John Drew Godsey, 88, one of the founders of the

Number 100  Spring 2011 Society Remembers John Godsey ohn Drew Godsey, 88, one of the founders of the International Bonhoeffer Society, English Lang...
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Number 100  Spring 2011

Society Remembers John Godsey ohn Drew Godsey, 88, one of the founders of the International Bonhoeffer Society, English Language Section, professor emeritus of Wesley Theological Seminary and a renowned scholar of German theologian and martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer, died October 12, 2010 in Gaithersburg, Maryland. He was a 44-year resident of Bethesda, Maryland and a professor of systematic theology at Wesley from 1968 until 1988 where he taught after moving from the faculty of Drew University Theological Seminary in New Jersey. In 1964, he was awarded a Fulbright Research Scholarship and spent a sabbatical year at the University of Gottingen, Germany. He authored and co-authored numerous books and other scholarly works, including Ethical Responsibility: Bonhoeffer’s Legacy to the Churches. Dr. Godsey was recognized throughout the theological world as an early researcher and writer on the life and works of Bonhoeffer. He served also as past president of the American Theological Society, and was active in the American Academy of Religion, the Society of Biblical Theologians and the Karl Barth Society of North America.

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JOHN DREW GODSEY 1922 - 2010

Inside This Issue ******* Tribute to John Godsey

Book Reviews 1 News Items

Meetings Notre Dame Union Seminary Annual Bibliography

13,16

18 14 8

Newsletter Archives Society News Presidents’ Message Note to Members

7 19

2 3,20

John was born on October 10, 1922 in Bristol, TN, the fourth of five children to William Clinton and Mary Lynn (nee Corns) Godsey. Though he termed this part of the country as part of the “Bible Belt” he grew up listening to the scholarly sermons of various preachers. During his teen years, he worked in every aspect of his father’s dairy business, where he “learned to work side by side

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President’s Message Greetings, It is a privilege to write to you at this time, because we have reached an important milestone. This is the 100th issue of the Newsletter; the first one was published in June 1973 and was sent to a small group of people who had expressed interest in the theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. In the intervening years, the size and scope of the Newsletter have grown, but its aim remains the same; to share important news and information about the life and legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. We continue to do this to an ever-expanding circle of interested persons around the globe. Over the past 38 years we have seen changes to the Newsletter. At the beginning of the second decade of the 21st century, we now want to take advantage of the new technology available to us. One change we hope to make soon is to distribute the Newsletter electronically. We would appreciate, therefore, if you have not already done so, to forward your e-mail address to our treasurer, Mark Randall, who maintains the mailing list, so that we can include you in this change. (Of course, if you prefer to receive the Newsletter in printed form via the US postal service, you may do so.) In addition to the Newsletter, communication via email will also enable us to share important information in a more timely fashion whenever the occasion arises. As we mark these changes in the way we both receive and distribute information, we note other changes as well. We welcome new members to the board of directors, members who each bring a unique perspective and have made contributions to the Bonhoeffer legacy. While we celebrate the continued interest in Bonhoeffer scholarship and welcome new scholars and other interested persons to our circle, we also said farewell to one of the founders of our society this past year, John Godsey. Among the many who have contributed to our understanding of Bonhoeffer and his valuable place in our world, none stands out more than he. Not only was he a top-notch Bonhoeffer scholar, he also embodied the spirit of Bonhoeffer in his joy of life and his warm embrace of those who shared his interest. As the first to write a dissertation on Bonhoeffer, he remained in the forefront of Bonhoeffer scholarship well into his retirement. He was one of the giants for whom no tribute is adequate. I say this as one who learned from him and was encouraged by him. As a young graduate student I remember well the warm reception and encouragement I received from him when I expressed my interest in this subject so important to him. And later, when I told him the subject of my research, he encouraged me to pursue it wholeheartedly because he wanted to see the scope of Bonhoeffer studies expand. Finally, as a member of my dissertation committee, he conveyed that same gracious spirit of support as he probed and questioned my research. Inasmuch as I feared what his judgment might be, I was overjoyed when his comments revealed that he had learned from me. One who was always gracious, who always found the good in others (and brought it out in all who associated with him), John was and remains the embodiment of the IBS. Last fall as we were absorbing the news of John’s death, we gathered in Atlanta at Ebenezer Baptist Church for our annual dinner. In the room that Martin Luther King spent his last birthday fighting for the marginalized, the parallels between Bonhoeffer and King’s lives were drawn once again and with it we were reminded that what we study and celebrate is not keeping a chapter of the past alive, but insuring that credible, faithful Christian voices continue to be heard. To all who contribute to this rich legacy, a sincere thank you. Finally, we invite you to continue this journey with us. Even though a great deal of the work is done by volunteers, there are expenses and financial commitments the society bears; therefore, we ask that you remain current with your dues payments and, if possible, consider an extra gift to the society. As you can see from this Newsletter, there are many important events taking place. We need your ongoing support and want you to be a part of our future.

H. Gaylon Barker Ridgefield, Connecticut 2

Condolences to Bill Peck Members of the society were saddened to learn of the death of Joyce Peck, wife of one of the founding members of the Bonhoeffer Society. Bill and Joyce (who was the daughter of Reformation historian Roland Bainton) were married in Munich in December 1950, followed by a church wedding in Innsbruck, Austria on January 20, 1951 and enjoyed sixty years of life together that Bill describes as “amazing and blessed.” We send condolences to Bill and his family from all his friends in the Society.

Note to Society Members

Please send changes/updates of mailing addresses and e-mail addresses to Rev. Mark Randall, Salmon Creek United Methodist Church, 12217 NE Highway 99, Vancouver WA 98686-3216 or to [email protected] Please notify the Editor ([email protected]) if you prefer receiving the Newsletter by e-mail in a PDF format.



Future Bonhoeffer Meeting Dates and Sites November 19-22 November 17-20 November 23-26 November 22-25 November 21-24 November 19-22

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

San Francisco, California Chicago, Illinois Baltimore, Maryland San Diego, California Atlanta, Georgia San Antonio, Texas

INTERNATIONAL BONHOEFFER SOCIETY ENGLISH LANGUAGE SECTION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2010

Officers: H. Gaylon Barker (President) Ridgefield CT; Stephen Plant (Vice-President) Cambridge UK; Lori Brandt Hale (Secretary) Maplewood MN; and Mark Randall (Treasurer) Vancouver WA Board of Directors: Mark Brocker, Beaverton OR; Peter Frick, Waterloo, ON; Clifford Green, Boston MA; Stephen Haynes, Memphis TN; Jenny McBride, Atlanta GA; Anna Mercedes, Collegville MN; Jeff Pugh, Elon NC; and Jens Zimmerman, Langley BC. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works - English Edition: Clifford Green (Executive Director)(Boston MA) Editorial Advisory Board: Lori Brandt Hale (Maplewood MN); John Matthews (Chair) (Apple Valley MN); and Clifford Green (Boston MA)

Newsletter Editor: Dean S. Skelley (San Antonio TX) Emeriti Board Members: Jim Burtness+, Keith Clements, John Godsey+, Daniel Hardy+, Pat Kelley, Geffrey Kelly, Michael Lukens, John Matthews, Burton Nelson+, Bill Peck, Larry Rasmussen, Deotis Roberts, Martin Rumscheidt, Charles Sensel, Charles West and Ruth Zerner

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JOHN GODSEY

(Barth) and was aware that he was looking over his shoulder all the time – after all, had Barth not published a letter in 1952 calling Bonhoeffer’s prison theology the ‘enigmatic utterances’ of ‘an impulsive visionary thinker’ whose description of Barth’s ‘positivism of revelation’ left him confused and hurt?” Green states that “even though working from limited sources – only the first volume of Gesammelte Schriften was out – John did something we rarely see today, namely ventured a thesis about Bonhoeffer’s theology as a whole: he argued that Bonhoeffer’s ‘understanding of the revelation of God in Jesus Christ…develops and thus provides the clue to the development within the theology itself.’”

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with all kinds of people, black and white.” For his last two years of high school, 1938-40, he attended The McCallis School, a military preparatory school in Chattanooga. He worked on the school newspaper, played second-string quarterback on the football team and won the Mid-South diving championship his senior year. He then entered Virginia Polytechnic Institute where he majored in Dairy Manufacturing with a minor in Business Administration. He was active in many organizations, including the German Club, and the YMCA. During his junior year he was inducted into the army, trained as an infantry officer and sent to the Philippines for the invasion of Japan. Having met Emalee Caldwell in the sixth grade, they were married during a 3-day week-end pass in 1943. He finished his college senior year upon discharge in 1946, and graduated with a B.S. degree in 1947. By this time the couple had two children: Emalee Lynn (born 1945) and John, Jr. (born 1946).

At Drew he helped teach a basic course in systematic theology, as well as dialectical theology, the history of Protestant thought, Bonhoeffer, Barth and Schleiermacher, Christology, the work of Christ, and theological anthropology.

For the 1964-1965 school year he was awarded a Fulbright Research Fellowship As his father had sold and took the family for the creameries, John a sabbatical year at the moved to New Jersey University of Göttingen. to work for a specialty John Godsey (r) with (l-r) Michael Luken, John De Gruchy and Hans Pfeifer His project for the year molding company based was to trace the rise of in Philadelphia. However, in 1950 he decided to enroll secularization in the West and to assess its impact on at Drew (NJ), the nearest Methodist seminary. He came religion. During this year he was offered a position in under the influence of several professors and became an systematic theology at Wesley Seminary. Godsey felt assistant to churches near Drew and in New York City. obligated to remain at Drew, but with administrative After graduating from Drew, he decided to study with changes there, he finally accepted an appointment at Karl Barth in Basel, Switzerland. Wesley in 1968 as Associate Dean and Professor of Systematic Theology. He quickly came to appreciate the After a year of study (while learning High German), free-standing administrative independence of Wesley as Barth accepted him as a doctoral candidate, whereupon well as its focus on diversity and ecumenism. Godsey Godsey began to work on a dissertation on the theology was instrumental in developing or nurturing a number of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. He stated that Barth was an of new programs, some of which have served as models excellent “Doktorvater” – demanding, but always ready at other institutions. In addition to presenting lectures, to be of help. While in Basel, he and Emalee had two more he published a number of books, including those on children, Susanne (1954) and Gretchen (1956). In 1956 Barth and Bonhoeffer (one co-edited with Geffrey Kelly). he was called back to Drew University to become assistant Barbara Green recalls working with Geff Kelly and Dean and instructor in theology. He completed his Godsey on the translation of Bonhoeffer’s Discipleship, dissertation in 1958 and received his Doctor of Theology spending an enormous amount of time in the “Godsey degree in 1960. Clifford Green notes that Godsey’s book, Room” of Wesley Seminary, where John’s personal library The Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, pubished by SCM was housed as a donation to the library. “John’s work Press in London was his dissertation and “contained included checking footnotes, references and sources. His signs that he wrote with great respect for the master collection was uncatalogued, but day after day, all day

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Beginning of IBS-ELS Clifford Green recalls that “John was a pioneer in organizing the English Language Section of the Bonhoeffer Society. In the Fall of 1971, Larry Rasmussen and I, along with Bill Peck and others, attended the first International Bonhoeffer Congress held in Dϋsseldorf-Kaiserwerth. In June, 1973, the first Newsletter was distributed, and the second in March, 1974, reports that two meetings of a ‘sterring committee’ had been held in Baltimore, attended by four people who were teaching in the mid-Atlantic area: John Godsey and Larry Rasmussen from Wesley Seminary, Geffrey Kelly from La Salle in Phildelphia, and myself from Goucher College in Baltimore. From this meeting came the first Bonhoeffer Consultation at the American Academy of Religion which met in Washington, D.C., October 24-27, 1974, the first of an unbroken series of conference that continues to this day.”

long he hopped up, unerringly pulled the volume he was looking for off the shelf and quickly found the page he needed. Occasionally other faculty members would stop in to ask him about some reference, and he always headed straight to what they needed. One evening after a day of this kind of bravura performance, I described what it was like to my husband. He said ‘John wears his erudition lightly,’ and that’s how I like to remember him.” John retired from Wesley in 1988 but remained active in numerous vocational interests for twenty years. He said, “I like to keep in touch with what’s going on at school,” so he faithfully attended monthly faculty meetings and weekly chapel services snappily dressed in a blazer and tie. He taught his seminars on Barth or Bonhoeffer every year.

Godsey’s death was preceded in 1993 by that of Emalee, his wife of 50 years, and Cozette Barker Godsey, who died October 13, 2010. Suzanne, John’s daughter notes that her father was a “born teacher, and one of those rare and lucky individuals who was able to channel his lifelong interest in Bonhoeffer into a lifetime of meaningful work at both Drew and Wesley Seminaries and through the Bonhoeffer Society. His enthusiasm for his intellectual pursuits was matched only by his passion for gardening, and he derived an enviable sense of spiritual fulfillment from both endeavors.”

Green also notes that “from these beginnings of scholarship and organization, in which John Godey played a formative role, the Bonhoeffer Society grew into the strong scholarly society that it is now – just about to celebrate in November the near completion of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works English Edition. Appropriately, John Godsey was co-editor of one of its key volumes.”

John & Emalee Godsey (front)celebrating their 45th wedding anniversary with (l-r, back) Larry & Nyla Rasmussen and Isobel & John De Gruchy. Poilhés (Southern France), June 26, 1988.

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A Reading from John D. Godsey The Legacy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer

(A Bonhoeffer Legacy, Ed. A.J. Klassen, Grand Rapids: W.E. Eerdmans, 1981)

John Godsey asked the question “How is Bonhoeffer’s contribution to be characterized?” In this brief essay, Godsey indicated three emphases in Bonhoeffer’s thought which he thought were fundamental and which continue to challenge and provoke those who live after him.

who calls the church to discipleship; and finally in the last period of his life he concentrated attention on Jesus Christ as Lord not only in and over the church but of the whole world. A second characteristic emphasis that we inherit from Bonhoeffer is that of the costliness of Christian discipleship. Already in his earliest books he stressed the visibility of the church as the fellowship of those called to the life of vicarious love or deputyship. But it was during the church struggle that the theme of the cost of discipleship surged to the fore. It then continued during the war years in his challenge to Christians to participate in the sufferings of God in the midst of a godless world and in his belief that the church might have to maintain a secret discipline of worship and devotion in a world come of age.

“The first of these is the Christ-centeredness of Christian thinking. This may seem self-evident to a Christian theologian, but the fact is that few Christians have allowed their thought to be shaped by Christ as consistently as did Dietrich Bonhoeffer. For him Jesus Christ formed the center around which all thought of God, humankind, and the world must revolve. To deal with human existence, history, or even nature apart from Christ, he insisted, is to miss the heart of reality. Why? Because the purpose and meaning of existence is revealed in Christ’s life, death, and resurrection. A human being is created to exist freely and vicariously for others. Self-abandoning love is the purpose of God; and Bonhoeffer believed that in the man Jesus Christ, God concretized his love for humankind. While men and women in their sinful self-love want to become as gods, God becomes man. In Jesus he assumed our flesh and lived his love among us, identifying himself with us, bearing our sin and guilt, reconciling us to himself, and calling us to a new life of free and vicarious living for others.

Bonhoeffer engaged in a strong polemic against what he called ‘cheap grace.’ His chief target was his own Lutheran Church, which had prided itself on its proclamation of Luther’s doctrine of justification by faith alone - or, to be more exact, not by works but by grace through faith alone. What distressed Bonhoeffer was that many of his fellow Christians seemed to be using this battle cry of the Reformation to justify their doing no ‘good works’ at all, or at least doing as little as they deemed possible. They were making ‘salvation by grace’ into an initial datum by which to calculate the cheapest way to live the Christian life.

In thinking about Jesus Christ, Bonhoeffer tended to emphasize Christ’s humility. For him the really incomparable miracle was not the incarnation as such but the Incarnate One’s identification with sinners. Like Luther, Bonhoeffer inclined toward a theology of the cross.

‘Cheap grace,’ says Bonhoeffer, ‘meant grace as a doctrine, a principle, a system...the justification of sin without the justification of the sinner.’ It is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, Communion without confession, absolution with personal confession... grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate.’

Although the cross of Christ is a dominant element in Bonhoeffer’s thought, he insisted that it would be a mistake to establish a separate theology of the incarnation or of the cross or of the resurrection, for those three go together to form a whole. ‘In Jesus Christ,’ he explains, ‘we have faith in the incarnate, crucified, and risen God. In the incarnation we learn of the love of God for His creation; in the crucifixion we learn of the judgment of God on all flesh; and in the resurrection we learn of God’s will for a new world.’

Much later in his life, when he was in prison, Bonhoeffer wrote to Bethge that he could see the danger in what he had written in his book on discipleship. I believe that the danger he referred to was not one of ‘works righteousness,’ that is, that we would try to justify ourselves before God by doing good works. Rather, it was that our efforts to lead a holy life of discipleship might lead us to be more interested in ourselves than in others. We might want to make something of ourselves rather than ‘being there for others.’

Man...is not to be understood in individualistic isolation from his brothers and sisters, but only in relationship to God and his fellow humans. This is because he is created in the image of God, and God revealed himself in Christ to be, not in and for himself, but in a loving relationship to others. The analogy between God and humankind, Bonhoeffer says, is not an analogy of being but an analogy of relationship. Because of Christ we can never think of man-in-himself or of God-in-himself, but only of their being related to each other.

A third emphasis bequeathed to us in Bonhoeffer’s theology, namely, the worldliness of Christian faith. In his Ethics, Bonhoeffer argued that, because in Jesus Christ God has concretely entered our world and has reconciled it to himelf, humans can no longer have the world without God or God without the world. The sacred can no longer be separated from the secular or the Christian from the worldly. Thus Bonhoeffer called on Christians to cease thinking of reality as divided into two spheres, the sacred and the secular, and to think, rather, of one reality in which humankind finds certain divinely imposed, universally applicable mandates, the chief of which are marriage and family, labor (including culture), government, and church.

Sin for Bonhoeffer is humankind’s refusal to accept the grace of God revealed in Christ, the breaking of the relationship with the Creator. While the emphases and foci of Bonhoeffer’s thought changed from time to time during his life, his thought nevertheless remained consistently Christ-centered. During the early years he saw Jesus Christ as the revelational reality of the church; then during the years of the German church struggle he emphasized that Jesus Christ is the Lord

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DONORS NEEDED FOR BONHOEFFER EXHIBIT

News of Interest Gϋtersloh has published its first Bonhoeffer comic book. The Berlin church newspaper, Die Kirche, reported in December that an “adult Graphic Novel” drawn and written by artist Moritz Stetter, is available for 14.99 Euros. The 112-page comic book is designed to strengthen the reader’s emotional connection to Bonnoeffer’s story. Bonhoeffer’s famous quotations are placed in historical context, with special attention to major turning points in his life.

The Bonhoeffer Archive at Union Theological Seminary wishes to create an electronic exhibit of its Bonhoeffer manuscripts, photographs, and printed materials. We are looking for a donor – an individual, a family, or a congregation – who could provide $4,000.00 to help create this exhibit. For nearly forty years the Burke Library of Union Seminary has been the Bonhoeffer research center for the Englishspeaking world. Its collection goes back to Bonhoeffer’s postdoctoral year at the Seminary in 1930-31. It includes originals of documents such as his application and academic transcript (which contains two incompletes!), inscribed first editions of his books, memoirs and lectures by Bonhoeffer’s students, numerous papers from conferences and the International Bonhoeffer Congresses, and microfiche of his entire written output (see Meyer & Bethge, Nachlass Dietrich Bonhoeffer). The Bonhoeffer Archive also created and manages the online Bonhoeffer bibliography that serves scholars around the world.

Southern Illinois University Press announces that Ronald C. Arnett’s Dialogic Confession: Bonhoeffer’s Rhetoric of Responsibility, is available in an electronic version [ISBN 080932640X, edition 2005, PDF, 256 pages, 1,02 mb] John S. Conway, Univesity of British Columbia, has reviewed Volume 12, DBWE, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Berlin: 1932-1933, ed. Larry L. Rasmussen, trans. Isabel Best, David Higgins and Douglas W. Stott (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2009), ISBN 978-0-8008312-2) in the December 2010 issue of the quarterly journal of the Association of Contemporary Church Historians (ACCH), Vol. 1, No. 4

The project will digitize this unique collection to create an electronic exhibit. Making original archival material readily accessible worldwide simultaneously helps preserve the manuscripts by limiting direct handling. If funded the exhibit will be unveiled at the conference “Bonhoeffer for the Coming Generations,” in November this year. The exhibit will be presented on several mobile LCD screens during the conference, and thereafter will be available for teaching and research, thus presenting “Bonhoeffer for the Coming Generations.”

The society acknowledges the generous support of long-time donors, helped by a few four-figure donations, in its annual Christmas appeal for support of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works English Edition. Fortyone donors contributed almost $6,500. Donors will be recognized in the conference book of the conference “Bonhoeffer for the Coming Generations,” which commemorates the completion of this project (see pages 13-15 for announcement). Late donations are still acceptable.

Ruth Cameron, Burke Library Archivist, will supervise the project and will train a graduate-student assistant. Image scanning will be undertaken by Columbia University’s imaging laboratory. If funds are raised, work will begin in April 2011. The $4,000.00 will cover the time of the Archivist and a stipend for a graduate student, the use of Columbia’s laboratory, and the purchase of one LCD screen that will be on permanent loan from the Bonhoeffer Society to the library.

Al Staggs has published a paperback What Would Bonhoeffer Say?, which is available through Parson’s Porch Books or through Amazon.com for $18.95. Staggs has combined his passions for writing and performing a one-person play that takes his audience into the prison cell of Bonhoeffer. Staggs is a full-time performing artist, adding characterizations of Clarence Jordan, Archbishop Oscar Romero, Thomas Merton and Walter Rauschenbusch to his repertoire of programs.

This is an ideal project for a congregation or a small family foundation. But time is short if this project is to begin in April. For further information contact Clifford Green at [email protected] cs.com. Checks made out to “Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works” and marked “Archive Exhibit” may be mailed to Clifford Green, 65 East India Row 20C, Boston, MA 02110.

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BONHOEFFER BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATE 2011 Joel D. Lawrence This is the nineteenth annual update to the Bonhoeffer Bibliography: Primary Sources and Secondary Literature in English (Evanston: American Theological Library Association, 1992). The English language bibliography is cumulated in the online Bonhoeffer Bibliography at Union Theological Seminary (see below), and the International Bibliography on Dietrich Bonhoeffer (Gütersloh, 1998) is cumulated in the occasional volumes of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Yearbook, of which four issues have been published to date. Please note the following: (1) any items marked ADD TO are revisions to entries in the published bibliography; (2) in order to register complete sets of conference papers, some German titles may be included; (3) The English Language Section of the International Bonhoeffer Society works to have all conference papers placed in the “Bonhoeffer Collection” at Union Theological Seminary, New York. However, conference paper sets are incomplete. Primary Sources

Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. “Bearing Suffering.” In Be Still, My Soul: Embracing God’s Purpose and Provision in Suffering, 6368. Edited by Nancy Guthrie. Wheaton, Ill.: Crossway, 2010. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. Dietrich Bonhoeffer: Meditation and Prayer. Ed. Peter Frick. Collegeville, MN.: Liturgical Press, 2010. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In Belief: Readings on the Reason for Faith, 242-250. Ed. Francis S. Collins. New York, NY: HarperOne, 2010, 328. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. God is in the Manger. Reflections on Advent and Christmas. Compiled and edited by Jana Riess. Translated by O.C. Dean Jr. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2010. [Texts excerpted from Dietrich Bonhoeffer, I Want to Live These Days with You. A Year of Daily Devotions, Ed. Jana Riess. Louisville: Westminster John Knox 2007.] Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. Letters and Papers from Prison. Volume 8 of Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works. Ed. by John de Gruchy. Translated by Isabel Best, Lisa Dahill, Reinhard Kraus, and Nancy Lukens. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. Letters and Papers from Prison. London: The Folio Society, 2000. [Special printing reproducing The Enlarged Edition, London: SCM Press, 1971.] Introduction by Irina Ratushinskaya and decorations by Christopher Brown. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. “Notes at the Conclusion of Bonhoeffer’s 1939 Diary.” Ed. Victoria J. Barnett. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Jahrbuch 4. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Yearbook 4. 2009/2010, 17-27. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus, 2010. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. “Selections from ‘The Bethel Confession’.” Lutheran Forum 44, no. 1 (March 1, 2010): 43-47. Bonhoeffer, Dietrich. “Two Bonhoeffer Inscriptions at Union Theological Seminary.” Ed. Clifford J. Green. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Jahrbuch 4. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Yearbook 4. 2009/2010, 15-16. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus, 2010.

Secondary Sources

Aitken, Jonathan. “Rebirth in Harlem.” American Spectator 43, no. 6 (July 2010): 78-79. Anderson, William P., Ed. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In A Journey through Christian Theology: With Texts from the First to the TwentyFirst Century, 362-368. Second Ed.. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Battle, Michael. “Reconciliation as Worshiping Community.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 233-242. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Becker Nissen, Ulrik. “Being Christ for the Other.” Studia Theologica 64, no. 2 (December 2010): 177-198. Bedford-Strohm, Heinrich. “Biotechnology and Public Theology: A Dialogue with Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 133-145. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Bohn, Jochen. “Bonhoeffer’s Religionlessness: Foundation of an As-if Theology.” In Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture: Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Thought 59-76. Eds. Stephen Plant and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008. Brook, Carl Ivor. “Bonhoeffer and the New Monasticism.” Unpublished Ph.D. diss., University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2010.

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Burnell, Joel. Poetry, Providence, and Patriotism: Polish Messianism in Conversation with Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2010. Cahill, Charles K. “Bonhoeffer as Pragmatist? A Reappraisal of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Time at Union Theological Semi-nary, 193031.” Unpublished Ph.D. diss., Univ. Wisconsin, 2010. Clements, Keith W. The SPCK Introduction to Bonhoeffer. London: SPCK, 2010. Clough, David. “Interpreting Human Life by Looking the Other Way: Bonhoeffer on Human Beings and Other Animals.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 51-74. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Coles, Robert, and David D. Cooper. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In Lives We Carry with Us: Profiles of Moral Courage, 161-173. New York: New Press, 2010. Copeland, M. Shawn. “Bonhoeffer, King, and Themes in Catholic Social Thought.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 79-90. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Csepregi, András. “Genuine or Elitist Democracy? Christianity and Democracy in the Thought of István Bibó and Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In From Political Theory to Political Theology: Religious Challenges and the Prospects of Democracy. Eds. Aakash Singh and Péter Losonczi. London: Continuum Press, 2010. Cumming, Richard. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Concept of the Cor Curvum in Se: A Critique of Bonhoeffer’s Polemic with Reinhold Seeberg in Act and Being.” Union Seminary Quarterly Review 62, no. 3-4 (2010): 116-133. Dahill, Lisa. “Con-Formation with Jesus Christ: Bonhoeffer, Social Location, and Embodiment.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 176-190. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. de Gruchy, John W. “Theology for Dark Times.” Christian Century 127, no. 21 (October 19, 2010): 28-33. de Gruchy, John W. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906-45).” In The Blackwell Companion to the Theologians, vol. 2, 233-52. Ed. Ian S. Markham. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. de Gruchy, John W. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer as Christian Humanist.” In Being Human, Becoming Human. Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 3-24. Eds. Jens Zimmermannm and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. de Gruchy, John W. “Editor’s Introduction.” In Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison (DBWE 8). Minneapolis: Fortress Press 2010. DeJonge, Michael P. “The Presence of Christ in Karl Barth, Franz Hildebrandt and Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” Dietrich Bonhoeffer Jahrbuch 4. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Yearbook 4. 2009/2010, 96-115. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus, 2010. DeJonge, Michael P. “Respecting Rights and Fulfilling Duties: Bonhoeffer’s Formed Life in Bioethical Perspective.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 109-122. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. DeJonge, Michael. “Bonhoeffer’s Concept of the West.” Paper Presented at Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. Elshtain, Jean Bethke. “Political Order, Political Violence, and Ethical Limits.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 43-52. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Frick, Peter. A Dialogue with Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Collected Essays. Chung Li, Taiwan: Chung, Yuan Christian Univ. Sino-Christian Studies Suppl. Series 2. 2009. Frick, Peter. “Bonhoeffer’s Theology and Economic Humanism: An Exploration in Interdisciplinary Sociality.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 49-68. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. Garćia, Ismael. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” The Westminster Dictionary of Theologians, 60-61. Ed. Justo L. Gonzales.Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2006. Graumann, Sigrid. “Biomedicine and our Understanding of Disability.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 123-131. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Green, Clifford J. “Bonhoeffer at Union. Critical Turning Points: 1931 and 1939.” Union Seminary Quarterly Review 62 (3-4) (2010): 1-16. Green, Clifford J. “Christus Pro Mundo. Bonhoeffer’s Contribution Toward a New Christian Paradigm.” Paper Presented at the Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. Green, Clifford J. “Commentary: Three Bonhoeffer Inscriptions at Union Theological Seminary Library.” Dietrich Bonhoeffer Jahrbuch 4. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Yearbook 4. 2009/2010, 142-47. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus, 2010. Green, Clifford J. “Hijacking Bonhoeffer” [Review aricle of Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer. Pastor, Prophet, Prophet, Spy. The Christian Century 127.21 (October 19, 2010), 34-39]. Green, Clifford J. “Sociality, Discipleship and Worldly Theology in Bonhoeffer’s Christian Humanism.” In Being Human, Becoming Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 71-90. Eds. Jens Zimmermann and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. Green, Clifford. “The Translation of Bonhoeffer’s Ethics: A Response to Jennifer Moberly.” Studies in Christian Ethics 23, no. 3 (2010): 316-320. Greggs, Tom. “Pessimistic Universalism: Rethinking the Wider Hope with Bonhoeffer and Barth.” Modern Theology 26, no. 4 (October 2010): 495-510.

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Greggs, Tom. “Religionless Christianity in a Complexly Religious and Secular World: Thinking Through and Beyond Bonhoeffer.” In Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture: Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Thought, 111-25. Eds. Stephen Plant and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008. Gregor, Brian. “Following-After and Becoming Human: A Study of Bonhoeffer and Kierkegaard.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 152-175. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. Gregor, Brian. “On the Sociality of Revelation. A Dialogue Between Kierkegaard and Bonhoeffer.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Gremmels, Christian. “Editor’s Afterword to the German Edition.” In Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison (DBWE 8), 56596. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Hansen, Collin. “The Authentic Bonhoeffer: Eric Metaxas Explains How the German Theologian Lived a Life Worth Examining. (Interview).” Christianity Today July 2, 2010. Harasta, Eva. “Christ Becoming Pluralist: Bonhoeffer’s Public Theology as Inspiration for Inter-Religious Dialogue Today.” Paper presented at Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. Harasta, Eva. “One Body: Dietrich Bonhoeffer on the Church’s Existence as Sinner and Saint at Once.” Union Seminary Quarterly Review 62 (3-4) (2010): 17-34. Harvey, Barry. “The Narrow Path: Sociality, Ecclesiology, and the Polyphony of Life in the Thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 102-123. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. Haynes, Stephen R. “King and Bonhoeffer as Protestant Saints: The Use and Misuse of Contested Legacies.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 21-32. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Haynes, Stephen R. and Lori Brandt Hale. Bonhoeffer for Armchair Theologians. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2009. Henley, Grant. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Fragmente aus Tegel: The Pastor as Author” and “Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Gefängnisgedichte: Poetic Tradition as Resistance.” In his Cultural Confessionalism. Literary Resistance and the Bekennende Kirche, 111-51. Bern: Peter Lang, 2007. Heuser, Stefan. “Bonhoeffer and Bioscience: Dialogues on the Hermeneutics of Human Life.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 13-26. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Heuser, Stefan. “Bonhoeffer on the Restoration of Politics.” Paper Presented at Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. Höhne, David A. Spirit and Sonship: Colin Gunton’s Theology of Particularity and the Holy Spirit. Ashgate, 2010. Holmes, Christopher R. J. “The Contemporaneity of God for Ethics Today: Paul Lehmann’s Contribution to a Neglected Theme, in Dialogue with Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” Studies in Christian Ethics 23, no. 3 (2010): 284-299. Holmes, Christopher. “‘The Indivisible Whole of God’s Reality’: On the Agency of Jesus in Bonhoeffer’s Ethics.” Int.J. Systematic Theology 12, no. 3 (August 2010): 283-301. Holmes, Christopher R.J. “Wholly Human and Wholly Divine, Humiliated and Exalted: Some Reformed Explorations in Bonhoeffer’s Christology Lectures.” Scottish Bulletin of Evangelical Theology (November 2007): 210-25. Jackson, Timothy P. “Church, World, and Christian Charity.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 91-106. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Jenkins, Willis, and Jennifer M. McBride. Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Jenkins, Willis. “Conclusion: Christian Social Ethics After Bonhoeffer and King.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 243-258. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Karttunen, Tomi. “The Church for Others: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Pioneering Ecumenical Vision.” Seminary Ridge Review 13, no. 1 (2010): 81-100. Kelly, Geffrey B. “Spiritualities of Justice, Peace, and Freedom for the Oppressed.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 207-218. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Kennedy, Philip. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer: 1906-45.” In Twentieth-Century Theologians: A New Introduction to Modern Christian Thought, 85-100. London: I.B. Tauris and Co, Ltd., 2010. Kevern, Peter. “Alzheimer’s and the Dementia of God.” Int. J. Public Theology 4, no. 2 (January 1, 2010): 237-253. Kirkpatrick, Matthew. “Nachlass Dietrich Bonhoeffer. A Guide to Understanding the Influence of Søren Kierkegaard on Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Knabb, Joshua J., et al. “Two Sides of the Same Coin: The Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).” J. Spirituality in Mental Health 12, no. 2 (2010): 150-180. Kruschwitz, Robert B. “The Finkenwalde Project.” In Christian Reflection: A Series in Faith and Ethics (2010): 4-16. Lawrence, Joel. Bonhoeffer: A Guide for the Perplexed. London: T&T Clark, 2010. Lenehan, Kevin. “Symmetries of the Kingdom: Suggestions from Girard and Bonhoeffer on Thinking the Church-State Relation.” The Heythrop Journal 51, no. 4 (2010): 567-581.

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Malesic, Jonathan. “Secrecy or Martyrdom: The Options for Bourgeois Discipleship in Kierkegaard and Bonhoeffer.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Marsh, Charles. “Bonhoeffer on the Road to King: ‘Turning From the Phraseological to the Real.’” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 123-138. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Marsh, Charles. “Reading Bonhoeffer During the Bush Presidency: Theological and Historical Observations on the Political Captivity of the Evangelical Church in the United States.” Paper Presented at the Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. McBride, Jennifer M. “Introduction: Communal Receptions and Constructive Readings in the Twenty-First Century.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 1-10. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. McBride, Jennifer M. “Thinking Within the Movement of Bonhoeffer’s Theology: Towards a Christological Reinterpretation of Repentance.” In Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture: Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Thought, 91-109. Eds. Stephen Plant and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008. McSwain, Jeff. “The ‘Yes’ of Reality and the Meaning of Grace in Barth and Bonhoeffer.” In Movements of Grace: The Dynamic Christo-Realism of Barth, Bonhoeffer, and the Torrances, 69-106. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock Publishers, 2010. Metaxas, Eric. Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson, 2010. Morse, Christopher. “Responsibility in the Real World: Bonhoeffer.” In The Difference that Heaven Makes. Rehearing the Gospel as News, 86-98. London & New York: T&T Clark International, 2010. Mottu, Henry. “Similarities betweenMartin Buber and Dietrich Bonhoeffer. A Contribution to Jewish-Christian Dialogue.” Dietrich Bonhoeffer Jahrbuch 4. Dietrich Bonhoeffer Yearbook 4. 2009/2010, 80-95. Gütersloh: Gütersloher Verlagshaus, 2010. Muers, Rachel. “Bonhoeffer, King, and Feminism: Problems and Possibilities.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 33-42. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Nielsen, Kirsten Busch. “Commnunity Turned Inside Out: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Concept of the Church and Humanity Reconsidered.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 91-101. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. Nissen, Ulrik Becker. “Responding to Human Reality: Responsibility and Responsiveness in Bonhoeffer’s Ethics.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 191-213. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. O’Donovan, Ursula. “Bonhoeffer’s ‘Religionless Christianity’ and His ‘Non-religious Interpretation of Biblical Concepts’ in Light of His Concept of Oikoumene.” In Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture: Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Thought, 77-90. Eds.Stephen Plant and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008. Osborn, Ronald E. “Bonhoeffer’s Pacifism.” In Anarchy and Apocalypse: Essays on Faith, Violence, and Theodicy, 15-19. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2010. Owen, John Michael. “Barth, Bonhoeffer and the Arian Clause, 1933-1935: A Response to Jordan Ballor.” Colloquium: Australian and New Zealand Theological Review 42, no. 1 (2010): 3-28. Owens, L. Roger. “Preaching as Practice of Participation: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Theology of Preaching.” In The Shape of Participation: A Theology of Church Practices, 65-94. Eugene, OR: Cascade Books, 2010. Howard, Pickett. “The Torso and the Hypocrite. Polyphonic Integrity in Bonhoeffer’s Letters and Papers from Prison.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, Georgia, October 30-November 1, 2010. Plant, Stephen. “Editorial: Edition of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Works Nearing Completion.” Theology 113, no. 872 (March 1, 2010): 8182. Plant, Stephen and Ralf K. Wüstenberg eds. Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture. Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Theology. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2008. Plant, Stephen and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. “Introduction” to Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Theology, 11-13. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2008. Posadas, Jeremy D. “Practicing to be Religionless Christians among Post-structuralist People. Reading Bonhoeffer with Fou cault.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Pranger, Jan H. “Moving the Goalposts: Bonhoeffer’s Faith and the Secularity of a Post-secular World.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30- November 1, 2010. Prosser, William L. “The Practical Theodicies of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Martin Luther King Jr.: The Minority Struggle Against the Majority.” Unpublished Ph.D. diss., Wofford College, 2010. Pugh, Jeffrey C. “Living in the ‘World Come of Age.’ Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Resistance to Modernity.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Rasmussen, Carl J. “Preserving the Natural: Karl Barth, the Barmen Declaration: Article 5, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Ethics.” In Theology and the Soul of the Liberal State. Eds. L. V. Kaplan and C. L. Cohen. Lanham, MD.: Lexington Books, 2010. Rasmussen, Larry L. “Life Worthy of Life: the Social Ecologies of Bonhoeffer and King.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 55-68. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Ratushinskaya, Irina. “Introduction. Courage: The Missing Word.” In Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison, Folio Society

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Ed., vii-xiii. London: The Folio Society, 2000. Ray Jr., Stephen G. “Embodying Redemption: King and the Engagement of Social Sin.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 163-174. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph. “Human Embryos at the IVF-stem Cell Interface: Towards a Hermeneutic Approach to Bioethics.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 27-50. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Richards, Jeffrey J. War Time Preaching and Teaching. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009. Rohrer, Daniel J. “Beyond Pacifism. A Theological Dialogue between Reinhold Niebuhr, Karl Barth and Dietrich Bonhoeffer.” B.A. thesis, Denison Univ., 2003. Schlingensiepen, Ferdinand. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance. London: T&T Clark, 2010. Simpson, Gary M. “Overhearing Resonances: Jesus and Ethics in King and Bonhoeffer.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 219-232. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Sjoerdsma, Richard Dale. “Bonhoeffer and Music.” Journal of Singing 67, no. 2 (Nov 2010): 123-125. Slane, Craig J. “Existing for God in an Age of Theology’s Disestablishment: Prospects for the Christian University.” In Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture: Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Thought, 33-57. Eds. Stephen Plant and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008. Slane, Craig J. “The Cross and its Victims: Bonhoeffer, King, and Martyrdom.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 107-120. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Song, Robert. “Bonhoeffer and the Biotechnological Imagination.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 75-87. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Stackhouse, John G., Jr. “Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Christian and the Church in and for the World.” In Making the Best of It. Following Christ in the Real World, 115-63. New York: Oxford Univ. Press, 2008. Stassen, Glen H. “Peacemaking.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 191-206. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Sutherland, Arthur M. “The Significance of Liturgical Time and Gift Exchange in Letters and Papers from Prison.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Tavast, Timo. “Comparative Study of Luther’s and Bonhoeffer’s Trinitarian Theology and Ethics.” Seminary Ridge Review 12, no. 2 (2010): 26-47. Townes, Emilie M. “Notes on Appropriation and Reciprocity: Prompts from Bonhoeffer and King’s Communitarian Ethic.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 13-20. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Ulrich, Hans G. “Bonhoeffer’s Work - Challenging the Ethical Approach in the Field of Bioethics for a Critical Herme-neutics of Life: Shared Insights from a Multiple Dialogue.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 169-174. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Ulrich, Hans G. “Understanding the Conditio Humana: New Hermeneutical, Theoretical and Practical Perspectives in the Field of Genome-research.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 147-168. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Ulshöfer, Gotlind. “On the Relation of Politics and Economics: Ethical Perspectives and Bonhoeffer’s Legacy in a Time of Changes.” Paper Presented at the Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. Walker, Jon. Costly Grace. A Contemporary View of Bonhoeffer’s The Cost of Discipleship. Abilene, Texas: Abilene Christian Univ. Press, 2010. Walker, Jon. Costly Grace. 90-Day Devotional. Abilene, Texas: Abilene Christian Univ. Press, 2010. Wannenwetsch, Bernd. “Loving the Limit: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Hermeneutics of Human Creatureliness and its Challenge for an Ethics of Medical Care.” In Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 89-108. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Warnock, Raphael G. “Churchmen, Church Martyrs: The Activist Ecclesiologies of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Martin Luther King Jr.” M. Div. thesis, Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1994. Warnock, Raphael Gamaliel. “Preaching and Prophetic Witness.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 151-162. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Willis, Andre C. “Culture in Bonhoeffer and King: Deweyan Naturalism in Action.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 175-188. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Wills Sr., Richard W. “Interpreting Pastors as Activists.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 139-150. Eds. Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2010. Wüstenberg, Ralf K., Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung, Eds. Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Wüstenberg, Ralf K. “Foreword” to Bonhoeffer and the Biosciences: An Initial Exploration, 9-11. Eds. Ralf K. Wüstenberg, Stefan Heuser, and Esther Hornung. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2010. Yoder, John Howard. “The Christological Presuppositions of Discipleship.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 127-151. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010.

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Young III, Josiah U. “Theology and the Problem of Racism.” In Bonhoeffer and King: Their Legacies and Import for Christian Social Thought, 69-78. Eds.Willis Jenkins and Jennifer M. McBride. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2010. Zahrnt, Heinz. “From the World Beyond to This World” [on Bonhoeffer and Gogarten]. In his The Question of God. Protestant Theology in the Twentieth Century, 123-69. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1969. Ziegler, Philip. “Promeity in the Christologies of Bonhoeffer and Kierkegaard.” Paper presented at annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, Atlanta, October 30-November 1, 2010. Ziegler, Philip. “The Royal Office and the Political Problem: Bonhoeffer, Barth and Visser‘t Hooft.” Paper Presented at Fourth International Bonhoeffer Colloquium. Mainz, Germany. 30-31 May, 2010. Zerner, Ruth. “Bonhoeffer, Dietrich.” Evangelical Dictionary of Theology Ed. Walter A. Elwell, 168-69. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1984. Zimmermann, Jens. “Being Human, Becoming Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Christological Humanism.” In Becoming Human, Being Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, 25-48. Eds. Jens Zimmerman and Brian Gregor. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2010. Zimmermann, Jens, and Brian Gregor, eds. Being Human, Becoming Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2010. Zimmermann, Jens, and Brian Gregor, “Introduction” to Zimmermann and Gregor, eds. Being Human, Becoming Human: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Social Thought, xi-xxi. Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2010. Zimmerman, Jens. “Beyond Fundamentalism and Postmodernism: Bonhoeffer’s Theology and the Crisis of Western Culture.” In Religion, Religionlessness and Contemporary Western Culture: Explorations in Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Thought, 15-31. Eds. Stephen Plant and Ralf K. Wüstenberg. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2008.

DBWE 12: A REVIEW REVISITED

Book reviewers are familiar with the practice of editors of scholarly journals to air disagreements with the reviewer through subsequent letters to the editor. These letters often serve as corrections or more accurate addenda that would clarify and even point out errors in the text of the reviewer. Having received such comments on my review of DBWE 12 (see Newsletter #99), I offer the following clarifications and corrections to my review. At the same time, I affirm the point made by one critic, namely, that my review failed to give due credit to the superb editorial work of the German editors who actually produced the authoritative texts that made the translation and annotation of the English translations of the texts possible.In the spirit of acknowledging the accomplishment of these German editors for their original editorial work that went into the successful publication of DBWE 12, I offer the following addenda. 1. The most fully authenticated reproduction of Bonhoeffer’s controversial essay, “The Church and the Jewish Question,” is actually the text provided by the German editors, for which, in the English language translation, the English language editor crafted 11 explanatory notes.

2. On page 6 of the review, I mention the addition of the “Memorandum” that added greater clarity to the arguments raised by Bonhoeffer in that controversial essay. The addition of the “Memorandum” was originally the decision and contribution of the German editors in DBW 12. 3. My praise of the English language editorial work for the inclusion and translation of the original text of the “Bethel Confession,” did not at all defer to the fact that the original text was actually provided for inclusion and translation by the German editors in DBW 12. 4. In addition, the sections of my review of the DBWE 12 that lauded the English language edition as a “masterpiece of organization” failed to acknowledge that that organization actually stemmed from the original, exemplary work set in place by the German editors.

It is the hope that this reviewer’s clarifications and corrections to the review of DBWE 12 can finally bring to the attention of readers of the Bonhoeffer Society Newsletter and achieve even greater appreciation for the authoritative work of the German editors in the publication of DBW 12 as also of DBWE 12. The English language text is a praiseworthy example of the spirited collaboration in the editorial work of both the German and English language sections of the International Bonhoeffer Society in what has already been acknowledged in scholarly circles as an outstanding achievement and an indispensable source for research in and understanding of the life, writings, and undying inspiration of Dietrich Bonhoeffer . Geffrey B. Kelly La Salle University 13

Program and Presenters

“Bonhoeffer for the Coming Generations” November 13-15, 2011 Union Theological Seminary

Sunday | November 13 11:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

Optional Worship at Abyssinian Baptist Church Check-in at Union Theological Seminary

8:00 p.m.

Keynote Address “Bonhoeffer: Theologian, Activist, Educator. Challenges for the Church of the Coming Generations” | Sam Wells, Duke University

Monday | November 14 Bonhoeffer, Ethics, Public Life 1945-2010 “Inspiration, Controversy, Legacy. The Response to Dietrich Bonhoeffer in Three Germanys” | Wolfgang Huber, Germany

Panel: Bonhoeffer in International Contexts | John de Gruchy, South Africa; Keith Clements, United Kingdom; Larry Rasmussen, USA; Carlos Caldas, Brazil; Kazuaki Yamasaki, Japan Emerging Issues, New Research 2011“Bonhoeffer’s Strong Christology and Religious Pluralism” | Christiane Tietz, Mainz

Panel: New Research, New Issues “Reading Discipleship and Ethics Together” | Florian Schmitz, Mainz “Harlem Renaissance Writers and Bonhoeffer’s Activism” | Reggie Williams, Pasadena “Church for Others: Bonhoeffer, Paul, and the Critique of Empire” | Brigitte Kahl, Union Theological Seminary

Tuesday | November 15 Translation and the Interpretation of History and Theology “Translating Bonhoeffer. Intercultural Theological Challenge” | Hans Pfeifer, Düsseldorf

Translators Panel: Bonhoeffer in Translation: Challenges and Discoveries | moderated by Victoria Barnett, USA | “The Bonhoeffer Legacy as Work-in-Progress. Reflections on a Fragmentary Series” | Victoria Barnett; other panelists TBA Historians Panel: History and Theology in Bonhoeffer Interpretation | moderated by Andrew Chandler, Chichester; panelists TBA Theologians Panel: Reading Bonhoeffer the Theologian ”Bonhoeffer in Intellectual History Perspective” | Michael DeJonge “Bonhoeffer: Toward a New Christian Paradigm” | Clifford Green Evening

Concluding Banquet celebrating all the translators, editors, publishers, financial supporters and volunteers of the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works English Edition

Questions? Contact Dr. Guy Carter: [email protected] or visit www.dietrichbonhoeffer.org

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Registration

“Bonhoeffer for the Coming Generation” | November 13-15, 2011 | www.dietrichbonhoeffeer.org Union Theological Seminary | 3041 Broadway at 121st Street | New York, NY, 10027 | www.utsnyc.edu Names) ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone _____________________________

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Accomodation & Meals Priority will be given to those making reservations for the full conference (the nights of Nov. 13,14,15)

If no roommate is requested for a shared room, the Conference Coordinator will assign one.

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CANCELLATION POLICY: Cancellations received after 10/13/2011 will be charged a fee equal to one night’s stay. No-shows will be charged a fee equal to one night’s stay, and the remaining nights of the reservation will be cancelled. In cases of cancellation after 10/13/2011, the registration fee is nonrefundable.

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Accomodation is available on the Union campus and nearby at International House and Hotel Newton. The cost for single occupancy rooms is higher. To reserve housing for additional nights before or after the conference, contact your housing institution directly, as soon as possible. Indicate that you are registered for the Bonhoeffer Conference and providing your own billing informaiton.

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Union Theological Seminary | New York City November 13-1 | 2011 15

Book Review



Bonhoeffer - Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy. Eric Metaxas. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2010, xvi + 591 pgs. ISBN 13-9781595551382. $29.99. (This review appeared originally in the October 5, 2010 issue of The Christian Century and is reprinted here with permission.)

Y

ou have to read Eric Metaxas with bifocals. With the upper lens you read the Metaxas of the book, an engaging narrative by an experienced writer who presents Bonhoeffer as a Christian hero led by God to struggle against an evil regime and against his wayward church. With the lower lens you read the Metaxas revealed in numerous web interviews in which he gives his account of Bonhoeffer’s “staggering” significance today.

Metaxas first read Bonhoeffer’s The Cost of Discipleship at the time of his evangelical conversion some 20 years ago. Formerly a staff writer for Chuck Colson’s BreakPoint, he appears frequently as a cultural commentator on Fox News and CNN. He founded and hosts Socrates in the City, a monthly event in New York featuring prominent speakers on “life, God, and other small topics.” He presumably treats such topics in the trilogy of popular apologetics, the first being Everything You Always Wanted to Know About God (But Were Afraid to Ask). In 2007 he published Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, which made the New York Times best-seller list and was the companion book to the film Amazing Grace. Readers coming to Bonhoeffer for the first time will likely be carried along by Metaxas’s engaging narrative and admiration for his subject. A talented writer, he depends heavily on Eberhard Bethge’s biography – 40 years old but still an unsurpassed source. His new material comes especially from the Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works English edition, which contains eight volumes of Bonhoeffer’s letters, sermons and papers. Metaxas quotes copiously from the five volumes that have only recently been translated. Also built into the narrative are letters between Bonhoeffer and his fiancée, Maria von Wedemeyer, published in 1994 as Love Letters from Cell 92. Other sources include various memoirs written by Bonhoeffer’s sister Sabine and by acquaintances such as Paul Lehmann, Reinhold Niebuhr and George Bell. Martin Doblmeier, maker of the film Bonhoeffer, calls the book “a masterpiece that reads like a great novel” and its author “the preeiminent biographer of Christianity’s most courageous figures.”

I will not linger over the numerous factual errors, including problems with the German words sprinkled throughout the text (even the notorious names Buchenwald and Dachau are misspelled). I will not fret about the problems infecting the copious endnotes, especially the missing, incomplete and garbled sources. I will not dwell on the fact that a critical

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assessment of sources is absent. (Metaxas repeats the pious and probably self-serving statement of the Flossenbϋrg camp doctor about Bonhoeffer’s death and the canard about Bonhoeffer’s radio speech on the Fϋhrer being cut off as if he were a marked man from the beginning of Hitler’s rule, when in fact he just went over the time limit.) One of the signs that the book was rushed through the press to appear on the 65th anniversary of Bonhoeffer’s death is found in the news that Bonhoeffer crossed the Atlantic in the “thirty-three-ton ship” Columbus. Informed readers will attend to what else is missing. Contrary to claims in the publicity, there is no new research in this biography. Bonhoeffer scholars are thanked but only mentioned in their role as editors; their research and writings are never discussed. (Disclosure: I have edited several volumes in the Bonhoeffer Works). Because research has found new documents and new interpretation has been written since Bethge’s book, one can indeed make a case for a new biography. (Ferdinand Schlingensiepen has just undertaken this serious task in Dietrich Bonhoeffer 19 06-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance.) And given the tendency of evangelicals and liberals to focus on different parts of Bonhoeffer’s theology and witness, the challenge is to transcend theological polarization and present an integrated and compelling picture. But that is not Metaxas’s approach: polarization is a structural motif of the whole narrative, because his mission is to reclaim the true Bonhoeffer from “liberals” who have “hijacked” the theologian. Consider the treatment of Bonhoeffer’s year at Union Theological Seminary in 1930-1931. It is true that Bonhoeffer was very critical of theology at Union as well as the preaching he heard in white churches like Riverside Church. What Metaxas highlights, however, is Bonhoeffer’s experience at Abyssinian Baptist Church, where he implies, Bonhoeffer had a conversion experience and became a serious Christian. In volume 10 of the Bonhoeffer Works I present new evidence of Abyssinian’s deep personal impact on Bonhoeffer. But that is to complement, not disparage, the decisive impact of Bonhoeffer’s friends at Union Seminary. At Union, as Bonhoeffer himself reports, he engaged in lifechanging discussions with Lehmann, Jean Lasserre, Erwin Sutz and Frank Fisher, discussions about the Sermon on the Mount, peace and “learning to have faith.” These led directly and quickly to work on his book Discipleship. There, too, he got to know several Social Gospel radicals – pacifists and socialists – about whom he continued to inquire in letters years later. Metaxas tells us nothing of all this. Why? Because his Union Seminary is a construct of his polarizing worldview in which evangelicals are pitted against liberals. This same simplistic approach governs Metaxas’s writing about German theology and about the church struggle under National Socialism. He flippantly compares the theological controversy

between Harnack and Barth to the conflict between latter-day Darwinians and proponents of Intelligent Design. He presents the Confessing Church as if it were an American denomination founded by Bonhoeffer. Indeed, he describes the battles of American fundamentalists and of the Confessing Church as essentially the same. Bonhoeffer, Metaxas tells us, “equated the fundamentalists with the Confessing Church. Here they were fighting against the corrupting influences of the theologians at Union and Riverside, and at home the fight was against the Reich church.” Two aspects of Bonhoeffer are so disturbing to Metaxas that he has to deny them outright or try to explain them away. Bonhoeffer, he insists, was not a pacifist. While pacifism as usually understood is not a good word to describe Bonhoeffer’s position, his Christian peace ethic was rooted in the core doctrine of his theology – his Christology and his understanding of discipleship, his interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount and his doctrine of the church. He did not abandon his peace ethic while working to kill Hitler and end the Nazi regime. Just one sign of this stance is the fact that even during the war Bonhoeffer wrote in his Ethics and spoke to his fiancée in support of conscientious objection. These matters of theology and ethics are too subtle for Metaxas; consequently his treatment of the Lasserre-Bonhoeffer friendship in New York falsifies the sources and wallows in sentimentality. Worse, if possible, is Metaxas’s embarrassment about Bonhoeffer’s writing in Letters and Papers from Prison about “religionless Christianity.” In a Trinity Forum interview he even stated that Bonhoeffer “never really said it,” but then had to retract that because, well, Bonhoeffer did say it. But Metaxas continues, he wrote it privately in a letter to Bethge and never intended anyone to see it because it was “utterly out of keeping with the rest of Bonhoeffer’s life.” He calls Bonhoeffer’s theological prison reflections a “few bone fragments…set upon by famished kites and less noble birds, many of whose descendants gnaw them still.” Descending to insult, even insulting the subject of his own book, is a sure sign that an author is in trouble. Why does he do this? Ostensibly because of the death-of-God theologians, those “liberals,” have “hijacked” Bonhoeffer. But why whip a few writers who made a brief splash 40 years ago and who have had little or no influence on theology or the church? Because they function as straw men in his polarizing narrative about “orthodox Christians” and “liberals.” His real target is liberals, and not just theological liberals, but political liberals too. The simplest way to refute Metaxas’s dismissal of the prison theology is to note Bonhoeffer’s answer when Bethge asked him how the book he was writing on religionless Christianity related to the unfinished Ethics. Bonhoeffer answered that the book he was writing in prison was “in a certain sense a prologue to the larger work [Ethics] and, in part, anticipates it.” So, pace Metaxas, Ethics and the prison theology belong together.

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A lot of nonsense has been written about Bonhoeffer’s prison theology, but the answer to that is good interpretation, not pretending that the prison theology is a dirty little secret. Why is the Christ-centered worldly theology of the Letters so threatening to Metaxas? Because it can’t be forced into a conservative evangelical mold – or a so-called liberal one either. Metaxas writes as an omniscient narrator, a mind reader who knows Bonhoeffer’s every thought and feeling. (Is this just a literary device, or does it reveal how much the author projects his own views into the mind and actions of his subject?) For example, at the height of the church struggle, Bonhoeffer caused an uproar when he wrote: “Whoever knowingly separates himself from the Confessing Church separates himself from salvation.” Metaxas assures us that Bonhoeffer did not think this was explosive and “never imagined that it would become a focal point of the lecture.” One curious problem parades itself in the sub-subtitle: Bonhoeffer is presented as “A Righteous Gentile vs. the Third Reich.” With this phrase Metaxas takes sides with a group that has advocated for Bonhoeffer to be recognized as a “righteous gentile” by Jerusalem’s Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem. Whatever one believes about the merits of the case, this element of the book is a piece of provocative posturing since there is no new information about the issue, or even discussion of it, in the book. This brings us back to the bifocals and the internet interviews. Bonhoeffer was a “theologically conservative evangelical,” Metaxas told Christianity Today. Born again at Abyssinian, Bonhoeffer was called by God to be in his own time a prophet like Jeremiah, Metaxas told Christianbook.com, in an e-mail to the Catholic News Agency. Metaxas stated that Bonhoeffer has “staggering” relevance today: “Just as the Third Reich was bullying the German church, [so] the American government is today trying to bully the church on certain issues of sexuality” and on “abortion and euthanasia and stem-cell research…We would do well to take our lead from him in our own battle on that front.” Lauren Green of FoxNews.com wrote that Metaxas showed how Bonhoeffer’s legacy was “the untold dangers of idolizing politicians as messianic figures…today as well.” Reading this, a blogger wrote: “That’s Obama and his followers he was warning us about.” If you think that’s a stretch, read Metaxas’s comments last December on Fox Forum discussing White House Christmas celebrations, in which Obama is connected – indirectly, of course – to Herod. Given all this, the most descriptive and honest title for Metaxas’s book would perhaps be Bonhoeffer Co-opted. Or better: Bonhoeffer Hijacked. Clifford Green Boston

New Conversations on Bonhoeffer's Theology

A Graduate Student Conference at the University of Notre Dame Notre Dame Conference Center - McKenna Hall April 10-11, 2011 New Conversations gathers scholars from North America and Europe to reflect on the recent emphasis in Bonhoeffer studies on his systematic and philosophical thought, and his historical and theological context.  Presentations will explore how this emphasis opens new possibilities for re-reading Bonhoeffer, for bringing him into dialogue with continental philosophy and other disciplines, for furthering discussion between Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Jewish communities, and for engaging a range of contemporary issues (e.g. race, disability, globalization) little discussed in the Bonhoeffer literature to date. F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N O R TO R E G I S T E R , V I S I T N A N O V I C . N D. E D U O R CO N TAC T A DA M C L A R K A N D M I K E M AW S O N AT N D B O N H O E F F E R @ G M A I L . CO M

PUBLIC LECTURES

CONTRIBUTING SCHOLARS David Congdon Princeton Theological Seminary

Markus Franz Universität Leipzig

Kendall Cox University of Virginia

Jeremy Kessler Yale University

Nathan Crawford Loyola University of Chicago

Matt Kirkpatrick University of Oxford

Brandy Daniels Duke University

Jeff Nowers University of Toronto

Brian Gregor Boston College

Jacob Phillips King’s College, London

Marie-Theres Igrec Universität Wien

Matthew Puffer University of Virginia

B E R N D WA N N E N W E T S C H University of Oxford “My strength is made perfect in weakness”: Bonhoeffer and the War over (the Meaning of) Disabled Life S U N DAY, A P R I L 1 0 AT 7 : 3 0 P. M . CHRISTIANE TIETZ Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz Bonhoeffer on the Ontological Structure of the Church M O N DAY, A P R I L 1 1 AT 1 1 : 0 0 A . M . R O B I N LO V I N Southern Methodist University The Divine Mandates in an Age of Globalization M O N DAY, A P R I L 1 1 AT 5 : 0 0 P. M .

Sponsored by the Nanovic Institute for European Studies, the Graduate School, the Department of Theology, and the Henkels Fund for Guest Lectures from the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts.

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Newsletter Archives

Readers may find of interest the following review of Issues #1-#9 of the society’s Newsletter. A copy of all nine of these issues is available to current members and will be sent by e-mail upon request to the Editor. The review and availability of additional past issues of the Newsletter will be announced in forthcoming issues.

(Issues #1-#9 all edited by C. Green). No. 1 June 1973

Int’l Bonhoeffer Kongress met in 1971 in Germany. Attendees included Paul Lehmann, Frederick Herzog, Edward Huermann, Wallace Alston, Virgil Moorefield, William Peck, Larry Rasmussen and Clifford Green. Int’l Bonhoeffer Committee formed with representatives of regional sections: Eberhard Bethge (Int’l), Ferdinand Schlingensiepen and Ernst Feil (FDR), Carl-Jurgen Kaitenborn (DDR), J.S. Weiland (Holland), F. Lehel (E. Europe), Jørgen Glenthøj (Scandinavia) and Clifford Green (English Language Section). Committee organized to collect 1) bibliographic cards and 2) DB seminar papers and original manuscript of Sanctorum Communio, Call for people interested in organizing English Language Section (ELS). Center proposed to house regional archives, to include primary and secondary resources, unpublished materials and unpublished dissertations. Call for members announced.

No. 2 March 1974

23 members added (R.McAfee Brown, John Godsey, David Manrodt, F. Burton Nelson, Larry Rasmussen, Clifford Green, Geffrey Kelly, Daniel Hardy, Martin Rumscheidt, Charles West, William Peck, John De Gruchy, Paul Busing and others). Steering Committee formed: John Godsey, Geff Kelly, Bill Peck, Larry Rasmussen, Jim Burtness, John De Gruchy and Tom Day. Archive materials may be housed at Union Theo. Seminary (NYC). Call issued for Archives Contributions. Bonhoeffer Colloquium announced for October in Washington DC. Complete, original manuscript of Sanctorum Communio had been microfilmed. Eberhard Bethge to lecture in South Africa

No. 3 September 1974

13 new members (including Ruth Zernerm E.H. Robertson, Raymond Orth, Franklin Littell and A.J. Klassen). Larry Rasmussen (Wesley Seminary) agreed to act as “collector general” for archive donations of books, articles, reviews and dissertations and theses. Bethge’s South African lectures accepted by Collins for publication. A complete DB bibliography can be found in Ernst Feil’s Die Theologie Dietrich Bonhoeffers) while an extract of Geff Kelly’s thesis (Revelation of Christ. A Study of Bonhoeffer’s Theology of Revelation) had been published. Sixth and concluding volume of DB’s Gesammelte Schriften VI published. Elizabeth Berryhill’s play, The Cup of Trembling, originally written as a Master’s thesis at Union.

No. 4 February 1975

6 new members (including Harvey Cox, Franz Hildebrandt, Hebert Jehle and Dale Brown), Second consultation meeting to be held in Chicago, fall of 1975. At fall meeting of Steering Committee, Geff Kelly agreed to serve as Secretary-Treasurer. Society to ask AAR for status as Affiliated Organization. Hans Pfeifer to serve as Secretary of West German section. Plans made for 2nd Int’l Committee meeting. DB Bibliography of Spanish language works available. Assorted news from around to world (USA, England, Germany and South Africa).

No. 5 June 1975

ELS regional archives (including photocopies and microfilm records) to be housed at Union. Authors urrged to donate writings on DB. Plans made to celebrate 70th anniversary of DB’s birth (1976). World Council of Churches to participate. Abstract of Thomas Day’s doctoral dissertation (Conviviality and Common Sense: The Meaning of Christian Community for Dietrich Bonhoeffer). Eberhard Bethge retired from position as Director of the Pastoralkolleg at Rengsdorf.

No, 6 September 1975

Final plans for 2nd Bonhoeffer Consultation meeting with AAR in Chicago and Bonhoeffer Conference for February 1976 in Geneva. West German section publishes first Rundbrief. Collins to publish Bethge’s Bonhoeffer: Exile and Martyr with lectures given in Brazil. Plans also underway for European tour in 1976, following steps of DB from birth to Flossenburg. No. 7 March 1976 17 new members (including John Matthews, J. Patrick Kelley, John S. Mogabgab, C.H. Yeh (Taiwan) and Maria von WedemeyerWeller). Report of Bonhoeffer Conference (papers, seminars and worship service) in Geneva. Union Seminary Quarterly Review features DB in Summer 1976 issue with bibliography, translations from Gesammelte Schriften, and book reviews. Daniel Hardy represents Britain on Executive Committee. Name change: From “Committee” to “Society.” Bethge plans to present lectures in New York this fall. Annual Scholar’s Conference on Church Struggle and the Holocaust planned for New York March 1976. Edwin Robertson writes from Britain on DB interest. Clifford Green’s book, The Sociality of Christ and Humanity. Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s Early Theology, 1927-1933, published. José J. Alemany reports of three related publications in Spanish.

No.8 June 1976

28 new members (including Robin Lovin, Floyd Loomis, Judy Holy, and Hubert J. Nelson) (Total membership: 94). Planning for 3rd annual gathering of Society in conjunction with AAR. DB letters (35) to Maria von Wedemeyer housed in library at Harvard and not available to public. John De Gruchy completed a study of DB’s notes & underlinings in his English Bible. Executive Committee met in John Godsey’s home. No. 9 December 1976 30 new members (including Mary Glazener, Clarke Chapman, Martin Hϋneke (London) and John Conway). Report of St. Louis meeting (Eberhard & Renate Bethge & Hans Pfeifer present). Burton Nelson & Larry Rasmussen reprinted lengthy responses to papers presented. Society receives grant from Lutheran Brotherhood. Publications of various forms noted as well as courses and lectures on DB. DB’s friend from Union, Jean Lassere, states that he is reading all he can about DB or his works themselves, discovering how close he is to his thought.”

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