NEW YEARS CELEBRATION

WEEKEND JAN. 2-3 2016 PAGE 1B NEW YEARS CELEBRATION By JON LANCE News-Telegram Media Editor [email protected] 2016 is going to be wonderful, I g...
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WEEKEND JAN. 2-3 2016 PAGE 1B

NEW YEARS CELEBRATION

By JON LANCE News-Telegram Media Editor [email protected]

2016 is going to be wonderful, I guarantee it! On Thursday evening family and friends gathered to eat, party and bring in the new year with style at my home in Emory. The result: amazing. New Years parties are always something special. Over the years, I have celebrated the holiday in New York, Denver, Pennsylvania, Germany and Texas. It always holds great expectations and fond memories. This year we celebrated at our home and it was so much fun. As always, we nailed all the New Years traditions to make sure 2016 is going to be the luckiest year of all. We had fireworks, champagne, ate black eyed peas, wore red underwear, gave toasts and watched the ball drop in New York City on television. Thursday was very special because

A night with family, friends and fireworks

so many things happened during 2015 to our family. My wife and I found out we were pregnant, welcomed old friends to live with us, quit the wedding business, mourned the passing of my grandfather and watched many new animal births on the farm. Both hard and wonderful, last year was one for the memory books. One of our traditions is watching my mother make hand-made pizza. As my mom flattens out the crust and adds all my favorite toppings, we always get to catch up with each others lives. For the fireworks show, it was majestic as always. We armed ourselves with a myriad of bottle rockets, roman candles and black cats. We even had an epic family roman candle fight that will go down in the history as both honorable and hilarious. Overall, I am so bless to celebrate the New Year in East Texas with my family and that is why this is definitely on my bucket list.

Fireworks

Jon Lance

East Texas Bucket List

Toasting the New Year

Pouring champagne

Making pizza

■ Classic Lanes, Sulphur Springs (Jon Lance) ■ Concert by the Lake, Rockwall (Butch Burney) ■ Fishing on the weekend, Sulphur Springs (Jon Lance) ■ Drag racing (Kerry Craig) ■ Caldwell Zoo, Tyler (Faith Huffman) ■ Reunions with friends (Butch Burney) ■ Shooting on the farm (Jon Lance) ■ Ghost Hunting tours in Jefferson, (Jon Lance) ■ High school football practice (Butch Burney) ■ Taking a stroll in Coleman Park (Jon Lance) ■ Meeting old friends in West Texas (Kerry Craig) ■ Texas Rangers game (Butch Burney) ■ Movie theater experience (Faith Huffman) ■ Raising pigs on the farm (Jon Lance) ■ TenFootDolf: the antidisc golf game (Butch Burney) ■ Lighting the Fires: A Lifetime of loving aeronautics (Kerry Craig) ■ Eastern Meditation: Bringing Zen to Sulphur Springs (Jon Lance) ■ Halloween parties (Butch Burney) ■ State Fair of Texas (Jon Lance) ■ Horror Movies (Jon Lance) ■ Amateur photography (Kerry Craig) ■ County fairs and festivals (Butch Burney) ■ North Pole of Texas (Faith Huffman) ■ Hopkins County historical markers (Butch Burney) ■ Christmas movies (Jon Lance) ■ Canton’s First Monday Trade Days (Butch Burney) ■ Nutcracker Ballet (Jon Lance) ■ New Years Party (Jon Lance)

NY ball drop

SOCIETY

2B — THE NEWS-TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend, Jan. 2-3, 2016

A NNIVERSARY Burgins celebrate golden anniversary

Society submission deadline is Wednesday at noon.

CLUB NEWS

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Alpha Delta Kappa holds socials

lpha Delta Kappa, Chapter RJ7284, met Tuesday, Dec. 8, in the home of Carolyn Rawson. She served finger foods and desserts. President Marilyn Tibbets called the meeting to order and everyone stood for the Opening Ritual, with eight members present. Marilyn received a letter from Dell D'Lizarraga (Xi Nu Iota) about presenting the award for Woman of the Year at the Chamber of Commerce Banquet to be held in a few months. Pam Hollingsworth has graciously accepted the honor of presenting the award. Our Christmas party will be held Thurs-

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day night, Dec. 10, at the home Sheila and Mike Boyd's country home for our "Country Christmas," which includes our spouses. Each member is to bring an ornament wrapped for our exchange and the spouses are to bring a gag gift to be exchanged. Each person was also to being a finger food. Carolyn Rawson read from the gray book. The program was given by Carolyn about the trip her and Tommy took with First Baptist Church to Branson, Mo. Our next meeting will be held on Jan. 12, in the home of Jimmie McIntire. Christmas Social

On Thursday, Dec. 10, we had our Christmas social in the home of Sheila and Mike Boyd. They have a lovely new home in the country. The women brought ornaments to exchange and the spouses brought gag gifts to exchange. Finger foods were enjoyed by all. Everyone enjoyed being outside by the fireplace. Those in attendance were: Don and Cathy Babb, Sheila and Mike Boyd, Pam Hollingsworth, Jimmie and Rae McIntire, Sylvia and Howard Mohler, Carolyn and Tommy Rawson, Marilyn and Phil Tibbets, Jan and John Trimble, and Linda and John Vaughn.

ET Genealogical Society meeting Jan. 9

he East Texas Genealogical Society's monthly meeting will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 9, at Taylor Auditorium in Tyler Public Library, 201 South College Ave. in Tyler. The program will be "Orphan Train Riders: Tracks to Texas & Beyond, All Aboard 1854 to 1929" by Paula Perkins. Between 1850 and 1930, over 200,000 children were relocated from the East to the West coasts on trains. Some were young enough that they lost knowledge of their families, ages, and even their names. In many cases siblings were separated. Paula Perkins will explain the origins of the Orphan Trains and how to research your ancestors if they were riders on one of the Orphan Trains. She will tell us about organizations ad websites that can help you do research as well as the DNA projects that may help connect your family even if the research has not. She is a sixth generation native Texan,

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oe Bob and Linda Burgin celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary this week at the Sulphur Springs Country Club. They were married on Wednesday, Dec. 29, 1965, at Gafford Chapel. Celebrating with them were their children Brad and Julie, Corey and Teffany, as well as their five grandsons and many family and friends.

COLLEGE NEWS

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Travis Hicks receives degree from Dallas Baptist University

ravis Keith Hicks, a Sulphur Springs High School graduate, graduated with a Master of Business Administration in business communication from Dallas Baptist University during winter commencement, which was held on Dec. 18. Hicks was among the 515 graduates receiving associate, undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral degrees from DBU. Of those graduating, 17 received associate degrees, 273 received bachelor’s degrees, 212 earned master’s degrees, and 13 earned doctoral degrees.

New Year’s resolutions for business travelers

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By BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel Editor

or some business travelers, the start of a new year offers an opportunity to take stock of ways to improve travel habits. Here are some ideas for resolutions from and for business travelers in 2016.

MAKE TIME FOR FUN Kat Cohen, a university admissions counselor and founder of IvyWise, hopes to build in "time to experience one event that is for pleasure on each business trip," even if it's "just a meal or one museum." Cheryl Andrews, president of Cheryl Andrews Marketing Communications, also hopes to "work at least one event of culture or beauty" into every trip. Leon Rbibo, who frequently travels to Tahiti, Japan and Hong Kong, says one of his resolutions for 2016 is to "extend my arrival and departure by one day each, landing a day early and staying a day later" in order to "take the time to enjoy some of the places I visit."

KEEP CALM AND STAY FIT Jamie Sigler, founding partner of J Public Relations, based in San Diego, plans to "leave time to listen to a daily meditation to keep calm and carry on when I am traveling for work. Two apps I'm loving are buddhify and Smiling Mind." Sigler's colleague at J Public Relations, Ali Lundberg, pledges to pack her running shoes so she can explore "urban trails in 2016."

"With not a lot of time to explore a destination during business travel, and the desire to get my morning fitness routine checked off the list, combining the two is at the top of my resolutions list," Lundberg said.

CHANGE UP YOUR DINNER PLANS, CUT OUT THE SNACKS Jared Blank, chief marketing officer of Deal News, a shopping comparison site based in Huntsville, Alabama, says travelers who frequent the same cities again and again for work "tend to fall into a rut where they eat at the same restaurants every time they go. But for the new year make a resolution to avoid the same places you've always gone." Gayle B. MacIntyre of Global Ink Communications says that "as a frequent business traveler who works in the hospitality industry, my resolution for 2016 is to cut out the peanuts, pretzels and Biscoff cookies. Arriving at a destination sans the salt and sugar has got to be a better and healthier way to arrive energized."

DON'T RUSH CONNECTING FLIGHTS It might seem counterintuitive to those who hate hanging around airports, but Pamela Wagner pledges to build in three to four hours between flights as a way to cut stress. "Why? I can absolutely calmly go into one of the lounges and enjoy all their facilities, and have a good two to three hours of concentrated, uninterrupted work," said Wagner.

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involved in family history research for more than 30 years and a professional genealogical consultant, lecturer and instructor of genealogy classes. She is currently employed as assistant head of access and delivery services and multimedia supervision for the Eugene McDermott Library at the University of Texas at Dallas Perkins is the Texas State Genealogical Society District 10 representative; Collin County Genealogical Society- second vice-president of membership, past president, administrator of the Orphan Train & DNA Projects; co-administrator of the Perkins and Cook DNA Surname Projects; served on the Texas Heritage Online users group with the University of North Texas and the Texas State Library. She previously served as executive vicepresident lectures/fundraising for Dallas Genealogical Society; Peters Colony Historical Society president, executive vicepresident of Clayton Library Friends; and

was appointed multiple terms to Collin County Historical Commission, serving on the Cemetery and Historical Marker Committees. She is also editor of Collin County Genealogical Society’s eNewsletter; has authored several articles in genealogical and historical journals; TXGenWeb website creator and coordinator; successfully accomplished research in northern, southern and national U.S. repositories. She is adjunct instructor of Genealogical Houston Community College; and is a past coordinator and presenter for Dallas, Texas, local PBS station community outreach program in conjunction with PBS series “Ancestors”. ETGS meetings are free and open to the public. For more information,visit www.etgs.org, or contact Scott Fitzgerald, first vice-president and programs committee chair, at [email protected] or 903-539-5572.

End of meat? Startups seek meat alternatives for the masses

EW YORK (AP) — Patrick Brown is on an improbable mission: Make a burger Americans love, minus the meat. Veggie patties have been around for decades, but Brown and others want to make foods without animal products that look, cook and taste like the real thing — and can finally appeal to the masses. "We are not making a veggie burger. We're creating meat without using animals," said Brown, a former Stanford scientist who has been scanning plants in search of compounds that can help recreate meat. Brown's company, Impossible Foods, is part of a wave of startups aiming to wean Americans off foods like burgers and eggs, and their efforts are attracting tens of millions of dollars from investors. The goal is to lessen the dependence on livestock for food, which they say isn't as healthy, affordable or environmentally friendly as plant-based alternatives. The challenge is that most Americans happily eat meat and eggs. That means that, without a breakthrough, those seeking to upend factory farming risk becoming footnotes in the history of startups. To understand the difficulty of their task, consider the transformation raw chicken undergoes when cooked. It starts as a slimy, unappetizing blob, then turns into a tender piece of meat.

LEARNING TO MIMIC NATURE

In its office in Southern California, Beyond Meat works on "chicken" strips made with pea and soy proteins that have been sold at places like Whole Foods since 2012. But founder Ethan Brown concedes the product needs work. To give the "meat" its fat, for instance, canola oil is evenly mixed throughout the product. "That's not really how it works in an animal," said Brown, a vegan. "The fat can be a sheath on tendons." To form the strips, a mixture is pressed through a machine that forms and sets the product's texture with heating and cooling chambers. The method isn't new in the world of fake meats, but the company says it fine-tuned the process to deliver a more realistic offering. Brown dismisses the idea that fake meat might weird people out and says it's a "desirable evolution." "It's like moving from the horse-drawn carriage to the automobile, or the landline to the iPhone," he said. But Beyond Meat isn't quite there yet;

The Huffington Post described the strips as having an "unpleasant" taste that inhabits a "strange territory between meat and vegetable." At Impossible Foods, the patty is made by extracting proteins from foods like spinach and beans, then combining them with other ingredients. The company, which has about 100 employees, expects the product to be available in the latter half of next year, initially through a foodservice operator. Few have tasted it, but the vision continues to gain traction. In October, Impossible Foods said it raised $108 million in funding, on top of its previous $74 million. Among its investors are Bill Gates, Google Ventures and Horizons Ventures.

CULTURING MEAT, JUST LIKE YOGURT

Another startup isn't totally ditching the cow. With $15.5 million in funding, Modern Meadow in New York City takes cells from a cow through a biopsy and cultures them to grow into meat. At a conference in February, company founder Andras Forgacs likened the process to culturing yogurt or brewing beer. "This is an extension of that," he said. Modern Meadow doesn't have a product on the market yet either. The company says it doesn't necessarily want to replicate steaks and burgers, and gave a hint of the type of foods it might make by presenting "steak chips" for attendees at a small conference last year. Only about 200 people have tried the chips, which Forgacs describes as "crispy, crunchy beef jerky." Citing the demand for more openness about how food is made, he sees a day when people tour meat plants, as they do with breweries. "There could be your friendly neighborhood meat brewery," Forgacs said.

BANNING THE WORD 'VEGAN'

In San Francisco, Hampton Creek's mission is to replace the eggs in products without anyone noticing. In trying to appeal to the mainstream, cofounder and CEO Josh Tetrick has a simple rule. "Number one, never use the word 'vegan,'" he said. To avoid perceptions its eggless spread Just Mayo won't taste good, Hampton Creek even removed the V-word from the label. Tetrick says what makes the product different is that it tastes better

and costs less — not that it's made with a protein from a Canadian yellow pea instead of eggs. "The egg-free thing is almost irrelevant," he said. Swapping out a single ingredient in a product may make it easier for people to swallow change. It may also make change simpler to achieve; Just Mayo's consistency and taste are similar to mayonnaise. The product, which is available at retailers including Target and WalMart, is gaining enough traction that the American Egg Board, which is responsible for slogans like the "Incredible, Edible Egg," sees it as a "major threat," according to emails made public through a records request. So far, Hampton Creek has attracted $120 million in funding. It continues to screen plants for compounds that can help replace eggs in recipes and plans to eventually introduce a scrambled-egg product.

ON THE CUSP OF SOMETHING BIG?

For those looking to lessen the reliance on animals for food, there are encouraging signs all around. Last year, Pinnacle Foods, the maker of Hungry-Man dinners, paid $154 million to acquire Gardein, which makes frozen veggie patties, nuggets and crumbles. Pinnacle CEO Robert Gamgort said he thinks meat alternatives are in the "early stages of a macro trend," similar to the way soy and almond milk changed the dairy category. But for now, vegetarian products remain a niche market. And even if people cut back on meat and eggs for health, environmental or animal welfare reasons, they might not want literal replacements. Morningstar, a longtime maker of vegetarian products owned by Kellogg, says people are becoming more accepting of vegetables as main ingredients. As such, it wants to evolve from a maker of meat substitutes to a brand known for its "veggie cuisine," such as bowls with brown rice and black beans. Yves Potvin, Gardein's founder, also thinks veggie alternatives don't have to replicate meat, so long as they taste good. It's why Gardein's products are shaped to be reminiscent of meat, but don't try to mimic their exact flavor and texture. "What people like is the experience," Potvin said. "They like the memory."

THE NEWS-TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend, January 2-3, 2016 — 3B

Happy New Year from your Extension staff JOHANNA HICKS

· Annual Leadership Advisory Board Banquet preparations · Annual Holiday Program goody bag preparations, registration and distribution of materials · Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes and Cooking Well with Diabetes registration, tray preparations, evaluation implementation · Ocean Spray employee health fair · 55+ Health Fair · District 4-H Food Show · 4-H Foods Project meetings · Administrative duties Approximately 3,500 contacts were made by volunteers in 2015. In addition, the “Volunteer Connection” newsletter helps everyone stay upto-date on volunteer opportunities and accomplishments. Updates to the Master Wellness Volunteer training materials are currently in the works and will be rolled out in February, so if you are interested in becoming a Master Wellness Volunteer for Hopkins County, let me know.

Hopkins County Extension Agent Family and Consumer Sciences

A new year has begun, and the old year is gone. We all have new challenges, but also new blessings coming in 2016. So, Happy New Year’s greetings to you! I want to share the 5th and final 2015 program summary, and then no more (at least until December!) Today’s focus will be on the Master Wellness Volunteer Program. Finding reliable resources of health and wellness information can be a challenge. Since 1906, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has provided Texans with guidance in various health areas and is now training volunteers to provide more communities with the education and tools needed for healthy living. The Master Wellness Volunteer initiative is a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service program that provides volunteers with 40 hours of training in health, food safety, and nutrition education. In return, the volunteers agree to give back 40 hours of service. The volunteer opportunities are diverse — giving presentations for local community groups, assisting with periodic cooking schools, distributing information at health fairs, serving as judges at local and district 4-H events, and much more. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has many programs for everyday folks to deliver to anyone. Master Wellness Volunteers can help teach classes to any age group about the importance of eating fruits and vegetables. They can help implement diabetes education programming, such as the Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes series that is coming up in the spring. They can serve as Walk Across Texas site managers. Love to cook? Master Wellness Volunteers can assist in providing healthy recipe demonstrations for people at local organization meetings, businesses, or clinics. The opportunities are endless. Being a Master Wellness Volunteer doesn’t have

Master Wellness Volunteers assisted with the dairy nutrition segment of the 2015 Ag-in-theClassroom, reaching approximately 1,000 fourth grade students from Hopkins, Rains, Franklin and Delta counties. to mean getting up in front of people and teaching a class. It can also mean helping with administrative tasks, such as helping to register people for programming, entering important data into computers that is gathered from AgriLife Extension programs, collating handouts, assisting with food demonstration tray preparations, and designing newsletters or flyers. Hopkins County has ten trained Master Wellness Volunteers. A newsletter, “Volunteer Connection,” is sent out six or more times per year to keep in touch with volunteers and to announce opportunities to assist with various events and programs. Volunteers are recognized annually at the Exten-

sion Leadership Advisory Board banquet, as well as at each event in which they participate. Their activities are also highlighted in the “Volunteer Connection” newsletter. Volunteers assisted with the following events in 2015: Kids’ Safe Saturday Fair · Sulphur Springs Farmers’ Market — Tomato Festival · Kids’ Camp: Fun, Food, Fitness · Multi-county Fabulous Fall Friday cooking and nutrition program · Fall Festival Creative Arts Contest · Senior Citizen’s Expo · Ag-in-the-Classroom planning sessions

Twogether in Texas Marriage Education Workshop Just a little “teaser” about the next marriage education workshop — scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 23, 8:30 a.m. at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service — Hopkins County Office, 1200-B W. Houston, Sulphur Springs. This is designed for engaged or married couples, and will provide a fun, interactive experience! Engaged couples will receive a certificate at the end of the workshop to save $60 upon applying for a marriage license. Call 903-885-3443 to sign up. Closing Thought The thoughts we choose to think are the tools we use to paint the canvas of our lives. — Louise Hay Johanna Hicks Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Family & Consumer Sciences 1200-B W. Houston P.O.Box 518 Sulphur springs, TX 75483 903-885-3443 – phone 903-439-4909 – Fax [email protected]

With intensive rain and wintery weather, 2015 is coming to an end MARIO A. VILLARINO Hopkins County Extension Agent Agriculture and Natural Resources

Please allow me to wish you a happy 2016 on behalf of the Hopkins County Extension Office staff and volunteers. As we get ready to 2016, our 4-H and FFA NETLA showers of poultry must get ready for birds by January 14, 2016. 1. OBSERVE ALL SHOW RULES AND REGULATIONS from NETLA governing the broiler show. NETLA poultry show allow the exhibition of both pullets and cockerals. 2. Raised poultry only provided by NETLA superintendent. 3. Use top-quality feeds. 4. Follow recommended management practices during the entire brooding and growing period. 5. Keep careful records of all expenses and receipts. 6. Cull birds closely and select the show entry properly. Broiler projects are popular with 4-H and FFA members and are an integral part of most youth livestock shows.

NETLA show limits the number of chicks ordered to 25 or 50 per exhibitor. Birds not shown can be slaughtered for home use or sold locally to special markets. Expensive housing and equipment are not necessary. However, a clean, dry structure that can be well ventilated, a brooder or heat lamps to warm the chicks and feeding and watering equipment are needed. Provide at least 2 square feet of floor space per broiler. Openings on three sides of the building provide plenty of fresh air for the birds. Plastic sheeting can be used to close sides during brooding and in cold weather. Make certain the concrete or dirt floor is at least 6 inches above ground level to prevent flooding.The roof overhang should be sufficient to effectively protect against blowing rain. Before chicken arrive Clean and disinfect the poultry house, feeders and waterers at least two weeks before the chicks arrive. Wash the house down with soap and water. Then spray a commercial disinfectant labeled for use in poultry houses. Be prepared for the chicks 2 days in advance. Put at least 4 inches of litter on the floor of the cleaned disinfected house. Wood shavings, cane fiber, coarse dry sawdust, peanut hulls or rice hulls make good litter. Hay makes very poor litter. Keep all sticks, boards and sharp objects

away from the broiler house. Construct a cardboard brooder guard (brooder circle) to keep chicks near heat, water and feed. The brooder guard should be 14 to 18 inches high and must be a minimum of 5 feet in diameter for 50 chicks. When chicks are 7 days old, remove the guard and allow them full freedom of the pen. Electric heat lamps (infrared bulbs) are good heat sources for brooding chicks. Two 125watt bulbs per 50 chicks are recommended. Make certain lamps are secured so they cannot fall to the litter and create a fire hazard. The lamps should hang so that the bottoms are 18 to 24 inches from the litter. Lamps can be raised or lowered depending on temperature conditions. Place waterers a good distance from the lamps to prevent splashing water from cracking the hot bulbs. If a gas or an electric hover-type brooder is used, it should operate at a temperature of approximately 92 degrees to 95 degrees F. Gradually reduce the temperature 5 degrees each week until the birds are 3 to 4 weeks old or until the house temperature reaches 70 degrees F. When chicks are comfortable, they will bed down in a semicircle around the perimeter of the heat zone. If cold, chicks will crowd near the heat source. If too warm, they will move to the outer limits of the brooder guard. Chilling can stunt chicks. In cold weather the

heat source should be turned on 48 hours before chicks arrive to adequately heat the litter. After birds reach 4 weeks of age, the ideal temperature range is 60 to 75 degrees F. When winter temperatures permit, the house should be partially opened to improve airflow and remove moisture. Supplemental heat may be needed when the outside temperature is low. In hot weather, fans or evaporative coolers are used to cool birds more than 4 weeks old. Provide all-night light for broilers and roasters. Twenty-four-hour lighting (natural and artificial) improves feathering and increases weight, especially during the summer months. Hang a 40watt bulb at least 6 feet above birds after removing heat lamps. TO ALL NETLA EXHIBITORS: NETLA Participant/Parent Meeting - This meeting is very beneficial to all exhibitors, especially to those who are showing for the 1st time! Sunday, January 10th – 2:00 p.m. at the Extension Office (conference room in back). Kevin Gibson, NETLA President and the different specie superintendents will be there to answer your questions and give information about the show and sale! For more information on this or any other agricultural topic please call the Hopkins County Extension Office at 903-885-3443 or email me at [email protected]

Study: Some cardiac arrest victims ignore warning symptoms WASHINGTON (AP) — Sudden cardiac arrest may not always be so sudden: New research suggests a lot of people may ignore potentially life-saving warning signs hours, days, even a few weeks before they collapse. Cardiac arrest claims about 350,000 U.S. lives a year. It's not a heart attack but worse: The heart abruptly stops beating, its electrical activity knocked out of rhythm. CPR can buy critical time, but so few patients survive that it's hard been to tell if the longtime medical belief is correct that it's a strike with little or no advance warning. An unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest in Portland, Oregon, for over a decade got around that roadblock, using interviews with witnesses, family and friends after patients collapse and tracking down their medical records. About half of middle-aged patients for whom symptom information could be found had experienced warning signs, mostly chest pain or shortness of breath, in the month before suffering a cardiac arrest, researchers reported Monday. The research offers the possibility of one day preventing some cardiac arrests if doctors could figure out how to find and treat the people most at risk. "By the time the 911 call is made, it's much too late for at least 90 percent of people," said Dr. Sumeet Chugh of the CedarsSinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, who led the study

reported in Annals of Internal Medicine. "There's this window of opportunity that we really didn't know existed." Importantly, a fraction of patients considered their symptoms bad enough to call 911 before they collapsed, and they were most likely to survive. That's a reminder to the public not to ignore possible signs of heart trouble in hopes they're just indigestion, said University of Pittsburgh emergency medicine specialist Dr. Clifton Callaway, who wasn't involved in Monday's study but praised it. "Chest pain, shortness of breath — those are things you should come in the middle of the night to the emergency department and get checked out," said Callaway, who chairs the American Heart Association's emergency care committee. "We strongly recommend you don't try to ride it out at home." Previous heart attacks, coronary heart disease, and certain inherited disorders that affect heartbeat all can increase the risk of sudden cardiac arrest. People known to be at high risk may receive an implanted defibrillator to shock the heart back into rhythm. But cardiac arrest is such a public health problem that the Institute of Medicine last summer urged a national campaign to teach CPR, so more bystanders know how to help. Monday's data from the Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study examined records for nearly 1,100 people ages 35 to 65 who suffered a cardiac arrest

between 2002 and 2012. For about a quarter of patients, researchers could find no information about whether they experienced symptoms — making it impossible to say just how common warning signs really are. But of the remaining 839 patients, half had evidence of at least one symptom in the previous month, the study found. For most, the symptoms began within 24 hours of their collapse, although some came a week before and a few up to a month. Chest pain was most common in men, while women were more likely to experience shortness of breath. Other symptoms included fainting and heart palpitations. Chugh had no way to determine symptom severity. But only 19 percent of patients called 911 about symptoms, mostly people with already diagnosed heart disease or who were having recurrent symptoms. Their survival was 32 percent, compared with 6 percent for other patients. Partly that's because a fifth of those 911 callers had their cardiac arrest in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. Stay tuned: The study is just the start of more research to better predict who is at highest risk for cardiac arrest, and determine how to target them without panicking people who'd do fine with general heart disease treatment, Chugh cautioned.BC-US-MED-Cardiac Arrest,1st LdWritethru/676 Eds: Adds photo. With AP Photos. Study: Some cardiac arrest vic-

tims ignore warning symptoms LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Sudden cardiac arrest may not always be so sudden: New research suggests a lot of people may ignore potentially life-saving warning signs hours, days, even a few weeks before they collapse. Cardiac arrest claims about 350,000 U.S. lives a year. It's not a heart attack but worse: The heart abruptly stops beating, its electrical activity knocked out of rhythm. CPR can buy critical time, but so few patients survive that it's hard been to tell if the longtime medical belief is correct that it's a strike with little or no advance warning. An unusual study that has closely tracked sudden cardiac arrest in Portland, Oregon, for over a decade got around that roadblock, using interviews with witnesses, family and friends after patients collapse and tracking down their medical records. About half of middle-aged patients for whom symptom information could be found had experienced warning signs, mostly chest pain or shortness of breath, in the month before suffering a cardiac arrest, researchers reported Monday. The research offers the possibility of one day preventing some cardiac arrests if doctors could figure out how to find and treat the people most at risk. "By the time the 911 call is made, it's much too late for at

least 90 percent of people," said Dr. Sumeet Chugh of the CedarsSinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, who led the study reported in Annals of Internal Medicine. "There's this window of opportunity that we really didn't know existed." Importantly, a fraction of patients considered their symptoms bad enough to call 911 before they collapsed, and they were most likely to survive. That's a reminder to the public not to ignore possible signs of heart trouble in hopes they're just indigestion, said University of Pittsburgh emergency medicine specialist Dr. Clifton Callaway, who wasn't involved in Monday's study but praised it. "Chest pain, shortness of breath — those are things you should come in the middle of the night to the emergency department and get checked out," said Callaway, who chairs the American Heart Association's emergency care committee. "We strongly recommend you don't try to ride it out at home." Previous heart attacks, coronary heart disease, and certain inherited disorders that affect heartbeat all can increase the risk of sudden cardiac arrest. People known to be at high risk may receive an implanted defibrillator to shock the heart back into rhythm. But cardiac arrest is such a public health problem that the Institute of Medicine last summer urged a national campaign to teach CPR, so more bystanders know how to help. Monday's data from the Ore-

gon Sudden Unexpected Death Study examined records for nearly 1,100 people ages 35 to 65 who suffered a cardiac arrest between 2002 and 2012. For about a quarter of patients, researchers could find no information about whether they experienced symptoms — making it impossible to say just how common warning signs really are. But of the remaining 839 patients, half had evidence of at least one symptom in the previous month, the study found. For most, the symptoms began within 24 hours of their collapse, although some came a week before and a few up to a month. Chest pain was most common in men, while women were more likely to experience shortness of breath. Other symptoms included fainting and heart palpitations. Chugh had no way to determine symptom severity. But only 19 percent of patients called 911 about symptoms, mostly people with already diagnosed heart disease or who were having recurrent symptoms. Their survival was 32 percent, compared with 6 percent for other patients. Partly that's because a fifth of those 911 callers had their cardiac arrest in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. Stay tuned: The study is just the start of more research to better predict who is at highest risk for cardiac arrest, and determine how to target them without panicking people who'd do fine with general heart disease treatment, Chugh cautioned.

4B - THE NEWS TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend, January 02-03, 2016

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Notices

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Help Wanted

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BAHENA CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, Inc. needs 25 temporary/full-time Concrete workers/finishers. $14.75 hr and $22.13 hr OT M-F 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM from 3/1/16 to 11/30/16. 3 month(s) experience required and minimum OTJ training provided. Pour, smooth, finish concrete and set forms. Must be able to stand on feet for long hours, and lift 50 lbs multiple times daily. job location in Winnsboro TX No drop ins please. Possibility of performance based raise. Transportation provided to jobsite from central location Must pass employer paid post hire drug test. Pay is weekly. Please inquire about the job opportunity or send applications, indications of availability, and/or resumes directly to: Texas Workforce Commission, 1101 Resource Dr., Plano, TX 75074 469- 229-0099 or 8916 Palacios Cove, Plano, TX 75025-Refer to job order # TX2879325. Transportation (including meals and to the extent necessary – lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, at its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employment period or is dismissed early by employer. Employer provided tools, supplies and equipment required to perform the job at no charge. Employer guarantees to offer work for hours equal to at least 3/4 of the workdays in each 12week period of the total employment period.

Help Wanted

021

Business Services

012

H & S HOUSE Leveling: Foundation repair. 25yrs. Experience. CARPENTER ENTERPRISES Free Estimates. 903-784-1849, ASPHALT and concrete, main903-782-4347. tenance and repairs, seal coating, striping, crack filling, patching, overlays, power-washing 903- DOZER SERVICE. LARGE or small. Ponds and brush. 903-335439-7666. 1735.

CUT TREES, TEAR down houses, Mow/Shred yards/lots, haul hay square/round, fence rows, track hoe service Call 214429-5287

Business Opp.

019

ATTENTION!! FOR YOUR PROTECTION, PLEASE INVESTIGATE ADVERTISERS UNDER THIS CLASSIFICASCOTT'S LAWN SERVICE TION BEFORE INVESTING need someone you can trust to MONEY! mow lots, storage units, etc Call Scott 903-850-3466 IT'S ILLEGAL FOR companies doing business by phone to PORTABLE BUILDING promise you a loan and ask you MOVING Company & Local to pay for it before they deliver. Moving Company, All size For more information, call toll buildings. Move any distance. free 1-877-FTC HELP. A public 903-439-7666. service message from The News Telegram and the Federal Trade NEALS HANDYMAN SER- Commission. VICES. Specializing in small 021 remodeles, painting, drywall, Help Wanted tape, bed, texture, ceramic tile, custom ADA wheelchair ramps JUST A $1.00 Now taking appliand decks, tear outs/ haul offs. cations for full time employment. Free estimates in area. Call Competitive weekly pay. No truck unloading. Apply in person Jeramiah 903-439-7009. at 1402 Mockingbird Lane, Suite C, Sulphur Springs. CDL DRIVER WANTED. OTR Hauling milk, Excellent Pay 903-485-3095.

CDL MANUFACTERED HOME driver needed. 214-808-9024.

BOAT/RV STORAGE. EXTENDED length for fifth

Pets

046

041

HAPPY JACK MITEX: Kills ear mites on contact on dogs AND cats! Atwoods of Sulphur Springs (903-885-2029) (kennelvax.com)

LOOKING FOR A federal job? The Career American Connection is the government's official listing of federal job vacancies. For free current information on employment opportunities, call Career American Connections, 478-757-3000.

LOW COST SPAY & Neuter Program & Vaccination Clinic. Call HCAPL 903-439-2953. Land for Lease

042

QUARTER ACRE LOT on Lake Fork. $5,900cash price or $91/month. 903-878-7265.

Rentals/Lease Property044

CDL DRIVER NEEDED, grain hauler, great pay, home weekends. 903-335-2066. Hay & Grain

029

HAY FOR SALE $30 per bale. 903-648-2325 or !!! SELF-STORAGE !!! Man903-243-2501. ager living on premises. All sizes, climate control units, conHOPKINS COUNTY MIX 30. crete, fenced. 24 hr. Boat & RV The High Energy liquid cattle storage. Southside of I-30 at RR feed. 16% protein, 10% fat. 903track. 885-6111. 348-8000. On-site pick up or delivery. mix30.com

B&B RENTALS. TWO locations to serve you. Fenced, locked entrance. Manager on-site. 903885-7490. 1st full month free!

AVAILABLE DAILY. I-30 STORAGE. (I-30 West.) Lighted and locked, gated with code entry. 903-243-3324, 903-885-0770.

Garage Sales

Mail Resume to: C/O Box A511 The News Telegram PO Box 598 Sulphur Springs, Tx 75482

Apartments

COVERED RV PARKING, manager on duty, gated facility, electric available. Landmark Storage. 903-885-0033.

POOLMAN: EQUIPMENT REPAIR, pool cleaning year round. Call 903-513-2445.

SHOWERS DOZER SERVICE. Small timber, dirtwork, BOAT STORAGE: 24 hour pools dug, backhoe work,$80/hr. 4hr minimum. 903-243-2232. access. Self Storage, 885-6111.

037

wheel hook-ups. Manager on duty. Dog on duty at night. Self Storage 885-6111.

TILL GARDENS, MOW lots and pastures, Robert Mercer 903-885-4152.

WHEN YOU NEED Something Done, call Ken & Son's. Free Estimates. Have junk to haul? Trees to cut? We'll remove almost Anything! 903-885-5115, 903438-9533.

Travel Trailers

031

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY Hwy 19 South 6miles, Corner CR 1170, Bicycle, parts new & used, house full, collectables. 8:30dark.

2BR/1.5BA STUDIO. $525/MO, $250/dep. Plano St. Call 903-440-0808.

QUIET, PEACEFUL LIVING! 1Bedroom; w/d connections, kitchen appliances, water paid, on-site manager. Call 903-8851077, Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 9-12. Easy Street Apartments.

QUAIL RIDGE APARTMENTS 1bd/1ba $375-$400 2bd/1ba $475-$500 2bd/1.5ba $550 2bd/2ba $550-$575 3bd/2ba $650-675 Water, Trash, and Sewer paid.CH/A. Refrigerator, Stove, and Dishwasher included. Mngr and Maint on site, 24hr maintenance. Pet Friendly. Call or visit us today 903-885-4231 or check us out online @ www.quailridgecommunity.ne

LANDMARK SELF-STORAGE. CLIMATE & nonclimate COMING SOON!!! units: gated & coded access. 275 1 Bedroom 1 Bath $685 Hillcrest S. 903-885-0033. 2 Bedroom 1 Bath $765 Houses For Rent 045 2 Bedroom 2 Bath $805 Furnished with: NICE 3/BR 2/BA, CH/A, 2 liv- Stove, Fridge w/ice maker, ing rooms, country. Microwave & Dishwasher $1400/month $500/deposit. Washer & Dryer Connections References. Serious inquires only. Gated Community 903-885-3955. Resort Style Pool 24 Hour Fitness Center 3BR/1 BA in sulphur Springs, Onsite Laundry Facility carport 903-439-7548. Call 903.885.3300 for more 4/BR 2.5/BA, JACUZZI, large information or visit Master, Carport, CH/A, 1108 www.timbercreekapartmenthomes .com Lemon Dr. 903-348-3021. ARK-TEX APARTMENTS: Available Dec.15th. Apartments for rent. 1BR effi2BR/2BA, BRICK HOME in ciencies. $475/mo, utilities paid. Arbala. $700/month 972-369-0177. $700/deposit. 972-814-0929. BRITTANY SQUARE APARTMENTS PRIVATE ROOM FOR Rent. Quiet Garden Living Day, week, month, year. Meals, Close to Restaurants and Shoplaundry & housekeeping. Call ping Laura 509-592-6088. Call about our Move-In Specials PRIVATE HOUSE FOR 2BR/1BA and 1BR/1BA! Seniors Lakeside, fish, garage, 903 885 7041 2/2, bill included, Call Laura www.brittanysq.com 509-592-6088. Duplexes 047 CAMERON SQUARE 2BR/ 2BR/1BA, TOWNHOUSE 2BA, quadplex, appliances fur$625/ month, $500/ deposit. nished, $700/ month, $500/ 1249 Main 903-348-4291. deposit. 903-348-2625. Apartments

046

PINE MEADOW APARTMENTS. Very Nice 1-2BR, 1BA, small and large efficiency. All bills paid plus cable. Social Security recipient no dep. required. Ark Tex welcomed. 539 Bellview St. 903-365-2764. 903951-1404. 903-335-0615.

FOR RENT: VERY nice, fenced backyard, 2/BR, 2/BA quadplex, includes refrig., dw, oven & micro. landlord maintains yard & pays water. $650/month $400/deposit. 903-885-6214.

DUPLEX FOR RENT. 2BR/1BA 1 Car Garage, CH/A, 2/BR 2/BA ALL appliances, Appliances furnished. $350 including washer/dryer deposit. $550 month. 705 Kasie. $695/month $250 deposit. 903-945-2622. westoakapt.com 903-885-3505

THE NEWS TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend , January 02-03, 2016 - 5B

Business Property

048

Land For Sale

053

Homes For Sale

057

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE for rent, $300/month includes all utilities except telephone. Located in Windsor Plaza, 101 Bill Bradford Rd, Ste#25. Call 903-885-2480 for more information. 2-3 ACRE TRACTS restricted to New Double Wide or New Construction. Extra acreage available. South part of Hopkins County. SSISD $18,750. Owner Financing Available! 903-3481052.

TO C NICE Photos of Homes on acreage & land listings visit: www.glennirvin.com

NICE 3/2/2, WITH dining room, brick, fireplace, new CH/A, updated recently 2,000sq ft. fenced yard, Located in Culde sac, $108,800 903-438-6779 FIXER UPPER FOR sale, $2500 down, $600/month Approx. 2.5acres 3/2 326 Weaver Dr. 903-736-5003. Lots For Sale

058

Public Notices

066

1 TO 2 ACRE lots suitable for Doublewide. Call 903-885-8866.

NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS BUYING PROPERTY IN THE VICINITY OF THE GAFFORDS CHAPEL WATER SUPPLY CORPORATION

The Gaffords Chapel Water Supply Corporation understands that property is sometimes sold with representation that water is available to the property from the Gaffords Chapel Water Supply Corporation System. Such is not always the case, and the Gaffords Chapel Water Supply Corporation urges any prospective buyer to verify with the president or manager at the Gaffords Chapel Water Supply Corporation that water is in fact available at the particular tract in question.

NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS BUYING PROPERTY IN THE VICINITY OF THE SHIRLEY WATER SUPPLY CORP.

Shirley Water Supply Corp., urges any prospective buyer to verify with the manager at the office, located on FM #1567, East of Hwy. #19 South of Sulphur Springs, Texas or phone 1-903485-5811, whether or not water is available at the tract of land in question.

Shirley Water Supply Corp. 6684 FM 1567 W. Sulphur Springs, Texas 75482

NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS BUYING PROPERTY IN THE VICINITY OF THE NORTH HOPKINS WATER SUPPLY CORPORATION THE NHWSC understands that property is sometimes sold with the representation that water is available to the property from the NHWSC system. Such is not always the case, and the NHWSC urges any prospective buyer to verify with the president or manager at the NHWSC office at Birthright, phone 945-2619, that water is in fact available at the particular tract in question.

NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS BUYING PROPERTY IN THE VICINITY OF THE BRASHEAR WATER SUPPLY CORPORATION

The BWSC understands that property is sometimes sold with the representation that water is available to the property from BWSC. Such is not always the case, and the BWSC urges any prospective buyers to verify with the manager of the BWSC by calling 903-582-2670 that water is in fact available at the tract in question.”

Classifieds 903- 885-8663

6B -THE NEWS TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend, January 02-03, 2016

Classifieds 903- 885-8663 Advertise Your Services! Call 885-8663

SERVICE DIRECTORY

NET PLUMBING CO. Repair & Remodeling 50 years experience. Low Prices. 903-885-3259 MAGGIE MAE'S CLEANING Visa/MasterCard M-9249 Service. Houses and offices, construction, move-ins, or move- Printing Service outs. 903-335-3181. ECHO COMMERCIAL www.maggiemaes.com PRINTING offers high quality single and multi-color printing. Dog Grooming/Training Fast service at a competitive JAMIE'S DOGHOUSE. ALL price. 885-0861. News Telegram sizes, all breeds, off College building, 401 Church. Street. Appt. available. 903-243- Roofing 4903. S.S.S. ROOFING& REMODELING, All work Guaranteed Dirt, Topsoil, Sand Free Estimates, TOPSOIL 8-YARDS FOR Call Glenn 903-243-6310. $100. Tree Service 903-439-7340. MS TREE SERVICE: We speDozer Service cialize in dangerous removal, DOZER, TRACKHOE, trimming. Bucket truck. 25 yrs MOTOR Grader, Land clearing experience. Insured. 903-439& development, Lagoon, Lake, 7340. Pond construction, Demolition, COMPLETE TREE & stump Site Preparation, Roadwork. removal, trim trees, bucket truck. Elwin Strawn - Since 1959. 903- Free estimates. 15 years experi885-6658, 903-243-1001. ence. 903-366-1150.



Plumbing

39



SCOTT'S LAWN SERVICE need someone you can trust to mow lots, storage units, etc Call Scott 903-850-3466



Lawn Care



ROGER SEWELL SEAMLESS GUTTERS. 36 colors aluminum & copper, galvalume. Quality work, affordable price. 903-885-2627.



Gutters









AVENT CONSTRUCTION 30YRS experience. Remodel/Build/Design replacement windows, vinyl siding, metal roofing. 903-348-9523 903-885-3083.



Construction



AREA WIDE PAVING. Asphalt paving & seal coating. New construction, repairs, maintenance. Owner Paul Pogue, 903-8856388.















Asphalt

1 Month (27 days) 15 Words or Less $ 60 Only...

Tree Service MERCER TREE SERVICE: Complete tree & stump removal, trim trees, bucket truck. Free estimates. 35yrs experience. Robert Mercer, 903-885-4152. Weddings

WEDDINGS, RECEPTIONS, CATERING, Flowers, Wedding Equipment. Tuxedo's. Melba's Kreations, 512 South Jackson. 903-885-7025, 903-885-9272.

Cleaning Service

Foundation Repair

CARROLL FOUNDATION REPAIR. Slabs, pier and beams, blocks. Since 1971, member of BBB, member of Chamber of Commerce. Gary Carroll. 903885-3051. CarrollFoundationRepair.com.

MIKE'S TREE SERVICE bucket truck, tree trimming, and stump removal. Free Estimates. 903-485-2442 MIKE'S TREE SERVICE bucket truck, tree trimming, and stump removal. Free Estimates. 903-485-2442

FRANK and ERNEST by Bob Thaves

ZITS ® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

MUTTS by Patrick McDonnell

ALLEY OOP by Dave Graue

THE BORN LOSER by Art Sansom

GARFIELD by Jim Davis

B.C. b

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE ® by Stephan Pastis

BUCKLES by David Gilbert

BABY BLUES by Kirkman & Scott

Classifieds 903- 885-8663

THE NEWS-TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend, January 2-3, 2016 — 7B

CHURCH DIRECTORY Agape Faith Worship Center 201 Houston St., Suite 2, Sulphur Springs. Sunday — 10:30 a.m. services (no evening service); Wednesday, 7 p.m. Pastor Jackie Passmore. 903-283-8909 or 903-885-7813 Arbala Road Church of Christ Intersection of FM 2297 and County Road 1175. (903) 485-3304. Minister David L. William. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday night Congregational Bible study, 7 p.m.; evening worship, 5 p.m.; First and third Sunday Mens and Ladies Bible study, 4 p.m. Second Sundays — family and friends day. Arbala United Methodist Church FM 2810 and FM 1567, on Arbala Road in the Arbala community; Rev. Jim Goodwin, pastor. Phone 903-885-1462. Sunday — Worship, 9:30 a.m. Beckham Missionary Baptist Church County Road 4760 north of Sulphur Springs. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; morning service, 11 a.m. Bibleway Lighthouse Church Pastor, Chalmer Dennis. North of Sulphur Springs to Mahoney Road, exit left FM 3236 to County Road 4591. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; evening worship 6 p.m. Wednesday — Evening service, 7 p.m. Phone: 903-485-2475. Birthright Baptist Church 9371 State Highway 19 north of Sulphur Springs. Pastor, Edgar Clements. Sunday — Sunday School, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; night service, 6 p.m. Wednesday — Bible study, 7-8 p.m. Phone: 903-348-0726. Birthright United Methodist FM 71 east, 1 mile east of State Highway 19 north in Birthright. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10:15 a.m. Paul Bailey, pastor, 903-885-0195. For rides or more information, call 903-8850195 or 903-945-2458. Black Oak Baptist Church 14440 FM 69 south in Como. Sunday — Sunday school, 10:15 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m.; children's church, 11:15 a.m. Phone: 903-488-2400. Brashear Baptist David Burns, Pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship and children's church, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; adult Bible study, youth and children's programs at 7 p.m. Wednesday — Awanas for prekindergarten through 6th grade, 6:30 p.m.; youth group for 7th-12th grades, 6:30 p.m. For transportation, call 903-485-6102. Nursery provided - Birth through 3 years. Brush Arbor Full Gospel Church FM 71 in Nelta. Tammie Foley, pastor; Jessie McKinney, praise and worship leader. Sunday — Sunday school, 10:30 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday — Worship, 7:30 p.m. Call 903-945-3476 for more information. Calvary Baptist 130 Lee St. Rev. Lee Huff, pastor Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; Worship services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Bible Study and Prayer, 6:30 p.m.; Nursery available. Call 903-885-6836. www.calvarybaptistchurchss.org Caney Baptist-Pickton 527 CR 2408, Pickton (FM 269 sout, 1 mile east on on CR 2408) Bro. Jimmy Henry, pastor. Phone 903-438-0240. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 10:40 a.m. Cedar Crest Christian 200 Airport Road at the corner of North Davis Street. Frakri Malak, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday — Wednesday night prayer meeting and Bible study, 6:30 p.m. Central Baptist 840 Connally St., at League Street. Bruce Stinson, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Service, 6 p.m. For transportation call 903-885-3660. Centro De Adoracian Asamblea De Dios 237 South Locust St. Pastor Josue F. Luna. Domingo — Escuelas Dominical, 10:30 a.m.; Servicio Evangelistico, 7 p.m. Miercoles — Reunion Familiar. Lunes — Oracion. Sabado — Oracion, 7 p.m. (Bilingual services). Changed Life Church 119 Shannon Road. nondenominational church. 903-885-8901. Clyde Warner, pastor. Sunday — Sunday School, 9:30 a.m.; service 10:30 a.m. Wednesday — evening service, 7 p.m. Chapel Hill Baptist Church of the Bonanza Community Billy Walker, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school 10 a.m.; services 11 a.m.; Bible study 5 p.m. Located off State Highway 19 south to County Road 1162. Cherry Grove Baptist Church 713 County Road 4766, North Caney community of Sulphur Springs. C.L. Moore, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9 a.m.; morning worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday — Bible class, 6:45 p.m. Christ Temple United Pentecostal 717 East Jefferson St. Dan Smith, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday — Bible study, 7:30 p.m. Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints 1701 Loop 301 east. Jeff Smith, Branch President. Sunday — Sacrament and worship 10 a.m.; Sunday school, 11:15 a.m.; Priesthood-Relief society, 12:15 p.m. Phone 903-885-8165. Church of the Nazarene 1300 South League St. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship, 10:45 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday night activities — Adult Bible study, Children’s Caravan and Youth Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Rev. Wayne Sweely, pastor, 903885-4725. Color Blind/Annointed Ministries FM 69 south, 210 Black Oak Road, Como. Rev. C.J. Duffey, pastor/founder; Jeff Spivey, elder. Sunday — 10 a.m., morning service; Wednesday — 6 p.m. service. Phone 903-413-0067. Community Bible Fellowship

FM 69 in Dike. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship, 10:45 a.m. Wednesday — Prayer meeting 7 p.m.; Pastor: Ron Smedley. Church phone 903945-3019. Como United Methodist Church Farm Road 69, in Como; 903-4883541, church office. Rev. Beverly Olsen, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Youth Group, 3:30-5 p.m. grades 6-12. Wednesday — Kids For Christ, 6-7:30 p.m., grades k-5. Nursery available for all services. Cornerstone Baptist Interstate 30 and FM Road 275 in Cumby. Jim Moore, pastor. Sunday — Bible study, 9:45 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m.; evening service, 6 p.m.; Wednesday Bible study, 6 p.m. Nursery available for all services. Cornerstone Independent Baptist 110 Glover St., Sulphur Springs. Jerry Clement, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; Worship, 11 a.m.; live on KGPF 91.1, 4 p.m. 903-249-9214 County Line Baptist FM 2966, east of Yantis. Rodney Crist, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; church, 11 a.m. Cross Country Cowboy Church Located on State Highway 19 south, 1 mile south of I-30 on the left. Sunday — morning worship service, 10:30 a.m.; Ranch Rodeo practice (youth), 2 p.m. Wednesday — Bible Study, 6:30 p.m. Thursday — Barrels and Poles practice, 6 p.m. Pastor is Stephen Leach. For information, call 903-885-4222. Cross Spur Cowboy Church Located on County Road 4759, 1 1/2 miles on the left, in Pleasant Grove. Sunday – 10:30 a.m. service; Tuesday – 6 p.m. Rodeo practice, at the Hopkins County Civic Center Pavillion; Wednesday — 7 p.m. Bible Study. Pastor Mike Eason. Cross Timber Cowboy Church (located at the old Mahoney Methodist Church next to Mahoney Cemetery) Pastor James “Shorty Bishop. sister sponsor: Bar Non Cowboy Church in Omaha. Sunday — 10:30 a.m. services. Cumby First Baptist Church 107 Main St., Cumby. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship services, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Prayer service, 6:30 p.m., children's program and youth program, 6:30 p.m. Pastor, Bro. John Ginn. Cumby United Methodist Church Main Street, Cumby. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; children's Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10 a.m. Pastor, Rev. Duncan Graham. Davis Street Baptist Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship service, 10:30 a.m. Wednesday — Bible study, 7 p.m. Andy Comer, pastor. Dike Church of Christ FM 69 six miles North of Interstate 30. P.O. Box 2, Dike, Texas 75437. Sunday — Bible study, 9 a.m.; worship 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Bible class at 7 p.m. Brandon Shurtleff, minister. Divide Baptist Located in the Divide Community on FM 3389. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Pastor, Bro. Ronnie Miller East Caney Baptist Route 1, Box 272-A, Sulphur Springs, Dr. M. LaVelle Hendricks, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10:40 a.m.; Tuesday — Youth for Christ Crusade, 7 p.m.; Wednesday — Bible study, 7 p.m.; choir, 8 p.m. Elm Ridge Church One mile west of Como on State Highway 11. Rick Higgins, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; morning worship, 10:30 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Services, 7 p.m. Phone 903-488-3706. Emmanuel Baptist Located on the northeast corner of Loop 301 (Highway 19) and Houston Street (Highway 11). Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Wednesday — Wednesday prayer and Bible study, 6 p.m. Bro. Michael Coker, pastor. Phone 903-885-5828. Evening Chapel C.M.E. 199 Putman Street; Rev. Fergus Jacobs, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Wednesday — Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; Thursday — Choir rehearsal, 6:15 p.m. Faith Tabernacle Full Gospel Pentecostal Church 711 Fuller Street. James L. Mason, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Tuesday — Services, 7 p.m.; Friday — Services, 7 p.m. Family Life Church 1400 East Loop 301. Terry Sparks, pastor. Sunday — morning worship services at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Call church number for more details. Tuesday — Youth groups, 7 p.m.; Wednesday — Prayer and Bible study, 7 p.m. A nursery for infants through prekindergarten is provided during all services. Contact the church office at 903885-7507. www.familylifechurch.com Fellowship Baptist Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Wednesday — Worship 7:30 p.m., L.D. Baxley, pastor. The church is located on Highway 69 north of Como. Fellowship Christian Church 207 North Davis Street. Tom Frisbie, pastor; Sunday — Elders meeting 9 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; radio program KSST, 10:30 a.m.; worship service, 10:45 a.m.; Wednesday — Classes for all ages To request a ride, please call the church office at 903-885-2610, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

day school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Mid week service 6:30 p.m. Phone 903-243-8178. First Baptist Sulphur Springs Oak Avenue at College Street. Mark Bryant, pastor. Sunday — Radio Bible Class and Bible study, 9:45; traditional service, 8:30 a.m.; contemporary service, 11 a.m.; evening service, 6 p.m. Sign language interpretation at 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. services. First Baptist Yantis Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship 11 a.m.; Wednesday — Worship, 6:30 p.m.; Saturday — Hispanic Bible study, 8 p.m. First Presbyterian Cumby 200 Depot St. Cumby. Sunday — Bible Study, 10-11 a.m.; Worship Service, 11 a.m.-noon. www.facebook.com/FirstPresbyterianChurchCumbyTexas First Presbyterian Sulphur Springs 129 College Street. Telephone 903-8852862. Charles Moore, pastor; Kevin Woolley, minister of music; Joan Snow, organist and pianist. Sunday — Church school and Bible study begin at 10 a.m. for all age groups. Worship will be at 11 a.m. The Grace Chaper of AA meets each Sunday evening at 7 p.m. in the church parlor. The Al-Anon Group meets on Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. church parlor. First United Methodist 301 Church Street. Rev. Pete Adrian, senior pastor; Dean Libby, associate pastor. Sunday — Traditional communion service, 8:30 a.m.; Ignite contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. Sunday school classes for all ages, 9:45 a.m.; Traditional service, 10:45 a.m. For information about midweek activities visit www.ssfumc.org, on Facebook FUMC-Sulphur Springs or call 903-885-2185. First United Pentecostal Brother Mike Davis, pastor. 415 Airport Road. Sunday — Services, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — 7 p.m. For other activities and dates or further information, call 903-885-5781. Freedom Church of God Pastor David Hamm. 10830 FM 514 east, Emory. 903-473-2457, 903-4733725. Sunday — Sunday school 10 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday — evening worship, 7 p.m. Athletics Ministry, Red Hat Ministries, Senior Adult Ministry. Full Gospel House of Prayer Annie Wagner, pastor. 824 North Jackson Street. Sunday — Worship service 10:30 a.m. Sunday night services, 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Wednesday night services 7 p.m. For transportation, call 903-8853486. Gafford Chapel United Methodist Church 6839 SH 11 west. Sunday - Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday night services, 6 p.m. on the first and third Sunday of each month. Rev. Jim Goodwin, pastor. Phone 903-885-1462. Galilee Baptist 3 miles south of Como in the Galilee Community. Rev. B.R. Hargest, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. Good News Christian Center 717 W. Industrial, Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Bible study, 6:30 p.m.; Barris Sims, pastor. Gospel Lighthouse 802 Jefferson Street. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 10:45 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Rev. Kenneth French, pastor. Rev. Morris Armstrong, associate pastor. The public is invited. Grace Family Church 1901 East Loop 301. Al Davis, pastor; Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship, 10:30 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Wednesday service 7 p.m.; Church phone 903-885-2160; pastor's home phone 903-866-0639. Greater Emmanuel MBC 900 Como Street; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday morning worship service 11 a.m.; Wednesday Bible study at 5:30 p.m.; the Rev. D.K. Young, pastor. Greenpond Baptist Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Lloyd Cashion, pastor; Richard Teer, music. Greenwood Baptist FM 900, five miles south of Interstate Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m. morning worship, 11 a.m. evening worship, 6:30 p.m.; Wednesday — Wednesday night service, 6:30 p.m. Bro. Mike Freeman, pastor. Harmony Assembly of God 16433 State Highway 11 east in Pickton, 1 mile east of Pickton on SH 11. www.HarmonyAGPicktonTX.org Sunday — Sunday school 9:45 a.m., Worship 10:45 a.m., Evening Worship 6 p.m. Wednesday — Bible study and worship 7 p.m.; Friday — Whispering Pines Nursing Home (Winnsboro) 9:30 a.m. Pastor Robert Montgomery. House of Prayer 1380 FM 515 East, Emory, TX 75440; located 2 miles east of Emory, across from the water tower. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; Children’s Church, 11:30 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m. Phone: 903-4749866, 903-612-4025. Brother Kenneth Ishmael, pastor. Independence Baptist Church Located off County Road 3584, north of Sulphur Springs. Bro. Charles Rawlinson, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; morning service, 11 a.m.; evening service, 6 p.m.

First Assembly of God 434 Jefferson St. Rusty Posey, pastor. Sunday School, 9:30 a.m., morning worship, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday midweek service for youth, adults, children at 7 p.m. 9 0 3 - 8 8 5 - 7 4 0 1 . www.sulphurspringsfirst.com

Independence Missionary Baptist Church Located in the Sanfield community;1696 CR 2347, Como. Rev. Derrick Johnson, pastor. Sunday — Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; worship 11 a.m. Wednesday — Bible Study, 7 p.m. Phone: church, 903-488-2030; pastor’s cellular phone, 972-352-2030.

First Baptist Church of Como Pastor Trevor Williams, Sunday — Sun-

Jesus Name Full Gospel Church Jesus Name Full Gospel Church, locat-

ed at 1422 North Hillcrest B, Sulphur Springs, TX 75482 (903-771-9581. Sunday school Service is at 10 a.m. Morning worship is 11 a.m. Sunday evening worship at 5 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study at 4 p.m. Transportation is available by calling the church. Lowell Skaggs, pastor. Lake Highlands Baptist Church 1500 College Street. Bro. Johnny Wheat, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; morning worship, 10:50; evening worship, 6 p.m. League Street Church of Christ 1100 South League Street. English and Spanish language services. Sunday — Bible classes, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Tuesday — benevolence clothing room open , 9:30 a.m. to noon; Wednesday — Ladies Bible class 10 a.m.; midweek Bible classes, 6:30 p.m. Jerry Savage, minister; Brad Sullivan, youth minister. Phone (church office) 885-1531. The Lighthouse 1 1/2 mile east of Sulphur Springs on the south service road. Neal Cochran, pastor. Sunday – morning service, 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m. Thursday – evening service, 7 p.m. Lord's Way Church of God in Christ 806 Freeman Street. Elder Timothy R. Sharp, pastor; Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; mornig worship, 11 a.m. Tuesday — prayer and Bible band at 7 p.m. Thursday — mission at 7 p.m. Martin Springs Baptist Located 2.8 miles east of Wal-Mart on State Highway 11; Brother Richard Leathers, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday — evening worship, 7 p.m. Miller Grove First Baptist Sunday - Sunday school, 10 a.m.; morning preaching service, 11 a.m.; evening preaching service, 6 p.m. Wednesday — Preaching service, 7 p.m. Pastor, Bro. Ron Davis. Miller Grove United Methodist Sunday — Sunday school each week, 10 a.m. worship service, 11 a.m. Howard Strickland, pastor. M.L.K. Church of Christ 154 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive. 903885-8511. Bishops/Elders of Congregation: Elders Danny Hynson and Fred Weeks. Local Minister and Evangelist: Bro. Delante Jackson. Sunday — Prayer Circle, 9:15 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; new convert class, 9:30 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m.; evening service, 5 p.m. Monday — Young Adult Sisters ages 18 years and up, 6 p.m. Wednesday — Bible class, 7 p.m. First and third Sunday — Ladies Bible Class, 4 p.m. Third Sunday Children's Worship, 11 a.m. Second and fourth Saturday — Song Leaders Practice and Order of Service Practice, 2 p.m. Fourth Sunday of even months (February, April, June, August, October, December) — Nursing Home visitation, 2:45 p.m. Fourth Sunday of every fifth Sunday month (March, May, August, November) — Family & Friends Day fellowship Mitchell Chapel C.O.G.I.C. 504 South Jackson St., 903-885-0338. Supt. Nelson Gatlin, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; morning worship, 11 a.m.; YPWW, 6 p.m.; evening worship, 7 p.m. Monday — Home Foreign Mission, 7 p.m. Tuesday, noon prayer; Catherine Aire's Choir Rehearsal, 7 p.m. Wednesday — Youth Bible Study, ages 511 years, 6-7 p.m., ages 13-18 years, 7-8 p.m.; Prayer Bible Band, 7 p.m. Thursday — Pastoral teaching, 7 p.m. Every 2nd and 4th Sunday, 8 a.m. prayer. Morning Chapel Missionary Baptist Church 208 Fuller St.; Harold B. Nash, pastor. Sunday — Morning worship, 11 a.m.; NBC/BTU, 5 p.m.; evening service TBA, 6 p.m. Tuesday — Inspirational/Mass choir, 8 p.m. Wednesday — Esther Circle, 3 p.m.; Dorcas Circle 4 p.m.; Star's and Echoes of Morning Chapel, 6 p.m.; youth department, 6 p.m.; prayer meeting and Bible study, 7 p.m.; Lydia Circle, Elizabeth Circle, 7 p.m.; Voices of Praise, 7:30 p.m. Saturday — Deacons Class and Brotherhood, 8 a.m. Mt. Zion Church 5 miles east of Commerce off Highway 11. Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. First and third Wednesday night dinner and fellowship. Third Sunday singing, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. First and third Sunday with Baptist Bro. Roy Dittmar; second and fourth Sundays with Presbyterian Bro. Bob Woodworth. Nelta Church of Christ Highway 71, 8 miles east of SH 19. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship service, 10:45 a.m. New Beginnings Fellowship Baptist Corner of Jefferson Street and Jackson Street. Sunday — Morning worship services, 10 a.m. and evening worship at 6 p.m.- Home Groups. Wednesday - children service at 6:45 p.m., adult Bible study and youth ministry, 7 p.m. Friday - 7 p.m. Christian Recovery. Pastor, Paul Pogue; Music Minister, Nate Smith; Administrator, Jay Murray; Recovery Group Facilitator, Paul Pogue. Phone 903-885-0624. New Covenant Church Located at the corner of Glover and N. Davis streets in Sulphur Springs. Bro. Bruce, pastor. Sunday — 10 a.m. Sunday school; 11 a.m. service. New Richland Baptist Church FM 69, one mile south Interstate 30. Tim Wright Jr., pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. New Shirley Baptist Services every Sunday except fifth Sunday. Sunday School at 10 a.m.; worship services 11 a.m.; Bible study 11 a.m. Hoyt Scogn, pastor. North Hopkins Church of Christ FM Road 71, 2 1/2 miles west of State Highway 19. Sunday — Bible study, 9:30 a.m.; worship 10:20 a.m. and 6 p.m. Phone 903-945-2149. North Hopkins Community Church State Highway 19, 200 yards north of FM 71 on the right, adjacent to North Hopkins Cemetery in Birthright. Phone: 903243-6863. Larry Friday Sr., pastor. Sunday — Worship service ,10 a.m.; Bible Study at 12 noon. Non-denominational fel-

lowship. North Liberty Baptist Highway 19 north, east on FM 1537, four miles in Mount Sterling community. Sunday — Services 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Evening service, 7 p.m. James Tomlinson, pastor.903-9453348. Oakland Gospel Church In Oakland community on FM 2653, 2 1/2 miles north of Ridgeway. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; preaching, 11 a.m.; Sunday night worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday — Bible study, 7 p.m. Darel Roach, pastor Old Saltillo Methodist Rev. Mac McClain, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. every Sunday; worship services 11 a.m. third and fourth Sundays. Olive Branch Missionary Baptist 225 Perkins Street. 885-0326. Pastor Leon Gossett Sr. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m.; Wednesdays — Prayer meeting and Bible study, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church, ex Woodhaven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center the second Wednesday of each month. First Sundays: Communion. First Saturdays: Communion will be administered to the sick and shut-in. Our Savior Lutheran 1000 Texas Street. phone: 903-8855787. Pastor Tim Eden. Sunday — Worship, 10 a.m.; Sunday school, 9 a.m.; adult Bible class, 9 a.m. Holy Communion is celebrated on the first, third and fifth Sundays of the month. "The Lutheran Hour" airs Sundays at 10:15 a.m. on 95.9 FM. Peerless Assembly of God Ten miles northwest of Sulphur Springs, located on SH 71 west at Spur 71. Sunday — Sunday Bible classes, 10:30 a.m.; worship services, 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m.; Wednesday — Worship service, 7 p.m.; Peerless Christian Academy, grades prekindergarten through 12th grade; Nickie D. Pinson, pastor. Jose Santana and Keith Penny, assistant pastors. Office number 903-945-2653. Peerless Baptist Church Pastor Doyle Hayes 7414 FM 71 W (903) 945-3011; www.peerlessbaptist.org Sunday – Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.; Worship and Children’s Church to 3rd grade, 10:45 a.m.; Bible Study 6 p.m.; Wednesday – Dinner 5:45 – 6:30 p.m.; AWANA Bible Club 4 years – 6th grade 6:45 p.m.; Adult Bible study and Youth Bible study 7 – 12 grade 7 p.m.; Iglesia Bautista de Peerless tiene los servicios a la misma hora; Nursery provided birth – three years old; Call for transportation. Pickton United Methodist Church Sunday — Sunday school 10:45 a.m.; worship service, 9:30 a.m.; Rev. Henry Suche, pastor. Located at FM 269 and CR 2417 in Pickton; 903-439-1007. Pine Hill Cumberland Presbyterian Church FM 3019 (Greenwood Road), near Winnsboro. Phone 903-342-5424. Pine Forest United Methodist County Road 3310, just off FM 269, four miles south of Interstate 30 and six miles north of Pickton. Sunday — Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 10:30 a.m. Beverly Olsen, pastor. Parsonage, 903517-7148. Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Located off FM 2297 (Arbala Road). Rev. Willis Taylor Sr., pastor. NBC & Spiritual Life Class 8 a.m. Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Morning worship and Children's Church, 11 a.m.; Midweek services Wednesday — Mission & Prayer meeting, 7 p.m.; worship, 8 p.m. 903-4856913 Posey Baptist Located on FM 71, west of Highway 19, 4 miles. Bro. Joe Perkins, pastor.Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m.; Sunday night 6 p.m.; Wednesday night 6 p.m. (nursery provided) Reilly Springs Baptist Larry Baxley, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m., worship, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Wednesday — Prayer meeting 7 p.m. Ridgeway Church of Christ Highway 11 West in Ridgeway. Bryan McAlister, minister. Sunday — Bible class 10 a.m.; worship, 10:45 a.m. Welcome. Saltillo Baptist Terry Bryan, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; fellowship time, 10:45 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. Located at 254 CR 3534; from U.S. Highway 67, turn north at Saltillo Volunteer Fire Department. Saltillo Church of Christ Sunday — Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10:30 a.m.; evening service, 6 p.m. Mike Long, minister. Saltillo Methodist Rev. Mark McLain, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. first and second Sunday. Seventh Day Adventist Saturday — Sabbath school, 9:15 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. 409 Houston Street. Alan Priest, pastor. 903-438-9131. Seymore Church of Christ Nine miles south on Highway 154. Sunday — Sunday services at 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday services at 7 p.m. Aaron Huddleston, 903-366-9612; Adam Teer, 3252 6 0 - 9 8 9 8 . www.seymorechurchofchrist.com Shannon Oaks Church 1113 East Shannon Road. Sunday — Morning Journey Groups for all ages, 9 a.m.; Worship Service, 10 a.m., Children’s Church available for infant-kindergarten; Evening Life Groups, Youth Growth Groups and Children’s Bible Boot Camp at 5:45 p.m. September-May. Wednesday — Night Journey Groups, 6:30 p.m. For more information call 903-885-6542. Website: www.shannonoakschurch.com South Liberty Baptist Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday — Wednesday night Bible study, 7 p.m.; Pastor Halston Potts. Southside Church of Christ 1208 South Davis Street. Sunday — Bible study, 9:3 a.m.; worship, 10:30 a.m.

and 6 p.m. Wednesday — Bible study, 7p.m. Office 903-885-9286. St. James Catholic 297 Texas St. Father Juan Sardiñas, priest. Phone: 903-885-1222 (office) Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Masses: Saturday Vigil, 5:30 p.m. (English) and 7 p.m. (Spanish); Sunday — 9 a.m. (English), 12:30 a.m. (Spanish) and 5:30 p.m. (bilingual); Daily Mass — Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m.; Devotion to Blessed Sacrament — First Friday of each month at 8 a.m.; Holy Days — 8 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Confessions — Saturday, 5:15 p.m. (English), 8 p.m. (Spanish); Other times on request. St. Luke Missionary Baptist FM 2285/Peerless Highway Sunday — School school, 9:30 a.m.; morning worship, 10:45 a.m. Troy L. Young, pastor. Church: 903-429-3273 St. Mark Baptist Highway 11 east, first right on oil top road, past Como-Pickton School. Rev. Charles Thomas, pastor. Sunday — Worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday — Prayer meeting, 5:30 p.m. St. Philip's Episcopal 1206 College St. Phone 903-885-5921. The Rev. Barbara Kelton, vicar. Sunday — Worship with Communion, 10:45 a.m. Wednesday — Worship with Communion, 6:30 p.m. Sulphur Bluff Assembly of God Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday — mid-week service, at 7 p.m. Jake Jones, pastor. Phone 903-945-3145. Sulphur Bluff Baptist Sunday — Sunday School, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Bro. Robert Newsom, pastor. Sulphur Bluff United Methodist Sunday — Worship, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday school, 10:30 a.m. David Larkin, pastor. Sulphur Springs Church of Christ 110 Glover St.. Sunday — Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tabernacle Baptist Pickton Sunday — Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.; worship services, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday — Worship service, 6 p.m. Interim pastor, Roy Edgemon. Tira United Methodist Church Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m. Associate, David Larkin. Trinity Harvest Church of God 1150 East Shannon Road, Interstate 30 east. Jason Connor, pastor. Phone 903885-3856. ID Kidz, “a fun and safe place to discover the amazing mysteries about God”; Nursery provided. Youth leader, Tissha George; Children's leader, Melanie Bailey. Regular Sunday schedule — Sunday school, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; worship service,10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Wednesday — 78 p.m. Triumph Christian Center 1318 North Jackson St. Sunday — morning service, 10 a.m.; evening service, 6 p.m. Wednesday — evening service, 7 p.m. Pastor Kevan Brown. For more information contact 903-885-9208. True Gospel Ministries 317 Spring St. The Rev. Kerry Roy, senior pastor/founder. Phone: 903-6896378. Sunday — adult and children’s Bible study, 10 a.m.; morning worship, 11 a.m. Wednesday — Women’s Night led by Sister Chasity Roy. Thursday — pastoral teaching led by pastor Kerry Roy. For a ride, contact Sister Mandy Edwards at 903-994-0511. www.sstruegospelministries.org Union Baptist 609 County Road 1444; phone 903885-5460; the Rev. Jim Boyte, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m.; evening worship, 6 p.m. Wednesday — Prayer meeting, 6 p.m. The Way Bible Church 874 FM 2560, 7/10th mile south of State Highway 11 east. Phone 903-4382363; Sunday — worship services, 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Wednesday — all services, 6 p.m. Pastor, Joel Tiemeyer. Weaver Baptist Weaver. Tom Friday, pastor. Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday — Worship service, 7 p.m. Wesley United Methodist 614 Texas St. Phone: 903-885-3383. Sunday — blended worship service, 9:30 a.m.; Sunday school,10:45 a.m. Wednesday — meal (menu on church Facebook page weekly), 6 p.m.; brief devotional, children’s activities, youth activities and choir practice, 6:45 p.m. Little Acorn (Christian) School for ages 6 weeks to 5 years: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Church Office: Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m., closed at noon for lunch; Friday, 8:30 a.m.-noon. Little Acorn contact: 903885-5839. Backpack Buddies provided for Travis Primary, North Hopkins ISD and Como-Pickton CISD weekly. Steve Cook, pastor. Facebook: Wesley UMC-Sulphur Springs. www.wesleysst.org White Oak Baptist FM 514 at 116 PR 5822, 2 miles west of Downtown Yantis. P.O. Box 356, Yantis, Texas 75497. Sunday — Bible Study, 10 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m. Wednesday — prayer meeting, 6:30 p.m. Jim Rogers, pastor. Phone: 903-383-2310. Email: [email protected] Winterfield Baptist 915 County Road 2400 in Pickton; Sunday — Sunday school, 10 a.m.; worship service, 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Brother Jack Culpepper, pastor.

8B — THE NEWS-TELEGRAM, Sulphur Springs, Texas, Weekend, January 2-3, 2016

SCHOOL MENUS Cumby ISD Monday — Breakfast: breakfast burrito, milk, cereal and whole grain toast, fruit, juice; Lunch: whole grain pizza or meatball subs, baby carrots, pasta marinara, green peas, okra and tomatoes, tropical fruit, milk Tuesday — Breakfast: breakfast sandwich, milk, cereal and whole grain toast, fruit, juice; Lunch: hot dog or Frito chili pie, pinto beans, baby carrots with dip, potato tots, peaches and cream, milk Wednesday — Breakfast: pancake sausage stick, milk, cereal and whole grain toast, fruit, juice; Lunch: steak fingers or roasted chicken, potatoes, gravy, spinach or Lima beans, grape tomatoes, whole grain roll, oranges, milk Thursday — Breakfast: pigs in a blanket, milk, cereal and whole grain toast, fruit, juice; Lunch: orange chicken or corn dog, macaroni and cheese, Italian green beans, cucumber and tomatoes, applesauce, milk Friday — Breakfast: super donut and string cheese, milk, cereal and whole grain toast, fruit, juice; Lunch: cheeseburger or hamburger, Romaine, tomato, pickles, onion, broccoli salad, ranch style beans, baked chips, bananas, milk

North Hopkins ISD Monday — teacher inservice/student holiday Tuesday — Breakfast: cinnamon toast or cereal and toast, apple, juice, milk; Lunch: pizza, salad, carrot sticks, pineapple, milk Wednesday — Breakfast: pancake and sausage or cereal and toast, apple, juice, milk; Lunch: mini burgers, fixings, Cheetos, vegetable sticks, juice bar, apple, milk Thursday — Breakfast: chicken biscuit or cereal and toast, orange, juice, milk; Lunch: chicken tenders, barbecue sauce, peas, roasted carrots, Jell-O, orange, bread, milk Friday — Breakfast: breakfast pizza or cereal and toast, banana, juice, milk; Lunch: steak sandwich, fixings, tater gems, mixed berries, milk

Saltillo ISD Monday — Breakfast: cinnamon roll, fruit, juice, milk; Lunch: spaghetti, Italian vegetables, tossed salad, garlic stick, fruit, milk Tuesday — Breakfast: breakfast pizza, fruit, juice, milk; Lunch: steak fingers, gravy, cream potatoes, cabbage, roll, milk Wednesday — Breakfast: sausage biscuit, fruit, juice, milk; Lunch: grilled chicken sandwich, lettuce, pickle, tomato, chips, fruit, milk Thursday — Breakfast: pancake on a stick, fruit, juice, milk; Lunch: chicken and dumplings, cornbread, sweet peas, carrots, banana, milk Friday — Breakfast: cereal, fruit, juice, milk; Lunch: sausage and potato casserole, green beans, breadstick, fruit, milk

Yantis ISD Monday — Breakfast: breakfast burrito or cereal and toast, milk, juice; Lunch: grilled chicken sandwich, baked beans, broccoli, pineapple, milk; Alternate (offered daily, middle and high school only): salad, sandwich and potato Tuesday — Breakfast: breakfast pizza or cereal and toast, milk, fruit, juice; Lunch: steak fingers, mashed potatoes, green beans, roll, tropical fruit, milk Wednesday — Breakfast: Pop Tarts and cereal, milk, fruit, juice; Lunch: pizza, corn, steamed carrots, sliced peaches, milk Thursday — Breakfast: warm muffins or toast and cereal, milk, fruit, juice; Lunch: meatloaf, sweet potatoes, spinach salad, sliced bread, mixed fruit, milk Friday — Breakfast: sausage and biscuit or toast and cereal, milk, fruit, juice; Lunch: hamburgers, salad, baby carrots, baked chips, applesauce, milk

Gadgets around us will keep getting smarter, like it or not Our cars, our homes, our appliances and even our toys: Things around us are going to keep getting smarter. In 2016, we'll entrust even more of our lives and their intimate details to machines — not to mention the companies that run them. Are we ready for that? You might, for instance, like the idea of turning on your TV with a spoken command — no more fumbling for the remote! But for that to work, the TV needs to be listening all the time, even when you're not watching. And even when you're discussing something extremely personal, or engaged in some other activity to which you'd rather not invite eavesdroppers. How much should you worry? Maybe your TV never records any of your casual conversations. Or maybe its manufacturer is recording all that, but just to find ways to make the TV better at understanding what you want it to do. Or maybe it retains everything it hears for some other hidden purpose. You may never know for sure. At best, you can hope the company keeps its promises on privacy. More important, you have to trust that its computer systems are really secure, or those promises are suddenly worthless. That part is increasingly difficult to guarantee — or believe — as hacking becomes routine. And here's the chief quandary: Every technological benefit comes with a cost in the form of a threat to privacy. Yet not paying that price has its own cost: an inability to participate in some of society's greater achievements. Because smart gadgets thrive on data — data about you and your habits, data about what large numbers of people do or say or appear to want in particular situations — it's difficult not to share pretty much everything with them. Doing otherwise would be like turning off your phone's location services, which disables many of its most useful

features. The consequences aren't restricted to phones and TVs: — Kids will be able to talk to more toys and get personalized, computer-generated responses. Does the "don't talk to strangers" rule apply if the stranger is the Hello Barbie talking doll or Dino, the dinosaur powered by IBM's Watson artificial-intelligence system? — Cars will work with GPS technology and sensors in parking meters, roads and home appliances to help route you around traffic and turn on your living-room lights as you approach the driveway. But that can also generate a detailed record of your whereabouts. — Thermostats from Nest and others will get smarter at conserving energy when you're away. Potential burglars might find that information handy. — Home security cameras are getting cheaper and more plentiful, but they're sometimes insecure themselves, especially if you set them up clumsily. There's already a website devoted to showing video from cameras with no passwords. Though they are mostly outdoor or business cameras, one was trained on a baby's crib, and another in a living room. — Wearable health devices will track your heart rate, fitness levels and more — and share achievements with friends and family. But slacking off may carry a heavier cost than those extra holiday pounds, particularly if your insurance company yanks discounts for meeting fitness goals. — Software from Google and Facebook will get even more refined to help you cut through the noise. That's great if Facebook is showing you posts from friends you already interact the most with, but will a long-lost friend's plea for help go unanswered because you don't see it? The pending onslaught of privacy trade-offs might seem trivial when it comes to a talking —

and listening — Barbie. But maybe it's less so when your phone knows enough about you to remind you it's time to leave for an important interview (if the alternative would be losing a shot at that job) or your smart home can really tell you if you turned off the oven before leaving for an international trip. "The encroachments on our privacy are often self-inflicted in the sense that we will accept the trade-off one bit at a time," says John Palfrey, co-author of "Interop: The Promise and Perils of Highly Interconnected Systems. And these trade-offs can be quite subtle. Technological advances typically offer immediate, tangible benefits that, once you've put enough of them together, can indeed revolutionize daily life. Can you imagine living your life without a smartphone? A few years from now, you might goggle at the thought of managing your day without constant advice from Siri or "OK Google." As for the risks, they'll tend to be diffuse, abstract and often difficult to ascertain even if you're paying attention — and most people won't. In a study released Wednesday, the Pew Research Center says about half of American adults have no confidence that they understand what's being done with their data, and about a third are discouraged by the amount of effort needed to get that understanding. In short, convenience usually wins. Shiny new things are inherently attractive, and it takes a while for some of us to get uneasy about the extent to which we may be enabling our own surveillance. Humans have made this bargain with technology for some time. When cameras were invented, legal scholars debated how far you can go snapping pictures of people in public. That's no longer an issue — although the camera on a drone in your backyard is.

Over time, manufacturers will get better at putting in safeguards, and consumers will get better at setting boundaries and taking charge. For instance, this holiday season's Hello Barbie talking toy won't listen in until your kid presses its belt buckle. Though it does store conversations between kids and their dolls to improve speech-recognition technology, its maker says there's little personal information tied to those conversations — no first or last names, no ages, no gender. "We don't need that information," said Martin Reddy, cofounder and chief technical officer of ToyTalk, which developed Hello Barbie with Mattel. "We don't want that information. It just makes it more difficult on our end." Of course, kids might simply tell their toys personal details about themselves. ToyTalk employees who review such conversations to improve the technology are trained to immediately delete anything sensitive, but they aren't charged with actively monitoring stored discussions. So Step One in managing interactions with our newly smart digital companions comes down to simple attentiveness. Parents, for instance, can be actively involved in what their kids are doing — in this case, by taking the time to review and delete conversations from ToyTalk's website. Step Two might be learning to say no. Many services ask for birth dates, phone numbers and even income levels just because they can — and few people resist. If enough people rise up, companies will stop. There's precedent: Enough people fed up with online ads have turned to ad blockers, such that websites are taking steps to make ads less annoying. There will always be a tradeoff, but the balance can always shift.

Hawaii raises smoking age to 21 HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii is raising the legal smoking to age 21 for traditional and electronic cigarettes on Jan. 1, becoming the first state in the nation to do so. Public health officials are hoping that by making it more difficult for young people to get their hands on cigarettes, they will keep them from developing an unhealthy addiction. "In Hawaii, about one in four students in high school try their first cigarette each year, and one in three who get hooked will die prematurely," said Lola Irvin, administrator with the chronic disease prevention and health promotion division of the Hawaii Department of Health. Officials included electronic smoking devices in the law after noticing a spike in the number of students trying electronic cigarettes. The percentage of Hawaii public high school students smoking electronic cigarettes quadrupled over four years to 22 percent in 2015, and among middle-schoolers, 12 percent reported using them in 2015, a sixfold increase over four years. While Hawaii is the first state to raise the smoking age to 21, more than 100 cities and counties have already done so, including New York City. The town of Needham, Massachusetts, raised the smoking age to 21 in 2005, and a decade later the percentage of adults smoking was 50 percent lower than the rest of the state. Several military bases in Hawaii expressed their support for the move, saying their bases would comply with the state law. "We see it as a fitness and readiness issue," said Bill

Doughty, spokesman for the Navy Region Hawaii. "When we can prevent sailors from smoking or using tobacco, if we can get them to quit, then that improves their fitness and readiness, and it saves them a ton of money too." But critics say that if a man or woman is old enough to potentially die defending their country, they're old enough to make a decision about smoking. "If you can serve the country, you should be able to have a drink and a cigarette," said Justin Warren, 22, an X-ray technician in the Army. Taylor Dwyer, 21, also an Army X-ray technician, said smoking is a "way for us to come down after the work day. It's not like a regular work day. It's a lot more stressful, especially for people who are in combat jobs." Rear Adm. John Fuller, commander of Navy Region Hawaii, countered those arguments in a blog post, saying "If someone is young enough to fight for their country, they should be free from addiction to a deadly drug." As the state begins enforcing the law, the first three months of the year will be dedicated to educating the public, so warnings will be handed out instead of fines, officials said. After that, young people caught smoking will be fined $10 for the first offense and $50 or community service for any further offenses. Retailers caught selling cigarettes to people under 21 can be fined $500 for the first offense and up to $2,000 for later offenses. The Health Department has distributed about 4,000 signs to 650 vendors, said Lila Johnson,

public health educator at the agency. To reach tourists, officials have been meeting with representatives from the tourism industry, business and hotels, and officials plan to produce signs in different languages, she said. "People are going to be coming in and out of our state that aren't aware of it," Johnson said. "It's a matter of education. We hope to see a lot more states picking it up so we're not the only one." Sabrina Olaes, 18, said she started organizing events to educate her classmates about the dangers of smoking after getting frustrated finding herself sur-

rounded by fumes from electronic cigarettes in the girl's bathroom at her school. She called the tobacco industry's marketing practices deceptive, and said some of the flavors of electronic cigarettes are targeted at young people. But her smoking friends didn't always want to hear what she had to say. "It's not easy conveying your opinions to people who may not agree with you, and I've definitely made a lot of enemies, but also a lot of allies," Olaes said. "Even though you don't get them to quit right away, you do get them to second-guess their choices."

Emerging from shadows, pot industry tries to build brands DENVER (AP) — Snoop Dogg has his own line of marijuana. So does Willie Nelson. Melissa Etheridge has a marijuana-infused wine. As the fast-growing marijuana industry emerges from the black market and starts looking like a mainstream industry, there's a scramble to brand and trademark pot products. The celebrity endorsements are just the latest attempt to add cachet to a line of weed. Snoop Dogg calls his eight strains of weed "Dank From the Doggfather Himself." Nelson's yet-tobe-released line says the pot is "born of the awed memories of musicians who visited Willie's bus after a show." The pot industry's makeshift branding efforts, from celebrity names on boxes of weed to the many weed-themed T-shirts and stickers common in towns with a legal marijuana market, show the industry taking halting steps toward the mainstream. Problem is, those weed brands aren't much more substantial than the labels they're printed on. Patents and trademarks are largely regulated by the federal government, which considers marijuana an illegal drug and therefore ineligible for any sort of legal protection. The result is a Wild West CITY CEMETERY HAS AN ABUNDANCE OF SPACES AND/OR LOTS FOR SALE.

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environment of marijuana entrepreneurs trying to stake claims and establish cross-state markets using a patchwork of state laws. Consumers have no way of knowing that celebrity-branded pot is any different than what they could get in a plastic baggie from a corner drug dealer. "You can't go into federal court to get federal benefits if you're a drug dealer," said Sam Kamin, a University of Denver law professor who tracks marijuana law. That doesn't mean that the pot business isn't trying. Hundreds of marijuana-related patents have likely been requested from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, according to those who work in the industry. Exact numbers aren't available because pending patent information isn't public. So far, federal authorities have either ignored or rejected marijuana patent and trademark requests, as in the 2010 case of a California weed-delivery service that applied to trademark its name, "The Canny Bus." "They haven't issued a single patent yet. But generally speaking, there is broad agreement within the patent law community that they will," said Eric Greenbaum, chief intellectual property officer for Vireo Health, which is seeking a patent for a strain of marijuana to treat seizures. Companies like Vireo are betting that if marijuana becomes legal nationally, they will be first in line to claim legal ownership of whichever type of marijuana they have already developed.