Ocean Climate products facilitated by COSPPac

Ocean Climate products facilitated by COSPPac Amanda Amjadali Bureau of Meteorology: Ocean Climate Manager (with thanks to Peter Dexter, Janita Pahal...
Author: Morgan Clark
2 downloads 0 Views 1MB Size
Ocean Climate products facilitated by COSPPac

Amanda Amjadali Bureau of Meteorology: Ocean Climate Manager (with thanks to Peter Dexter, Janita Pahalad, Claire Spillman, Luke Garde and Sheng Guo) 1 Image: Ocean Climate Section, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM)

What is COSPPac?  Climate and Ocean Support Program for the Pacific (COSPPac) is a proposal to be funded by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and implemented by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology o Component 1 - Climate and Ocean Monitoring and Prediction Project (COMP) • Consisting of the new Ocean Climate section and the next phase of the Pacific Islands – Climate Prediction Project (PI-CPP). PI-CPP has been running for 8 years and has provided a seasonal forecast tool for 10 of the Pacific Island countries as well as running several successful pilot projects around climate adaptation. o Component 2 - Sea Level Monitoring Project (SLM)

• The restructured South Pacific Sea Level Climate and Monitoring Project (SPSLCMP) with only the Sea level monitoring components (both in terms of data and real-time products) o Component 3 - Capacity Development & Communication (CDC) • A new component focussing on training, work attachments, capacity mapping, institutional strengthening, traditional knowledge and communication  Participating countries: Cook Islands, Fiji, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Republic of the Marshall 2 Islands, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

What is Ocean Climate and why is it important? It is impossible to monitor climate variability and change without taking into account how the ocean is behaving. Ocean climate at the Bureau refers to ocean products and services within a climate timescale. (i.e. Seasonal, annual, decadal etc) Products that fall within these time scales and that have been requested by PICs at the April 2010 SPSLCMP data workshop and the April 2011 COSPPac workshop are…. 3

Ocean Climate Products requested by PICs in April 2010 (SPSLCMP) Reconstructed time series of tidal gauge data o

Use the SPSLCMP sea level data in combination with other sources of sea level data (including tide gauges and satellite altimetry) in sea level reconstructions, with a view to providing maps of regional sea level change and anomalies over a variety of longer time and spatial scales than provided by the SPSLCMP observations alone. This will also better relate sea level rise Observations in the region to trends being reported in the literature and utilised in the workings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

4 Image: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) J Church, N White

Ocean Climate Products requested by PICs in April 2010 (SPSLCMP) Improved access to products o Data presented in maps rather than tables to make it easier to utilise; o Improved real time access to data and services to facilitate use; o Regular updating of products – including links to other data/services such as wave, BLUElink, etc.; o Interpretation / post analysis of unusual or extreme events, forecasting, ENSO and so on to understand local impacts. 5 Image: Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning Program (PACCSAP)

Ocean Climate Products requested by PICs in April 2010 (SPSLCMP) Island scale Variability – Augment existing stations in several key locations with additional sensors (wave / surface elevation sensors) to build understanding of island scale variability; – Links to regional wave climate data; – Use for hydrographical survey, island datum; – Tide predictions in more diverse locations; – Link SEAFRAME data to seasonal, ENSO, Survey to benchmarks and CGPS campaigns;

6

Ocean Climate Products requested by PICs in April 2010 (SPSLCMP) Analysis of other data – For example linking historical UHSLC data with SPSLCMP data for improved understanding and analysis of extreme events and possibly longer term sea level trends; – Link existing regional wave model products to SPSLCMP products to better determine combine impacts of related phenomena. 7 Image: Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research (CAWCR)

Ocean Climate Products requested by PICs in April 2011 (COSPPac) – Disaster Mitigation (Sea level rise, wind and waves, hazard mapping) – Climatology of epicentre and runups, sea level and wave climate – Climatology (BLUElink/BRAN, WaveWatchIII, WAM) – Dynamical sea level predictions and additional sea level information in SCOPIC – Sea level climatology in CliDe Image: Ocean Climate Section, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM)

8

Ocean Climate Products requested by PICs in April 2011 (COSPPac)  Extreme Ocean event (Sea Surface Temperature) o Coral bleaching  Tide Gauge, Altimetry, Reconstruction, and Climatology o Climatological verification of current sea level trends  Ocean Climate Data Applications (to be built in time and in partnership with the PICs)  Training in Ocean Climate Applications 9 Image: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) J Church, N White

Pacific Ocean Climate Web Portal – Proof of Concept

Here’s one we prepared earlier…

10

Pacific Ocean Climate Web Portal – Proof of Concept ENSO monitoring: Sub-surface temperature analysis, Nino and SOI

11 Image: Ocean Climate Section, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM)

Pacific Ocean Climate Web Portal – Possible Products BLUElink Products – currently exploring the IP constraints around data access

Sea Level Anomaly

Sea surface temperature and currents Image: Weather & Ocean Services, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM)

Salinity

12

Pacific Ocean Climate Web Portal – Possible Products Pacific Wave Climatology – Data Extraction Tool : noting the data period for the WAM model is < 10 yrs

13 Image: Ocean Climate Section, Bureau of Meteorology (BoM)

13

Marine Applications for Seasonal forecasting Coral bleaching risk The Great Barrier Reef Pacific Island Countries Commercial long-line fisheries Southern bluefin tuna

Use forecasts of  sea surface  temperature (SST)  anomalies  Operational &  experimental  products

Aquaculture Salmon farms in Tasmania Seabird colony management Phillip Island penguin colony 14 Slide: Claire Spillman. Images Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA), L Chambers, A Hobday

QUESTIONS?

My Details :

Amanda Amjadali Manager Ocean Climate Services Climate Information Services Australian Bureau of Meteorology P: +61 (03)9669 4448 E: [email protected] 15

Suggest Documents