MORAL DECISION MAKING

MORAL DECISION MAKING STORIES-2nd Edition 18th Judicial Circuit Court Department of Probation and Court Services Juvenile Detention Center Moral De...
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MORAL DECISION MAKING STORIES-2nd Edition

18th Judicial Circuit Court Department of Probation and Court Services Juvenile Detention Center

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 2

CONTENTS: Moral Decision Making Stories Problem Story 1 Jim 2 Jerry 3 Mark 4 George 5 Leon 6 Sam 7 Reggie 8 Alonzo 9 Antonio 10 Juan 11 AJ 12 Amy 13 Betty 14 Bobby 15 Buddy 16 Beau 17 Barney 18 Destinee 19 Floyd 20 Nicole 21 Jack 22 Jacqueline 23 Frank 24 Joel 25 Jose 26 Fernando 27 Jessica 28 Jesse 29 Vinny 30 Tyrone 31 Juanito 32 Jordan 33 Kim 34 Mark & Danny 35 Keisha 36 OJ 37 Bob & Henrietta 38 Sam 39 Shari 40 Dave 41 Mike 42 Trey 43 Vanessa 44 Zack 45 Katrina 46 Liz 47 Josh 48 Andy 49 The Booby Trap 50 The Passenger Ship 51 Saving a Life 52 The Toy Revolver 53 Drugs Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 3

Gender Focus M M M M M M M M M M M F F M M M M F M F M F M M M M F M/F M M M M F M F M/F M/F M F M M M F M F F M M M/F M/F M/F M/F M

Problem Type Crime-Theft Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-drugs Crime-In Jail Crime-Theft Family Crime-Theft School Crime-In Jail Family Family Crime-Theft Crime-Firearm Family Family CJ System Alcohol-Drugs Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-Drugs Crime-theft Crime-firearm Crime-In Jail Interpersonal Alcohol-Drugs Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-Theft Crime-Theft Alcohol-Drugs Crime-firearm Interpersonal Crime-theft Crime-Prostitution Interpersonal Interpersonal Alcohol-Drugs Interpersonal Crime-Theft Alcohol-drugs Crime-firearm Lost & Found Crime-theft Alcohol-drugs Interpersonal Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-Theft Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-Theft Crime-Drugs

Summary Gift of stolen tape deck Team-mates vs. personal friends Breaking up with steady girl friend Brother says he is using drugs Escape from jail Friend steals CDs Alcoholic father Finds sports car with keys inside Cheating on math test Contraband in detention center Found gun Run away from home Stealing clothes Drive by shooting Parent finding contraband in school bag Friends vs. family obligations Going to party where drugs are present while on probation Argument over boy friend using drugs Sex with girl other than girlfriend Boyfriend active with another girl Friend is dealing drugs Finding briefcase full of money Get gun to shoot peers Contraband in detention Fight at party DUI Partner Abuse Cheating on boy friend House burglary House burglary Drugs found in car Drive-by shooting Pregnancy Stealing wallet from car Sleeping around for money Pregnancy Pregnancy Drug overdose Gossip Stolen guitar from band Selling drug that killed someone Bringing gun to school Found puppy Finding stolen goods in car OD on alcohol Behavior in treatment center STD Girl dancing seductively Shooting a thief Who is saved on a sinking ship. Doctors saving a dying man Heart attack during a hold-up Brother selling drugs

54 Drunken Driving 55 Lieutenant Berg 56 LSD 57 Lying in Order to Help Someone 58 Misrepresentation 59 Perjury 60 Shoplifting 61 The Case of Charles Manson 62 Doctor’s Responsibility 63 The Dope Pusher 64 The Kidney Transplant 65 The Noisy Child 66 The Robin Hood Case 67 The Stolen Car

M/F M/F M/F M M/F M/F M/F M/F M/F M/F M/F M/F M/F M

Interpersonal Crime-During War Crime-Drugs Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-Drugs Crime-Theft Crime-Murder Interpersonal Crime-Drugs Interpersonal Interpersonal Crime-Theft Crime-Theft

Policeman Arresting a Drunk Friend Killing a village Making LSD Parents lying in order to help Divorce after a lie Lying in court to help brother Witness of shoplifting Responsibility for actions Treating the victim of an accident Police getting information from drug dealers Organ transplant without permission Sick child endangering lives of others Tricking a wealthy man Keeping a stolen car

The first ten stories have been adapted by , Ph.D., from Goldstein, A. P., Glick, B., and Gibbs, J.C. (1998) Aggression Replacement Training: A Comprehensive Intervention for Aggressive Youth, Revised Edition. Champaign, IL: Research Press. Stories 11 through 49 were adapted by Sareena Green, from material submitted by residents of the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center during the Summer and Fall of 2000. The remaining stores are from various other sources.

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A. MORAL DEVELOPMENT STAGES This material has been adapted from Goldstein, A. P., Glick, B., and Gibbs, J.C. (1998) Aggression Replacement Training: A Comprehensive Intervention for Aggressive Youth, Revised Edition. Champaign, IL: Research Press.

As all of us grow older and interact with other people, we develop a more mature way of looking at things and making decisions. “As we think, so we act,” is a good way at looking how we develop ways of making decisions that have implications for ourselves and others. The process of making better moral decisions goes through four stages. The first two stages represent the moral stages of childhood, while the last two stages reflect a mature, adult view of one’s self and the world.

STAGE 1: Power—“Might makes right.” • • • • •

Morality is whatever big or powerful people say that you have to do. If you are big and powerful, whatever you want to do or get is fair. If you don’t get punished for what you do, or no one powerful sees it, whatever you do is ok. Only punishment makes something wrong. Doing physical damage to someone is wrong, but doing psychological damage is not. Persons in this stage spout statements like, “You should never tell a lie” without much understanding of what they mean. A person in this stage doesn’t understand the moral reasons for rules, has trouble with give and take in a relationship if it takes seeing more than one point of view at a time.

STAGE 2: Deals—“You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours.” • • • • •

Morality is an exchange of favors (“I did this for you, so you’d better to that for me”) or of hits (“Do it to others before they do it to you” or “Pay them back if they have done it to you”). You should ask or figure “What’s in it for me?” before you help or listen to others. The main reason for not stealing, cheating, etc. is that you could get caught. No one should “boss” anyone else around, people should mind their own business, and everyone should do what they want”. Persons in this stage have trouble understanding a relationship as being something mutual between two people. They may appear to others as self-centered: better at detecting how others are unfair or don’t do things for them than how they are unfair or don’t do things for others.

There are some self-talk statements, thinking and beliefs that persons in the first two stages often have self-talk: Self-centered self-talk: • If I see something I like, I take it. • If I lie to people, that’s nobody’s business but my own. • If I really want to do something, I don’t care if it is legal or not. • When I get mad, I don’t care who gets hurt! Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 5

Assuming the worst self-talk: • You might as well steal; if you don’t take it, somebody else will • I might as well lie—when I tell the truth, people don’t believe me anyway. • People are always trying to hassle me • You should hurt people first, before they hurt you. Blaming others self-talk: • If people don’t cooperate with me, it’s not my fault if someone gets hurt • People force me to life when they ask me too many questions • When I lose my temper, it’s because people try to make me mad. • If someone is careless enough to lose a wallet, they deserve to have it stolen. Minimizing/mislabeling self talk: • Everybody lies; it’s no big deal. • If you know you could get away with it, only a fool wouldn’t steal. • People who get beat up badly probably don’t suffer a lot. • You have to get even with people who don’t show you respect. False consensus/anchoring self talk: • All my friends do it, so what if I do it? • I will look weird if I don’t do this. • Everyone reacts to things like I do. • No one can make me do anything different.

STAGE 3: Mutuality—“Treat others as you hope they would treat you” • Having a relationship itself becomes something valuable. Trust and caring are important and real. • An individual can care about other people, trust them and feel comfortable in saying “we”. • You should try to understand if your friend is hostile or selfish. • You should try to make a good impression so others understand will think well of you. • Persons in this stage can care a lot about others. Sometimes, however, they can care so much about how OTHERS think about them that they turn into “moral marshmallows” in difficult situations.

STAGE 4: Systems—“Are you contributing to society?” • This stage involves seeing oneself as interdependent with others; it means believing in cooperation for the sake of “society”. • It is important to hold to one’s commitments. • If you are in a position of authority (judge, teacher, etc.) you should consistently uphold fair standards, but also consider extenuating circumstances. • Willing to become unpopular to maintain self-respect and integrity. • Persons in this stage appeal to ethical codes, respect for rights and responsibilities as the basis for society. Stage 4 is actually an extension of Stage 3.

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B. THE MORAL DECISION MAKING GROUP

The goal of the group is to work on identifying choices that people have to make in certain problem situations. There are four parts to the group session. PART 1: Introduce the Problem Situation A resident reads the problem situation out loud, and then the following questions are discussed: • Who can tell us just what (the problem person’s name) problem is? • Why is that a problem? • Do problems like this happen? • Has anyone been in a situation like this? Tell us about it. Everyone’s response to the questions are recorded on poster board, erase board, etc. PART 2: Examine Moral Maturity Here the group deals with the following issues: • Who in the group has indicated positive decisions? • What are some of the reasons for those decisions? • What are some decisions which are less positive? • What are some of the reasons for those decisions? PART 3. Move Beyond Stage 1 and 2 This is the time to challenge individuals to consider other—and more mature—viewpoints. The idea is to move beyond stage 1 and 2 moral decision making, which does not work for adolescents or adults. • Tell us about how you got to your decisions? • What would the world be like if everybody did that? • What is some of the thinking that you used? • Can other members who thought differently respond to this? • How (addressed to those with negative decisions) do you respond to these others members? • What are the core beliefs that are driving the decisions? Are they helpful in the long run? PART 4. Move to Consensus

In this phase, the group seeks consensus. Some possible questions to pose to the group at this time include:

• •

Can you all agree on what (problem person) should do? Any strong objections? What is the most positive reason for the problem person to make this decision?

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STORIES 1-9 can be found in Agression Replacement Trainiing, Revised Edition, by Arnold P. Goldstein, Barry Glock, and John C. Gibbs. Champaign, IL: Research Press, 1998

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One day A.J. was cleaning out his closet that he shares with his brother Romeo. While cleaning, he found a gun in one of Romeo’s shoeboxes. Later that day, he asked Romeo about the gun. Romeo tells A.J. not to worry. He explains that it is only for his protection and he will only use it if it is necessary. He then asks A.J. not to tell their Mom, because he does not want her to worry.

1.

Should A.J. tell his mother? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should A.J. tell if he knew Romeo was very angry with someone? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should A.J. tell if Romeo threatened to hurt someone? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

How would knowing Romeo was heavily involved in a gang change your decision?

5.

Does your decision change if you knew Romeo had a quick temper and gets angry very quickly?

7.

If Romeo hurts or kills someone using the gun, how responsible is A.J.?

This story was contributed by Joshua M. , a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 9

12. Amy’s Problem Ashley and her Mom had an argument, because Ashley wanted to go out with friends but her mom said no. Ashley already agreed to stay home and help her mother by cleaning and babysitting and her mom depended on her help. Ashley became furious and ran away from home later that night. Because Ashley was on probation, her mother called her Probation Officer to report her missing. The next day a warrant was issued for her arrest. It was cold outside and Ashley was hungry so she went to her friend Amy’s house. When she arrived there she explained the situation to Amy and asked if she could stay there. Amy knows she can get into trouble with the police and her parents if she allows Ashley to stay in her home.

1.

Should Amy allow Ashley to stay in her home? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Amy call the police and tell them her friend’s location? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Amy call Ashley’s mom? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Would it be a good idea to give Ashley food and blankets, but tell her she cannot stay at her house? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What kind of things could Amy say to Ashley in this situation?

6.

Have you ever been in a situation like Amy’s? Like Ashley’s?

This story was contributed by Hannah P., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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13. Betty’s Problem Betty has a friend named Wilma. Betty knows Wilma steals clothes from different stores, but she does not approve of stealing. Betty sees Wilma come into class wearing a new outfit and she is sure Wilma stole it.

1.

Should Betty confront Wilma? Yes / No / Can’t Decide.

2.

If Betty is sure she will lose Wilma as a friend if she confronts her about the stealing, should she still do it? Yes / No / Cant Decide

1.

Should Betty report Wilma’s behavior to an authority figure? Yes / No / Cant Decide

2.

Betty is certain that Wilma will go to jail if she reports her stealing. Should she still report the behavior? Yes / No / Cant Decide

3.

What if Wilma and Betty did not like one another and gave nasty looks to one another, should she tell in that case? Yes / No / Cant Decide

4.

Wilma explains that she only takes from expensive stores reasoning they could afford to lose the money. Does this make her stealing right? Yes / No / Cant Decide (Circle One)

7.

Discuss the ripple effects of Wilma’s thefts.

This story was contributed by Laura M., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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Bobby has a friend named Jimmy. Jimmy is planning to do a drive-by shooting. Jimmy had is angry with another guy because he was with Jimmy’s girlfriend, but hasn’t confronted either one of them. So Jimmy is going to do the shooting and wants Bobby to drive. Jimmy offered Bobby $350 to do it. What should Bobby do? 1.

Should Bobby help Jimmy? Yes / No

2.

Should Bobby do it for the money? Yes / No

3.

Let’s say that if Bobby didn’t help Jimmy, should he still be Jimmy’s friend? Yes / No

4.

Should Jimmy follow through on his plan? Yes / No

5.

What else could Jimmy do in this situation?

6.

If Bobby doesn’t do it should Jimmy still value his friendship? Yes / No

7.

What if Bobby’s mom was in the hospital and needed money for an important operation. Should he still do it? Yes / No

8.

Bobby knows the other guy. What does Bobby do if the other guy is his friend? How about if Bobby does not like the other guy?

9.

Have you known anyone who was hurt or killed in a drive-by? What did you or they feel like when you found out? What did their family feel like?

10. Is “putting the moves” on someone else’s girl friend reason to die? What should people die for? Anything?

11. Have you ever done anything “stupid” that someone might want to kill you?

This story was contributed by Alma N., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 12

15. Buddy’s Problem Coming home from the library with his mother and sister one day, Buddy enters his family room and sees his father holding his backpack. Buddy knows some of the things in the backpack are wrong for him to have. His father questions him about the items in the bag. Buddy does not know what to say to his father but he knows his father does not like it when he lies.

1.

Should Buddy tell the truth about the items. Yes / No / Can’t Decide.

2.

Was Buddy’s Dad right in searching his bag? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Would your answer change if Buddy’s Dad were kind and caring? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

How about if his Dad is abusive or mean? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What if the items are not Buddy’s and he is holding them for someone else? Should he tell his Dad this information? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What may happen to Buddy’s relationship with his father if he lies?

This story was contributed by Dominick T., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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16. Beau’s Problem One Friday Beau’s girlfriend and some other friends invited him to a concert. He and his girlfriend have been dating for three years. Later that night his mother tells him that his aunt who lives in another state is coming for dinner the same Friday as the concert. He has already made plans to go to the concert. Beau does not want to disappoint all his friends and girlfriend. He also wants to please his aunt and family.

1.

Should Beau go to the concert? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Beau’s Aunt plans to stay for the weekend. Should Beau go to the concert? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Does your answer change if Beau has not seen his Aunt for three years? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Does your answer change if this is Beau’s favorite Aunt? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Let us change the situation; what if the concert is a three-day Music Festival. Should Beau have dinner with his Aunt on Friday? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

Can Beau solve the problem so that everyone is satisfied?

This story was contributed by Justin H., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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17. Barney’s Problem Barney has recently transferred to a new school. On his first day, he meets a kid named Jay. Jay and Barney begin to develop a good friendship so Jay introduces Barney to some of his close friends. Tasha, one of Jay’s friends, invited Barney to a party where, she explained, there would be a lot of people, drugs, alcohol and music. Barney is not sure he wants to go especially because he is on probation.

1.

Should Barney go to the party? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should he go if he does not drink or use drugs? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Let us change the scenario and add that Barney has recently conquered a drug addiction. Should he go to the party? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

What if Barney goes to the party and Tasha and Jay begin to encourage him to drink or offer him drugs? Should he stay? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Should Barney explain his situation to his new friends? If yes, explain how he should do it or what he could say.

6.

Since Jay and his friends are excited about a party where such activities occur, should Barney continue his friendship with them?

This story was contributed by Andy L., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 15

18. Destinee’s Problem Destinee has a boyfriend named Matt. They have been dating for one and a half years. Destinee begins noticing unusual behaviors from Matt. Sometimes he is mean to her and bossy. There are also times when he is very tired and acts weird. Destinee also starts to hear rumors about Matt using drugs. She confronts him about the situation and he admits his drug use to her. She gives Matt a warning explaining that if he does not stop using drugs, she will break up with him. He apologizes to her and promises to quit. One week later, she notices the same type of unusual behavior. When she confronts him about it this time, he breaks her nose with a punch.

1.

Should Destinee continue to date Matt? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should she continue to date him if he cries, apologizes and promises not to hit her or use drugs again? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should she take legal action against him for breaking her nose? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Would it be a good idea for her to date him if he goes to counseling for his drug problem? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

How has the use of drugs and violence complicated this situation?

This story was contributed by Heather A., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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19. Floyd’s Problem Floyd has been dating Mary for six months. One Friday night Floyd has a party at his house. During the party, Mary drives a friend home. While Mary is gone, another girl asks Floyd to have sex with her.

1.

Should Floyd have sex with the girl? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should he do it with the knowledge that he and Mary have planned to have sex later that night? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

What if Mary told Floyd she was going home after she dropped off the friend; should he have sex with the girl? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

What if Floyd has been attracted to the girl for a long time; should he have sex with her? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Give reasons why Floyd should not have sex with this girl.

6.

How will Mary feel if she finds out Floyd had sex with another girl?

This story was contributed by Justin D., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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20. Nicole’s Problem Heather and Brandon have been dating for two years. One day Heather was ill and Brandon called before going to a party to check in on her. She explained that she was doing fine, but encouraged him to go to the party and have a good time. Before hanging up the telephone, they both said they loved one another for the first time. Later, at the party, Heather’s best friend Nicole sees Brandon making out with a girl he has known for years named Mary. The next day at school, Heather tells Nicole that she and Brandon have finally said they loved each other.

1.

Should Nicole tell Heather what she saw the night before? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Nicole approach Brandon about what she saw him doing? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Nicole tell Heather when they get home later? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Nicole tell if she believes Brandon is a great guy? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Should Nicole tell if she never liked Brandon? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

If Nicole tells Heather, what could she say?

This story was contributed by Heather A., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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21. Jack’s Problem

Mickey and Jack have been friends for many years. Jack is walking home one day after work when he sees Mickey dealing drugs along with other guys. Mickey sees him and quickly tries to change the situation. He appears concerned that Jack saw him dealing. He has tried to keep his recent entry into drug dealing a secret, because he knows how much Jack would disapprove of his actions.

1.

Should Jack confront Mickey? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Jack pretend he did not see anything? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Mickey stop dealing to save his friendship? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Mickey try to explain his reasons for dealing? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What if Mickey needs money to help support his household; what should the friends do?

6.

What if Jack recently completed a drug rehabilitation program; what should the friends do?

7.

When someone you are close to does something that you think is dangerous, what could you do? What have you done in the past?

This story was contributed by a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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22. Jacqueline’s Problem

One day Jacqueline was walking down the street when she came across a briefcase. She looked around to see if anyone was nearby or looked like it belonged to them and saw no one. When she opened the briefcase, she found it full of money. More money than she has ever seen.

1.

Should she keep the money? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should she leave the briefcase and money where she found it? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should she take the case home and ask her parents what to do? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should she turn the case in to the police? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

How would your answers change if Jacqueline knew the money belonged to a criminal fleeing police?

6.

How would your answers change if Jacqueline knew the money belonged to a local school fund raising project?

This story was contributed by Esther B., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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23. Frank’s Problem Johnny and Bobby are having problems at school with two boys, Derek and James. They know Johnny’s cousin Frank who recently graduated from their high school, has a gun. Johnny and Bobby explain their problem with Derek and James to Frank and their plan to shoot the two boys if he lets them borrow his gun.

1.

Should Frank give Johnny and Bobby the gun? Yes / No / Cant Decide

2.

Should Frank report what the kids are planning? Yes / No / Cant Decide

3.

Let us say Frank decides not to give them the gun. Should he try to help them solve the problem? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Do your answers change if Johnny and Bobby’s plan is to shoot the boys at school? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What kinds of thinking caused Johnny and Bobby to want to kill Derek and James? (six irrational beliefs)

6.

Discuss safer ways to resolve the conflict between Johnny & Bobby and Derek & James.

7.

If they succeed in their goal, what might happen to Derek and James? To Johnny and Bobby? To the students at school? To their parents and friends? To the community?

This story was contributed by Dominick T., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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24. Joel’s Problem One day Joel was having free time at the detention center. Bobby told him he was hiding a pair of nail clippers and needed to get rid of them. Joe knows the staff’s response to missing items is to lock down all residents and begin searches. He also knows the searches can be strip searches.

1.

Should Joel tell a staff member about the nail clippers? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Joel help Bobby hide the clippers? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

If Joel tells staff about the clippers, should he explain who had them? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Do your answers change if staff begin room and pat down searches for the clippers? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Do your answers change if staff begin strip searches for the clippers? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Why would a missing pair of nail clippers in a detention center cause a problem?

6.

If someone got the clippers and hurt another person with them, in what way would Bobby be responsible?

7.

In what way would Joel be responsible?

This story was contributed by Richie D., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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25. Jose’s Problem Roberto and Jose are at a party. Roberto starts to drink heavily and soon is out of control. He starts to fight with someone.

1.

Should Jose fight along side his friend? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Jose try to stop the fight? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should he try to make Roberto leave the party with him? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Jose leave the party and Roberto? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If Roberto is fighting with another of Jose’s friends, should he try to stop the fight? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

What could Jose have done earlier to prevent the fight?

7.

List some negative consequences of drinking too much?

8.

Have you ever tried to get someone to slow or stop drinking or taking drugs? What makes this difficult to do?

This story was contributed by Russell J., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

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26. Fernando’s Problem Fernando is at a party where there is drinking and drug using occurring. At the end of the party, Jason and Fernando are the only one’s left. Jason asks Fernando if he needs a ride. After accepting Jason’s offer, he realizes Jason is in no condition to drive.

1.

Should Fernando still accept the ride? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

If Fernando is sober, should he ask to drive? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

If Fernando is sober, but does not have a driver’s license, should he take the risk of driving? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

If Fernando has drank or used drugs a little during the party, should he take the risk and drive? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Should Jason allow Fernando to drive his car if he is sober? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

Should Jason allow Fernando to drive his car if he is sober, but does not have a driver’s license? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

7.

Should Jason allow Fernando to drive his car if he is not sober? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

8.

Discuss other positive options available to the two guys?

This story was contributed by Elia P., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 24

27. Jessica’s Problem Situation Jessica and Amanda have been friends for several years. Recently Amanda began dating a boy named Justin. After a while, Justin and Amanda’s relationship took a turn for the worse. Justin became verbally and physically abusive to Amanda. She often felt sad and down. Amanda confided in her friend Jessica when she began questioning her moodiness. 1.

Should Jessica encourage Amanda to end the relationship? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Jessica tell Amanda’s parents or an authority figure about the abuse? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Jessica simply mind her own business? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Would it help if Jessica talked to Justin? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

How do you think Amanda sees this situation?

6.

Have you or someone you knew ever been in Amanda’s situation? …Jessica’s?

6.

If you were Amanda, what would you do?

This story was contributed by Hannah P., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 25

28. Jesse’s Problem Jesse and Marta have been dating for three years. Jesse just heard a rumor that Marta cheated on him with the captain of the football team, Ken.

1.

Should Jesse try to find out more about the rumor? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Jesse confront Marta? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Jesse confront Ken? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Jesse break up with Marta based on the rumor? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If Jesse discovers the rumor is true, should he break up with Marta? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

What would you say to Marta if you were Jesse?

This story was contributed by Ion R., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 26

29. Vinny’s Problem Jake met his best friend Vinny and Vinny’s girlfriend at the home where she baby-sits two children. After coming from the bathroom, Jake pulls Vinny to the side and shows him two wedding rings he has found in the bathroom upstairs. Jake attempts to persuade Vinny to go with him to pawn the two rings.

1.

Should Vinny participate? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Vinny encourage Jake to put the rings back? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Vinny allow Jake to take the rings but not participate himself? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Vinny tell his girlfriend what Jake is planning? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

What might happen to Vinny’s girlfriend if Jake steals the rings?

5.

Discuss the problems that may arise in Vinny and Jake’s friendship because of this situation.

This story was contributed by James W., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 27

30. Tyrone’s Problem Mike and Tyrone are best friends. Tyrone wants to buy a new car for his 18th birthday, but he does not have enough money for the car he wants. Mike knows how badly Tyrone wants the car and proposes a plan to get the extra money he needs. Mike’s plan is to rob a house on his block he believes is not very secure.

1.

Should Tyrone go with Mike? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Tyrone persuade Mike not to rob the house? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

What if the house belonged to a friend of Tyrone’s, should he participate? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

If the house belongs to a neighbor who has always been nice to Tyrone, does that make a difference? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What if Tyrone knows the people living in the home, but does not like them? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Discuss what harm could be caused to a family when their home is burglarized.

6.

Has this happened to you or someone you know?

This story was contributed by Evan, a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 28

31. Juanito’s Problem

Juanito, Chris, Pablo and Dan are all riding in Juanito’s car. Chris has 2oz. of marijuana with him. The other people in the car know that Chris usually has drugs on him but do not really mind, because he has not been arrested for drug possession before. Juanito stops at an intersection and turns left, but he forgets to signal and is stopped by a police officer. Chris panics and puts the marijuana between the seats in the back of the car. The police officer notices the unusual odor of marijuana and begins a search of the vehicle and the individuals when his backup arrives. The officer finds the drugs and asks each person who it belongs to and they all say they do not know. When they get to Juanito, the owner of the car, they explain that if he does not tell them the truth then he will be held responsible.

1.

Should Juanito say he does not know? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Juanito take responsibility for the drugs? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Juanito tell the officer the drugs belong to Chris? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

If Chris has been arrested for drug possession before, should Juanito tell the officer? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Should Chris take responsibility when he sees that Juanito will be held responsible for his drugs? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

If Juanito has been detained before and has worked hard not to repeat history, do any of your answers change?

This story was contributed by Joe B., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 29

32. Jordan’s Problem While attending a new high school, Jordan makes new friends he does not know are gang members until they ask him to participate in a drive by shooting. Jordan wants to impress his new friends and decides to go along. When they get to the house, he notices it is his friend Richard’s house. Richard has recently gotten out of a gang that wars with the one Jordan’s new friends belong to and the two have been friends since kindergarten.

1.

Should Jordan try to stop the shooting? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should he not go along with it, but stay in the car? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should he not go along with it and get out of the car? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Jordan tell Richard if he did not participate? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Should he tell Richard if he decided to participate? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

Should Jordan report the incident to the authorities? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

7.

How would Jordan be affected if Richard becomes seriously hurt?

This story was contributed by Gilbert C., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 30

33. Kim’s Problem Situation

Kim has been dating her boyfriend Joel for one year and she just found out she is two months pregnant. She also remembers she had sex once with one of Joel’s friends a few months ago. She is now uncertain who the father of the child is.

1.

Should Kim explain the situation to Joel? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should she explain the situation to both guys? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should she allow her boyfriend to believe he is the father of the child? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should she have an abortion and not say anything? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If Joel has cheated on her in the past, do any of your responses change?

6.

Would your answers change if Joel and Kim have only been dating for 2 months?

This story was contributed by Hannah P., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 31

34. Mark and Danny’s Problem Mark and Danny are walking through a parking lot when they see a nice convertible car with its top down. They walk over to check it out and notice a wallet lying on the seat.

1.

Should they take the wallet? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should they put the wallet in the glove compartment? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Does your answer change if the boys know the owner of the vehicle? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

What if the boys like the owner of the car, do any of your answers change? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Does it make a difference if the boys do not like the car’s owner? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

This story was contributed by a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 32

35. Keisha’s Problem Nancy earns quite a lot of money by having sex with men and tells her friend Keisha how much money she gets doing this in class one day. She tries to convince Keisha to do the same. Keisha does not want to, but she does not want to lose her friendship with Nancy.

1.

Should Keisha engage in this activity for the money? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Keisha engage in the activity in an attempt to keep the friendship going? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Keisha discourage Nancy? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Keisha maintain her friendship with Nancy? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Should Keisha tell anyone about Nancy’s arrangement? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

Identify some dangers in doing what Nancy does?

7.

If Nancy is harmed in this activity, how may Keisha feel if she does not do anything to deter her?

This story was contributed by Vanessa and Laura, residents at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 33

36. OJ’s Problem OJ and Latesha have been dating for six months. Her parents go on vacation to Las Vegas leaving her home alone for the weekend. She invites OJ over and they have sex. Six weeks later she tests positive for pregnancy. She shares the results of the test with OJ.

1.

Should OJ take responsibility for the child? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should OJ take a paternity test? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should they tell their parents? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Latesha have the child? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What might be the consequences for Latesha if OJ does not take responsibility? …For OJ?

6.

Discuss the options for the two.

7.

To whom could they go to for help?

This story was contributed by Dominic T., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 34

37. Bob and Henrietta’s Problem Bob has gotten his girlfriend, Henrietta, pregnant. Now all the responsibilities of this situation are coming down very hard on them and both families. Their parents have told them if they keep they do not end the pregnancy, they are both going to be kicked out of the house. Bob and Henrietta are very involved in school and athletics. If they drop out, both will sacrifice a lot. Both are sixteen and do not have full time jobs. They currently have no way to support a child.

1.

Should Bob and Henrietta keep the child? Yes / No / Can’t Decide (Circle One)

2.

Is it worth giving up all that they’ve worked for to keep the child? Yes / No / Can’t Decide (Circle One)

3.

Are abortion or adoption a reasonable alternative? Yes / No / Can’t Decide (Circle One)

4.

It is right to bring a baby into the world if you cannot support it financially? Yes / No / Can’t Decide (Circle One)

5.

What would be the best decision for the child?

6.

What would be the best decision for the teens involved?

This story was contributed by Tony H., Chris J., Dave Y., residents at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 35

38. Sam’s Problem Sam and Jack were sitting in Sam’s room. They have been friends for a long time. Sam pulls out a drug and wants Jack to try it. Jack does and he passes out.

1.

Should Sam just take off and leave Jack there? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Sam call the police or an ambulance? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Sam tell his or Jack’s parents about what happened? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should Sam dump the drugs and then get help? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If Sam finds out later the drug was impure, and had other chemicals in it, and Jack has permanent brain damage, is he responsible?

6.

If this is in fact the real situation, should Sam tell the police so they can stop more kids from getting hurt?

This story was contributed by Russell J., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 36

39. Shari’s Problem Sharie and Jennie have been friends since fourth grade and they tell each other everything. One day Sharie tells Jennie she lost her virginity with her boyfriend Brian. The next day, several people come up to her asking if she really had sex with Brian. Sharie is shocked and upset when she discovers her friend Jennie told other people. She sees Jennie later in the hallway.

1.

Should Sharie confront Jennie? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should she end her relationship with Jennie? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Sharie break up with Brian to avoid the pressure she is experiencing? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Is it important to keep secrets like this? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

How could Sharie handle this situation?

6.

Can the two mend their relationship?

This story was contributed by Stephawn S. , a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 37

40. Dave’s Problem Dave had a rehearsal with his band at his house. Tom, Dave, Steve, Art, and Pat are in the band. After rehearsal they all sat around for awhile and left one by one. Steve was preparing to leave when he noticed his $2,699 guitar was gone.

1.

Should Dave take responsibility for the missing guitar since the practice was at his home? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Dave and Steve go to the other band members’ homes to search for the guitar? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should the band buy Steve a new guitar? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should they bring up the missing guitar issue at the next band rehearsal? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

What if Steve has reliable information that Art has his guitar? Should he confront Art? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

Should he call the police? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

7.

Discuss Steve’s responsibility in this situation?

8.

Discuss Dave’s responsibility in this situation?

This story was contributed by Tom B., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 38

41. Mike’s Problem Mike was selling drugs and he was making a lot of money, but he was well known with police and spent a lot of time hiding out. One day he sold someone drugs and the person died because of taking that drug. Tim knows Mike well and was with him when he sold the drug to the person who died. The police question Tim about the situation.

1.

Should Mike confess? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Tim tell the police what happened? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

If Tim is sure he will lose his relationship with Mike, should he still tell? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

If Tim is sure Mike will be charged as a juvenile, should he tell? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If Tim is sure Mike will be charged as an adult, should he tell? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

Discuss Mike’s responsibility in the death of his customer?

7.

Discuss Tim’s responsibility in the death of Mike’s customer?

This story was contributed by Vanessa J., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 39

42. Trey’s Problem While walking down a hallway at school, Trey sees his best friend Lee with a gun in the front part of his pants. He remembers calling Lee the night before and telling him he was having a serious problem with another student in one of his classes.

1.

Should Trey try to prevent Lee from making a bad decision? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Trey report the situation to an authority figure at school? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Trey take the gun from Lee? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Is this situation serious enough to report to an authority figure? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Discuss the problems with bringing a weapon to school.

6.

Identify other ways Lee could help Trey with his problem.

This story was contributed by Tim R., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 40

43. Vanessa’s Problem One Sunday afternoon a girl named Vanessa was walking down the sidewalk when she heard someone following her. She looked back and saw a cute little brown puppy looking up at her with big black eyes. She took it home and kept it. About a week later, she was walking her new puppy and noticed a flyer saying “If found please return our puppy which we love so dearly”. When she looked at the picture attached to the flyer, she saw her puppy.

1.

Should Vanessa return the puppy? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should she ignore the flyer? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

If she goes to the house and it seems like a nice home, should she return the dog? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

If she goes to the house and it does not seem acceptable, should she return the dog? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If the family has other pets, should she return the puppy? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

If Vanessa returned the puppy, what could she do to feel better about her decision?

This story was contributed by Ester B., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 41

44. Zack’s Problem Peter and Zack are best friends. Recently Peter robbed someone’s house, and hid the merchandise inside Zack’s car. When the police searched Zack’s car, they found all the items. What should Zack do?

1.

Should Zack take the blame for Peter and risk jail time? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Zack tell the police it was Peter and risk their friendship? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Zack be angry with Peter for hiding the stolen merchandise in his car? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Is their friendship more important than the risk of jail in this case? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

Is it O.K. for Zack to tell the police about Peter, because Peter caused this problem for him? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

If you were Zack, what would you do?

7.

Discuss how Peter betrayed Zack.

This story was contributed by Matt M., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green. Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 42

45. Katrina’s Problem

Katrina and Anna have been as close as sisters since meeting in kindergarten. One evening, they went to a party together where they both drank alcoholic beverages. As the night went on, Katrina stopped drinking, but Anna continued. While walking to Anna’s house later, she kept falling down, because she drank too much even after Katrina warned her to stop several times. Katrina was worried, because she wanted to get home before curfew and because she was with someone who was very drunk. Anna fell several times on that walk home and Katrina decided to leave her the last time she fell. The next day, Katrina found out Anna went to the hospital for alcohol poisoning and would be there for at least a week.

1.

Did Katrina do the right thing by leaving Anna? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Is it Katrina’s fault that Anna was admitted to the hospital? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Anna still be Katrina’s friend? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Katrina have called Anna’s parents? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Discuss Katrina’s responsibility in this situation.

5.

Discuss Anna’s responsibility.

6.

Discuss the person who threw the party’s responsibility in this situation.

This story was contributed by Molly H., a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 43

46. Liz’s Problem Liz is in an inpatient program, which does not allow smoking. Eric gets cigarettes from his father’s coat one day during a visit and offers to share them with Liz and her roommate. One day Liz gets caught smoking. If she does not tell where she got the cigarettes, she will be required to stay in the facility for 90 days longer than she was to stay initially. Eric told her she would be sorry if she exposed him..

1.

Should Liz tell where she got the cigarettes? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should Liz lie about how she got the cigarettes? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should she decline to answer any questions? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Are the 90 extra days enough reason to reveal what she knows? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

How do you believe Liz could handle the situation?

6.

How would you have handled this situation?

This story was contributed by a resident at the DuPage County Juvenile Detention Center, and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 44

47. Josh’s Problem Josh’s good friend, Danny sleeps with many girls. Josh knows that Danny has a sexually transmitted disease. Danny had told Josh that he does not use protection when he has sex. Danny has just started dating a girl that Josh knows from school.

1.

Should Josh tell the girl about Danny’s STD? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

If the STD is curable, should Josh tell the girl? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

If the STD is incurable, should Josh tell the girl? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

If the STD is deadly or serious, should he tell the girl? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If Danny’s new girlfriend is Josh’s friend, should he tell her about Danny’s STD? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

If the girl was someone Josh did not like, should he tell her? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

7.

If Danny did always use protection during sex, should Josh still tell the girl about his STD? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

8.

Discuss the importance of using protection when having sex with anyone.

9.

Identify reasons why it is important to be honest with sexual partners about your sexual health.

This story was contributed and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 45

48. Andy’s Problem Andy went to a party one night with a few friends. During the party, he noticed a girl dancing seductively with different guys. Later, a group of guys encircled her and began touching her inappropriately. She looked scared and was trying to get out of the circle of people, but Andy did not hear her say, “Stop” to anyone. 1.

Should Andy stop the guys from touching the girl? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

2.

Should he help the girl get out of the circle? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

3.

Should Andy join in the activity? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

4.

Should he try to get help since there are so many guys? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

5.

If the girl is a friend of Andy’s, should he help her? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

6.

If the girls has a reputation as sexually active with many guys, should he help her? Yes / No / Can’t Decide

7.

What would you do if you were in Andy’s situation?

8.

Does the girl’s reputation or her seductive dancing make it all right for the guys to touch her? Why or Why not?

This story was contributed and edited by Sareena Green.

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 46

49. The Booby Trap A farmer’s house was repeatedly broken into. Each time he reported the robbery to the police, but the police could not catch the thieves. So the farmer came up with his own device. He rigged up a gun to go off in case someone opened the door. He and his family had a way of getting into the house without triggering the gun. Eventually a robber came in and was shot in the leg. The bullet went through his thigh and he was limping. The doctor told him that he would have a limp the rest of his life. Therefore, the robber sued the farmer for damages.

1.

Do you think that a person has a right to use any means to protect his own property?

2.

If this case got to court, what do you think would be the judge’s verdict?

3.

What do you think the verdict should be?

4.

Should booby traps like the one the farmer set up be against the law? Why or why not?

5.

Should the law allow people to shoot prowlers? Why or why not?

6.

Should the law allow people to kill prowlers? Why or why not?

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 47

50. The Passenger Ship A passenger ship sank in the middle of the Atlantic. There was a great deal of panic on the ship as it became known that the ship was sinking. People were rushing into the lifeboats. The ship finally sank, and most of the people managed to get into the lifeboats. One of the lifeboats was very overcrowded. It became evident that the boat would sink unless a number of the people on it would get off. One of the passengers suggested that they take ropes and have people dragged behind the boat. However, it was winter and a person would be paralyzed if he/she stayed in the water for more than 10 minutes. People came up with many suggestions in order to avoid making the decision about who should live and who should die. But nobody came up with a solution that would save all the lives in the boat. After some discussion, two general opinions emerged. Some people believed that they should leave themselves to chance. What will happen, will happen. They felt that it was wrong to make a decision to kill people. They might all die or all might be saved. Another opinion was that they should draw lots as to who should stay n the boat and who should be thrown overboard.

1.

Which of these two alternatives would you see as the more justified and why? Do you have any other suggestions?

2.

Do you think it is justifiable to kill a few people in order to save many?

3.

Would a lottery be a fair way to make the decision? Why or why not?

4.

If they decided to have a lottery but two people refused to participate, should they be allowed to abstain and stay in the boat? Why or why not?

5.

Do you think there is any way to decide whose lives are the most valuable? Why or why not?

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 48

51. Saving a Life A soldier, while on a patrol mission in Vietnam, stepped on a land mine and lost both his arms and legs. In addition, he was blinded. Thanks to advanced medical knowledge and fast treatment, the doctors were able to save his life. Had he not received quick attention, he would have died from his battle wounds.

1.

Do you think that the doctors made the right decision when they preserved his life? Why?

2.

If you were the soldier, which would you choose: to live or to die? Why?

3.

Should doctors automatically decide in all circumstances to try to preserve life? Why or why not

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 49

52. The Toy Revolver Henry, a young man in his early 20’s wanted to get married but he did not have any money. He thought o a way of making money quickly. He bought a toy revolver that really looked like a real gun. He went to a distant section of town and tried to hold up a grocery store. The store owner was an old man who, when he saw the gun aimed at him, he became frightened, had a heart attack and died. Henry was caught and tried for murder.

1.

Do you think Henry was guilty of murder? Why or why not?

2.

When he was brought before the judge, what sentence should the judge give him and why?

3.

Should Henry get the same sentence as someone who used a real gun to rob and accidentally killed someone? What if the man with the real gun did not kill anyone, should he be given a longer or shorter sentence than Henry?

4.

Henry seems really shocked and upset about the old man’s death and said that he had learned not to rob anyone again. Should he be left off without a jail sentence or should he be made to go to jail? Why?

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 50

53. Drugs One day Joe discovered that his older brother was selling dope. He knew that selling drugs is illegal and also that drugs are bad for people, that they ruin people’s lives.

1.

What should Joe do?

2.

Does it, or should it, make a difference to Joe that it is his brother who sell the dope?

3.

Would it make a difference if it were Joe’s best friend? Why?

4.

Which of the two problems is central: whether the dope is illegal or that it is hurting people?

5.

Joe tried to stop his brother, but his brother got very angry and told him that if got him into trouble eventually the brother would get revenge. What do you think of that?

6.

Does it make any difference what kind of drugs he’s selling? What if it’s marijuana? What if it’s heroin?

7.

Should it be against the law to sell marijuana?

8.

Should it be against the law to smoke marijuana?

9.

What punishment should someone get if convicted of selling marijuana? What punishment for selling heroin?

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 51

54. Drunken Driving In the past six months three persons had been killed by drunken drivers in a particular district of a city. The mayor and the police chief, as a result of this, ordered the police to crack down on drivers who had been drinking. One night a policeman stopped a car and found that the driver had been drinking heavily. The policeman saw that the driver was an old friend from school. He knew that his friend’s wife was very sick and that his friend was under a severe strain. The family spent almost all of their money on doctor bills. If he arrested the driver for drunk driving the man might lose his job and the family would go deeper into debt. His friend said that he was sorry and that it would not happen again. The policeman is faced with a conflict. His duty is to arrest the drunken driver, or the policeman himself could be fired. He stopped his friend once before for drunken driving and took him home. This time he does not know what to do.

1.

Should the policeman’s actions be dictated by his feelings of friendship or duty? Why do you feel that way?

2.

What is meant by professional responsibility?

3.

Who does the policeman work for?

4.

What would be the best or most important reason for the policeman to report his friend?

5.

What would be the best or most important reason for the policeman NOT to report his friend?

Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 52

55. Lieutenant Berg During World War II, Poland was under German occupation. In a small village, a German soldier was killed at night, but the Germans could not find out how it had happened. The people of the village either refused to inform them or they just did not know. So orders came from Berlin to kill all the population of the village, including the women and children. Lieutenant Berg, the German officer in charge of the soldiers in the village, called his superior and argued that they should not kill the women and children, just the men. The high command in Berlin disagreed but after a long argument between Lieutenant Berg and the command, the orders were changed. The Germans killed all the men and let the women and children live. After the war, Lieutenant Berg became a Catholic priest. Twenty years later he was identified as the lieutenant who killed all the men in the village. He was accused of mass murder of civilians and brought to trial. He admitted that he had carried out the order to kill all the men in that Polish village, even though he had known that there was no evidence to indicate that they were guilty. He told the court that he had spared the lives of the women and children. 1.

Should Father Berg be tried at all? Yes or no, and why?

2.

Should the court consider the fact that he did save some people and give him a smaller sentence? Yes or no, and why?

3.

Does it, or should it make a difference to the court that he has become a priest after the war?

4.

Lieutenant Berg argued that they should save the women and children. Are the lives of women and children more important than the lives of men?

5.

Suppose that the German high command refused to change the order, and Lieutenant Berg knows that if he does not execute all the people in the village, he himself will be shot for disobeying orders. Should he sacrifice his own life?

6.

What would you do if you were a soldier in wartime and you were given an order by a superior to kill civilians in a village because some of the civilians were known to be working with the enemy, but that it was impossible to know which civilians were actually working with the enemy?

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56. LSD Doug, who is a high school senior, is a chemistry whiz and has a chemistry laboratory in his house. He has been seen taking drugs like LSD, which he used to buy. One day he thought, “Why spend all that money? I could make them myself.” He asked the chemistry teacher what the formula for LSD was. The teacher asked him why he wanted to know. Dough told him the truth. The teacher knew the possible harm that can come from taking drugs and wondered what to do. 1.

Can a person do whatever he wants in his house? Is his home his castle? What should the limits be on a person’s individual rights?

2.

If Doug had no intention of selling his drugs, can he make them for himself? If he intended to sell them, would that make a difference? Give your reasons.

3.

If the police heard that Doug was producing LSD in his laboratory, but knew that he used the drugs for himself, should they interfere?

4.

What should the teacher do? Why?

5.

If the teacher tells Doug what the LSD formula is and the school administration finds out, should the teacher be fired? Why or why not?

6.

If the teacher doesn’t tell Doug but suspects that he will get the information somewhere else, should he tell Doug’s parents or the police? Why or why not?

7.

If Doug makes LSD at home and is caught, should he be punished? If so, how and why? If not, why?

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57. Lying in Order to Help Someone After high school, Mike got a job as a plumbing apprentice in a large plumbing company. He worked under an experienced person who taught him how to become a tradesman. One day Mike’s boss made a mistake which would cost the company about $400 and blamed the mistake on Mike so that the owner would be mad at Mike instead of him. Mike told his parents what happened and tried to get another job. But it was difficult finding one after two weeks of looking he still had no results. One day when he came home, his parents told that the owner of the company had called and asked him to come back to work. Mike believed the story and returned. What actually happened was that Mike’s father called the owner, apologized for Mike (about something that Mike had never done), and pleaded with him to take Mike back. 1.

The parents lied to Mike. Do you think that lying, in this case, was a justified act? Give your reasons.

2.

If Mike found out the truth about how he was allowed to take back his old job, how would he feel? Why would he feel that way?

3.

Is lying in the attempt to help another person different from lying in order to help yourself? Why or why not?

4.

Was it right for the parents to call the company owner and lie to him? Why or why not?

5.

Should Mike tell anybody what really happened?

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58.

Two young college students met in their freshman year. The girl was an orphan on scholarship at the college but told her boyfriend a fantastic story, which she made up. She said her parents were in the Orient and her father was a wealthy businessman who believed that children should not be given any money even though he was controlling a large amount of money in trust for her. The boy came from a poor family but he had ambitions of going into business and becoming rich. He believed his girlfriend’s story and saw her as a good prospect. The girl was a very lonely person and desperately wanted to get married. The couple got married 6 months after they met. One week after the wedding the boy found out that the story was a fantasy. She told him the truth about her life. The boy was extremely angry and sued for divorce. He claimed that he had been cheated and humiliated.

1.

Should he get a divorce on these grounds?

2.

What do you think are legitimate grounds for divorce?

3.

Should people who intend to get married ever keep secrets from each other? If so, what kinds of things and why? If not, why not?

4.

Should a married couple try to stay together and make it work out even when they do not really love each other? Why or why not?

5.

What is your conception of an ideal marriage?

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59. Perjury John Henderson discovers that his brother Bill has been selling heroin to young people for some time. Bill has been accused of this crime and is on trial. His brother, John, has been called as a witness. He knows that if he tells the truth Bill will go to jail for a long time. If he lies, he will be guilty of perjury. However, if he lies there is a good chance that Bill will probably go free.

1.

What should John do? Why?

2.

What if Bill were not his brother but a good friend? Should that make a difference? Why?

3.

Suppose Bill’s crime had been less serious, such a driving without a license or turning in false fire alarms, should that make a difference? Why?

4.

John decides to lie under oath to protect his brother, but he is turned in by another witness. Should John be punished? What should his punishment be? Why?

5.

Should a family member be allowed to refuse to testify in court? What about a good friend? Why? Give the best reasons you can think of on both sides of the question.

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60. Shoplifting Mrs. Jackson was doing her grocery shopping one weekend in the big supermarket near her house. As she walked in to one of the back aisles, she saw a young man putting some cans of food into his coat pocket. She wondered whether or not to turn the young man in to the store manager. 1.

Should she report him to the manager or let him get away with shoplifting the food? Why? Is there something else that she might do?

2.

If she tells him to put it back and he refuses, should she turn him in? Why?

3.

If she knows that shoplifters are always prosecuted by that store and often end up gong to jail, should that make a difference in her decision? Why?

4.

What if the man who was stealing looked very poor?

5.

If she were an employee of the store, should that make a difference in her decision? Why?

6.

Suppose she knew that the manager of the store was a selfish man who exploited his customers because his was the only store in the neighborhood. Should that make a difference? Why?

7.

What should the penalty for shoplifting be? Why?

8.

Should the amount of punishment depend on how badly the man needs the food? Why?

9.

In what way could the young man’s shoplifting affect Mrs. Jackson?

10. Why do people shoplift?

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61. The Case of Charles Manson Do circumstances change a person’s responsibility for his actions? Charles Manson was born an illegitimate child. His first years of life were extremely difficult. His mother was irresponsible, and Charles was neglected. Finally, when he was 5, his mother disappeared and left Charles behind. No one knew where she went. The neighbors reported to the police that Charles had been abandoned. The police put Charles in the permanent custody of his relatives when his mother did not come back for several months. When Charles started school, he soon became known as a trouble-maker. The teachers began throwing him out of their classes. His relatives had a hard time with Charles and could not handle him. Besides, they had children of their own and really did not care for Charles. It was not long before Charles was brought to the attention of the police. He was caught stealing, vandalizing, and so on. After a number of offenses, he was sent by a juvenile court judge to a reform school. He spent approximately 8 years in the reform school. During those 8 years, he ran away a number of times, committed some offenses while he was out, and was finally sent back to the reform school. He was released from the reform school when he became of legal age. At the age of 28 he became a leader of a mystical group. He and a number of members of this group were convicted of a multiple murder which included Sharon Tate, an actress, and several of her friends in her secluded California home. 1.

Can or should you hold Charles Manson responsible for his behavior? Could you place the blame of a person’s actions on the conditions or circumstances of his life?

2.

Could Charles claim that the responsibility for his actions rests with society? The judge, who is a representative of society, sent him into reform school. The reform school did not do its job. What do you think about this argument?

3.

How should he be punished: If you consider him responsible for his actions? If you don’t consider him responsible?

4.

Why do you feel he should or should not be punished?

5.

Should he get the death sentence? Why?

6.

Do you think that Charles was insane, and if so, should that make a difference in his punishment? Why?

7.

What, in general, is the purpose of putting someone in prison?

8.

If you disagree with the idea of putting people into prisons, what do you think would be a just solution? Why?

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62. The Doctor’s Responsibility Dr. Katzen was sitting at home watching a football game on television when he heard a huge crash outside his house. When he went outside to see what had happened, he saw that a bad traffic accident had taken place. The driver of one of the cars was lying face down and appeared to be unconscious. Dr. Katzen feared that if the man were not treated soon, he might die. However, he was also aware of the fact that treating someone in such a situation could easily lead to a lawsuit.

1.

Should Dr. Katzen come to the aid of the injured man? Why or why not?

2.

If the injured man were not really in danger of dying, but if he were in great pain, should Dr. Katzen help him? Why or why not?

3.

If Dr. Katzen knew that a lawsuit could possibly lead to his losing his license to practice, how should that influence his decision?

4.

Do you think it is fair that doctors can be sued for coming to someone’s aid? Why or why not?

5.

If Dr. Katzen treated the victim who later recovered and refused to pay the medical bills on the grounds that he never asked for treatment, should he be forced to pay? Was it right for Dr. Katzen to charge him at all? Why or why not?

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63. The Dope Pusher The narcotics problem in this country has reached alarming proportions. Hundreds of people die each month and thousands of young lives are ruined. All of these drugs are illegal in this country. The drugs are brought in and distributed by an organized crime group. These groups of organized crime are very hard to crack. The people who work for these groups do not talk when they are caught. So far, the government has not been able to find enough legal evidence to jail these people. A dope pusher had been caught in a high school. He was questioned by the police as to the source of his supplies, but he refused to cooperate. Some people say that we should get the information in any way we can; if they do not talk voluntarily, they should be forced to talk by some method. These people claim that if we did that, we could eliminate these criminals and save many lives.

1.

Would you approve of it or give the police the right to keep people in jail until they agreed to talk or to question them at great length in order to find out information that would help control the organized drug traffic? Would you approve of torturing them in some way?

2.

Is it morally justifiable to control one evil by using evil means? Why or why not?

3.

Suppose 50 pushers are caught in one week. The police department does not know how much information each of these pushers has. Should they torture all of them and take a chance on torturing an individual who does not have any information that would help crack the ring? Why or why not?

4.

Some people feel that they could not torture another person. Why do you think they feel that way?

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64. The Kidney Transplant Patty Barnes was near death at Massachusetts General Hospital. Although she was only 25 years old, both kidneys were irreparable diseased and she needed an immediate kidney transplant in order to survive. The hospital had been trying to find a suitable donor for some time, but had not been able to locate anyone for the donation. Just at the point where her doctor was ready to give up, he found the perfect tissue match in a man who had just been killed in a car crash. However, the man had not given his consent for the donation of his kidney.

1.

Should the doctor transplant the dead man’s kidney into Patty Barnes in order to save her live? Why or why not?

2.

The doctor knows that it is illegal to transplant any organ, even from a dead man, without his consent before he died. Should that enter into the doctor’s decision? Why or why not?

3.

The doctor decides to ask the dead man’s wife for permission to perform the transplant. What should she do? Why?

4.

Suppose she knows that he was opposed to the idea of donating his organs and even stipulated in his will that an autopsy was not to be performed upon his death. What should she do in that case? Why?

5.

Suppose the wife really feels it would be wrong to let Patty die. Then what should she do? Why?

6.

Should the law allow other people to refuse to donate a person’s organs after the person dies? Why or why not?

7.

Do you feel it is a moral obligation to allow organs to be used after your death? Why or why not?

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65. The Noisy Child During World War II, a group of people were trying to run away from the German Gestapo who were trailing them. One of the women in the group had an infant who was ill. It was not known what was wrong with the child but it cried continuously. All of the people were hiding together in a small attic of a large house. One of the men in the group suggested that they kill the infant because it made a great deal of noise. Otherwise, the Germans might discover them and kill them all.

1.

What should the mother of the infant do and why?

2.

Is it justified to kill one person if it will increase the chance of saving a lot of people?

3.

Suppose they killed the baby and the Germans never came into the house, are they guilty of murder?

4.

Do you consider this kind of killing murder or self-defense? Why?

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66. The Robin Hood Case A man invented a way to win at cards without ever losing. He often plays cards with a rich old gentleman, who is very stingy with his money. The young man knows he will be cheating at cards, but he could use the money he won usefully in helping the poor people in the neighborhood. He knows he can’t get any of the old man’s money any other way because the old man is leaving it to his children who are already very wealthy. 1.

Is this all right? Why or why not?

2.

What if he were keeping the money? He needs it because he is very poor. What if he were not very poor but not as rich as the old man, would it be all right to keep the money in that case? Why should (shouldn’t) these things make a difference?

3.

Should it matter whether he’s cheating a nice old guy or a mean old guy? Why?

4.

Is this better or worse than stealing from the old man? Why?

5.

What should the law be?

6.

Should he be punished differently if he gave the money away rather than if he kept it?

7.

Does this end (helping the poor) justify the means? Do good ends ever justify the bad means? (Give examples.)

8.

Is stealing from an enemy, for example Saddam Hussein, all right? Why or why not?

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67. The Stolen Car James is 18 years old. One day, he and a friend stole a car and planned to paint it, change the license plate, and generally fix it up so they wouldn’t be caught. James tells his older brother, Bill about their plan and asks him not to tell anyone about it. Bill wonders what he should do.

1.

What should Bill do? Why?

2.

Bill tells James to return the car but James refuses. What should Bill do now? Should he tell their father? Why?

3.

If Bill decides to tell their father, what should the father do? Why?

4.

Suppose Bill knew the people from who James had stolen the car. Should that make a difference in his decision?

5.

According to the law, a citizen is required to report any crimes he may know about. What do you think the purpose of this law is?

6.

Should the law require you to turn in a relative? Why?

7.

What about turning in a friend? Why?

8.

Should decisions about whether to turn someone in be left up to the judgement of the individual? Why or why not?

9.

Can you think of a good reason why a decision to turn someone in should not be left up to an individual?

10. Suppose the crime committed by James and his friend was considered to be a felony under the law. Would you consider Bill (and their father if he knows) to be an accessory? Why or why not? Moral Decision Making Stories, 2nd Edition Page 65