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healthcare food solutions & more FA L L / W IN T ER 20 07 REDUCING TRANS FATS: CALGARY HEALTH REGION TAKES THE LEAD THE GREEN ROOF VITAMIN D DILEMMA...
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healthcare food solutions & more

FA L L / W IN T ER 20 07

REDUCING TRANS FATS: CALGARY HEALTH REGION TAKES THE LEAD THE GREEN ROOF VITAMIN D DILEMMA PROBIOTICS: EAT YOUR BACTERIA MORE REASONS TO LOVE CHOCOLATE EATING TOGETHER

Omega 3 Sources...

INSIDE...

on the chart Trans Fat-Free Products . . . 7 SYSCO Fresh Fish Products . . . 9 October At A Glance . . . 17 November At A Glance . . . 18 December At A Glance . . . 19 Healthy Books . . . 22 By The Numbers . . . 25

f e atures

5



TRANS-FORMING THE FATS Calgary Health Region takes the lead.



9 11 14

OMEGA 3 SOURCES



VITAMIN D DILEMMA How much do we need?



THE GREEN ROOF They’re sprouting up all over Western Canada.

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MORE REASONS TO LOVE CHOCOLATE Satisfaction comes in many forms.

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EAT YOUR BACTERIA Naturally occuring and good for you!

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EATING TOGETHER

www.syscocalg ar y.ca



THE SYSCO CALGARY HEALTHCARE TEAM

H

ello and welcome to our first issue of Lifewise magazine. This quarterly publication will feature products, concepts, and general industry information specifically to support Health Care. Our Health Care team has been in place since October 2006. Since then, we’ve been working on various initiatives to support our Health Care customers & this publication is one of them. We at Sysco Calgary are excited to be launching this magazine and I hope that you find the information inside interesting and educational.

Blair Schmidt, Director of Healthcare

One article that may be of specific interest because of the attention that it has received in the media lately is trans fats. This subject has been in the forefront in the media over the past few months. Dr. Brent Friesen, Medical Officer of Health, Calgary Region, contributes some facts about the CHR’s Trans Fat Free initiative that will be taking effect on January 1, 2008. Calgary & area restaurants will be expected to adhere to the regulations put in place by the CHR. We also have Karen Owen who writes on Omega 3 Fatty Acids, the Vitamin D Dilemma, and Probiotics. You may also know Karen as the CTV Calgary, Medical Watch lady. Every week she brings us interesting information on various Health and Lifestyle issues. Finally, we have some great information from our Health Care vendor partners and a calendar of events with some key dates on it for your information. Have a great festive season and all the best.



We a re . . . Sandra Chabot • SYSCO Associate 6 Years • Calgary and Area

Lynn Faris • SYSCO Associate 13 Years • Red Deer and Area

Angel Harper • SYSCO Associate 3 Years • Lethbridge and Area

Kim Jesse • SYSCO Associate 8 Years • Calgary and Area

Lui Paladino • SYSCO Associate 4 Years • Calgary and Area

CHECKING IN A NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

H

ello everyone and welcome to the premier edition of SYSCO Calgary’s Lifewise. This quarterly magazine is dedicated to promoting a healthy lifestyle through a number of different ways, most importantly, through food and nutrition.

Adam Duncan, Marketing Manager

Lifewise is your connection, through SYSCO Calgary to the latest hot button issues. In this edition, we will take a look at the Calgary Health Region’s initiative to reduce trans fats for all of their permit holders. Trans fats have been on the tip of everyone’s tongue for quite some time, and we outline some of the reasons it’s crucial to reduce the intake of trans fats. Other topics and issues that we cover are Green Roofs in Calgary, probiotics, how social dining can affect the body in a positive way and Omega 3 fatty acids. SYSCO Calgary is really excited about Lifewise magazine and what it will offer our customers. We welcome your feedback and your ideas. Have a great start to the festive season and we’ll see you again in January. All the best.

Lifewise is published quarterly by SYSCO Food Services of Calgary 4639 - 72 Avenue, S.E. Calgary, Alberta T2C 4H7 Tel.: (430) 720-1474 Fax: (403) 720-1340 Advertising For advertising rates, information, letters, suggestions or ideas, contact us at the numbers above. Subscriptions are available for $25.00 per year.



SYSCO Calgary Marketing Marketing Manager / Editor Adam Duncan Marketing Coordinator Jessica Powless Marketing Coordinator Ryan Parkins Editorial Inquiries Please call (403) 720-1474 Fax (403) 720-1557 or email us at [email protected] www.syscocalgary.ca

Co n t r i b u t o r s. . . Karen Owen has been working as a television journalist for 20 years. She currently focuses on medical news for CTV News Calgary, in a segment called Medical Watch. Karen started her career as a general assignment reporter and covered everything from entertainment news to murders, but in 1997 she started focusing exclusiving on health and lifestyle issues. Karen Owen says her job is not to be a medical expert, but to talk to the experts and then communicate that information in an easy to understand format. Jennifer Allford has been writing stories for 20 years; first as a journalist at CBC Radio in cities across the country and for the past several years as a freelance writer in Calgary. A mother of two and abundant eater of meals, Jennifer has always had a special interest in stories about keeping healthy.

Design and Publishing Oil City Press Ltd. Contributing Advertisers Campbell’s Chapman’s Ice Cream Ltd. Golden Boy Foods Inc. Kellogg’s Kraft Maple Leaf Starbucks Unilever Voortman © 2007 SYSCO Food Services of Calgary All rights reserved.

TRANS-FORMING THE FATS Trans fats have been a hot button topic over the past few years, and with reason. Studies have shown that trans fats contribute very heavily to heart disease, and that no level of consumption of these types of artificial fat are healthy for human beings. It is for this very reason the Calgary Health Region has become a national leader in trans fat reduction. By Jessica Powless

T

aking the lead from Health Canada’s Task Force, recommending a limit of 5% trans fat to total fat ratio in all products sold to consumers in Canada, additionally recommended was 2% for tub margarines and spreads. Calgary is the first city in Canada to have an initiative of this kind. There has been some movement in the United States, specifically New York City’s board of health, who have voted to completely ban trans fats from restaurants. Calgary Health Region Registered Dietician

Carole Micholuk notes “Toronto is looking at doing something different, using a different approach, as well Vancouver has expressed interest in making strides, other municipalities are building on our approach, but as far as Canada’s concerned, Calgary is a leader in trans fats reduction.” With respect to Health Canada’s recommendations, Micholuk says that the CHR wanted to ensure more tangible guidelines and time frames for compliance for permit holders, “ The Calgary Health Region] felt that it was important for our region to take a step forward and set some www.syscocalg ar y.ca



to take part in the Calgary Health Region’s goal to ‘reduce the amount of artificial trans fat in our food supply’. On August 16th, 2006 food permit holders were sent the draft policy document outlining the CHR’s initiative for trans fat reduction. The document also sought feedback from the permit holders on the initiative, and polled them regarding potential challenges that may arise from the reduction strategy.

dates, in consultation with those who are involved and are going to need to comply. We’re hoping to have that understanding on their part.”

Being a leader requires taking realistic and necessary steps for implementation is important to the success of the program. Micholuk anticipates that the initiative will have some growing pains, but is certain that the CHR has put the proper safety nets in place, “The biggest challenge will be to be clear to operators what is expected of them,

what this means for them, and what they need to do to modify cooking methods or ingriedients. We will try to provide that to them. Certainly that is one of our great interests to provide them with the support that they’ll need to make this happen”. A website is currently being created, as well as a hotline, to allow permit holders and operators access to information that they require in the transition. Michouk emphasizes how proud she is to be a part of this initiative, and knows it will have lasting effects on Calgarian’s health, “we’re really wanting to make this an easy initiative and demonstrate what the benefits are, and what the impact will be for those who live within the Calgary Health Region”. **From the Calgary Health Region Trans Fat Reduction Strategy Draft Policy Document.

The trans fat reduction strategy recommendation**: Beginning January 1st, 2008 (Phase 1) you can no longer use hydrogenated margarine, oils and shortening, for cooking, frying, sautéing, deep-frying, and grilling. You will also need to use non-hydrogenated products for all spreads you put on food. The trans fat content of any product you use as a frying oil or a spread must be less than 2% of the product’s total fat content. Beginning January 1st, 2009 (Phase 2) you will also need to ensure that the trans fat content of every food item you store, serve, or use is less than 5% of the food item’s total fat content. All permit holders, which consist primarily of restaurants and the like, as well as food distributors and suppliers, have been invited 

Carole Micholuk, Calgary Health Region

feature TRANS-FORMING THE FATS

Some Trans Fat-Free Products from SYSCO Calgary Grocery 4966383 Bakersource French Toast 4/14.13 KG Beverages 8699241 Citavo Cocoa Mix Hot Chocolate 12/907 G 8699555 Citavo Cocoa Mix Hot Chocolate 6/50 EACH Cookies, Crackers & Croutons 6832430 SYSCO Classic Crouton Seasoned Homestyle 4/1.02 KG Spices, Flavors & Colors 5337474 SYSCO Classic Spread Garlic 8.8 LBS Syrup 5331663 House Recipe Syrup Pancake 200/16 ML 5331873 House Recipe Syrup Pancake Cup 120/42.5 ML Dressings & Toppings 4607024 SYSCO Classic Dressing Coleslaw W 2/3.78 L 4946000 SYSCO Classic Dressing French 2/1 GAL 4607156 SYSCO Classic Dressing Italian Traditional W 2/3.78 L 4607115 SYSCO Classic Dressing Ranch Savery W 2/3.78 L 4002440 SYSCO Classic Dressing Salad 37% 30 LBS 4002465 SYSCO Classic Dressing Salad 37% 4/1 GAL 3185808 SYSCO Classic Mayonnaise Heavy Duty 2/3.78 L 3186558 SYSCO Classic Mayonnaise Heavy Duty 14.5 L 3186558 SYSCO Classic Mayonnaise 1/14.5 L 3185808 SYSCO Classic Mayonnaise 2/3.78 L 0147025 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Blue Cheese Chunky 2/3.78 L 9590878 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Caribbean Mango Vinegar 2/1 GAL 7139546 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Greek Feta Cheese 2/1 GAL 4973087 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Phillippe Maison 2/3.78 L 4945846 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Raspberry Honey Vinaigrette 4/1 GAL 6475230 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Sesame Toasted FTFR 2/1 GAL 0391268 SYSCO Imperial Dressing Sesame Toasted 2/3.78 L 6985972 Wholesome Farms Frozen Whipped Toppings Ready to Whip Jug 12/32 OZ 6896053 Wholesome Farms Frozen Whipped Toppings - Pastry Bag 12/16 OZ Gravy & Dry Mixes 2272110 SYSCO Classic Sauce Alfredo Instant 6/745 G

2260057 2258945 2270171 2262343 2268670 2260271 0225159 2261048 2258903

SYSCO Classic Sauce Demi-Glace Roasted Beef 6/750 G SYSCO Classic Sauce Peppercorn Five Instant 6/822 G SYSCO Imperial Mix Gravy Aujus Instant 6/139 G SYSCO Imperial Mix Gravy Beef Instant 6/377 G SYSCO Imperial Mix Gravy Brown Instant 6/492 G SYSCO Imperial Mix Gravy Chicken Instant 6/419 G SYSCO Imperial Mic Gravy Turkey Instant NO MSG 6/475 G SYSCO Imperial Sauce Cheese Instant 4/823 G SYSCO Imperial Sauce Hollandaise 6/895 G

Jams, Jellies & Spreads 9581828 House Recipe Honey Pure Cup 200/14 G 0045864 House Recipe Jam Raspberry Cup with Pectin 200/16 ML 1484880 House Recipe Jam Raspberry Cup with Pectin 200/10 ML 0043372 House Recipe Jam Strawberry Cup with Pectin 200/16 ML 1487172 House Recipe Jam Strawberry Cup with Pectin 200/10 ML 1486703 House Recipe Jelly Grape Cup with Pectin 200/10 ML 2028777 House Recipe Marmalade Orange 200/16 ML 1490432 House Recipe Marmalade Orange Pure Cup 200/10 ML 4002063 SYSCO Classic Honey Pure Golden Liquid 15 KG 4029120 SYSCO Classic Honey Pure Golden Liquid 6/1 KG Oil & Shortening 7303308 Arrezzio Olive Oil 100% Pure 4/3 L 7302466 Arrezzio Olive Oil Extra Virgin 4/3 L 7303324 Arrezzio Olive Oil Pomace 4/3 L 3355757 Butter-It Butter Alternate Liquid ZTF 3/1 GAL 7099773 Fry-On ZTF Oil Liquid ZTF 17.4 L 1484708 SYSCO Classic Oil Canola 4/4 L 6703284 SYSCO Classic Oil Canola 16 L 1484567 SYSCO Classic Oil Canola Jib 17 L 2528180 SYSCO Imperial Pan Coating Aerosal Consentrate 6/14 OZ 2531317 SYSCO Supreme Pan Coating Professional Formula 6/16 OZ

www.syscocalg ar y.ca



Ava i l able f ro m S YSCO Ca l gar y 0202135 Dutch Boy Herring Filet Rollmop, Pickled 3 kg 8684615 Fishery Haddock Filet 10lb 0105437 Fishery Salmon Atlantic, Portioned 6oz, 10lb 1626795 Fishery Salmon Atlantic, Portioned 8oz, 10lb 242131 Highliner Haddock Fillet 8-12 oz, 3/15lb 3053808 Highliner Haddock Loin 10lb 0251405 Highliner Salmon Atlantic Light Tonight 40/4oz 0447987 Mirabel Trout Rainbow Fillet 5-6oz, 4/5lb 2733988 Nanuk Mackerel Filet, Smoked/Peppered 2.5kg 1358951 Pacifica Salmon Steak. Coho 10lb 6935084 Packer Ahi Tuna 10lb 8635187 Packer Atlantic Salmon Fillets 4.54kg 4713766 Packer Atlantic Salmon Fillets 13.61 kg 8891269 Packer Halibut Fillets 11.34kg 8381386 Packer Rockfish Fillets 4.54kg 5363787 Packer Sockeye Salmon Fillets 4.54kg 4713741 Packer Whole Atlantic Salmon 8-10, 22.7kg 2691962 Polrsea Salmon Fillet Chinook Boneless/Skinless 20/8oz 1609759 Portico Halibut Loin Steak Skon, Vacuum Packed 10lb 8437675 Portico Salmon Pink Burger 4.45kg 8038309 Trident Salmon Fillet Sockeye, Wild Skinless 6oz, 10lb

OMEGA 3 SOURCES By Karen Owen

H

ave you ever heard your mother, or perhaps your grandmother talking about the good old days when they had a daily spoonful of cod liver oil? They might not have liked it, Registered Dietitian Andrea Holwagner says, “you can imagine how gross a spoonful of fish oil is!” but despite the taste, that generation was on to something. Cod liver oil is good for you; it’s a great source of Omega 3 fatty acids. Omega 3 fatty acids can help prevent heart disease, arthritis and possibly Alzheimer’s. It’s also been linked to preventing post partum depression, attention deficit disorder, and strokes. Fortunately there are much more delicious ways of getting Omega 3 these days, such as, salmon on the barbeque or sardines on toast. Fatty fish such as salmon, sardines and herring, naturally contain Omega 3. You’ve probably seen other food being advertised as a source of omega 3, such as omega 3 eggs. Some egg producers feed their chickens special diets usually containing flax seed, so the chickens produce eggs with higher amounts of omega 3. The Flax Council of Canada estimates these enriched eggs have “eight to 10 times more omega-3 fatty acids than regular eggs”. Holwager says eggs are a “great source of protein, but not a great source of omega 3” the amount of omega 3 fatty acids you can get by eating the enriched eggs just doesn’t measure up to fish, she says the best source is “fish by far”.

and flaxseed. Flaxseed has long been touted as a good source of omega 3, but you should know whole flaxseed is a great source of fibre, it needs to be ground flaxseed if you want to get omega 3. Holwegner says, “you can meet your omega 3 baseline requirements from getting those plant based sources”, but if you eat fish you will get more. The Canadian Heart & Stroke Foundations recommends eating fish two times a week. It doesn’t take much, one serving of fresh fish is about the size of a deck of cards, and as for canned fish, half a can of tuna or salmon is considered one serving. At this point in time, the average North American eats fish about once every ten days. And remember, if you don’t like fish you can always have, a spoonful of cod liver oil. Oh don’t worry, these days it comes in easy to swallow capsule form!

You can also find omega 3 fatty acids in enriched milk, soybeans, canola, walnuts www.syscocalg ar y.ca



What makes the Voortman Omega 3 “2 in 1” pack so good? Could it be the fact that Voortman Flaxseed cookies contain Omega 3 oils that are proven in many ways to be beneficial to not only your heart but to other organs as well. Flaxseed oil is good for your heart because it is the richest source of alpha-linolenic acid, known to lower cholesterol, protect against heart disease and control high blood pressure. While it is still up for discussion, flaxseed contains lignans which may help in the protection against certain cancers.1 Omega 3 is the single most important essential nutrient that is almost entirely missing from our diets today. There is now overwhelming evidence from thousands of clinical studies that Omega 3 can improve general heart benefits, lower triglycerides, improve brain functioning as well as helping with diabetes, strokes, depression, arthritis, allergies, Alzheimers and many more.2 With all these many benefits, Voortman Flaxseed Cookies with Omega 3 is the healthy alternative! Pack Size 50 / 35g SCC 50067312007153

SUPC # 6083089 UPC 067312007158 1 www.healingdaily.com; 2 www.truthaboutfishoil.com

VITAMIN D DILEMMA By Karen Owen

V

itamin D is called the sunshine vitamin, because sunshine is one of the best sources of vitamin D, but how much do we need? And how do we safely get enough vitamin D from the sun without increasing our risk of skin cancer? There’s no question we all need vitamin D, it helps maintain strong bones and there’s a growing evidence that adequate amounts of vitamin D can reduce the risk of multiple sclerosis, as well as a number of cancers, including colorectal cancer and breast cancer. But here in Canada many Canadians aren’t getting enough vitamin D. Due to our northern latitude we don’t get enough sun exposure in the wintertime and because of our diligence in slapping on the sunscreen in the summer, we may not get enough sun in the summertime. So here is what you can do, either take vitamin D supplements or get a little sun on your bare skin. That’s right, bare skin, no sun block for 10-15 minutes a day! Dr. David Hanley, an endocrinologist at the University of Calgary and an expert on vitamin D says “face and hands is not enough”, he suggests bare arms and legs at the very least. However, during the winter the sun’s rays are too weak for adequate vitamin D production, as Dr. Hanley says, “four to six months of the year, if we went out naked we wouldn’t make enough”. The only exception to this lack of sunshine is outside workers. Those people who work

outside all day and build up a dark tan, may age prematurely, and quite possibly increase their risk of skin cancer, but they usually store enough vitamin D to last them throughout the year. If you are not getting enough vitamin D through sunshine because you always wear sun block or avoid the sun, then supplements are probably necessary. The Canadian Cancer Society recommends that Canadian adults should consider taking vitamin D supplements of one thousand international units a day during the fall and winter. If you don’t get out much in the

summer or have dark skin, then you should take the supplements all year round. You can also increase your intake of vitamin D through some foods, in particular, milk which is fortified with vitamin D, but don’t rely on food for vitamin D, Dr. Hanley says, “The amount from food is negligible and often overestimated.” So for now take your supplements or get a little sun (not enough to burn!) because the sunshine vitamin is good for you.

www.syscocalg ar y.ca

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White Tea: Perfect For Your Fall Menu Tea is second only to water as the

Now another tea

most popular beverage on earth.

is poised to take the

And it should come as no surprise

lead — white tea4.

that Canadians are drinking

Although white tea is new on our

more of it than ever before. It’s

scene, it has been enjoyed in China

enjoyed year-round at home and

is tea originated in

increasingly at restaurants as well. Consider these numbers: tea consumption in 2005 was up 43 percent rms that 77 percent

ose watching

Today white tea is produced in the

their weight will appreciate that

same area between the coastal towns

white tea is delicious without adding

of Fuzhou and Xiamen.

milk or sugar. Sweet, delicate and

tea comes from the plant Camellia

avours that it’s easy for people to

sinensis. But white tea is made from

nd the right tea for their mood.

the white-tipped buds and young leaves instead of from the mature

Traditionally, Canadians favoured black tea, but this is no longer true. In 2005 the sales of other

contains no fat, salt, sugar, calories

southeast China’s Fujian province.

Just like black and green teas, white there are so many varieties and

Tea is completely natural and

e least-processed of all teas, white tea is simply plucked by hand and air dried

specialty teas outgrew

(and sometimes

black tea sales for the

creamy, this tea is truly unique. Its golden hue and enticing aroma will make you want to sit back and relax. Considering all this, it’s easy to see why white tea is growing in popularity. If you’re looking to increase sales this spring, add white tea to your menu. Your customers will

steamed), preventing

first time in Canada 3.

oxidation from occurring.

Green tea became the

is method leads to white tea’s

fastest-growing segment of our

high level of antioxidants.

tea market. Remarkably it wasn’t

nd this delicious and restorative new tea on their next visit. ee Canada

even a category 10 years ago. Sources: 1

Tea Association of Canada

2

Tea Council of Canada

3

Calgary Herald

4

MSNBC.com

9

THE GREEN ROOF

Anyone who has ever served basil they just picked or munched a tomato straight from the vine will happily tell you: nothing beats the flavour of fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs from the garden. And those gardens are beginning to pop up more and more on the roofs of restaurants and other buildings...

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feature THE GREEN ROOF By Jennifer Allford

C

algary’s popular River Cafe restaurant is in a design and feasibility phase for a green roof as part of Calgary Park’s upgrades to the building on Prince’s Island. Part of the plan includes a rainwater catch system to irrigate the tasty delights on what the restaurant calls an edible roof. “It’s very exciting” says Sal Howell of River Café. “We have been pioneering some of our edible delights – flowers and herbs - in planters at the restaurant.”

“Every chef ’s dream is to have his own herb garden” says the Executive Chef of The Fairmont Royal York in Toronto. David Garcelon has been growing a variety of herbs, vegetables and ornamental fruit trees on top of the historic hotel in downtown Toronto for almost ten years. It produces enough organic herbs – including basil, chocolate mint and lemon balm – to serve with 6000 meals a day in the hotel’s restaurants. Across the country in Vancouver, The Fairmont Waterfront Hotel grows its own herbs as well. It cost about $24,000 to build the green roof in 1994 and it’s estimated it produces about $30,000 a year in herbs for the restaurants below. The kitchen staff starts harvesting in March, clipping chives, pansies and sorrel and by the summer, they’re bringing down about four huge bus trays of herbs every week. Aside from growing delicious herbs, fruits and vegetables, green roofs also offer a number of environmental benefits. They reduce the amount of heat generated by urban areas (what’s called the heat island effect), they increase energy efficiency all

year round (there’s a reduction in heat gain in the summer and less heat loss in the winter) and they provide better storm water management by reducing flow and retaining water. That’s why green roofs are sprouting up all over western Canada – most with native plants and flowers (not basil and chocolate mint!) There’s a green roof in Yellowknife, hundreds in British Columbia and several in each Edmonton, Calgary, Banff and Canmore. Kerry Ross, an architect and green roof champion has even planted one on her garden shed in northwest Calgary. But it’s tiny compared to the one Ross and a group of partners built in 2005 at the Alistar Ross Technology Centre (ARTC) at Calgary’s University Research Park. They wanted to prove that a green roof could grow in Calgary’s notoriously challenging gardening climate; very little precipitation, only 112 frost free days and lots of drying Chinook winds. Ross says several thousand plants now grow on the ARTC roof, including Mountain Goldenrod, Rocky Mountain Fescue and Wild Strawberries. Ross is working with the River Café on its green roof. “The more you see it happening in Calgary the less concern there is that green roofs won’t work” says Ross. “When properly integrated, the simple technology of a green roof can benefit people and the environment, all the while making our cities more livable and attractive.” Not to mention, our meals more tasty.

www.syscocalg ar y.ca

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OCTOBER Sunday Celiac Awareness Month

Monday

1

Mental Illness Awareness Week September 30 - October 6

7

8

Thanksgiving Day

Tuesday

2

Mental Illness Awareness Week September 30 - October 6

Calgary Stampeders vs. Winnipeg Blue Bombers McMahon Stadium 2:00 pm

21

Calgary HItmen vs. Kamloops Blazers Pengrowth Saddledome 2:00 pm

28

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29 Calgary HItmen vs. Edmonton Oil Kings Pengrowth Saddledome 2:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. San Jose Sharks Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

29

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29

Friday

Saturday

3

4

5

6

Calgary HItmen vs. Swift Current Broncos Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Philedelphia Flyers Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary HItmen vs. Medicine Hat Tigers Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Vancouver Canucks Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

Mental Illness Awareness Week September 30 - October 6

Mental Illness Awareness Week September 30 - October 6

Mental Illness Awareness Week September 30 - October 6

Mental Illness Awareness Week September 30 - October 6

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27

Calgary Flames vs. Minnesota Wild Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary HItmen vs. Lethbridge Hurricanes Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Colorado Avalanche Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Stampeders vs. Montreal Alouettes McMahon Stadium 5:00 pm

World Food Day

22

Thursday

9

Calgary Stampeders vs. Saskatchewan Roughriders McMahon Stadium 2:00 pm

14

Wednesday

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29

30

Calgary Flames vs. Nashville Predators Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

World Mental Health Day

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29

Calgary Flames vs. Los Angeles Kings Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29

Calgary Flames vs. Edmonton Oilers Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

Healthy Workplace Week October 23-29

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www.syscocalg ar y.ca

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NOVEMBER Monday

Sunday Crohns and Colitis Awareness Month

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Calgary HItmen vs. Everett Silvertips Pengrowth Saddledome 5:00 pm

11

Remembrance Day National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

18

Calgary Flames vs. Vancouver Canucks Pengrowth Saddledome 6:00 pm

25

Calgary Flames vs. St. Louis Blues Pengrowth Saddledome 4:00 pm

18

5

6

National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

2

3

7

8

9

10

Calgary HItmen vs. Prince Albert Raiders Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Vancouver Canucks Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary HItmen vs. Moose Jaw Warriors Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Edmonton Oilers Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

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21

22

23

28

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30

National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

Calgary Flames vs. Minnesota Wild Pengrowth Saddledome 7:30 pm

National Child Day

27

Calgary Flames vs. Detroit Red Wings Pengrowth Saddledome 5:00 pm

Calgary HItmen vs. Saskatoon Blades Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

National Seniors Safety Week November 6 - 12

17

World Diabetes Day

Calgary Flames vs. Colorado Avalanche Pengrowth Saddledome 7:30 pm

26

Saturday

1

Diabetes Month

Calgary Flames vs. Detroit Red WIngs Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

4

Friday

Calgary Flames vs. Edmonton Oilers Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Chicago Blackhawks Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Anaheim Mighty Ducks Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

24

Calgary Flames vs. Colorado Avalanche Pengrowth Saddledome 5:00 pm

on the char t CALENDAR OF EVENTS

DECEMBER Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

World AIDS Day Calgary Flames vs. Columbus Blue Jackets Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

2

3

International Day of Disabled Persons

4

Calgary Flames vs. St. Louis Blues Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

5

6

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women in Canada

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8

14

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21

22

28

29

Calgary Flames vs. Pittsburg Penguins Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm

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Calgary Flames vs. Chicago Blackhawks Pengrowth Saddledome 5:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. St. Louis Blues Pengrowth Saddledome 4:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Florida Panthers Pengrowth Saddledome 5:30 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Vancouver Canucks Pengrowth Saddledome 7:00 pm (31)

13

Calgary Flames vs. Tampa Bay Lightning Pengrowth Saddledome 5:30 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Columbus Blue Jackets Pengrowth Saddledome 5:00 pm

23/30 24/31 25 Calgary Flames vs. New Jersey Devils Pengrowth Saddledome 6:00 pm (23)

12

Christmas Day

Calgary Flames vs. Carolina Hurricanes Pengrowth Saddledome 5:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Dallas Stars Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

26

Boxing Day

27

Calgary Flames vs. Vancouver Canucks Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

Calgary Flames vs. Anaheim Mighty Ducks Pengrowth Saddledome 8:00 pm

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MORE REASONS TO LOVE CHOCOLATE You vanilla lovers may still be goading, ‘Yeah but what about all the fat in chocolate?” Well take this you fans-o-bland: the fat in chocolate comes from cocoa butter and it ain’t all that bad. It has one third good fat (the same kind that’s in olive oil and lowers cholesterol), one third indifferent fat (it doesn’t affect cholesterol) and one third of the bad fat (it increases cholesterol and is linked to heart disease). That means two out of three fats agree you can eat dark chocolate. But to get all the health benefits, it has to be dark chocolate. The flavonoids are reduced the more the chocolate is processed so forget about milk or white chocolate.

By Jennifer Allford

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here is so much to love about chocolate. The richness. The sweetness. The exquisite full flavour as it permeates each taste bud. The satisfaction comes in many forms; a piece of cake, a chocolate truffle, ice cream. Yummmah. All so good … but all so bad in a calorie laden, artery hardening kind of way. We all have our flaws. But it turns out chocolate, at least dark chocolate has a couple of really good character traits. Really, that’s not just the sugar and cocoa talking. Studies the world over have touted the health benefits of dark chocolate due 20

to something called ‘flavonoids’ found in cocoa. Falvonoids are known to be something called an ‘antioxidant,’ which apparently is a good thing. It works like this: flavonoids are found in plants where they provide important benefits such as repairing damage and protecting the plant from environmental toxins. We eat the plant (in this case our beloved cocoa bean) and ergo we eat the flavonoids which then get to work protecting our cells. As an antioxidant, flavonoids are thought to help our cells resist damage by the nasty substances found in contaminants such as cigarette smoke. Antioxidants may even aid in preventing heart disease.

And watch out for marshmallows, caramel, nuts and the other ingredients that contaminate the pure heaven of dark chocolate. Not only can they get stuck in your teeth, they add calories and notso-good fat. Also, sadly, please note you should not eat a kilogram of chocolate a day. But as you savour the rich delight of a dark chocolate dessert, know that the bad fat is outnumbered and the flavonoids in the cocoa are keeping your cells healthy. There’s one more thing you need to know to enrich the love affair with your favourite après dinner treat; our new friend the flavonoid is also found in red wine and tea, both of which excel at washing down dark chocolate. I think they call that a win/win. Source: www.clevelandclinic.org/heartcenter/

feature MORE REASONS TO LOVE CHOCOLATE

Ty p e s o f Chocolate White chocolate Chocolate made with cocoa butter, sugar, milk, emulsifier, vanilla and sometimes other flavorings. It does not contain any non-fat ingredients from the cacao bean and has therefore an off-white color. In some countries white chocolate cannot be called ‘chocolate’ because of the low content of cocoa solids. It has a mild and pleasant flavour and can be used to make Chocolate Mousse, Panna Cotta and other desserts. Milk chocolate Sweet chocolate with 10-20% cocoa solids (which includes cocoa and cocoa butter) and more than 12% milk solids. It is seldom used for baking, except for cookies. Dark chocolate Sweetened chocolate with high content of cocoa solids and no or very little milk, it may contain up to 12% milk solids. Dark chocolate can either be sweet, semi-sweet, bittersweet or unsweetened. If a recipe specifies ‘dark chocolate’ you should first try semi-sweet dark chocolate.

Bittersweet chocolate A dark sweetened chocolate which must contain at least 35% cocoa solids. Good quality bittersweet chocolate usually contains 60% to 85% cocoa solids depending on brand. If the content of cocoa solids is high the content of sugar is low, giving a rich, intense and more or less bitter chocolate flavour. Bittersweet chocolate is often used for baking/cooking. If a recipe specifies bittersweet chocolate do not substitute with semi-sweet or sweet chocolate.

Health Fa c t Research indicates that chocolate may be effective at preventing persistent coughing. The ingredient theobromine was found to be almost 1/3 more effective than codeine, the leading cough medicine. The chocolate also appears to soothe and moisten the throat.

Unsweetened chocolate A bitter chocolate which is only used for baking. The flavor is not good, so it is not suitable for eating. Use it only if a recipe specifies ‘unsweetened chocolate’. It contains almost 100% cocoa solids, about half of it might be fat (cocoa butter).

Sweet dark chocolate Similar to semi-sweet chocolate, it is not always possible to distinguish between the flavour of sweet and semi-sweet chocolate. If a recipe asks for sweet dark chocolate you may also use semi-sweet chocolate. Contains often 35-45% cocoa solids. Semi-sweet chocolate This is the classic dark baking chocolate which can be purchased in most grocery stores. It is frequently used for cakes, cookies and brownies. Can be used instead of sweet dark chocolate. It has a good, sweet flavour. Contains often 40-62% cocoa solids. www.syscocalg ar y.ca

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HEALTHY BOOKS

Centax Books & Distribution 1150 Eighth Avenue, Regina, SK 800-667-5595 • www.centaxbooks.com

A Taste of Healthier Choices By Jacquie Schmit, Eileen Mandryk & Jo Wuth Feel and look your best with this latest batch of family recipes from the authors A Taste of Christmas and A Taste of the Great outdoors. Dedicated to good food, they have now adapted favourite recipes to create easy-to-make, healthier choices that range from mouthwatering breakfasts and breads, to outstanding soups, salads, main courses and desserts, all simple, all sensational. Retail - $14.95 • 172 pages • ISBN 1-897010-24-9

Tofu Mania By Brita Housez Tofu demystified – add protein, calcium, vitamins, iron and natural estrogens to your diet while reducing cholesterol, fats and calories. Add delicious to describe the recipes in Tofu Mania. Sound unbelievable? It’s true! Tofu is substituted for part of the fat in your favourite dishes. Its mainstream popularity is due to scientific studies which conclude that tofu and other soy foods, can treat or prevent many diseases. Retail - $12.95 • 120 pages • ISBN 1-894022-21-1

201 Fat Burning Recipes By Cathi Graham Master your metabolism. Cathi Graham lost 186 pounds and has kept it off for over 10 years without dieting. This book compliments her Fresh Start program. Although there were no foods she wouldn’t allow herself, she ate a high-calorie intake of proven “fat burning” foods. These easy recipes feature fibre-rich or highcarbohydrate/low-fat foods. Calorie and fat counts are included. Here are great recipes for losing weight or for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Retail - $19.95 • 248 pages • ISBN 1-895292-34-4

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EAT YOUR BACTERIA Probiotics is bacteria, (or is that bacterium!) which is actually good for you. Probiotics have been available for some time in capsule form, they are also naturally occurring in leeks, garlic and chicory but now probiotics are being added to food, such as yogurt, milk or cheese. By Karen Owen

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robiotics are not the active cultures used to make yogurt, probitoics must be added separately. When you are grocery shopping, look for words such as, bifido bacterium, acidophilus or lactobacillus but you won’t have to do much guessing, food manufacturers are only too happy to be able to advertise the fact that their product has probiotics. The probiotics don’t change the taste of the food, just enhances the health benefits. Probiotics are actually specific strains of bacteria, which are able to improve the health of your gut, your immune system, and these bacteria may even help prevent some types of cancer such as colon cancer.  Many people use them after a course

of antibiotics. After all antibiotics kill bacteria, both good and bad, so probiotics can help replenish all the good bugs your body needs. Dr. Raylene Reimer, from the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Calgary says, “This is, I feel, one ingredient added to Canadian food supply that is actually going to be beneficial.” We used to eat a lot more bacteria, for instance in fermented foods such as sauerkraut and fermented drinks. Dr. Reimer says “our body was exposed to a higher level, or higher dose of bacteria on a daily basis.” Probiotics have lots of pros but there are a few cons. The foods containing probiotics

may be slightly more expensive than similar foods, and you have to keep eating probiotics regularly. The effect is short term, once you stop eating the probiotics, the good bacteria leaves your system and doesn’t get replenished. The effects are gone within a week or two. If you really want to encourage those good bacteria, you can also include prebiotics in your diet. Slightly different from the probiotics, the prebiotics enhance the growth of the healthy bacteria in the intestine. There is now prebiotic bread on supermarket shelves. Both pro and pre biotics are more than just a food fad, the experts seem to agree, this bacteria is good for you.

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EATING TOGETHER When it comes to the overall health of seniors, having people around the dinner table may be just as important as having nutritious food upon the table.

By Jennifer Allford

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t has been well documented that older adults who live alone are at risk of eating poorly; their diet often doesn’t contain sufficient vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Dr. Annette Lane says it’s often called the “tea and toast diet.” Lane – a specialist in mental health in seniors in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Calgary – says a lot of older Canadians who live by themselves tend to think ‘why bother’ when it comes to preparing nutritious meals for themselves. “Living alone, it’s harder to think I’m going to prepare a whole chicken or a steak so the tendency is to rely on prepared foods or something like a slice of toast” she says. “Eating becomes perfunctory or it’s just to quell hunger but the tendency to prepare a good meal is not there because you’re not sharing it with anyone else.” 24

Lane says eating a meal with other people can be particularly important for the well being of older adults because of the social aspect of dining together. She says as people age, they can lose a lot of the social and support networks they’ve relied on over the decades. Retirement can be perceived as a huge loss, never mind the death of family members and friends over the years. “In Canada, 10 to 15 per cent of older adults suffer from depression or have signs of depression” Lane says. “But socialization lessens depression and the risk of suicide.” Socializing over a meal is a natural way for people to come together and a common practice in facilities that care for the elderly. A shared dining experience prevents older adults from sequestering themselves in their rooms; creating an outlet for that important social contact. “Eating together is a major form of people relating, of forming friendships and it’s really important for developing social and support networks” Lane says.

The other benefit to sharing a meal is you’re more likely to prepare more than tea and toast. “If you are together with other people and if you’re preparing the meal together, someone is doing carrots, someone is doing the meat, someone else does the potatoes. There’s the social aspect that makes it worthwhile to prepare such a meal but people will say ‘this is delicious’ so there is positive reinforcement too.” Getting proper nutrients in your meals is bound to help anyone feel better. “I would never say that a good diet cures mental illness,” Lane says “but a good diet can help people feel an overall sense of wellness.” Older adults who share their meals with other people will also feel better, because they’ll have someone with whom they can pass the potatoes and chew the fat.

BY THE NUMBERS x2 Women blink nearly twice as much as men. There are ten human body parts that are only three letters long: Eye, Ear, Leg, Arm, Jaw, Gum, Toe, Lip, Hip and Rib.

Nerve impulses to and from the brain travel as fast as 170 miles per hour.

The average person’s left hand does 56% of the typing.

56%

Our eyes are always the same size from birth, but our nose and ears never stop growing.

You burn more calories sleeping than you do watching TV.

Ketchup was served in the 1830’s as medicine.

3500

Rx

It takes 3500 calories to make a pound of fat.

Drinking water after eating reduces the acid in your mouth by 61 percent.

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