedures and Dates You are assessed on: Folio and Practical Coursework

60%

Written Examinations

40% Paper 1 (2hrs)

(40 hours of work)

Coursework Requirements and Important Target Dates To complete a series of smaller projects at the beginning of the course and one substantial project of your choice based upon Resistant Materials in the second part of the course. All major project coursework will be completed by February half term. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers Both the design and manufacturing industry’s employ a large number of people in a wide range of professions. With this GCSE you will have gained an insight into the following careers Engineer Product Designer Product Manufacture Architect Teacher/Lecturer Concept Designer

Interior Designer Jewellery / Designer/Maker Wood/Metal work crafts Model Maker Construction Industry/carpenter/metalworker Furniture Designer/Maker

Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course You will need to be very organized, keeping to deadlines and bringing the correct work to lessons. You must have an eye for design and also practical ability. You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting. Questions to consider before opting for this course Am I prepared to put extra time in after school? Do I enjoy designing and making? Can I follow Health and Safety rules in a workshop? Materials and Equipment which you might need A set of graded pencils, coloured pencils, 30cm ruler, good quality rubber, A3 folder and a tape measure. You will need to be able to finance/resource materials for your final coursework product. Thoughts of students who have studied this course 'I liked the fact that you can make a brilliant product if you put the time in'. ''I was really chuffed with my design folio and it helped me get into college'. “You are treated like an adult but you have to earn it first”

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NAME OF SUBJECT:

DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY Unit Award Scheme

Level of Qualification Foundation Examination Board AQA Course of Study The UAS (Unit Award Scheme) course is a study of design and practical making in a studio/workshop setting. At the beginning of the course you will be taught all of the skills that you will need to successfully complete this qualification. Over the length of the course you will be required to complete multiple units of work which you receive an award for. Tools and Materials Working with a range of resistant materials mainly wood, metal and plastics you will learn to use a wide range of hand tools and machinery including Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacture systems to enhance your design and production quality. Design and Communication Throughout the course you will be expected to develop your own design folio. This will include having a theme throughout your work, adopting sketching styles, making 3D models, verbally explaining your designs, making proposals and evaluating your own work. Health and Safety You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting, these working practices and procedures will be strictly adhered to at all times. Homework Homework will be set weekly. This could be research, carrying out investigations, completing design work, revising and making outside lesson time.

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Assessment Procedures and Dates You are assessed on: Each separate unit is awarded; up to 8 units throughout the course. Coursework Requirements and Important Target Dates To complete four projects based upon Resistant Materials. All project coursework will be completed by February half term. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers Both the design and manufacturing industry’s employ a large number of people in a wide range of professions. With this Entry Level Certificate you will be prepared for the following careers: Wood/Metal work crafts Product Manufacture Model Maker Construction Industry/carpenter/metalworker Furniture Designer/Maker Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course You will need to be very organized, keeping to deadlines. You must have an interest in design and making. You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting. Questions to consider before opting for this course Do I enjoy designing and making? Can I follow Health and Safety rules in a workshop?

Materials and Equipment which you might need A set of graded pencils, coloured pencils, 30cm ruler, good quality rubber, A3 folder and a tape measure. You will need to be able to finance/resource materials for your final coursework product.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: Level of Qualification: Examination Board:

Engineering GCSE AQA

Course of Study Intended as an introduction to Engineering, this qualification allows students to develop skills and understanding which will be of use generally and as part of a progressive career path leading to further technical or academic engineering qualifications. The single award specification integrates designing, making and the applications of technologies allowing students to follow programmes which include both designing and making of engineered products. Tools and Materials Working with a range of precision tools and electronic components you will use composite materials, metals and plastics to make quality engineered products. You will understand that working characteristics, physical properties and cost are factors which influence the choice of materials in design solutions. You will learn to use a wide range of hand tools, machinery and processes including milling, turning, welding and aluminium casting. Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacture systems are used to enhance design and production quality and skills are developed through state of the art software and a laser cutting machine. Design and Communication You will undertake a product study where you will be expected to develop your own design and communication style through your design folio. This will include the use of client design briefs adopting sketching styles, making 3D models, CAD/CAM, verbally explaining your designs, making proposals and evaluating your own work. Health and Safety You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting, these working practices and procedures will be strictly adhered to at all times. Homework Homework will be set weekly. This could be research, carrying out investigations, completing design work, revising and making outside lesson time.

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Assessment Procedures and Dates You are assessed on: Folio and Practical Coursework

60%

Written Examinations

40% Paper 1 (1hr)

(45 hours of work)

Coursework Requirements and Important Target Dates To complete a series of smaller projects at the beginning of the course and one substantial project which will be set by the teacher. All major project coursework will be completed by Easter. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers Both the Engineering and manufacturing industries employ a large number of people in a wide range of professions. With this GCSE you will have gained an insight into the following careers: Level 3 Engineering Product Designer Product Manufacture Architect Teacher/Lecturer Concept Designer Marine Engineer

Motor vehicle industry – F1 Electrical engineer Metal work crafts Model Maker Construction Industry Energy sector Aeronautic engineer

Personal qualities and aptitudes useful for this course You will need to be very organized, keeping to deadlines and bringing the correct work to lessons. You must have an eye for design detail and be good at working from detailed plans to produce engineered products within strict tolerances. You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting. You must also enjoy physics and maths which are important skills in engineering. Questions to consider before opting for this course Am I prepared to put extra time in after school? Do I enjoy designing and making? Can I follow Health and Safety rules in a workshop? Materials and Equipment which you might need A set of graded pencils, colored pencils, 30cm ruler, good quality rubber, A3 folder and a tape measure. You will need to be able to finance/resource materials for your final coursework product.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY TEXTILES Level of Qualification G.C.S.E Examination Board AQA Course of study: The Textiles course is broken into 6 stages. Research (8 marks): The portfolio to the course begins with choosing a design brief, which pupils use as a starting point to research themes, existing products and to create an image board. The research will inform all design ideas. Designing and Modelling (32 marks): This involves experimenting with a multitude of different techniques including screen printing, block printing, batik, appliqué, felting and machine embellishing. Once you have decided on the decorative techniques that you will use to create your product, you will learn construction techniques including seam work, inserting a zip and creating buttonholes. Making of the Product (32 marks): With the knowledge gained in the modelling section, pupils will create a high quality product and through this work will learn about industrial techniques and environmental issues. Evaluation of Product (12 marks): The pupil journal is a key tool to use within the course when recording the successes and problems that all pupils will face when making their final product. These recordings will directly inform the Evaluation of the product as well as photographs of making. Communication (6 marks): Throughout the course you will develop you design and communication skills. A large emphasis will be placed on your ability to present your designs and ideas through modelling and your ability to analyse your progress through these models. Revision for the exam: Pupils will recap on all theory learnt throughout the portfolio and making of their final product in order to sit a written exam worth 40%. A revision guide will be provided with tips, activities and subject knowledge. Tools and Materials: Throughout the course you will become proficient in using the sewing machine, hand sewing, decorative techniques using wax, embellishing machines and the CAD/CAM machines. You will understand the uses and construction of certain fabrics, as well as the environmental and ethical issues that are current within the Textiles industry.

Health and Safety: You must adhere to the health and safety rules at all times in the Textiles workshop and have a mind for safe working practices. Assessment Procedures Pupils are assessed on coursework consisting of an A3 portfolio and practical piece of work worth 60% and a written examination paper worth 40%. The coursework mark is

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based on the quality of the final product and supporting portfolio. Coursework Requirements and Important Target Dates: To complete a substantial coursework project on a design brief for a textile product. This must show considerations towards manufacture and appropriate ICT evidence. The completion of the design and making work should take a maximum of 45 hours. Materials and Equipment which you might need You will need to provide materials for your final coursework project, though these can be recycled from other products. An A3 storage folder to store your portfolio and samples. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers From taking Textile Technology as a GCSE there are many opportunities to study further at College and University, which can lead into a future career in:        

Textile Design Fashion Design Interior Design I.C.T. Textile researcher Industrial based work through to Management Garment Technologist Fashion Buyer Preproduction and Production Management.

Thoughts of students who have studied this course: “It’s great to be hands on in a subject and work independently” “To have the freedom to create what you like, but with the support to help the product be a success.” “You learn that there’s more to Textiles than you thought, including issues on fair trade as well as smart materials.”

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NAME OF SUBJECT : DRAMA Level of Qualification G.C.S.E. Examination Board EDEXCEL

What is GCSE Drama all about? GCSE Drama is all about understanding what it is like to put yourself in somebody else’s shoes. You will play many parts in different imaginary situations. You will have the opportunity to create your own work as well as look at plays written by other people.

** Please note that this course information relates to the Drama syllabus which will be examined in June 2017. Course of study The course is in three parts:   

In part one of the course you will use drama to express your feelings and ideas about a range of issues. In part two of the course you will look at a play to see how a playwright expresses their ideas about a theme or topic and explore ways of making the play work on stage. In part three of the course you will have the choice of being involved in the performance of a play from an existing script or one you can create yourselves.

Will I enjoy this course? You will enjoy this course if you want to study a subject that is both practical and creative. You may have done some acting before or helped out backstage on a production. You may have always wanted to have a go at making a play, performing, making costumes, building a set or operating the lights but never had the chance. You will enjoy this course if you enjoy working as part of a team as Drama involves a lot of group work. How does it follow on from what I have learned before? GCSE Drama follows on from drama work that you will have done at Key Stage 3 (years 7 – 8). You will develop your improvisation and acting skills to a higher level. You will also look at plays in more detail and look at different ways of bringing a script alive on stage. Assessments procedures The examination for GCSE Drama is a practical performance. It is worth 40% of the marks. You will take part in a play that you have created as a group or rehearsed from a script. You can either be examined on your acting skills in the performance or on your design and technical skills (stage design, costume, masks and make-up, lighting or sound). You will perform the play in front of an audience and the examiner will be present at one of the performances.

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Coursework requirements The 60% coursework part of the GCSE Drama course consists of practical performance work and a documentary response. During your course, you will take part in 2 different workshops that will be marked by your teacher. In one of the workshops you will use all that you have learnt about Drama to explore your responses to a range of material presented to you by your teacher. In the other workshop, you will explore a play and show your understanding of drama by taking part in a number of exercises based on the play. You will be assessed on your practical work and on the supporting notes you keep during documentary response following the workshops. You can achieve grades A* to G in GCSE Drama. The final grade is reported in August. You will be given the opportunity to work with professional theatre practitioners who come into school for whole day workshops. You will also be given the opportunity to go to watch professional theatre productions. What other skills might I develop? As well as acquiring the skills involved in creating and performing Drama, you will also be able to acquire skills in working with others, problem solving and communication. You will find that Drama will help you feel more self-confident and prepare you to deal with a range of different situations and people. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers There are many things you can go on to do with a GCSE in Drama. If you are unsure about what to do next, the best thing to do is to speak to your Drama teacher who will know about the choices on offer. You could go on to take an AS or A level in Drama and Theatre Studies, or a Vocational A level in Performing Arts or a BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in Performing Arts or Performance Design and Technology. You may wish to take a GCSE in Drama for its own sake, perhaps to form the basis of a future interest or as part of a range of other subjects. Or you might wish to go into a job where it is useful to have had experience of Drama, or where you will need to use some of the skills developed during this course. These might include careers in such fields as retail, travel and tourism, sales and marketing or any career that involved meeting people face to face. The study of Drama can help you develop transferable skills which you can take into any career or job. Thoughts of students who have studied this course during the past ‘I can express my feelings through playing another person.’ ‘The more relaxed you are the more you get out of the lesson and the more fun you have.’ ‘It gives you confidence in your own abilities.’ ‘You’ve got to take responsibility for what you do.’ ‘It’s fun!

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Level 2 Project and Duke of Edinburgh Award

This option is a combined course, enabling students to complete a Level 2 Project equivalent to a half GCSE and an opportunity to complete aspects of the Duke of Edinburgh award. The D of E award scheme is a voluntary, non-competitive programme of practical, cultural and adventurous activities, designed to support the personal and social development of young people aged 13-25, regardless of gender, background or ability. It offers an individual challenge and encourages young people to undertake exciting, constructive, challenging and enjoyable activities in their free time. It is a four section programme with three levels:   

Bronze (for those aged 13 and over) Silver (for those aged 15 and over) Gold (for those aged 16 and over)

As part of the D of E scheme you will cover many varying skills including; First Aid, Campcraft, Cooking skills on Trangia Stoves and Compass reading/route card planning. All the skills are required to complete the D of E Bronze Award. Once these skills have been completed all participants then have to complete a practice expedition in the local area which comprises of 2 days walking and 1 night camping. Each day’s walk lasts for approximately 6hrs and participants have to carry a back pack with all the required kit including Trangia stoves and tents. All participants are in groups for the expedition and will walk, rest and prepare and cook meals together. You are not alone. After this has been completed all participants will then complete a final expedition where everything that has been learnt will be put into practice. Although the expeditions are hard work all the participants who have taken part have had a great time. If you feel you would like to take this challenge, the cost is £18.00 for you to join the Duke of Edinburgh scheme and £30.00 towards the cost of each Expedition (one practice & one final). Although most of the work will be completed in lesson time there will be some compulsory after school training and all expeditions will be out of school hours. The Project is a single piece of work submitted to the exam board in May and equivalent to half a Grade C-A at GCSE. The Project will run alongside all of the Duke of Edinburgh hours. This project will be something of your choice. This is about you managing your own time and yourself. You may choose a research project, produce an artefact, such as a website, a video, or be part of a production such as a play. The assessment measures your ability to “Project Manage” and covers planning, research, carrying out the project and presenting your project to an audience. This is a one year single option programme open to anyone in Year 9, 10 and 11.

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NAME OF SUBJECT : FRENCH G.C.S.E.

Level of Qualification G.C.S.E. All pupils follow the full GCSE Course Examination Board EDEXCEL GCSE. Course of Study including Homework The course builds on the topics begun in Years 7 and 8 and the emphasis is on enabling you to communicate confidently with native speakers. You will also learn to cope in a variety of situations. Approximately two hours should be spent on French homework per week. It will be a combination of written tasks and learning. It is also worth noting that this needn’t be a single block of time. Short and regular bursts of intensive learning are often most effective and vocabulary can be acquired on languages web sites as well as from your vocabulary book. The French GCSE course will be completed over two years in years 10 and 11 however the year 9 foundation course will also serve as a fundamental element of the French GCSE. The foundation course will serve as a transition period for all pupils opting to take French. Over 2.5 hours every fortnight, it is expected that students will cover a range of core grammar, vocabulary and verbal skills that will enable them to begin the GCSE course in Year 10 with solid and confident baseline language skills. Assessment procedure and dates Listening, speaking, reading and writing will all be assessed as part of the course. Each of these skills counts for 25% of the overall grade and all skills will be tested in May/June of Year 11. Although you are only externally assessed in year 11, regular mock examinations and in class assessments will be set by your French teacher to make sure you are progressing as you should through the course. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers With a language qualification you have an advantage over other applicants when applying for College or University places, or for jobs. The English Baccalaureate, which includes a GCSE in a foreign language, will undoubtedly be required in the future by many universities and some further education providers. Nowadays, young people are competing for jobs with students from other European countries, most of whom speak at least two languages. Much of Britain’s trade is with France, Germany and other EC countries and you may have the opportunity to use your language both in Britain and abroad. Studying French broadens your horizons and makes travelling to France more rewarding. You will be able to communicate effectively, meet new people and learn about a different culture. During the course, you will have the opportunity to take part in an exchange to Blois and stay with a French family. Requirements for this course. A love of communicating with others. You will need a fair memory for words and longer phrases; the ability to see patterns in language and start using them yourself; and the ability to organize and store work carefully during the course. Perhaps more importantly though, you will need a willingness to open yourself up to new experiences and to the enjoyment that communicating in a different language can bring.

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Questions to consider before opting for this course Am I likely to go to university? Many universities are asking for a GCSE in a foreign language. Do I enjoy speaking and writing French? Can I remember words and phrases from week to week? Do I pay attention to detail? Can I organize and store work carefully? Materials and Equipment which you might need It is expected that you equip yourself with a suitable bilingual dictionary. The cost need not be exorbitant as perfectly good dictionaries can be acquired for as little as £4.00. Verb tables are also a good idea. Thoughts of students who have studied this course ‘I chose French because I have always held a strong interest in the language. It can be very rewarding if you work hard and put effort into learning the new words and phrases.’ ‘I chose French because it makes more sense and I understand it more easily.’ ‘I found the French course challenging and a valuable subject and think it is very worth while if you are willing to put effort into it.’ Future Pathways -

‘A’ and AS level French Leisure and Tourism work and study French combined with other subjects at university eg. Law, business management, media. Using languages in industry – insurance, marketing, catering, hospitality, teaching, finance Working in a foreign country.

Bonne chance!

J’espère que vous allez nous joinder.

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NAME OF SUBJECT : GEOGRAPHY GCSE Level of Qualification: G.C.S.E. 2 tiers of entry: Higher: Foundation:

A* - E B -G

Examination Board: EDEXCEL GCSE Geography A What will I learn? The world is a changing place and Geography gives you the chance to learn about these changes. The Edexcel GCSE in Geography A comprises of four units: Unit 1: Geographical Skills and Change: This unit builds on the geographical skills you learned in Years 7 and 8 and will give you the opportunity to develop more advanced skills appropriate for a GCSE geographer. The unit has two sections: Section A: Geographical Skills This covers map skills, graphical skills, geographical enquiry, ICT skills and GIS (Geographical Information Systems) skills Section B: Challenges for the Planet This covers issues that have arisen from climate change and sustainable development. This unit is assessed through a 1 hour written exam with a total of 54 marks (including 4 marks for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar). There are 25 marks for Section A and 29 marks for Section B. The exam will take place at the end of the course and is worth 25% of the final grade. Unit 2: The Natural Environment: This unit is based on physical geography and has two sections: Section A: The Physical World This covers Coasts, Rivers and Tectonics Section B: Environmental Issues This includes a unit called A Wasteful World which looks at how the amount of waste differs around the world and energy usage This unit is assessed through a 1 hour 15 minute written exam with a total of 69 marks (including 4 marks for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar). There are 45 marks for Section A (15 marks per topic area) and 24 marks for Section B. This exam will take place at the end of the course and is worth 25% of the final grade.

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Unit 3: The Human Environment: This unit is based on human geography and has two sections: Section A: The Human World This covers Economic Change, Settlement and Population Section B: People Issues This includes a unit on Tourism and a trip to Great Yarmouth to help consolidate knowledge. This unit is assessed through a 1 hour 15 minute written exam with a total of 69 marks (including 4 marks for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar). There are 45 marks for Section A (15 marks per topic area) and 24 marks for Section B. This exam will take place at the end of the course and is worth 25% of the final grade. Unit 4: Investigating Geography: This unit will involve going out of school to carry out fieldwork along the North Norfolk coastline and then writing it up. The final write up will be carried out predominantly in class time so that you don’t have to spend hours at home doing geography coursework! This unit is assessed through a 2000 word written report. The report will be written up in controlled examination conditions during lesson time from November to December and is worth 25% of the final grade. You can expect to spend approximately 20 hours in examination conditions to complete the report. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers: Geography is a subject that links to many other subjects in the curriculum, so a GCSE in Geography is a stepping stone to a whole range of opportunities and courses. Geography is a useful and relevant qualification for most careers. The skills you develop can lead you to employment opportunities in: Journalism and the Media ICT Environmental Management Business Management Agriculture Cartography and Surveying Town Planning

Engineering Travel and Tourism Marketing Teaching Armed Services Accountancy Meteorology

In fact, Geographers are everywhere! Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course: An interest in the environment and in different places. You will need to enjoy working in a variety of different ways and be organized. You should have a firm commitment to working hard both in school and at home. You need to have a degree of independence during the course, particularly when studying Unit 4. Is this the right course for me? You will have learned a number of geographical skills and gained a body of geographical knowledge in Years 7 and 8. This will be developed further during the GCSE course to give you a deeper understanding of the world. Much will be new, but your previous study of geography will have prepared you and helped you to think like a geographer. 60

Before opting for this course, consider these questions as they are all important parts of the course. Am I curious about other places? Do I care about the environment? Can I work well in group situations and on an individual basis? Do I enjoy working with maps? Do I like making graphs, doing sketches and drawing diagrams? Am I prepared to work independently on fieldwork and controlled assessments? Am I able to meet deadlines? Can I work hard under strict time limits during the course? Fieldwork Opportunities: Geography is all about the world, so fieldwork plays an important part in the course. There will be 3 local area fieldwork opportunities – one of which will be the basis of your controlled assessment task. There may also be an opportunity to take part in a residential fieldtrip. Suggested Materials and Equipment: Ring binders (essential from the start of the course for revision notes) Atlas Coloured pencils Protractor Ruler Calculator Basic Writing Equipment Lined Paper Thoughts of students who have studied this course in the past: ‘Geography is great. You get to go on field trips and you get to learn more about the world you live in.’ ‘A good GCSE to gain, even if you don’t want to go into it after school – it looks good on your CV!’ ‘This course is based around the environment and provides pupils with the occasional trip. It is also based around how humans and nature have created the world around us. I personally find this course very interesting and would definitely recommend it to anyone willing to discover the world around them with enthusiasm.’

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NAME OF SUBJECT : GERMAN Level of Qualification G.C.S.E. All pupils follow the full GCSE Course

Examination Board EDEXCEL

Course of study including homework As with French, the GCSE course in German builds on the topics begun in Years 7 and 8. Through the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing the emphasis is on learning and manipulating language for confident and accurate communication using a good range of varied and interesting structures and expressions. The German GCSE course will be completed over two years in Years 10 and 11. Approximately 2 hours per week needs to be spent on homework which will be a combination of written tasks and learning. Experimenting with different ways of learning e.g. ‘Concertina’ method, card games, “keep-fit” learning, teaching Teddy vocabulary to practise speaking aloud, language web sites, will help train your memory and add variety to life! Assessment Procedures and Dates Listening, speaking, reading and writing will all be assessed as part of the course with each skill counting for 25% of the overall grade. All skills will be tested by final external exam in May /June of Year 11, but throughout the two year course you will be given regular mock examinations and in class assessments to ensure you are progressing as you should be through the course. Usefulness of the course for further education and careers People with language skills and knowledge are highly thought of in the modern world. They stand out as talented and successful people, with broad and exciting horizons! A GCSE qualification in a language is testament to a certain set of skills which many Universities, Colleges and jobs require. The English Baccalaureate, which includes a GCSE in a foreign language, will undoubtedly be required in future by many universities, further education providers and employers. Knowledge of another European language is an asset no matter what career you have in mind. Since the EC changes of 1992 and the re-unification of Germany, German is the most widely spoken language in the European Union. Language qualifications are being requested more and more by employers with interests in Europe. Germany is the second largest exporter of goods worldwide after China. It is always advantageous to be able to use a foreign language when selling products to that country. Much of Britain’s trade is with EC countries where German and French are the languages

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spoken. Germany plays a vital role in scientific and research innovation. It is also terrific to be able to converse with a whole range of extra people by being able to speak in their language and doing so, gives you the opportunity to make many more new friends. Taking GCSE German means you will:  Have much more fun when travelling to a German speaking country  Be able to study AS and A2 German courses  Add an extra dimension to your personal skills profile which will impress anyone who reads your CV.  Be in a stronger position to get a job in companies with international links, take part in scientific research, or to work abroad Do not forget that in years 9,10 and 11 you will have the opportunity to take part in the German Exchange trip which gives an ideal chance to put knowledge into practice to develop your listening and speaking skills and to experience life with a German family. Going on the Exchange gives you confidence in and enjoyment of your language skills and very useful preparation for the oral examination. Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course  Pleasure in communicating with others.  A fair memory for words and phrases and an enjoyment of using spoken and written words.  Being intrigued by communicating in a different language or being challenged by this and finding it exciting.  Being determined to conquer the tricky bits, enjoying the satisfaction of success!  Wanting to broaden your horizons and wanting to take up the opportunity of being able to compete on equal terms in a fast-changing Europe.  Being able to organize yourself and your work well. Questions to consider before opting for this course Do I enjoy speaking and writing German? What is my memory for words and phrases like? Do I pay attention to details? Is my approach to my work organised? Do I want to be able to access more people in the world? Do I want a career for which a language would be useful? Am I likely to go to University or College Post 18? More universities are asking for a GCSE in a foreign language as a basic requirement to study many other subjects because of the skills you develop in doing it. Materials and Equipment which you might need It is expected that you will equip yourself with a bilingual dictionary ( Collins Express Edition is the one we recommend as it has excellent verb tables and grammar sections as well) and make use of a range of excellent web-sites to support your language (list available from your teacher).

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What thoughts do other pupils have about this course?  ‘I picked German because I really like it! I like speaking it because it’s not too hard to pronounce the words and they are also fairly easy to learn as they are close to English in a lot of cases.  ‘Going on the Exchange really helped me – it made it all seem more relevant somehow. It was very satisfying to find I could cope in certain situations with what I know already.’  ‘I like being able to write a whole piece of German and even though the word order and things are sometimes difficult, I have found the more I do the better I get! You have a lot of words to learn but you have more lesson time which makes it better.’ Future pathways Many possibilities are open to you with a GCSE in German including…  A and AS level German  Leisure and Tourism work and study  German combined with other subjects at University e.g. Law, Business, Finance, Media, Management, Information Technology  Working in scientific research or innovation  Working abroad on a gap year or permanently  Languages for industry and other professions such as:          

Insurance Catering Teaching Journalism Hospitality Tourism Finance Marketing Law Scientific research

The possibilities are endless and everincreasing….so, nimm’ doch Deutsch!!

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HAIR & BEAUTY Students are able to choose a Hair and Beauty course as a one year Option. The course is a basic introduction to working in the industry sector and would suit any student interested in becoming either a hairdresser or beautician and is the essential step on the industry ladder. The school has invested in a new hair salon with up-to-date equipment enabling the course to be offered at Aylsham. The course is taught by industry professionals and has proved a very successful start point for many students before moving into the labour market. Course Content - Consists of 5 Units  Unit 101- Introduction to the hair and beauty sector  Unit 102- Presenting a professional Image  Unit 103- Styling women’s hair  Unit 006- Hand care  Unit 007- Skin care Assessments - All assessments will be assessed by practical skills and underpinning knowledge. “Top Tips for Success” 



Timing- Complete your tasks within the time limit your tutor has set. Presentation - Try to present your written work in a clear and logical way. To

improve your assignments prepare a front cover and contents page.  

 



Be creative- Use colours, symbols, diagrams, pictures and leaflets in your tasks. Remember to reference - If you refer to books, the internet and information given to you by your tutor in your tasks you should include a reference to show where the information came from. Aim High- Review the grading criteria for your tasks to see what you need to get a higher grade. Be prepared - Review the observation check list before carrying out your final practical assessments because you cannot look at it during your assessment Remember- Think about how you present yourself and communicate during your practical assessment.

Useful resources- City &Guilds Certificate in Salon Services Key Coursework tasks and deadlines - Course work deadline information set by teacher. Finished portfolio- (May 2017)

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Health and Social Care Cambridge National

This is a Level1/2 course equivalent to 1 GCSE at Grades A* to G. Cambridge Nationals in Health and Social Care will equip learners with sound specialist knowledge and skills for everyday use. They will also challenge all learners, including high attaining learners, by introducing them to demanding material and skills; encouraging independence and creativity; providing tasks that engage with the most taxing aspects of the National Curriculum (including Values of Care and the current legislation requirements and the importance of softer skills such as communication skills to ensure individuals right to independence and dignity). The course consists of four units, 2 of which are core and 2 optional and all of which are weighted equally at 25% of the final mark. 2 Core Units: The core units are: R021: Essential values of care for use with individuals in care settings This unit focuses on the rights of individuals and will instill the values of care to be used when working in a health, social care or early years environment. All good practice is based on these values and enables those who use and work in care settings to apply quality practice. The unit also provides an overview of legislation and its impact on the care settings and covers the hygiene, safety and security matters that relate to promoting a healthy and safe environment. This unit is assessed by an external written examination. R022: Communicating and working with individuals in health, social care and early years’ settings This unit will provide learners with the underpinning knowledge and understanding of how to communicate effectively and what personal qualities will contribute to the creation of a caring environment when working with individuals in a health, social care and early years setting. This unit is assessed by an internally assessed controlled assessment 2 optional Units: The optional units are: R027 - Creative activities to support individuals in health, social care and early year settings. This unit is assessed by an internally assessed controlled assessment R029 - Understanding the nutrients needed for good health. This unit is assessed by an internally assessed controlled assessment Mrs T Wiseman Health & Social Instructor

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NAME OF SUBJECT: HISTORY Level of Qualification G.C.S.E. Examination Board Edexcel

Course of Study If sitting exam in 2017 (1 year course 2016/17) Unit 1 - Medicine Through Time (Essay based exam - completed June) Unit 2 - Life in Germany 1918 - 1945 (Essay based exam - completed June) Unit 3 - The Development of Surgery (Source based exam - completed June) Unit 4 – Impact of war on Britain in the 20th Century (controlled assessment) All elements of assessment have an equal weighting of 25% towards the final grade. If sitting exam in 2018 or beyond Paper 1: Thematic study and historic environment (30%) - Medicine in Britain, c1250–present - The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries, treatment and the trenches. Paper 2: Period study and British depth study (40%) - Anglo-Saxon and Norman England, c1060–88 - Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941–91 Paper 3: Modern depth study (30%) - Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39 Trips It might also be advantageous for those pupils thinking of taking History at GCSE to be involved in the Year 8 trip to the World War One battlefields in France in May 2015. Usefulness of the course for further education and future careers Not all historians work in museums! It is well known that historical skills are in demand in a widespread spectrum of careers, both technical and managerial. The skills that History develops include the abilities:        

to work independently to appreciate the points of view of others to form reasoned opinions and draw justified conclusions to analyse evidence carefully to use a wide variety of different types of sources to produce well-formed, structured and reasoned arguments to develop a good understanding of the causes of events to assess the motives for peoples’ actions to fully develop written skills

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GCSE History would be of particular use in the following fields: Journalism  Law  Local and national government (including the Civil Service)  Personnel  Marketing  Teaching  Museum and archaeological services  Tourism and the rapidly expanding heritage industry  Social work. Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course Clearly an interest in the period would be desirable but the course will aim to develop skills in assessing sources, understanding different viewpoints and developing coherent arguments about causation and change. Questions to consider before opting for this course Do I want to understand the present? Am I keen to understand how other people lived in the past? Am I willing to work hard, as quality grades in History can only be achieved through hard work? Do I have good research and literacy skills? Am I able to form and justify my own opinions on historical events? Am I prepared to have my assumptions challenged? Materials and equipment which you might need None. All textbooks will be available for pupils use throughout the course. It would be helpful if pupils undertook their own wider reading and had access to the internet and word processing facilities although this is not essential. Thoughts of students who have studied this course during the past ‘I never knew History could be so interesting and thought-provoking.’ ‘History is a very complex subject but with lots of effort it is very rewarding. It’s not easy, you have to work hard to get good marks, but when you do, you feel very proud about the work you have done! ‘I can honestly say that I have thoroughly enjoyed my History course and as a result I am planning to take History at ‘A’ level.’ ‘Medical History is fascinating. It’s interesting to look at medicine over a long period of time to see how it advances and how sometimes it goes backwards’ ‘We need to study Nazi Germany to protect our world in the future.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: MUSIC

Level of Qualification G.C.S.E Examination Board EDEXCEL Course of Study including Homework The aims of the G.C.S.E. course are:  to develop skills, knowledge and understanding in performing, composing, listening and appraising;  to encourage the development of aural perception, musical sensitivity and imaginative response;  to promote candidates’ cultural development through the study and understanding of a wide range of music;  to support candidates’ social and personal development through creating and performing music with others. Homework consists of:  Daily practice on your main instrument,  Regular listening to a broad range of music  Composition and performance as appropriate. This is an on-going task, largely prepared away from the classroom. Assessment procedures and dates 1. Listening and Appraising (40%) Written responses to recorded musical extracts 1hr.30 mins. Section A

Candidates to answer 8 questions based on the 12 set works from the following Areas of Study below.

Area of Study 1

Repetition and contrast in Western Classical Music 1600 – 1899. Set works: Mozart, Handel and Chopin. New directions in Western Classical Music - 1900 to present day. Set works: Schoenberg, Bernstein and Reich. Popular song in context. Set works: Moby, Miles Davis and Jeff Buckley. Rhythms, scales and modes in music from around the world. Set works: Indian and African traditional music and Capercaille.

Area of Study 2 Area of Study 3 Area of Study 4 Section B

Candidates to answer listening questions on 8 of the pieces and an essay style question on one of the set works.

2. Performing (30%) (a) Solo Performing (15%) Candidates will perform one solo piece (b) Ensemble Performance (15%) Candidates will perform one piece as a group. 3. Composing (30% ) The best two compositions from two different areas of study will be selected at an appropriate time during the course, teacher assessed and externally moderated.

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Usefulness of the course for further education and careers You will encounter music throughout your life, whether as part of your work or your recreation. The GCSE course will enable you to develop a greater sense of awareness and understanding of music from your own and other cultures. Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course  You will already enjoy music and must be competent at playing an instrument or singing, if you expect to attain a high grade. (It is strongly advised that you should be receiving tuition on your main instrument or voice.)  You will want to develop your enjoyment of music through closer involvement in performing on your main instrument or voice and this will happen regularly during lessons.  You will enjoy experimenting with musical ideas and will be seeking to discover your possibly hidden talents for composing music through different styles and techniques.  You will be open to fostering a deeper understanding of instrumental, vocal and other sounds and structures from different times, fashions and cultures.  You will be able to organise yourself without teacher supervision, in order to complete compositions in your own time.  You will be prepared to read from, and perform using, musical notation. Thoughts of students who have studied this course ‘The music course is challenging and unpredictable.’ ‘One of the good points about choosing music for GCSE, is that the work is mostly of a practical nature, compared to some other subjects, where much more writing is involved.’ ‘It’s not just about playing instruments, you have to learn about music as well.’ ‘Music is definitely not an easy option. You have to work hard in order to enjoy the result.’ ‘Music gives you a chance to improve at your instrument and it gives you skills to take away, as well as a qualification.’

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NAME OF SUBJECT: First in Music Level of Qualification BTEC Level 2 Award Examination Board: Edexcel

Course of Study The BTEC level 2 Award in Music offers students the opportunity to study the subject of music through a number of different topics. It is an introduction to the issues surrounding music and the various careers available. The course comprises two compulsory units; ‘The Music Industry’ where pupils will research the various roles within the music industry, not just performer, and ‘Managing A Music Product’ where pupils will begin to understand the process of putting on a live music event. As one of the other units is Introducing Music Performance you must therefore be able to sing or play an instrument to a reasonable standard.

What topics are covered? The Music Industry Professional Development in the Music Industry

60 min exam Coursework

Introducing Music Performance Introducing Music Recording/Sequencing

Coursework Coursework

How is it assessed? This course is mostly made up of assignments completed throughout the year which show evidence that you have met the specification criteria. Coursework will take the form of note books, logbooks, tutor observation, peer observation, witness statements, audio and video. Coursework is internally assessed and externally moderated. In addition to this pupils will have to sit a 1hour externally assessed exam based on the topic ‘The Music Industry’. Certification. All individual units are graded as Pass, Merit or Distinction at level 2.

What sort of person should study this course?  The sort of pupil who plays an instrument or sings but perhaps does not read or write traditional musical notation.  The type of pupils who is interested in music but is put off by the level of theory or listening required in the more traditional GCSE music.  Pupils interested in a career in the music profession.

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Name of Subject: GCSE Physical Education Level of Qualification & Exam Board: GCSE - Edexcel

Course of Study including Homework GCSE PE is a 1 year course which includes practical and theoretical elements. The practical component is designed to develop skill, knowledge and understanding within a range of activities. Pupils will be encouraged and expected to attend extra-curricular clubs for their selected sports in order to improve their performance. The theoretical component of the course requires pupils to develop their understanding and knowledge of the relationship between physical activity, training, diet and a health active lifestyle. Pupils will also study the functions and importance of the body systems and the effects of exercise on the body. Pupils will be given a minimum of 1 hour homework per week.

Practical Component (60% of overall mark): 12% assessed within the verbal analysis of performance in 1 selected sport 48% assessed through performance in 4 sports from a minimum of 2 activity groups below:

Group A: Outwitting opponents Amateur boxing, American football, Association football, Badminton, Baseball, Basketball, Cricket, Fencing, Field hockey, Gaelic football, Handball, Judo, Ju-jitsu, Karate, Korfball, Lacrosse, Lawn Tennis, Netball, Rounders, Rugby league, Rugby union, Softball, Squash, Table tennis, Tae kwon do Volleyball, Water polo Group B: Accurate replication of actions, phrases and sequences Gymnastics, Synchronised swimming, Trampolining Group C: Exploring and communicating ideas, concepts and emotions Dance Group D: Performing at maximum levels - speed, height, distance, strength or accuracy Archery, Athletics (3 events), Clay pigeon shooting, Competitive swimming, Cross-country running, Cycling, Golf, Lawn bowls, Rowing, Weightlifting Group E: Identifying and solving problems to overcome challenges of an adventurous nature Canoeing, Climbing, Horse riding, Kayaking, Life-saving, Mountain biking, Orienteering, Personal survival, Sailing, Skiing, Snowboarding 72

Group F: Exercising safely and effectively to improve health and wellbeing Fitness training If pupils already have experience and can provide evidence throughout the course they can offer 2 of their performances as a coach/leader or official

Theory Component (40% of overall mark): 1 hour 30 minute written exam which includes multiple choice, short and essay style questions. Pupils will need to apply their knowledge of what constitute a healthy body and lifestyle and the way in which their exercise impacts on the body systems by studying the following areas:

     

Components of fitness and fitness testing Planning and analysing an exercise session Training methods, training principles and target setting Diet & Drugs in sport Injury Prevention & Treatment The functions and relationship between exercise and the respiratory, cardiovascular, muscular and skeletal systems

Assessment Procedures & Dates Verbal Analysis of Performance Exam - January Practical Exams - January and March/April Written Exam - May

Usefulness of the Course for Further Education & Careers    

To develop practical skills and performance To develop knowledge base to be able to assess sports courses in further education To gain an understanding of basic anatomy and physiology To gain work within the leisure industry

Personal Qualities and Aptitudes Required:  Enthusiasm and willingness to study and revise for the theory components of the course  Commitment to attend extra-curricular clubs for assessed sports  Organisation with kit 73

Name of Subject: Aylsham High School Sports Diploma (PE Foundation Course) Level of Qualification & Exam Board: Level 2 Project - Edexcel Course of Study including Homework The Aylsham High School Diploma is a bespoke 1 year course, enabling students to complete a Level 2 Project, add sports leadership and first aid qualifications to their CV and study the content within the GCSE PE short course to prepare them for the full GCSE course. The Level 2 Project is a single piece of work submitted to the exam board in May and equivalent to half a Grade A-C at GCSE. This project will be something of your choice. This is about you managing your own time and yourself. You may choose a research project, produce an artefact, such as a website, a video, or be part of an event such as a multi-skills festival. The assessment measures your ability to project manage and covers planning, research, running and evaluating your project. Throughout the year the practical element of the course will allow students to develop skill, knowledge and understanding within a range of activities suitable for the full GCSE course as a performer. Usefulness of the Course for Further Education & Careers    

To develop practical skills and performance To enhance your CV with sport specific qualifications To develop your knowledge base and confidence to be able to assess full course GCSE PE To gain work within the leisure industry

Personal Qualities and Aptitudes Required    

Enthusiasm and willingness to study and revise for the theory components of the course Commitment to attend extra-curricular clubs Organisation with kit This is a one year single option programme open to anyone in Year 9, 10 and 11.

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NAME OF SUBJECT –Triple Science GCSE GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry and GCSE Physics

We also offer a Triple Science GCSE option. This is taken in Double GCSE time plus one option block in year eleven. Pupils need to opt for triple science at the start of year ten if they wish to take it as an option in year eleven. This is because triple science pupils work slightly differently from double scientists from the start of year ten.

Confident students may choose to stretch themselves further with the Triple Science award. This will result in pupils obtaining 3 Science GCSEs; one in Biology, one in Chemistry and one in Physics. Entry Requirements Triple Science is a challenging course requiring pupils to be self-motivated, interested and hard working. Pupils will need to be working at high level six or above in year nine to make a success of this highly popular course. Pupils who do not have a solid understanding of key stage three Science at level six or above often struggle to make good progress in triple science. Pupils should talk to their Science teacher if they are unsure of meeting the grade requirement. Course Content Pupils will learn the same curriculum as the double award students as well as an extension unit for each subject, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. The extension units in the Triple Science award cover complex topics such as biotechnology and control Systems in Biology, quantitative analysis and organic chemistry in Chemistry as well as radiation treatment and kinetic theory in Physics. Triple Science is not a required GCSE for studying A-Level Sciences. It is not generally recommended that a student take a triple science course without having first obtained a consistent level 6s or higher in Key Stage 3 tests. Assessment Methods Internal Controlled Assessments Pupils will sit controlled assessments in each subject: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. These make up 25% of their GCSE grade. Pupils plan and carry out an investigation. They then write up an analysis of their results. These are internal exams and are timetabled to best suit the ability and progress of the class. External Assessments Pupils’ knowledge of the content of their GCSE is examined with structured written papers. There are two tiers of entry – Higher and Foundation; the class teacher will advise pupils on the appropriate tier for them. There are three exam papers to sit, one exam each for Biology, Chemistry and Physics. External assessments are carried out at the end of the course in year 11 pupils will sit 9 exams in total, 3 for Biology, 3 for Chemistry and 3 for Physics.

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Work Related Courses/Foundation Learning For some students in Key Stage 4, taking a full portfolio of GCSE or Level 2 courses can be very daunting. Some students are just not ready for the intensity of GCSE with its terminal examinations and will be identified as benefitting from a Foundation Learning programme. Foundation Learners are defined as students who will are likely to be more successful on a range of courses covering Entry Level, Level 1 and Level 2. In addition they will often have greater success on non-GCSE courses such as BTEC, OCN or Cambridge Nationals. Whist the curriculum content of these courses is similar, the assessment methods are different. Continuous assessment with work completed in small units with immediate assessment is a characteristic of applied learning programmes along with a more practical approach and less written work. Examinations usually play a less significant role than in GCSE subjects. For Year 9 students we are able to offer an Outdoor Learning option leading to OCN qualifications at Entry Level l and Level 1. This course is based at Aylsham High School and is led by an outdoor learning specialist using the excellent facilities around the perimeter of our site. Students will build and maintain an outdoor environment whilst learning a range of skills. Sidestrand Hall School also offer a Level 1 course (2 year course over Years 10 and 11) covering elements of construction and motor vehicle engineering. With purpose built premises and modern resources Sidestrand Hall School, with the support of industry sector professionals, is able to offer an introductory course in construction, covering brick-laying and general building as well as motor vehicle engineering where students will learn the basics of service and repair to a range of motor vehicles. Students have an opportunity to experience both aspects of this course. Students taking up the option of the off-site course at Sidestrand Hall will s will take additional English and Maths in Year 10 giving greater curriculum time to these essential skills which will support the wider curriculum. To complete the Foundation Learner Programme students also take a Personal and Social Development (PSD) course during Year 10. This choice, therefore, takes up 3 of the available 6 option blocks.

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Outdoor Learning – Foundation Learners Option This a new course which is open to students who will follow a Foundation Learning programme during Years 9 and 10. The option follows the normal school timetable of 5 hours per week and takes place here on site but, unlike most Key Stage 4 courses, will be based outdoors. The course will be led by an outdoor learning specialist teacher. Using the outdoors is a great method of learning for many students, allowing them to develop personal skills such as team work and communication. This can lead to discovering other new skills and abilities that may not have been realised in conventional learning methods. This will help them to prepare for their future. Using the newly developed onsite facilities next to the playing fields and making the most of the recently refurbished garden area to the rear of the school, students will be involved in a range of activities that will not only improve their knowledge of woodland, wildlife and plant culture but will also enable them to develop their work skills and numeracy skills along with decision making and team building skills. In addition students undertake a wide range of off site visits to local organisations such as the National Trust, to gain real work experiences. This will be accredited through the Gateway Progression Suite of qualifications, allowing students to gain recognition for their work; they will also need to complete a portfolio to achieve this.

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NAME OF SUBJECT: EXTENDED PROJECTS (LEVEL 3) Level of Qualification

GCSE (graded A* to E) Equivalent to half a GCE and has weighting in terms of UCAS points Course of Study (including Homework) This course is a content free qualification- the learner is the leader of one’s own learning; working independently to plan, manage, complete and evaluate a single piece of work with their Projects teacher to guide and advise them. The course helps to support students with the transition to higher education or into the world of work. They provide opportunities for the development of critical, reflective, problem-solving and independent learning skills through the planning, research and evaluation of a self-selected project. The course gives students the chance to develop their knowledge and learn about topics that interest them and may not even be included on the current Curriculum. Examples from previous cohorts can be found below. Pupils will be expected to develop and finalize one of four options: 1. Dissertation (Extended essay on a topic of the student’s choice) E.g. ‘What is Dark Matter?’ ‘To what extent does human interference affect the breeding, feeding and migratory habits of the humpback whale?’ 2. Artefact (Design and make something, from art work to furniture!) E.g. ‘A government is not necessary for a peaceful world’: Design an illustrated collection to portray a fantasy world (using influences of J R Tolkien among others) 3. Performance (direct and perform a dramatic piece, a song etc.) E.g. The Tempest: How does Miranda’s character transformation in The Tempest relate to that of Juliet’s in Romeo and Juliet? 4. Investigation (predominantly mathematics or science based, an investigation is carried out based on a student’s own hypothesis) Homework is not set, but students are expected to plan work to be completed at home to contribute towards the project work. Personal Qualities and Aptitudes useful for this course

You must be an independent, able learner. Organizational skills and personal motivation are a must. This course is currently offered to year 11 students only. Pupils will be nominated by subject teachers based on their performance in their GCSEs (usually A*-B grade students), but students who show interest but have not been nominated will still be considered.

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Questions to consider before opting for this course

Am I responsible? Can I manage my own time effectively with little help from my teachers? Do I have a strong interest in a particular subject or topic that I would like to learn more about? Am I able to meet deadlines? Usefulness of the course for further education and careers The Extended Research Project qualification is already being recognised by universities, schools, colleges and students for the valuable skills it provides. It also allows you:

To further your independence To improve on organisational skills To improve your research skills To improve your ability to create and counter arguments To improve your understanding of your chosen topic, adding depth to your knowledge and understanding To give you the confidence to research and learn about academic topics independently To allow you to develop skills in preparation for higher education or future careers

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Summary of Options

Before you complete your choices sheet, here are a few pointers to guide your choices. Art (Fine Art) GCSE

Suitable for all learners but regular attendance will be essential, along with keeping up to date with homework (3hrs minimum a week).

Graphics GCSE

Graphics is a highly enjoyable course where students become thoroughly absorbed developing ideas using professional digital software. The course, however, is intense and in order to succeed, students are expected to put in a minimum of three hours homework a week and attend lunchtimes or after school to use specialist software. This course is not for the work shy!

Business Studies GCSE

This GCSE is for those students who prefer exams and have a REAL passion for looking at why businesses make certain decisions. Good literacy levels as well as an analytical approach is essential. Time management and a good work ethic are also needed.

. Catering GCSE

Suitable for all learners.

Computing GCSE

For students who enjoy logical thinking and maths and are interested in computer programming.

ICT GCSE

For students who want a GCSE programme in ICT.

Creative iMedia Cambridge National Build upon your success in IT year 8. Dance BTEC

For students with an interest in Performing Arts.

Design & Technology Resistant Materials GCSE

Combines the theory and practice of design and manufacture.

Resistant Materials Entry Level

Suitable for learners who are not yet working at GCSE level.

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Engineering GCSE

If you enjoy Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacture, electronics and metal working, and have a good eye for detail then you might like to choose GCSE Engineering. You must have a mind for safe working practices in a workshop setting and be able to work from detailed plans to produce engineered products within strict tolerances. You should also enjoy physics and maths which are an important part of engineering.

Textiles GCSE

Design and make within the clothing and fashion industries.

Drama GCSE

Regular attendance, working in groups and performing for an audience.

Level 2 Project and Duke of Edinburgh

Must attend all lessons and there will be some afterschool sessions which must be attended. Some payment involved. Must be independent learners for the project but must be able to work within groups for the Duke of Edinburgh award.

French GCSE

For those with a flair for language. L5+ literacy essential.

Geography GCSE

Investigate our world and the interactions between the human and physical. This is an intense course with a large amount of content to understand. It requires good literacy and numeracy skills. You must expect constant revision based homework during the course on top of examination question practise and research.

German GCSE

Literacy and an enjoyment of words are important. More suited for able linguists.

Hair & Beauty

Level 1 course in Hair & Beauty is ideal for anyone interested in a career in Hair & Beauty or just with an interest.

Health & Social Care Cambridge National

Some individual work and some group work. Regular attendance is important.

History GCSE

Learn from the mistakes of the past. You will need to have good literacy skills.

Music GCSE

You should be able to play an instrument and will need to perform to an audience.

Music BTEC

For those interested in performing, music technology, researching music careers and the all round musician. As one unit is Introducing Music Performance you must be able to sing or play an instrument to a reasonable standard.

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PE GCSE

Pupils will apply their knowledge of what constitutes a healthy body and lifestyle and the way in which their lifestyle and exercise impact on the body systems. Pupils will also be practically assessed in 4 sports and will complete a verbal exam on one sport. 60% practical based and 40% exam based. Pupils would ideally need to be playing sport at a school/club standard and be fully committed to the theoretical demands of the course.

Triple Science (Biology/ Chemistry/Physics GCSEs) For those aiming at ‘A’ Level sciences. L6+ science essential. Work Related Courses/ Foundation Learning

A range of courses with a focus on applying knowledge in a work placed setting.

Outdoor Learning

Foundation Learning course for those who enjoy working outside.

Extended Projects

Independent learners will enjoy the opportunity to take control of their own learning, developing skills in preparation for higher education/careers. This course is currently offered to year 11 students only. Pupils will be nominated by subject teachers based on their performance in their GCSEs (usually A*-B grade students), but students who show interest but have not been nominated will still be considered.

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