Inside this issue: Volume 6, Issue 3. Summer 2016

Volume 6, Issue 3 Summer 2016 On Monday August 22, Russell County TR program, along with Adanta Team Members Collene Rooks and Amber Smith participa...
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Volume 6, Issue 3

Summer 2016

On Monday August 22, Russell County TR program, along with Adanta Team Members Collene Rooks and Amber Smith participated in a “letting go” activity. Balloons were inflated and each client wrote something on their balloon they wanted to work on “letting go.” They could put anything from eliminating bad habits, prayers for others, personal goals, etc. then the balloons were released. Everyone enjoyed the activity and are looking forward to more fun activities in the future!

Amber Smith  CSA‐Adults—Russell County Clinic 

Inside this issue: Taylor Clinic Construction

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Stroke Support Group

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Mental Health Proclamation

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Adair County-School Readiness

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Medication Errors

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Medication Errors Continued

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Officer Appreciation

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Ice Cream Social

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Zero Suicide

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Ask Dr. Angelia

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Adair TRP Cookout

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I Love Adanta

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The Adanta Group Serving: Adair, Casey, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, McCreary, Pulaski, Russell, Taylor, & Wayne Counties

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June 2016 was a great month for Adanta! Ground was broken for the new Taylor Clinic relocation and construction - a project that the agency has been wanting to do for a very long time. The clinic will be located on property owned by Adanta, adjacent to the Taylor Tenco building on Water Tower Bypass in Campbellsville. This relocation will move the clinic to a more accessible location in town and will combine all of the agency’s Taylor County services into one convenient location. The building will utilize the latest in HVAC systems for energy efficiency, new LED lighting systems, and a newly designed floor plan. Kim L. Worley, Operations Director

Adanta Team Members Jenna Noe and Kristi Howard had the opportunity to share Adanta's resources at the Lake Cumberland Area Stroke Support Group kick-off luncheon at LCRH on May 13. Adanta professional counselors provide therapy to stroke survivors and families who are adjusting to the impact of strokes, such as depression, anxiety, stress, and grief.

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Pictured from left to right: Adanta Team Members Tina Creekmore (Board of Directors), Santana Morgan, Danielle Pryor, Tanie Baker, Casey Daughtery (Intrust), Judge Stephens, Tracy McDonald, Ann Sutton, Amy Heath, Nicky Hansford

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The summer months are full of fun and excitement and families welcome the break that it brings from the demands of the school year. While it is certainly important that children enjoy vacation such as swimming, little league, and the county fair - school staff and community early childhood professionals want parents to know that being prepared for the upcoming school year is important as well. To help families prepare and to promote school readiness, the Adair County School District and Early Childhood Council sponsored a “School Readiness Bus” at the Adair County Fair in June. The bus - modified and climate controlled - was turned into an early childhood center, complete with crayons and building blocks. It was parked at the local fairgrounds each night of the fair and staffed by kindergarten and preschool teachers, Family Resource Center staff, and other local early childhood professionals. Parents with young children were encouraged to board the bus to access information about the abundance of early childhood programs that are available in the area with special emphasis on future school readiness. Each young child that visited the bus received a gift bag with a new book and suggested activities to promote school readiness skills. Parents had access to information about Preschool, Headstart, First Steps, Family Resource, Agape House Pregnancy Resource Center, Adair Public Library, and Adanta Early Childhood programs. Unfortunately, kindergarten screenings show that only about 50% of Adair County students are prepared to enter school “ready to engage in and benefit from early learning experiences that best promote the child’s success.” Adair County Schools are actively seeking ways to promote school readiness for every student through targeted programs such as Preschool, Kindergarten Camp, and a new Born Learning Academy sponsored by the Family Resource Center. School staff partner with the Adair County Early Childhood Council to address early childhood needs in the community and to coordinate outreach efforts like the “School Readiness Bus.” The Council was recently awarded a grant from the Governor’s Office of Early Childhood to develop programs that will help ensure that Adair County families have access to programs and activities that will ensure that their children enter school ready and eager to learn. Wes Feese, Public Information Officer Adair County School District

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“The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Medication errors are preventable. Your best defense is asking questions and being informed about the medications you take. Medication errors may sound harmless, but mistakes in prescribing, dispensing and administering medications injure hundreds of thousands of people a year in the United States. Yet most medication errors can be prevented. How can you protect yourself and your family? One of the best ways to reduce your risk of being harmed by medication errors is to take an active role in your own health care. Learn about the medications you take — including possible side effects. Never hesitate to ask questions or share concerns with your doctor, pharmacist and other health care providers. What are medication errors? Medication errors are preventable events that lead to medications being used inappropriately. Medication errors that cause harm are called adverse drug events. An example of a medication error is taking over-the-counter products that contain acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) when you're already taking a prescription pain medicine that contains acetaminophen, possibly exceeding the recommended acetaminophen dose and putting yourself at risk of liver damage. Another example of a possible error is taking the brand-name drugs Zyban and Wellbutrin at the same time. Both contain the drug bupropion, but each medication is intended to treat two separate conditions. Zyban is used for smoking cessation, and Wellbutrin is used to treat depression. If you're taking Wellbutrin for depression, then decide to quit smoking, you may mistakenly be prescribed both drugs. Taking both brand names together may lead to an overdose of bupropion. How do medication errors happen? Medication errors can happen anywhere, including your own home and in doctors' offices, hospitals, pharmacies and senior living facilities. Knowing what you're up against can help you play it safe. The most common causes of medication errors are:  Poor communication between health care providers  Poor communication between providers and their patients  Sound-alike medication names and medical abbreviations Communication is key to preventing medication errors Knowledge is your best defense. If you don't understand something your doctor says, ask for an explanation. Whenever you start a new medication, make sure you know the answers to the following:  What is the brand or generic name of the medication?  What is it supposed to do? How long will it be until I see results?  What is the dose? How long should I take it?  Are there any foods, drinks, medications or activities I should avoid while taking this medicine?  What are the possible side effects? What should I do if they occur?  What should I do if I miss a dose?  What should I do if I accidentally take more than the recommended dose?  Will this new medication interfere with my other medication(s) and how? Practice medication reconciliation Asking questions is essential, but it isn't enough. By collaborating with your doctors through a process known as medication reconciliation, you can significantly decrease the risk of medication errors. Medication reconciliation (Continued on page 6)

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(Continued from page 5)

is the process of comparing your current medication orders to all of the medications you have been taking. This reconciliation is done to avoid medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors or drug interactions. Medication reconciliation should be done at every transition of care in which new medications are ordered or existing orders are rewritten. Transitions in care include changes in setting, service, practitioner or level of care. Sharing your most up-to-date information with your health care providers provides the clearest picture of your condition and helps avoid medication mistakes. Here's what you need to tell your health care providers: 

The names of all medications you're taking, including all prescription medications, herbs, vitamins, nutritional supplements, over-the-counter drugs, vaccines and anything received intravenously, including diagnostic and contrast agents, radioactive medications, feeding tube supplements and blood products

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Any medications that you're allergic to or that have caused problems for you in the past

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Whether you have any chronic or serious health problems

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If you might be pregnant or you're trying to become pregnant

Avoid these mistakes The following medication errors have happened to real people. Don't make these same mistakes: 

Confusing eardrops and eye drops. Always double-check the label. If a medication says "otic" it's for the ears. If it says "ophthalmic" it's for the eyes.

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Chewing non-chewables. Don't assume chewing a pill is as good as swallowing it. Some medications should never be chewed, cut or crushed. Doing so may change how they're absorbed by the body.

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Cutting up pills. Never split pills unless your doctor or pharmacist has told you it's safe to do so. Some medications shouldn't be cut because they're coated to be long acting or to protect the stomach.

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Using the wrong spoon. The spoons in your silverware drawer aren't measuring spoons. To get an accurate dose, use an oral syringe (available at pharmacies) or the dose cup that came with the medication.

Make safety a habit Get into the habit of playing it safe with these medication tips: 

Keep an up-to-date list of all your medications, including nonprescription and herbal products.

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Store medications in their original labeled containers.

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Keep your medications organized by using a pillbox or an automatic pill dispenser.

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Save the information sheets that come with your medications.

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Use the same pharmacy, if possible, for all of your prescriptions.

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When you pick up a prescription, check that it's the one your doctor ordered.

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Don't give your prescription medication to someone else and don't take someone else's.

A final word on medication errors "Don't ask, don't tell" is never a smart policy when it comes to medications and your health. Don't hesitate to ask questions or to tell your health care providers if anything seems amiss. Remember, you're the final line of defense against medication errors. If despite your efforts you have problems with a medication, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about whether to report it to MedWatch — the Food and Drug Administration safety and adverse event reporting program. Reporting to MedWatch is easy, confidential and secure — and it can help save others from being harmed by medication errors. Resource: www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/medication-errors/art-20048035

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Celebrating Officer Appreciation with Somerset Police Department and Pulaski County Sheriff! Hats off to you, thanks for all you do for our community!

Adanta Team Members say “Thank You” for the Ice Cream Social to celebrate Mental Health Month!!

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What is Zero Suicide? It is a commitment to suicide prevention in health and behavioral healthcare systems, using a specific set of strategies and tools. The foundational belief of Zero Suicide is that suicide deaths for individuals under care within health and behavioral health systems are preventable. It presents both a bold goal and an aspirational challenge. The programmatic approach of Zero Suicide is based on the realization that suicidal individuals often fall through cracks in a fragmented, and sometimes distracted system. A systematic approach to quality improvement in these settings is both available and necessary and Adanta is committed to suicide prevention. At Adanta, there is a Zero Suicide implementation team, consisting of Team Members with a variety of personal and professional backgrounds. Team Members are: Katrina Riley, Clinical Director; Patti Page, Child and Family Services Director; Julie Parent; Kristal Mullins, School Therapist; Missy Jones, Case Manager and Barbara Bryant, Peer Specialist. The team began meeting in May 2016 and completed the Zero Suicide Organizational Self-Study. This study assessed which components of the comprehensive Zero Suicide approach that Adanta currently had in place. The self-study allowed the team to assess the organization’s strengths and weaknesses to develop a work plan. From the work plan, priorities were set and the team is in the process of formulating a plan to collect data to support evaluation and quality improvement regarding the Zero Suicide initiative. All Team Members at Adanta are committed to the adoption of this enhanced suicide care approach. Soon, a Zero Suicide Workforce Survey will be sent to all clinical and non-clinical staff to learn more about their perceptions of their comfort and competence caring for those at risk for suicide. The team will review and develop processes and policies, evaluate progress and measure results and then revisit the Zero Suicide Organizational Self-Study to check Adanta’s fidelity to the core components of Zero Suicide. It is VITAL that each of us examine our approach to caring for our clients with past and current suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior. We need to be mindful and present with our clients regarding suicide. We want to do all we can to not let any suicidal individuals fall through the cracks. We do not need to view suicide as a taboo subject or a legal liability. My fellow CLINICIANS: We need to complete the Columbia Suicide Screener EVERY TIME we see a client for therapy. Put a post-it note reminder on your computer screen. Create a reminder that works for you to complete the Screener after EVERY session. Not only is this being tracked, but it is important for quality client care. We want to break the pattern of the “distracted system.” All of us at Adanta have such an important responsibility to our clients and completing the Columbia Suicide Screener after ALL contacts is truly one of the most important parts of our jobs as Clinicians. Kristal Mullins, M.Ed., LPCC, Casey County Adanta School Therapist

“The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” ~Pablo Picasso

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The bond that links your family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other's life. Richard Bach Family relationships are complicated and, if that were not enough, they are ever changing, through developmental cycles and altered through divorces, death, relocation, etc. Families are in a constant state of flux and reformation through life events. In a society of constant change, families move from their home community and families are further fragmented. Just when a family reaches homeostasis, comfort, consistency, and, possible complacency, something or someone changes everything – and we start the process to bring the family back into balance. The social, emotional, intellectual developmental stages are the predictable transitions from childhood to senior adulthood. Throughout the lifespan we grow within the family system. The family life system, challenges, supports and aids in the transition to the next stage in the cycle. Without challenges, the family system tends to stagnate. It is through the challenges, faced within the system where family members to grow, change, rebuild and mature with new skills to face the next set of life cycle changes. Erik Erikson (1959) postulated growth-related stages where the mastery of skill sets and developmental milestones allow for successful transition from one stage of development to the next. If one does not master the skill set, theoretically, you may still move to the next phase of the cycle, but more likely to encounter social anxiety, difficulty with relationships and future adjustment without intervention. Life experiences through the family system will affect personal perspective and success. Erikson claimed we all inadvertently experience “crisis and intrapsychic conflict” when faced with developmental tasks. Developmental crisis, challenges and conflict can be a painful and prolonged process. Ultimately, the developmental cycle is dependent on the distress, discomfort, discomposure and discombobulation for the necessary outcome – growth and metamorphosis into the next developmental stage. Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open, and rules are flexible -- the kind of atmosphere that is found in a nurturing family. Virginia Satir Families are the major source of life gratification. Be assured, you can improve your family's quality of life at any stage. Self-examination, education, and perhaps counseling are ways to improve relationships. No matter what the stress and struggles, the family is there to help one another battle through the trials, make to the other side and celebrate this amazing life together. Last week, my family came together for the July 4 holiday weekend. I continue to be amazed at how we all get along, both the in-laws and out-laws. Families are a mix of the sweet with a taste of bitter. And I always remember, like them, I continue to evolve into the person I am becoming. I’m not who I want to be; I’m definitely not who I once was. Choose this day to live life to the fullest and leave nothing undone! And so, be Grateful in all things, Live in Joy, Peace, Belief and Grace. Enjoy a Larger than Life, life. Love God and People. Amen. Angelia S. Bryant, EdD, CCMHC, CHt, LPCC

On July 1, Bryan Miller treated the Adair County TRP clients to an Independence Day party. Steaks and hot dogs cooked on the grill, baked potatoes, and salad were a few of the menu items. Everyone had a good time, and looks forward to doing it again next year! Bryan Miller, BA, MEd, LPCC, Adair County Therapeutic Rehabilitation Director

Adanta’s Mission: Adanta is dedicated to establishing and maintaining a standard of excellence in providing community behavioral health care to the citizens of the ten county Lake Cumberland area in order to enhance the quality of life for those in need of such care and the family members of those served.

Corporate Office 130 Southern School Road Somerset, KY 42501 1.800.954.4782 www.adanta.org www.facebook.com/The.Adanta.Group

Our Rule: Use good judgment in all situations

24/7 Adanta Crisis Line: 1.800.633.5599 KY Hope Now Hotline: 1.800.221.0446 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1.800.273.8255

Dana Neat, school based therapist with Taylor County Adanta Clinic, provided this photo of something created by one of the children she sees. She has alphabet magnets on her desk for children to play with and while she was completing updates with the parent, the child spelled out this message for her. She thought it was cute and wanted to share. Thank you!

Adanta’s Purpose: Enhancing the Lives of Others