LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS EXPAND

Leadership Programs CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Faculty Development Program Obstetrics, has enrolled in five courses thus went surfing. It seemed like a p...
Author: Dustin Ryan
5 downloads 0 Views 2MB Size
Leadership Programs CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Faculty Development Program

Obstetrics, has enrolled in five courses thus went surfing. It seemed like a pretty good “Thirty-five years ago, I thought far, and plans to attend more. idea at the time.” leadership meant telling people what “Gene brings a certain sensitivity from Crumley eventually graduated from to do and when to do it. I no longer his time as a minister, because people in UC Davis in 1978 and San Francisco think that way. Instead, I now think the clergy traditionally are the epitome of Theological Seminary in 1981. that the first and most important job of kindness, and they’re gentle and patient “I went to divinity school because my leadership is to listen. That’s because souls. They listen to a lot of people for father-in-law was a minister, and I admired when people feel listened to, when they a lot of reasons – just as physicians do,” him. The ministry in my mind combined feel like you genuinely understand how Schrimmer said. the two urges that I had at the time. One they see and make sense of the world, was to help people, and the other was they do things, good and important In addition to his training as an a love of books, reading, thinking and things, without having to be told. And ordained Presbyterian minister, Crumley writing,” Crumley said. “So, here I am, sometimes they do those good and also spent 13 years in management 40 years later, still trying to be helpful by important things before the leader positions with Habitat for Humanity, for reading books, but instead of translating even knew they needed to be done,” which he served as the organization’s Crumley said. director of development – fundraising – as them into sermons, now I’m translating them into PowerPoint slides.” “In the leadership positions I’ve well as coordinator of the organization’s In addition to teaching workshops, held, my effectiveness improved when $6.5 million response to Hurricane Andrew in 1992, in South Dade County, Florida. In Crumley also offers one-on-one leadership I stopped providing answers and coaching. Faculty members who have started asking good questions with a 1996, Crumley left Habitat for Humanity spirit of inquiry – to gain and began working as a continuing understanding about how educator with UC Davis Extension, the world appears from that rising to the position of department other person’s point of view. chair in 2009. In my courses I try to create Since 2007, Crumley has an environment in which all focused his teaching efforts and of us can travel together on now works exclusively with this path of inquiry, of trying physicians, veterinarians, scientists to understand ourselves, and and engineers. “If you teach others, and our world better. business people the kind of course And we do that only by asking subjects I’m interested in, you have better and better questions to be up on all the ‘buzzwords,’ over time.” which I don’t find interesting,” The courses that Gene Crumley explained. Crumley teaches do not have “On the other hand,” he to be taken in sequence; continued, “if you teach the same they stand independently. Gene Crumley surfing at Pismo Beach in October 2012 (photo by courses to doctors, engineers and James Ritchey, M.D.) For a listing of Crumley’s scientists, they want to know ‘What’s upcoming workshops, check the science behind your ideas?’ And enlisted him for coaching include Joseph the “calendar” section in this newsletter if you can point to the science, rather than M. Galante, an associate professor of or visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/ the ‘business speak,’ they’re very interested surgery and chief of the Division of Trauma facultydev/leadership.html on the web. in listening and learning. That shift in and Emergency Surgery. And, by the way, after more than audience focus has nicely coincided with “Gene transcends teachers who just 50 years, Gene Crumley still hits the my growing fascination with neuroscience give leadership nuggets. He offers much waves with his surfboard almost every and emotional intelligence, which are my deeper insight into how to lead, by tying weekend. abiding intellectual passions.” leadership principles to philosophy, As an undergraduate student at UC religion, military, his own experiences, and campuses in Santa Barbara and in his literature,” Galante explained. To schedule leadership coaching: native San Diego, Charles E. “Gene” Crumley’s time allocation to the Faculty Contact Cheryl Busman, Faculty Crumley II initially considered becoming Development Program will be increased to Development Program Manager, (916) a physician. “Organic chemistry was my accommodate demand for the coaching, 703-9230, [email protected] downfall,” Crumley laughed, “as it was for consulting and retreat facilitation services To enroll in workshops, register online: many pre-med students at the time, so I he performs for the School of Medicine’s http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev/ dropped out of school for five years and academic departments.

Sherman Building, Suite 3900 UC Davis Health System 2315 Stockton Blvd. Sacramento, CA 95817

Published by the Faculty Development Program SPRING 2015 Workshops and other activities

10 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

You are invited! We encourage you to enroll in one of the various workshops and events sponsored by the Faculty Development Program. For more event details and to register, visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev/ and click Enroll Online. (Event co-sponsors are indicated within parentheses.) Volunteer Clinical Faculty members are also welcome and encouraged to attend faculty development events.

11 Career Flexibility/Work-Life Balance (WIMHS)

April

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 1

June 8 Organizational Culture and Leadership: Advanced Topics, Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

15 Organizational Culture and Leadership: Advanced Topics, Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

7 A Leadership Model for Faculty in Academic Medicine (MCLP) 9 Breakfast with the Vice Chancellor/ Dean

Event co-sponsors ECLP: Early Career Leadership Program

facultyNEWSLETTER

9 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

MCLP: Mid-Career Leadership Program WIMHS: Women in Medicine and Health Science

14 How to Give Effective Feedback (ECLP)

Published quarterly by Faculty Development, which administers and coordinates programs that respond to the professional and career development needs of UC Davis Health System faculty members.

21 Getting Delegation Right! – Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

5

Gene Crumley’s thought-provoking courses increase in popularity What makes delegating tasks and responsibilities so difficult for some people, and why does it go wrong? What is “emotional intelligence,” and why could it be more revealing than IQ in determining leadership qualities? Why do so many people have difficulty in accepting constructive criticism? Gene Crumley tackles those and other compelling questions in the ongoing series of leadership workshops that he has been conducting throughout the past 12 years for the Faculty Development Program, in collaboration with the Early Career Leadership Program (ECLP) and the Mid-Career Leadership Program (MCLP). His teaching is steeped as much in philosophical and metaphysical

concepts as it is in organizational strategy and tactics. And the Faculty Development Program is increasing the number of offerings in response to growing demand. “Gene is very worldly, and he provides a unique perspective by virtue of his background,” said David B. Schrimmer, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology who was recruited to the faculty last spring. Shortly after Schrimmer’s arrival, he was appointed vice chair, and with his substantial increase in duties he sought training in leadership. Gary Leiserowitz, interim department chair, encouraged him to consider Crumley’s workshops. Schrimmer, chief of the Division of CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

28 Getting Delegation Right! – Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

2315 Stockton Blvd. Sherman Building, Suite 3900 Sacramento, CA 95817 (916) 703-9230 www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

28 Workshop: Writing a Successful Grant Proposal May

Edward Callahan, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Academic Personnel

14 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

Brent Seifert, J.D. Assistant Dean for Academic Personnel

15 Organizational Culture and Leadership: An Introduction, Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

Cheryl Busman Program Manager, Faculty Development [email protected]

22 Organizational Culture and Leadership: An Introduction, Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

EditPros LLC Writing and Editing www.editpros.com

Gene Crumley conducting one of his workshops. (Photos: Emi Manning, Medical Illustration) JUNE CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS EXPAND

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

6

officeVISIT VCF MEMBER BRUCE RYHAL UNDERSTANDS WHAT HIS ALLERGY PATIENTS EXPERIENCE Doctors offer the most compassionate care when they are able to empathize with their patients. Allergist and immunologist Bruce Ryhal has a deep understanding of the fears and discomforts his allergy and asthma patients suffer, because he has experienced them himself. Ryhal, a UC Davis Volunteer Clinical Faculty (VCF) member for 30 years, is assistant chief of the Allergy Department at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Roseville. As a child growing up in the Sacramento area in the early 1960s, he was stricken with asthma at age 6. “The asthma attacks were very unpleasant and unnerving, and caused a lot of concern for me and my family,” Ryhal said. “I missed school because of asthma, and I had to go to the doctor a lot. Many people who haven’t experienced asthma don’t realize that it can be a lot more troublesome disease than they think.” Ryhal (who pronounces his name RY-all), diagnoses and treats patients not only for respiratory allergies and asthma, but also for dermatitis, exercise-related bronchospasm, food allergies, autoimmune diseases and other conditions, and is regularly asked to consult with physicians in other departments. “Even fields such as cardiovascular disease rely on immunologic techniques. For example, a commonly implanted vascular stent contains sirolimus, which is actually an immunosuppressant,” Ryhal said. “Other specialists such as oncologists are increasingly turning to immunotherapies for cancer. We will not likely be the leads in applying those therapies, but clinical immunologists are routinely called upon as advisers.” Ryhal has taken interest in psychoneuroimmunology, an area of study that examines potential connections between stress and immune function. As technology lead for his department, he has been pursuing a business management

viewPOINT

A WELCOME TO NEW FACULTY COLLEAGUES

BY JULIE A. FREISCHLAG, VICE CHANCELLOR AND DEAN

Brian Jonas

STRATEGIC REGIONAL EXPANSION FOR UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM

Jennifer Rothschild

Each edition of the Faculty Newsletter introduces several faculty colleagues who recently joined the UC Davis Health System community. Watch for more new clinical and research staff members in the next issue.

bright, enthusiastic internal medicine residents on the medicine wards at the KP Sacramento and South Sacramento hospitals, and all I had to do was fill out some forms.” In his current VCF role, he oversees students, residents and fellows as he serves as the attending physician on the first Friday of each month at the allergy clinic at the UC Davis Medical Center. At the end of each clinic he conducts a seminar. In addition, he has been coordinator of the medical center’s Allergy and Immunology Journal Club since 1996. “The journal club has been a real joy to me, and I advise every volunteer faculty member to attend or organize Bruce Ryhal (courtesy photo) something like this,” Ryhal said. technique called queuing mathematics in M. Eric Gershwin, M.D., pursuit of improving the balance between Distinguished Professor of Medicine and appointment supply and demand. He also chief of the Division of Rheumatology, is a member of Kaiser Roseville’s quality Allergy and Clinical Immunology, assurance committee. credits Ryhal for helping maintain the His interest in immunology was first department’s accreditation status. piqued when he was an undergraduate “Bruce Ryhal is an extraordinary student at Stanford University in the 1970s. teacher and physician who has dedicated “I worked in a transplant immunology literally hundreds and hundreds of hours laboratory at Stanford during the very to the university,” Gershwin said. “Bruce exciting days when some of the first heart helps Suzanne Teuber, our fellowship transplants were being performed. The director, with a mountain of paperwork, technical surgical issues in transplantation including the monstrous stack of material were worked out fairly quickly, but the for ACGME reaccreditation. Thanks in rejection issues still have not been totally part to his efforts, we have had five-year solved even to this day. So I came to see accreditations and excellent evaluations the various fields of immunology as having by fellows. We have the best and really interesting problems,” explained longest-standing accreditation in allergyRyhal, who obtained his M.D. degree from immunology of any medical school in the UC San Diego. United States.” After practicing with Kaiser Bruce and his wife, Denise, a school Permanente in San Diego and in nurse, have a son, Danny, who is a Sacramento for six years to retire his graduate student at UC Davis; and a medical school debt, he took a leave of daughter, Emily, a case manager for absence and completed a fellowship in psychiatric patients. After undergoing allergy and clinical immunology at UC allergen immunotherapy successfully, Davis. By that time he already had been a Bruce is able to spend his leisure time UC Davis VCF member for four years. outdoors, skimming across Folsom Lake “They made me an offer I couldn’t on small, high performance sailboats. For refuse,” he quipped. “I got to work with him, that’s a breath of fresh air.

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

facultyROUNDS

Brian Jonas studying new leukemia therapy approaches Hematologist and oncologist Brian A. Jonas, M.D., Ph.D., a specialist in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, is investigating novel targets and therapies for these diseases. Jonas, an assistant professor of medicine, is intent on reducing the high mortality rate of those diseases, which are resistant to existing therapeutic approaches.

Other new colleagues n

Fellowship-trained endocrine surgeon Michael J. Campbell, M.D., an assistant professor of surgery, has a dual appointment in surgical oncology and gastrointestinal surgery. He specializes in treating patients with thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal and pancreas disorders. He is investigating the benefits of adrenal venous sampling for patients with aldosterone-producing tumors, and evaluating the risk of undiagnosed thyroid cancers in patients with multinodular goiters.

Jonas, who obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. n Board-certified dermatologist and degrees at UC Davis, and fellowship training dermatopathologist Maija Kiuru, M.D., at Stanford, sees patients at the UC Davis Ph.D., an assistant professor of clinical dermatology, maintains a practice in Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has a dermatology and dermatopathology particular interest in leukemia stem cell while conducting research into genetic biology and development of therapeutics alterations in nevi, melanoma and other that target these cells to improve treatment skin tumors. She seeks improvements outcomes, particularly for older patients. in diagnostic accuracy and ways to more precisely identify markers of Jennifer Rothschild treats male tumor progression. She also studies and female urinary incontinence familial skin, hair and nail disorders through gene discovery to improve Jennifer Rothschild, M.D., MPH, an understanding of epidermal biology. assistant professor of urology, has expertise n Board-certified oncologist and in male and female reconstructive urology. hematologist Eve Rodler, M.D., an Her clinical practice in male and female assistant adjunct professor of medicine, pelvic health encompasses treatments for specializes in breast cancer treatment. incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Rodler, who is co-chief of hematology She is skilled in implantation of artificial urinary sphincters and urethral strictures, and performs complex genitourinary reconstructions, including urinary fistula repair. She is conducting research in evaluation and treatments for male and female incontinence.

2

n

and oncology for the VA Northern California Health Care System in Martinez, is the principal investigator for a phase I trial investigating the efficacy of a PARP inhibitor in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced BRCA mutation-associated and/or triple negative breast cancer.

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

We have been extending the reach of UC Davis Health System on a limited basis during recent years by means of affiliations with several hospitals and with clinical practice groups. Those relationships have proven to be constructive in enhancing our public health improvement aspirations. With those intentions in mind, UC Davis is putting out the welcome mat to invite clinical affiliations with additional healthcare providers throughout the region. As a regional referral center, UC Davis is committed to being as accessible as possible to physicians in outlying areas. Unlike UC Davis Health System, many smaller hospitals cannot justify employing teams of medical specialists or surgeons skilled in complex procedures. Numerous regional hospitals and other healthcare systems have asked us to consider establishing partnership agreements with them. Some seek access to our specialists using telemedicine. Other hospitals would like UC Davis to dispatch physicians to their facilities to complement their medical staffs. Still others wish to establish UC Davis-affiliated medical residency programs and rotations for students in medicine and other allied health services. Through our partnership initiative we can create a network that will give patients in rural communities greatly improved access to state-of-the-art medical technology and advanced health care in neonatology, cancer therapy and other disciplines. Alliances between UC Davis and smaller, independent community hospitals are inherently patient-centered because we’re collaboratively making sure that each patient is in the right place to receive the right care.

Robert J. Steffner, M.D., an assistant clinical professor with dual appointments in orthopaedic surgery and surgical oncology, treats patients for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, benign bone and soft-tissue lesions, and metabolic bone disease. Steffner, who is chief of orthopaedic oncology, is conducting research in evidencebased decision-making in orthopaedic oncology, evaluation of advanced imaging for tumor staging, and perioperative pain management in oncology patients.

n

Urologic oncologist Stanley A. Yap, M.D., M.Sc., FRCSC, an assistant professor of urology, is skilled in open, minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques for prostate, kidney, bladder and testicular cancer. Yap, board-certified by the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, is affiliated with the VA Northern California Health Care System in Sacramento. He conducts research assessing the quality of care and effectiveness of treatments for urologic malignancies.

n

Pediatric cardiologist Jay Yeh, M.D., is conducting research on threedimensional imaging, deformation imaging and other echocardiographic assessments of systolic function in congenital heart disease. He also is investigating fetal echocardiographic predictors of outcomes in patients with congenital heart disease. Yeh, an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics with board certifications in general pediatrics and in pediatric cardiology, is medical director of the pediatric echo lab.

3

Alliance participants benefit mutually Affiliation with UC Davis Health System enhances the credibility of smaller community hospitals, and gives them access to world-renowned specialists through telemedicine while retaining their independence. Clinicians and medical departments at all participating facilities benefit mutually by sharing protocols and expanding practice in evidence-based medicine. We will learn from the other hospitals, as well, their ideas about attaining efficiencies and patient-centered, team-based care. Patients benefit by receiving top-quality care and gaining access to participate in clinical trials within their own communities. From a business standpoint, partnerships neutralize the potential for competitive polarization by uniting hospitals and doctors on the same collaborative team. In our partnerships we seek to complement needs and strengths. Furthermore, alliances with other hospitals and practice groups give our physicians, residents and students access to patients throughout a wide geographic area, thereby enhancing our educational aims.

“Alliances with other hospitals and practice groups give our physicians, residents and students access to patients throughout a wide geographic area, thereby enhancing our educational aims.” —Julie Freischlag

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

Julie A. Freischlag

I believe that the increase in affiliation requests we have received is attributable in part to our high U.S. News & World Report rankings, and to our inclusion in the Leapfrog Group’s Top Hospital list for the past three consecutive years – the only UC medical center to do so. Our growing renown is evidenced by the inquiries we receive from hospitals overseas about telemedicine cooperative arrangements. This is exciting. UC Davis has long been a proponent of outreach in recruitment of students, physicians and staff members. Seeking alliances with other health-care systems is strategically important and philosophically sound as a means through which to cohesively achieve population health management. It’s something we should be doing, and I’m glad that we are. The architects of our strategic alliance initiative are Thomas Nesbitt, our associate vice chancellor for Strategic Technologies and Alliances, with responsibility for administering clinical outreach; Ann Madden Rice, chief executive officer of UC Davis Medical Center; and James Goodnight, who as director of the Practice Management Board works hard to increase access to our clinics. Combining forces benefits everyone involved – physicians at UC Davis as well as at outlying hospitals and clinics, medical students and residents who gain new rotation opportunities, hospitals and medical practice groups that gain recruitment visibility, and most importantly, patients who gain top-quality medical access points within their communities. Strategic alliances make sense for patients, for students in medicine and other allied health services, for medical residents, for community hospitals, for UC Davis Health System, and for each of our faculty physicians. I encourage your wholehearted involvement in welcoming new alliances. 4

officeVISIT VCF MEMBER BRUCE RYHAL UNDERSTANDS WHAT HIS ALLERGY PATIENTS EXPERIENCE Doctors offer the most compassionate care when they are able to empathize with their patients. Allergist and immunologist Bruce Ryhal has a deep understanding of the fears and discomforts his allergy and asthma patients suffer, because he has experienced them himself. Ryhal, a UC Davis Volunteer Clinical Faculty (VCF) member for 30 years, is assistant chief of the Allergy Department at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Roseville. As a child growing up in the Sacramento area in the early 1960s, he was stricken with asthma at age 6. “The asthma attacks were very unpleasant and unnerving, and caused a lot of concern for me and my family,” Ryhal said. “I missed school because of asthma, and I had to go to the doctor a lot. Many people who haven’t experienced asthma don’t realize that it can be a lot more troublesome disease than they think.” Ryhal (who pronounces his name RY-all), diagnoses and treats patients not only for respiratory allergies and asthma, but also for dermatitis, exercise-related bronchospasm, food allergies, autoimmune diseases and other conditions, and is regularly asked to consult with physicians in other departments. “Even fields such as cardiovascular disease rely on immunologic techniques. For example, a commonly implanted vascular stent contains sirolimus, which is actually an immunosuppressant,” Ryhal said. “Other specialists such as oncologists are increasingly turning to immunotherapies for cancer. We will not likely be the leads in applying those therapies, but clinical immunologists are routinely called upon as advisers.” Ryhal has taken interest in psychoneuroimmunology, an area of study that examines potential connections between stress and immune function. As technology lead for his department, he has been pursuing a business management

viewPOINT

A WELCOME TO NEW FACULTY COLLEAGUES

BY JULIE A. FREISCHLAG, VICE CHANCELLOR AND DEAN

Brian Jonas

STRATEGIC REGIONAL EXPANSION FOR UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM

Jennifer Rothschild

Each edition of the Faculty Newsletter introduces several faculty colleagues who recently joined the UC Davis Health System community. Watch for more new clinical and research staff members in the next issue.

bright, enthusiastic internal medicine residents on the medicine wards at the KP Sacramento and South Sacramento hospitals, and all I had to do was fill out some forms.” In his current VCF role, he oversees students, residents and fellows as he serves as the attending physician on the first Friday of each month at the allergy clinic at the UC Davis Medical Center. At the end of each clinic he conducts a seminar. In addition, he has been coordinator of the medical center’s Allergy and Immunology Journal Club since 1996. “The journal club has been a real joy to me, and I advise every volunteer faculty member to attend or organize Bruce Ryhal (courtesy photo) something like this,” Ryhal said. technique called queuing mathematics in M. Eric Gershwin, M.D., pursuit of improving the balance between Distinguished Professor of Medicine and appointment supply and demand. He also chief of the Division of Rheumatology, is a member of Kaiser Roseville’s quality Allergy and Clinical Immunology, assurance committee. credits Ryhal for helping maintain the His interest in immunology was first department’s accreditation status. piqued when he was an undergraduate “Bruce Ryhal is an extraordinary student at Stanford University in the 1970s. teacher and physician who has dedicated “I worked in a transplant immunology literally hundreds and hundreds of hours laboratory at Stanford during the very to the university,” Gershwin said. “Bruce exciting days when some of the first heart helps Suzanne Teuber, our fellowship transplants were being performed. The director, with a mountain of paperwork, technical surgical issues in transplantation including the monstrous stack of material were worked out fairly quickly, but the for ACGME reaccreditation. Thanks in rejection issues still have not been totally part to his efforts, we have had five-year solved even to this day. So I came to see accreditations and excellent evaluations the various fields of immunology as having by fellows. We have the best and really interesting problems,” explained longest-standing accreditation in allergyRyhal, who obtained his M.D. degree from immunology of any medical school in the UC San Diego. United States.” After practicing with Kaiser Bruce and his wife, Denise, a school Permanente in San Diego and in nurse, have a son, Danny, who is a Sacramento for six years to retire his graduate student at UC Davis; and a medical school debt, he took a leave of daughter, Emily, a case manager for absence and completed a fellowship in psychiatric patients. After undergoing allergy and clinical immunology at UC allergen immunotherapy successfully, Davis. By that time he already had been a Bruce is able to spend his leisure time UC Davis VCF member for four years. outdoors, skimming across Folsom Lake “They made me an offer I couldn’t on small, high performance sailboats. For refuse,” he quipped. “I got to work with him, that’s a breath of fresh air.

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

facultyROUNDS

Brian Jonas studying new leukemia therapy approaches Hematologist and oncologist Brian A. Jonas, M.D., Ph.D., a specialist in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, is investigating novel targets and therapies for these diseases. Jonas, an assistant professor of medicine, is intent on reducing the high mortality rate of those diseases, which are resistant to existing therapeutic approaches.

Other new colleagues n

Fellowship-trained endocrine surgeon Michael J. Campbell, M.D., an assistant professor of surgery, has a dual appointment in surgical oncology and gastrointestinal surgery. He specializes in treating patients with thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal and pancreas disorders. He is investigating the benefits of adrenal venous sampling for patients with aldosterone-producing tumors, and evaluating the risk of undiagnosed thyroid cancers in patients with multinodular goiters.

Jonas, who obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. n Board-certified dermatologist and degrees at UC Davis, and fellowship training dermatopathologist Maija Kiuru, M.D., at Stanford, sees patients at the UC Davis Ph.D., an assistant professor of clinical dermatology, maintains a practice in Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has a dermatology and dermatopathology particular interest in leukemia stem cell while conducting research into genetic biology and development of therapeutics alterations in nevi, melanoma and other that target these cells to improve treatment skin tumors. She seeks improvements outcomes, particularly for older patients. in diagnostic accuracy and ways to more precisely identify markers of Jennifer Rothschild treats male tumor progression. She also studies and female urinary incontinence familial skin, hair and nail disorders through gene discovery to improve Jennifer Rothschild, M.D., MPH, an understanding of epidermal biology. assistant professor of urology, has expertise n Board-certified oncologist and in male and female reconstructive urology. hematologist Eve Rodler, M.D., an Her clinical practice in male and female assistant adjunct professor of medicine, pelvic health encompasses treatments for specializes in breast cancer treatment. incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Rodler, who is co-chief of hematology She is skilled in implantation of artificial urinary sphincters and urethral strictures, and performs complex genitourinary reconstructions, including urinary fistula repair. She is conducting research in evaluation and treatments for male and female incontinence.

2

n

and oncology for the VA Northern California Health Care System in Martinez, is the principal investigator for a phase I trial investigating the efficacy of a PARP inhibitor in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced BRCA mutation-associated and/or triple negative breast cancer.

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

We have been extending the reach of UC Davis Health System on a limited basis during recent years by means of affiliations with several hospitals and with clinical practice groups. Those relationships have proven to be constructive in enhancing our public health improvement aspirations. With those intentions in mind, UC Davis is putting out the welcome mat to invite clinical affiliations with additional healthcare providers throughout the region. As a regional referral center, UC Davis is committed to being as accessible as possible to physicians in outlying areas. Unlike UC Davis Health System, many smaller hospitals cannot justify employing teams of medical specialists or surgeons skilled in complex procedures. Numerous regional hospitals and other healthcare systems have asked us to consider establishing partnership agreements with them. Some seek access to our specialists using telemedicine. Other hospitals would like UC Davis to dispatch physicians to their facilities to complement their medical staffs. Still others wish to establish UC Davis-affiliated medical residency programs and rotations for students in medicine and other allied health services. Through our partnership initiative we can create a network that will give patients in rural communities greatly improved access to state-of-the-art medical technology and advanced health care in neonatology, cancer therapy and other disciplines. Alliances between UC Davis and smaller, independent community hospitals are inherently patient-centered because we’re collaboratively making sure that each patient is in the right place to receive the right care.

Robert J. Steffner, M.D., an assistant clinical professor with dual appointments in orthopaedic surgery and surgical oncology, treats patients for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, benign bone and soft-tissue lesions, and metabolic bone disease. Steffner, who is chief of orthopaedic oncology, is conducting research in evidencebased decision-making in orthopaedic oncology, evaluation of advanced imaging for tumor staging, and perioperative pain management in oncology patients.

n

Urologic oncologist Stanley A. Yap, M.D., M.Sc., FRCSC, an assistant professor of urology, is skilled in open, minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques for prostate, kidney, bladder and testicular cancer. Yap, board-certified by the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, is affiliated with the VA Northern California Health Care System in Sacramento. He conducts research assessing the quality of care and effectiveness of treatments for urologic malignancies.

n

Pediatric cardiologist Jay Yeh, M.D., is conducting research on threedimensional imaging, deformation imaging and other echocardiographic assessments of systolic function in congenital heart disease. He also is investigating fetal echocardiographic predictors of outcomes in patients with congenital heart disease. Yeh, an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics with board certifications in general pediatrics and in pediatric cardiology, is medical director of the pediatric echo lab.

3

Alliance participants benefit mutually Affiliation with UC Davis Health System enhances the credibility of smaller community hospitals, and gives them access to world-renowned specialists through telemedicine while retaining their independence. Clinicians and medical departments at all participating facilities benefit mutually by sharing protocols and expanding practice in evidence-based medicine. We will learn from the other hospitals, as well, their ideas about attaining efficiencies and patient-centered, team-based care. Patients benefit by receiving top-quality care and gaining access to participate in clinical trials within their own communities. From a business standpoint, partnerships neutralize the potential for competitive polarization by uniting hospitals and doctors on the same collaborative team. In our partnerships we seek to complement needs and strengths. Furthermore, alliances with other hospitals and practice groups give our physicians, residents and students access to patients throughout a wide geographic area, thereby enhancing our educational aims.

“Alliances with other hospitals and practice groups give our physicians, residents and students access to patients throughout a wide geographic area, thereby enhancing our educational aims.” —Julie Freischlag

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

Julie A. Freischlag

I believe that the increase in affiliation requests we have received is attributable in part to our high U.S. News & World Report rankings, and to our inclusion in the Leapfrog Group’s Top Hospital list for the past three consecutive years – the only UC medical center to do so. Our growing renown is evidenced by the inquiries we receive from hospitals overseas about telemedicine cooperative arrangements. This is exciting. UC Davis has long been a proponent of outreach in recruitment of students, physicians and staff members. Seeking alliances with other health-care systems is strategically important and philosophically sound as a means through which to cohesively achieve population health management. It’s something we should be doing, and I’m glad that we are. The architects of our strategic alliance initiative are Thomas Nesbitt, our associate vice chancellor for Strategic Technologies and Alliances, with responsibility for administering clinical outreach; Ann Madden Rice, chief executive officer of UC Davis Medical Center; and James Goodnight, who as director of the Practice Management Board works hard to increase access to our clinics. Combining forces benefits everyone involved – physicians at UC Davis as well as at outlying hospitals and clinics, medical students and residents who gain new rotation opportunities, hospitals and medical practice groups that gain recruitment visibility, and most importantly, patients who gain top-quality medical access points within their communities. Strategic alliances make sense for patients, for students in medicine and other allied health services, for medical residents, for community hospitals, for UC Davis Health System, and for each of our faculty physicians. I encourage your wholehearted involvement in welcoming new alliances. 4

officeVISIT VCF MEMBER BRUCE RYHAL UNDERSTANDS WHAT HIS ALLERGY PATIENTS EXPERIENCE Doctors offer the most compassionate care when they are able to empathize with their patients. Allergist and immunologist Bruce Ryhal has a deep understanding of the fears and discomforts his allergy and asthma patients suffer, because he has experienced them himself. Ryhal, a UC Davis Volunteer Clinical Faculty (VCF) member for 30 years, is assistant chief of the Allergy Department at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Roseville. As a child growing up in the Sacramento area in the early 1960s, he was stricken with asthma at age 6. “The asthma attacks were very unpleasant and unnerving, and caused a lot of concern for me and my family,” Ryhal said. “I missed school because of asthma, and I had to go to the doctor a lot. Many people who haven’t experienced asthma don’t realize that it can be a lot more troublesome disease than they think.” Ryhal (who pronounces his name RY-all), diagnoses and treats patients not only for respiratory allergies and asthma, but also for dermatitis, exercise-related bronchospasm, food allergies, autoimmune diseases and other conditions, and is regularly asked to consult with physicians in other departments. “Even fields such as cardiovascular disease rely on immunologic techniques. For example, a commonly implanted vascular stent contains sirolimus, which is actually an immunosuppressant,” Ryhal said. “Other specialists such as oncologists are increasingly turning to immunotherapies for cancer. We will not likely be the leads in applying those therapies, but clinical immunologists are routinely called upon as advisers.” Ryhal has taken interest in psychoneuroimmunology, an area of study that examines potential connections between stress and immune function. As technology lead for his department, he has been pursuing a business management

viewPOINT

A WELCOME TO NEW FACULTY COLLEAGUES

BY JULIE A. FREISCHLAG, VICE CHANCELLOR AND DEAN

Brian Jonas

STRATEGIC REGIONAL EXPANSION FOR UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM

Jennifer Rothschild

Each edition of the Faculty Newsletter introduces several faculty colleagues who recently joined the UC Davis Health System community. Watch for more new clinical and research staff members in the next issue.

bright, enthusiastic internal medicine residents on the medicine wards at the KP Sacramento and South Sacramento hospitals, and all I had to do was fill out some forms.” In his current VCF role, he oversees students, residents and fellows as he serves as the attending physician on the first Friday of each month at the allergy clinic at the UC Davis Medical Center. At the end of each clinic he conducts a seminar. In addition, he has been coordinator of the medical center’s Allergy and Immunology Journal Club since 1996. “The journal club has been a real joy to me, and I advise every volunteer faculty member to attend or organize Bruce Ryhal (courtesy photo) something like this,” Ryhal said. technique called queuing mathematics in M. Eric Gershwin, M.D., pursuit of improving the balance between Distinguished Professor of Medicine and appointment supply and demand. He also chief of the Division of Rheumatology, is a member of Kaiser Roseville’s quality Allergy and Clinical Immunology, assurance committee. credits Ryhal for helping maintain the His interest in immunology was first department’s accreditation status. piqued when he was an undergraduate “Bruce Ryhal is an extraordinary student at Stanford University in the 1970s. teacher and physician who has dedicated “I worked in a transplant immunology literally hundreds and hundreds of hours laboratory at Stanford during the very to the university,” Gershwin said. “Bruce exciting days when some of the first heart helps Suzanne Teuber, our fellowship transplants were being performed. The director, with a mountain of paperwork, technical surgical issues in transplantation including the monstrous stack of material were worked out fairly quickly, but the for ACGME reaccreditation. Thanks in rejection issues still have not been totally part to his efforts, we have had five-year solved even to this day. So I came to see accreditations and excellent evaluations the various fields of immunology as having by fellows. We have the best and really interesting problems,” explained longest-standing accreditation in allergyRyhal, who obtained his M.D. degree from immunology of any medical school in the UC San Diego. United States.” After practicing with Kaiser Bruce and his wife, Denise, a school Permanente in San Diego and in nurse, have a son, Danny, who is a Sacramento for six years to retire his graduate student at UC Davis; and a medical school debt, he took a leave of daughter, Emily, a case manager for absence and completed a fellowship in psychiatric patients. After undergoing allergy and clinical immunology at UC allergen immunotherapy successfully, Davis. By that time he already had been a Bruce is able to spend his leisure time UC Davis VCF member for four years. outdoors, skimming across Folsom Lake “They made me an offer I couldn’t on small, high performance sailboats. For refuse,” he quipped. “I got to work with him, that’s a breath of fresh air.

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

facultyROUNDS

Brian Jonas studying new leukemia therapy approaches Hematologist and oncologist Brian A. Jonas, M.D., Ph.D., a specialist in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, is investigating novel targets and therapies for these diseases. Jonas, an assistant professor of medicine, is intent on reducing the high mortality rate of those diseases, which are resistant to existing therapeutic approaches.

Other new colleagues n

Fellowship-trained endocrine surgeon Michael J. Campbell, M.D., an assistant professor of surgery, has a dual appointment in surgical oncology and gastrointestinal surgery. He specializes in treating patients with thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal and pancreas disorders. He is investigating the benefits of adrenal venous sampling for patients with aldosterone-producing tumors, and evaluating the risk of undiagnosed thyroid cancers in patients with multinodular goiters.

Jonas, who obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. n Board-certified dermatologist and degrees at UC Davis, and fellowship training dermatopathologist Maija Kiuru, M.D., at Stanford, sees patients at the UC Davis Ph.D., an assistant professor of clinical dermatology, maintains a practice in Comprehensive Cancer Center. He has a dermatology and dermatopathology particular interest in leukemia stem cell while conducting research into genetic biology and development of therapeutics alterations in nevi, melanoma and other that target these cells to improve treatment skin tumors. She seeks improvements outcomes, particularly for older patients. in diagnostic accuracy and ways to more precisely identify markers of Jennifer Rothschild treats male tumor progression. She also studies and female urinary incontinence familial skin, hair and nail disorders through gene discovery to improve Jennifer Rothschild, M.D., MPH, an understanding of epidermal biology. assistant professor of urology, has expertise n Board-certified oncologist and in male and female reconstructive urology. hematologist Eve Rodler, M.D., an Her clinical practice in male and female assistant adjunct professor of medicine, pelvic health encompasses treatments for specializes in breast cancer treatment. incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Rodler, who is co-chief of hematology She is skilled in implantation of artificial urinary sphincters and urethral strictures, and performs complex genitourinary reconstructions, including urinary fistula repair. She is conducting research in evaluation and treatments for male and female incontinence.

2

n

and oncology for the VA Northern California Health Care System in Martinez, is the principal investigator for a phase I trial investigating the efficacy of a PARP inhibitor in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced BRCA mutation-associated and/or triple negative breast cancer.

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

We have been extending the reach of UC Davis Health System on a limited basis during recent years by means of affiliations with several hospitals and with clinical practice groups. Those relationships have proven to be constructive in enhancing our public health improvement aspirations. With those intentions in mind, UC Davis is putting out the welcome mat to invite clinical affiliations with additional healthcare providers throughout the region. As a regional referral center, UC Davis is committed to being as accessible as possible to physicians in outlying areas. Unlike UC Davis Health System, many smaller hospitals cannot justify employing teams of medical specialists or surgeons skilled in complex procedures. Numerous regional hospitals and other healthcare systems have asked us to consider establishing partnership agreements with them. Some seek access to our specialists using telemedicine. Other hospitals would like UC Davis to dispatch physicians to their facilities to complement their medical staffs. Still others wish to establish UC Davis-affiliated medical residency programs and rotations for students in medicine and other allied health services. Through our partnership initiative we can create a network that will give patients in rural communities greatly improved access to state-of-the-art medical technology and advanced health care in neonatology, cancer therapy and other disciplines. Alliances between UC Davis and smaller, independent community hospitals are inherently patient-centered because we’re collaboratively making sure that each patient is in the right place to receive the right care.

Robert J. Steffner, M.D., an assistant clinical professor with dual appointments in orthopaedic surgery and surgical oncology, treats patients for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, benign bone and soft-tissue lesions, and metabolic bone disease. Steffner, who is chief of orthopaedic oncology, is conducting research in evidencebased decision-making in orthopaedic oncology, evaluation of advanced imaging for tumor staging, and perioperative pain management in oncology patients.

n

Urologic oncologist Stanley A. Yap, M.D., M.Sc., FRCSC, an assistant professor of urology, is skilled in open, minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques for prostate, kidney, bladder and testicular cancer. Yap, board-certified by the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, is affiliated with the VA Northern California Health Care System in Sacramento. He conducts research assessing the quality of care and effectiveness of treatments for urologic malignancies.

n

Pediatric cardiologist Jay Yeh, M.D., is conducting research on threedimensional imaging, deformation imaging and other echocardiographic assessments of systolic function in congenital heart disease. He also is investigating fetal echocardiographic predictors of outcomes in patients with congenital heart disease. Yeh, an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics with board certifications in general pediatrics and in pediatric cardiology, is medical director of the pediatric echo lab.

3

Alliance participants benefit mutually Affiliation with UC Davis Health System enhances the credibility of smaller community hospitals, and gives them access to world-renowned specialists through telemedicine while retaining their independence. Clinicians and medical departments at all participating facilities benefit mutually by sharing protocols and expanding practice in evidence-based medicine. We will learn from the other hospitals, as well, their ideas about attaining efficiencies and patient-centered, team-based care. Patients benefit by receiving top-quality care and gaining access to participate in clinical trials within their own communities. From a business standpoint, partnerships neutralize the potential for competitive polarization by uniting hospitals and doctors on the same collaborative team. In our partnerships we seek to complement needs and strengths. Furthermore, alliances with other hospitals and practice groups give our physicians, residents and students access to patients throughout a wide geographic area, thereby enhancing our educational aims.

“Alliances with other hospitals and practice groups give our physicians, residents and students access to patients throughout a wide geographic area, thereby enhancing our educational aims.” —Julie Freischlag

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

Julie A. Freischlag

I believe that the increase in affiliation requests we have received is attributable in part to our high U.S. News & World Report rankings, and to our inclusion in the Leapfrog Group’s Top Hospital list for the past three consecutive years – the only UC medical center to do so. Our growing renown is evidenced by the inquiries we receive from hospitals overseas about telemedicine cooperative arrangements. This is exciting. UC Davis has long been a proponent of outreach in recruitment of students, physicians and staff members. Seeking alliances with other health-care systems is strategically important and philosophically sound as a means through which to cohesively achieve population health management. It’s something we should be doing, and I’m glad that we are. The architects of our strategic alliance initiative are Thomas Nesbitt, our associate vice chancellor for Strategic Technologies and Alliances, with responsibility for administering clinical outreach; Ann Madden Rice, chief executive officer of UC Davis Medical Center; and James Goodnight, who as director of the Practice Management Board works hard to increase access to our clinics. Combining forces benefits everyone involved – physicians at UC Davis as well as at outlying hospitals and clinics, medical students and residents who gain new rotation opportunities, hospitals and medical practice groups that gain recruitment visibility, and most importantly, patients who gain top-quality medical access points within their communities. Strategic alliances make sense for patients, for students in medicine and other allied health services, for medical residents, for community hospitals, for UC Davis Health System, and for each of our faculty physicians. I encourage your wholehearted involvement in welcoming new alliances. 4

Leadership Programs CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Faculty Development Program

Obstetrics, has enrolled in five courses thus went surfing. It seemed like a pretty good “Thirty-five years ago, I thought far, and plans to attend more. idea at the time.” leadership meant telling people what “Gene brings a certain sensitivity from Crumley eventually graduated from to do and when to do it. I no longer his time as a minister, because people in UC Davis in 1978 and San Francisco think that way. Instead, I now think the clergy traditionally are the epitome of Theological Seminary in 1981. that the first and most important job of kindness, and they’re gentle and patient “I went to divinity school because my leadership is to listen. That’s because souls. They listen to a lot of people for father-in-law was a minister, and I admired when people feel listened to, when they a lot of reasons – just as physicians do,” him. The ministry in my mind combined feel like you genuinely understand how Schrimmer said. the two urges that I had at the time. One they see and make sense of the world, was to help people, and the other was they do things, good and important In addition to his training as an a love of books, reading, thinking and things, without having to be told. And ordained Presbyterian minister, Crumley writing,” Crumley said. “So, here I am, sometimes they do those good and also spent 13 years in management 40 years later, still trying to be helpful by important things before the leader positions with Habitat for Humanity, for reading books, but instead of translating even knew they needed to be done,” which he served as the organization’s Crumley said. director of development – fundraising – as them into sermons, now I’m translating them into PowerPoint slides.” “In the leadership positions I’ve well as coordinator of the organization’s In addition to teaching workshops, held, my effectiveness improved when $6.5 million response to Hurricane Andrew in 1992, in South Dade County, Florida. In Crumley also offers one-on-one leadership I stopped providing answers and coaching. Faculty members who have started asking good questions with a 1996, Crumley left Habitat for Humanity spirit of inquiry – to gain and began working as a continuing understanding about how educator with UC Davis Extension, the world appears from that rising to the position of department other person’s point of view. chair in 2009. In my courses I try to create Since 2007, Crumley has an environment in which all focused his teaching efforts and of us can travel together on now works exclusively with this path of inquiry, of trying physicians, veterinarians, scientists to understand ourselves, and and engineers. “If you teach others, and our world better. business people the kind of course And we do that only by asking subjects I’m interested in, you have better and better questions to be up on all the ‘buzzwords,’ over time.” which I don’t find interesting,” The courses that Gene Crumley explained. Crumley teaches do not have “On the other hand,” he to be taken in sequence; continued, “if you teach the same they stand independently. Gene Crumley surfing at Pismo Beach in October 2012 (photo by courses to doctors, engineers and James Ritchey, M.D.) For a listing of Crumley’s scientists, they want to know ‘What’s upcoming workshops, check the science behind your ideas?’ And enlisted him for coaching include Joseph the “calendar” section in this newsletter if you can point to the science, rather than M. Galante, an associate professor of or visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/ the ‘business speak,’ they’re very interested surgery and chief of the Division of Trauma facultydev/leadership.html on the web. in listening and learning. That shift in and Emergency Surgery. And, by the way, after more than audience focus has nicely coincided with “Gene transcends teachers who just 50 years, Gene Crumley still hits the my growing fascination with neuroscience give leadership nuggets. He offers much waves with his surfboard almost every and emotional intelligence, which are my deeper insight into how to lead, by tying weekend. abiding intellectual passions.” leadership principles to philosophy, As an undergraduate student at UC religion, military, his own experiences, and campuses in Santa Barbara and in his literature,” Galante explained. To schedule leadership coaching: native San Diego, Charles E. “Gene” Crumley’s time allocation to the Faculty Contact Cheryl Busman, Faculty Crumley II initially considered becoming Development Program will be increased to Development Program Manager, (916) a physician. “Organic chemistry was my accommodate demand for the coaching, 703-9230, [email protected] downfall,” Crumley laughed, “as it was for consulting and retreat facilitation services To enroll in workshops, register online: many pre-med students at the time, so I he performs for the School of Medicine’s http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev/ dropped out of school for five years and academic departments.

Sherman Building, Suite 3900 UC Davis Health System 2315 Stockton Blvd. Sacramento, CA 95817

Published by the Faculty Development Program SPRING 2015 Workshops and other activities

10 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

You are invited! We encourage you to enroll in one of the various workshops and events sponsored by the Faculty Development Program. For more event details and to register, visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev/ and click Enroll Online. (Event co-sponsors are indicated within parentheses.) Volunteer Clinical Faculty members are also welcome and encouraged to attend faculty development events.

11 Career Flexibility/Work-Life Balance (WIMHS)

April

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 1

June 8 Organizational Culture and Leadership: Advanced Topics, Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

15 Organizational Culture and Leadership: Advanced Topics, Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

7 A Leadership Model for Faculty in Academic Medicine (MCLP) 9 Breakfast with the Vice Chancellor/ Dean

Event co-sponsors ECLP: Early Career Leadership Program

facultyNEWSLETTER

9 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

MCLP: Mid-Career Leadership Program WIMHS: Women in Medicine and Health Science

14 How to Give Effective Feedback (ECLP)

Published quarterly by Faculty Development, which administers and coordinates programs that respond to the professional and career development needs of UC Davis Health System faculty members.

21 Getting Delegation Right! – Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

5

Gene Crumley’s thought-provoking courses increase in popularity What makes delegating tasks and responsibilities so difficult for some people, and why does it go wrong? What is “emotional intelligence,” and why could it be more revealing than IQ in determining leadership qualities? Why do so many people have difficulty in accepting constructive criticism? Gene Crumley tackles those and other compelling questions in the ongoing series of leadership workshops that he has been conducting throughout the past 12 years for the Faculty Development Program, in collaboration with the Early Career Leadership Program (ECLP) and the Mid-Career Leadership Program (MCLP). His teaching is steeped as much in philosophical and metaphysical

concepts as it is in organizational strategy and tactics. And the Faculty Development Program is increasing the number of offerings in response to growing demand. “Gene is very worldly, and he provides a unique perspective by virtue of his background,” said David B. Schrimmer, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology who was recruited to the faculty last spring. Shortly after Schrimmer’s arrival, he was appointed vice chair, and with his substantial increase in duties he sought training in leadership. Gary Leiserowitz, interim department chair, encouraged him to consider Crumley’s workshops. Schrimmer, chief of the Division of CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

28 Getting Delegation Right! – Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

2315 Stockton Blvd. Sherman Building, Suite 3900 Sacramento, CA 95817 (916) 703-9230 www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

28 Workshop: Writing a Successful Grant Proposal May

Edward Callahan, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Academic Personnel

14 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

Brent Seifert, J.D. Assistant Dean for Academic Personnel

15 Organizational Culture and Leadership: An Introduction, Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

Cheryl Busman Program Manager, Faculty Development cd[email protected]

22 Organizational Culture and Leadership: An Introduction, Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

EditPros LLC Writing and Editing www.editpros.com

Gene Crumley conducting one of his workshops. (Photos: Emi Manning, Medical Illustration) JUNE CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS EXPAND

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

6

Leadership Programs CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Faculty Development Program

Obstetrics, has enrolled in five courses thus went surfing. It seemed like a pretty good “Thirty-five years ago, I thought far, and plans to attend more. idea at the time.” leadership meant telling people what “Gene brings a certain sensitivity from Crumley eventually graduated from to do and when to do it. I no longer his time as a minister, because people in UC Davis in 1978 and San Francisco think that way. Instead, I now think the clergy traditionally are the epitome of Theological Seminary in 1981. that the first and most important job of kindness, and they’re gentle and patient “I went to divinity school because my leadership is to listen. That’s because souls. They listen to a lot of people for father-in-law was a minister, and I admired when people feel listened to, when they a lot of reasons – just as physicians do,” him. The ministry in my mind combined feel like you genuinely understand how Schrimmer said. the two urges that I had at the time. One they see and make sense of the world, was to help people, and the other was they do things, good and important In addition to his training as an a love of books, reading, thinking and things, without having to be told. And ordained Presbyterian minister, Crumley writing,” Crumley said. “So, here I am, sometimes they do those good and also spent 13 years in management 40 years later, still trying to be helpful by important things before the leader positions with Habitat for Humanity, for reading books, but instead of translating even knew they needed to be done,” which he served as the organization’s Crumley said. director of development – fundraising – as them into sermons, now I’m translating them into PowerPoint slides.” “In the leadership positions I’ve well as coordinator of the organization’s In addition to teaching workshops, held, my effectiveness improved when $6.5 million response to Hurricane Andrew in 1992, in South Dade County, Florida. In Crumley also offers one-on-one leadership I stopped providing answers and coaching. Faculty members who have started asking good questions with a 1996, Crumley left Habitat for Humanity spirit of inquiry – to gain and began working as a continuing understanding about how educator with UC Davis Extension, the world appears from that rising to the position of department other person’s point of view. chair in 2009. In my courses I try to create Since 2007, Crumley has an environment in which all focused his teaching efforts and of us can travel together on now works exclusively with this path of inquiry, of trying physicians, veterinarians, scientists to understand ourselves, and and engineers. “If you teach others, and our world better. business people the kind of course And we do that only by asking subjects I’m interested in, you have better and better questions to be up on all the ‘buzzwords,’ over time.” which I don’t find interesting,” The courses that Gene Crumley explained. Crumley teaches do not have “On the other hand,” he to be taken in sequence; continued, “if you teach the same they stand independently. Gene Crumley surfing at Pismo Beach in October 2012 (photo by courses to doctors, engineers and James Ritchey, M.D.) For a listing of Crumley’s scientists, they want to know ‘What’s upcoming workshops, check the science behind your ideas?’ And enlisted him for coaching include Joseph the “calendar” section in this newsletter if you can point to the science, rather than M. Galante, an associate professor of or visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/ the ‘business speak,’ they’re very interested surgery and chief of the Division of Trauma facultydev/leadership.html on the web. in listening and learning. That shift in and Emergency Surgery. And, by the way, after more than audience focus has nicely coincided with “Gene transcends teachers who just 50 years, Gene Crumley still hits the my growing fascination with neuroscience give leadership nuggets. He offers much waves with his surfboard almost every and emotional intelligence, which are my deeper insight into how to lead, by tying weekend. abiding intellectual passions.” leadership principles to philosophy, As an undergraduate student at UC religion, military, his own experiences, and campuses in Santa Barbara and in his literature,” Galante explained. To schedule leadership coaching: native San Diego, Charles E. “Gene” Crumley’s time allocation to the Faculty Contact Cheryl Busman, Faculty Crumley II initially considered becoming Development Program will be increased to Development Program Manager, (916) a physician. “Organic chemistry was my accommodate demand for the coaching, 703-9230, [email protected] downfall,” Crumley laughed, “as it was for consulting and retreat facilitation services To enroll in workshops, register online: many pre-med students at the time, so I he performs for the School of Medicine’s http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev/ dropped out of school for five years and academic departments.

Sherman Building, Suite 3900 UC Davis Health System 2315 Stockton Blvd. Sacramento, CA 95817

Published by the Faculty Development Program SPRING 2015 Workshops and other activities

10 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

You are invited! We encourage you to enroll in one of the various workshops and events sponsored by the Faculty Development Program. For more event details and to register, visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev/ and click Enroll Online. (Event co-sponsors are indicated within parentheses.) Volunteer Clinical Faculty members are also welcome and encouraged to attend faculty development events.

11 Career Flexibility/Work-Life Balance (WIMHS)

April

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 1

June 8 Organizational Culture and Leadership: Advanced Topics, Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

15 Organizational Culture and Leadership: Advanced Topics, Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

7 A Leadership Model for Faculty in Academic Medicine (MCLP) 9 Breakfast with the Vice Chancellor/ Dean

Event co-sponsors ECLP: Early Career Leadership Program

facultyNEWSLETTER

9 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

MCLP: Mid-Career Leadership Program WIMHS: Women in Medicine and Health Science

14 How to Give Effective Feedback (ECLP)

Published quarterly by Faculty Development, which administers and coordinates programs that respond to the professional and career development needs of UC Davis Health System faculty members.

21 Getting Delegation Right! – Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

5

Gene Crumley’s thought-provoking courses increase in popularity What makes delegating tasks and responsibilities so difficult for some people, and why does it go wrong? What is “emotional intelligence,” and why could it be more revealing than IQ in determining leadership qualities? Why do so many people have difficulty in accepting constructive criticism? Gene Crumley tackles those and other compelling questions in the ongoing series of leadership workshops that he has been conducting throughout the past 12 years for the Faculty Development Program, in collaboration with the Early Career Leadership Program (ECLP) and the Mid-Career Leadership Program (MCLP). His teaching is steeped as much in philosophical and metaphysical

concepts as it is in organizational strategy and tactics. And the Faculty Development Program is increasing the number of offerings in response to growing demand. “Gene is very worldly, and he provides a unique perspective by virtue of his background,” said David B. Schrimmer, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology who was recruited to the faculty last spring. Shortly after Schrimmer’s arrival, he was appointed vice chair, and with his substantial increase in duties he sought training in leadership. Gary Leiserowitz, interim department chair, encouraged him to consider Crumley’s workshops. Schrimmer, chief of the Division of CONTINUED ON PAGE 5

28 Getting Delegation Right! – Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

2315 Stockton Blvd. Sherman Building, Suite 3900 Sacramento, CA 95817 (916) 703-9230 www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

28 Workshop: Writing a Successful Grant Proposal May

Edward Callahan, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Academic Personnel

14 Workshop: Enhanced Training for Faculty Search Committee Members

Brent Seifert, J.D. Assistant Dean for Academic Personnel

15 Organizational Culture and Leadership: An Introduction, Part 1 (ECLP/MCLP)

Cheryl Busman Program Manager, Faculty Development [email protected]

22 Organizational Culture and Leadership: An Introduction, Part 2 (ECLP/MCLP)

EditPros LLC Writing and Editing www.editpros.com

Gene Crumley conducting one of his workshops. (Photos: Emi Manning, Medical Illustration) JUNE CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS EXPAND

facultyNEWSLETTER | Spring 2015 | www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/facultydev

6

Suggest Documents