Lecture 2: The Classical Linear Regression Model

Economics 513 Lecture 2: The Classical Linear Regression Model Introduction In lecture 1 we • Introduced concept of an economic relation • Noted that...
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Economics 513

Lecture 2: The Classical Linear Regression Model Introduction In lecture 1 we • Introduced concept of an economic relation • Noted that empirical economic relations do not resemble textbook relations • Introduced a method to find the best fitting linear relation No reference to mathematical statistics in all of this. Initially econometrics did not use the tools of mathematical statistics. Mathematical statistics develops methods for the analysis of data generated by a random experiment in order to learn about that random experiment.

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Is this relevant in economics? Consider • Wage equation: relation between wage and education, work experience, gender, … • Macro consumption function: relation between (national) consumption and (national) income What is the random experiment? To make progress we start with the assumption that all economic relations are essentially deterministic, if we include all variables

y = f( x1 , … , xW )

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Hence, if we have data yi , xi1 , … , xiW , i = 1, … , n then

yi = f( xi1 , … , xiW ) , i = 1, … , n Let x1 ,… , xW be the sample averages of the variables and assume that f is sufficiently many times differentiable to have a Taylor series expansion around x1 ,… , xW , i.e. a polynomial approximation

yi = β 0′ + β1 ( xi1 − x1 ) +

+ γ 1 ( xi1 − x1 ) 2 +

+ βW ( xiW − xW ) +

+ ( xiW − xW ) 2 +

+ δ 1 ( xi1 − x1 )( xi 2 − x2 ) +

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We divide x1 ,… , xW into three groups 1. Variables that do not vary in the sample (take this to be last W − V variables), i.e. for i = 1, …, n , xi ,V +1 = xV +1 ,… , xi ,W = xW . Example: gender if we consider a sample of women. 2. Variables in the relation that are omitted or cannot be included because they are unobservable. Let this be the next V − K + 1 variables. 3. Variables included in the relation, i.e. x1 ,… , x K +1.

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To keep the relation simple we concentrate on the linear part. Hence the observations satisfy

yi = β 0 + β1 xi1 + with

β 0 = β 0′ −

+ β K −1 xi , K −1 + ε i

K =1

∑β jxj j =1

The remainder term contains all the omitted terms

ε i = β K ( xiK − x K ) + + γ 1 ( xi1 − x1 ) 2 +

+ βV ( xiV − xV ) + + γ V ( xiV − xV ) 2 +

+ δ 1 ( xi1 − x1 )( xi 2 − x2 ) + We call ε i the disturbance (of the exact linear relation). 5

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Note that

βj =

∂f ( x1 , … , xW ) , ∂xj

β 0 = f( x1 ,… , xW ) −

j = 1, …, K − 1

K −1

∑β jxj j =1

Conclusions: 1. The slope coefficient β j is the partial effect of x j on y . 2. The slope coefficients and the intercept depend on the variables that are constant in a sample, e.g. in a sample of women the coefficients in a wage relation may be different from those in a sample of only men. 3. Only in very special cases will the relation have a 0 intercept.

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Consider the following experiment: Prediction of yi on the basis of xi1 , …, xi , K −1 . Assume that we have observed xi1 , …, xi , K −1 . This does not tell us anything about the disturbance ε i that depends on (many) variables beside x1 ,… , x K −1 . Hence, even if we know the coefficients β 0 ,… , β K −1, we cannot predict with certainty what yi is. A variable with a value that is unknown before the experiment is performed is a random variable in probability theory. As in classical random experiments (flipping coin, rolling die) randomness due to lack of knowledge.

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In prediction experiment yi is a random variable and hence so is

ε i = yi − β 0 − β1 xi1 −

− β K −1 xi , K −1

If we have a sample of size n , we have n replications of the random experiment

y1 = β 0 + β1 x11 +

+ β K −1 x1, K −1 + ε1

y n = β 0 + β1 xn1 +

+ β K −1 xn, K −1 + ε n

The distribution of the disturbance ε reflects the fact that we do not know the value of the disturbance if we know x1 ,… , x K −1 . In fact we make a more extreme assumption: the value of ε is completely unpredictable from x1,…, xK −1 .

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Assumption 1: E(ε i | xi1 ,… , xi , K −1 ) = 0 In words: the disturbance ε is mean-independent of x 1 , … , x K − 1 . Why do we need this assumption? Consider (1)

ε i = γ ( xi1 − x1 ) + ηi , i = 1, …, n

Hence, ε is (partially) predictable using x1 (but not completely so). Substitution gives

yi = β 0 − γx1 + ( β1 + γ ) xi1 +

+ β K −1 xi , K −1 + ηi

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Remember that

β1 =

∂f ( x1 ,… , xW ) ∂x1

Conclusion: If (1) holds then the coefficient of x1 is not equal to the partial effect of x1 on y . Failure of Assumption 1 is a failure of the ceteris paribus condition in the sample: a change in x1 has two effects on y , a direct effect β1 and an indirect effect γ . The latter effect is due to the fact that in a sample we cannot hold other relevant variables fixed/constant. Hence we only measure the partial effect if the omitted variables are not related with x1. Measuring partial effects is the goal of most empirical research in economics (and other social sciences). The biggest challenge in empirical research is to ensure the Assumption 1 holds.

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Whether we care depends on our objectives. Compare homeowner who is interested in relation between house price and square footage of house.

• If he/she wants to predict the sales price of house as is no reason to be worried about interpretation of regression coefficient as partial effect. • If he/she wants to evaluate the investment in an addition to the house the estimation of the partial effect is essential.

Two strategies to estimate partial effect

• Include all variables that are correlated with x1 in the relation. • Assign x1 randomly, i.e. using a random experiment that is independent of anything, e.g. by flipping a coin if x1is dichotomous.

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The CLR model Re-label the variables x 1 , … , x K − 1 as x2 , … , x K and introduce the variable x1 ≡ 1

i.e. xi1 = 1, i = 1, … , n . Also re-label β 0 ,… , β K −1to β1 ,… , β K . In the new notation for i = 1, …, n (2)

yi = β1 xi1 + β 2 xi 2 +

+ β K xiK + ε i

This is the multiple linear regression model. The relation (2) is linear in x1 , … , x K and also linear in β1 ,… , β K . The latter is essential. By reinterpreting x1 , … , x K we can deal with relations that are non-linear in these variables.

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Examples:

• Polynomial in x y = β1 + β 2 x + β 3 x 2 + β 4 x 3 + ε Define: x1 ≡ 1, x2 = x, x3 = x 2 , x4 = x 3

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• Log-linear relation ln y = β1 + β 2 ln x + ε

Define: x1 ≡ 1, x2 = ln x Note

β2 =

∂ ln y ∂ ln x

i.e. β 2 is the elasticity of y w.r.t. x .

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• Semi-log relation ln y = β1 + β 2 x + ε Note: no re-definition is needed.

Also

∂y ∂ ln y y β2 = = ∂x ∂x

This is a semi-elasticity.

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Assumption 1 in the new notation: (3)

E(ε i | xi1 , … , xiK ) = 0 , i = 1, …, n

Note that this implies that E (ε i ) = 0 . This is without loss of generality because a non-zero mean can be absorbed into the intercept.

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In matrix notation (2) and (3) are

y = Xβ + ε and

E(ε i | xi ) = 0 , i = 1, … , n with

(4)

⎡ x1′ ⎤ X =⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢⎣ xn′ ⎥⎦

Note that xi is a K − vector.

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The Classical (Multiple) Linear Regression (CLR) model is a set of assumptions mainly on the conditional distribution of ε given x1 , … , x K . Some assumptions are essential, some are convenient initial assumptions and can/will be relaxed. The CLR model is appropriate in many practical situations and is the starting point for the use of mathematical statistical inference to measure economic relations

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CLR model

y = Xβ + ε Assumption 1: Fundamental assumption

E(ε | X ) = 0

Assumption 2: Spherical disturbances

E(εε ′ | X ) = σ 2 I Assumption 3: Full rank

rank( X ) = K

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Discussion of the assumptions Assumption 1 is shorthand for

E(ε i | X ) = 0 , i = 1, …, n Hence this is equivalent to

E(ε i | x1 , … , xn ) = 0 , i = 1, …, n Compare this with

E(ε i | xi ) = 0 , i = 1, … , n By the law of iterated expectations, the current assumption implies the latter.

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The current assumption states that not only xi but also x j , j ≠ i is not related to ε i . This is not stronger than the previous assumption if x1 , … , x n are independent as in a random sample from a population. If these are not independent, as e.g. in time-series data, then this additional assumption may be too strong. Assumption 1 is satisfied if X is chosen independently of ε i . In that case we can treat X as a matrix of known constants. Therefore instead of Assumption 1 one sometimes sees Assumption 1’: X is a matrix of known constants determined independently of ε . Note: Chosing/controlling X is not enough.

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Next, we consider assumption 2 Note

⎡ ε12 ε1ε 2 ⎢ ε ε εε ' = ⎢ 2 1 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢⎣ε nε1

ε1ε n ⎤

ε n2

⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥⎦

Hence Assumption 2 implies that

E(ε i2 | X ) = σ 2

, i = 1, … , n

This is called homoskedasticity.

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Assumption 2 also implies that

E(ε i ε j | X ) = 0 Hence, given X the disturbances are uncorrelated.

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Example of failure of homoskedasticity: random coefficients

y = β 0 + ( β1 + u ) x + ε ↑ population variation in coefficient

= β 0 + β1 x + ε + ux For the composite disturbance, if E(u | x) = 0

E(ε + ux | x) = 0 but

Var(ε + ux | x) = σ 2 + σ εu x + σ u2 x 2 with σ εu = E(εu ) , σ u2 = E(u 2 ) . Hence the composite error is heteroskedastic.

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Failure of uncorrelated disturbances: serial correlation Assume serial correlation of order 1 in disturbances

ε i = ρε i −1 + ui Applies in time-series. Finally, consider Assumption 3. If rank( X ) = K , then Xa = 0 if and only if a = 0 with a a K − vector, i.e. there is no linear relation between the K variables.

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Failure of Assumption 3: wage equation

yi = β1 xi1 + β 2 xi 2 + β 3 xi 3 + β 4 xi 4 + ε i with

x2 = schooling (years) x3 = age x4 = potential experience (age-years in school-6)

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, i = 1,… , n

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Hence

x4 = x3 − x2 − 6

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Define for any constant c,

~

~

~

~

β1 = β1 − 6c, β 2 = β 2 − c, β 3 = β 3 + c, β 4= β 4 − c Then also

~ ~ ~ ~ yi = β1 xi1 + β 2 xi 2 + β 3 xi 3 + β 4 xi 4 + ε i

, i = 1,… , n

~ ~ Conclusion: We cannot distinguish between β1 ,… , β 4 and β1 ,… , β 4 . For all c these parameters are observationally equivalent. Problem is also clear if we substitute for x4

yi = ( β1 − 6 β 4 ) xi1 + ( β 2 − β 4 ) xi 2 + ( β 3 + β 4 ) xi 3 + ε i

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By assumptions 1 and 2, E(ε | X ) = 0 , Var(ε | X ) = σ 2 I . Sometimes it is assumed that

ε | X ~ N (0, σ 2 I ) . Why is the normal distribution a natural choice?

In sequel we sometimes assume: Assumption 4 ε | X ~ N (0, σ 2 I )

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Linear regression as projection Alternative interpretation of linear regression is as conditional mean function. In previous derivation regression coefficient β j in multiple linear regression is the partial effect on y

∂f ( x1 ,… , xW ) ∂xj For this result Assumption 1 was necessary.

βj =

Alternative: Consider β j as the coefficient of x j in a linear conditional mean function. To keep things simple we consider the case of 1 explanatory variable (and an intercept).

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The dependent variable y and the independent variable x have a joint population distribution with joint frequency distribution f(x, y) . Example: y = savings rate, x = income and f(x, y) is frequency distribution over all US households. By a sample survey we obtain yi , xi , i = 1,… , n . This survey can be used to obtain an estimate of the population f(x, y) denoted by fˆ(x, y) (see table 1.1). Note savings rate and income have been discretized.

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From the joint frequency in the sample we obtain the sample conditional frequency distribution (see table 1.2)

ˆ(y, x) f fˆ(y | x) = fˆ(x)

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If there is an exact relation between y and x , then every column should have one 1 and rest 0’s. If not, we can consider the average of y for every value of x . This is the conditional mean function. In population

m( x) = E( y | x) = ∑ y f( y | x) y

with estimate

mˆ ( x) = ∑ y fˆ( y | x) y

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Note that mˆ ( x) may be rough: sampling variation around smooth population m(x) .

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Why is m( x) = E( y | x) interesting? One reason is optimal prediction. Assume joint population distribution f(x, y) is known and that you have a random draw from this distribution. Only x is revealed and you must predict y . What is the best predictor h(x) ? Criterion: minimize expected squared prediction error E ( y − h( x) )2 = E (( y − m( x)) + (m( x) − h( x)) )2 =

(

) ( ) = E (( y − m( x)) ) + 2 E(( y − m( x))(m( x) − h( x)) ) + 2

(

) (

+ E (m( x) − h( x)) 2 ≥ E ( y − m( x)) 2 and this lower bound is achieved if h( x) = m( x) .

)

Conclusion: Optimal prediction is h( x) = E( y | x) .

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Now let us restrict to linear prediction

h( x) = a + bx Best linear predictor

(

min E ( y − a − bx) 2 a,b

)

First-order conditions with u = y − a − bx

− 2 E(u ) = 0 ⇒ E( y ) = a + b E( x) − 2 E(ux) = 0 ⇒ E( xy ) = a + b E( x 2 )

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Solution (compare with OLS solution)

b=

Cov( x, y ) Var( x)

a = E( y ) − b E( x) If we replace population moments with sample moments we obtain n

∑ ( xi − x )( yi − y )

bˆ = i =1

n

∑ ( xi − x ) 2

i =1

aˆ = y − bˆx This is the OLS solution!

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There is an important difference between the case that the conditional mean is linear and the case that the conditional mean is not linear. If E( y | x) = a + bx , we have for u = y − a − bx E(u | x) = E( y − a − bx | x) = E( y − E( y | x) | x ) = 0

This is Assumption 1 in the CLR model. However, b has not a ‘structural’ interpretation, as a partial effect!

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If conditional mean is not linear, we have from the first-order condition E(ux) = 0 . This is weaker:

E(u | x) = 0 ⇒ E(ux) = 0 but

E(ux) = 0 not ⇒ E(u | x) = 0 Hence in that case Assumption 1 of the CLR model is not satisfied but a weaker uncorrelatedness assumption.

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The Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) estimator We have n observations yi , xi 2 , … , xiK , i = 1, … , n . We organize the data in the n × 1vector y and the n × K matrix X with

⎡1 x12 ⎢ X =⎢ ⎢ ⎢1 x ⎣ n2

x1K ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ xnK ⎥⎦

The observations are a sample from a population and we assume that the joint distribution of y, X is such that the CLR model is the appropriate statistical model, i.e. y, X satisfy

y = Xβ + ε

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for some K × 1vector β of regression coefficients and some n × 1vector of random errors ε with a distribution that satisfies

E (ε | X ) = 0 E (εε ′ | X ) = σ 2 I This specifies the random experiment of which y, X is the outcome (the CLR model). We can now discuss statistical inference: estimation of population parameters and tests of hypotheses concerning the population parameters and other aspects of the population distribution.

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Setup applies to both cross-section and time-series data. In first case yi , xi 2 , … , xiK , i = 1, … , n is a random sample and the CLR assumptions on the population distribution can made on y1 = x1′ β + ε1

Because the observations are independent we can obtain the joint distribution of y, X from the marginal distributions. For time-series data the observations are not independent and the CLR model applies directly to the joint distribution of y, X .

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Estimation of β and σ 2 The solution to minimization of sum of squared deviations/residuals

b = ( X ' X ) −1 X ' y Note that for this rank ( X ) = K . This is an estimator of β (only depends on the data): the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) estimator of β . Is the OLS estimator a good estimator? In mathematical statistics estimators are evaluated by considering their sampling distribution, i.e. their distribution in repeated samples ( y s , X s ), s = 1, … , S .

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All samples are realizations of CLR random experiment

ys = X s β + ε s

, s = 1, … , S

The sampling distribution of the OLS estimator b is the frequency distribution of bs , s = 1, …, S for S large. We can obtain this distribution by computer simulation (as in assignment 2).

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Alternative is to use the CLR assumptions and rules of probability theory to derive (features) of the sampling distribution of b . Consider

b = ( X ' X ) −1 X ' y = ( X ' X ) −1 X ' ( Xβ + ε ) = = β + ( X ' X ) −1 X ' ε From this we can, using the CLR assumptions, find the conditional average of b given X (in the sampling distribution)

E (b | X ) = β + ( X ' X ) −1 X ' E (ε | X ) = β Hence the unconditional average of b is (law of iterated expectations) E (b) = E X ( E (b | X )) = β In words: under CLR assumptions the OLS estimator is unbiased for β .

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Beside mean consider the variance of b : Var (b) = E [(b − E (b))(b − E (b))'] = E [(b − β )(b − β )']

We have

b − β = ( X ' X ) −1 X ' ε Upon substitution

(

Var (b) = E ( X ' X ) −1 X ' εε ' X ( X ' X ) −1

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We have

(

)

E ( X ' X ) −1 X ' εε ' X ( X ' X ) −1 | X = = ( X ' X ) −1 X ' E (εε ' | X ) X ( X ' X ) −1 = σ 2 ( X ' X ) −1 and hence

(

Var (b) = E X (σ 2 ( X ' X ) −1 ) = σ 2 E ( X ' X ) −1

)

Note that σ 2 ( X ' X ) −1 is an unbiased estimator of this variance.

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In special case of constant and one regressor we have the unbiased variance estimator

Var (b2 ) =

σ2 n

∑ ( xi − x ) 2

i =1

Note that this decreases with σ 2 and with the variation in x .

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Optimality of OLS estimator in CLR model Consider class of estimators for β that are linear in y , i.e. bL = Cy

For the OLS estimator C = ( X ' X ) −1 X ' , i.e. C in general depends on X . Gauss-Markov Theorem: In CLR model the OLS estimator is the Best Linear Unbiased (BLU) of β , i.e. it has the smallest variance of linear unbiased estimators.

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