GRADE 6: SUMMER PACKET

SUMMER 2014 PUBLIC ACADEMY FOR PERFORMING ARTS GRADE 6:
 SUMMER PACKET ESSENTIALS AND EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS AND
 ENGLISH LANGUAGE-ARTS Welc...
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SUMMER 2014

PUBLIC ACADEMY FOR PERFORMING ARTS

GRADE 6:
 SUMMER PACKET

ESSENTIALS AND EXPLORATIONS IN MATHEMATICS AND
 ENGLISH LANGUAGE-ARTS

Welcome to PAPA: 
 Work hard, and have fun! Thank you for choosing Public Academy for Performing Arts. We do indeed appreciate that you have chosen a school that strives to be the best in the performing arts and as a college preparatory academy. With this Summer Packet, you have the first opportunity to work and prepare for a successful year as a sixth-grade student. 
 Inside, you will discover that the Summer Packet is divided into various sections. One is Math and the other English. Within those academic subjects, you will find Essential categories and Exploration categories. This way, you and your parents have an opportunity to work together, prepare for PAPA, and explore during the summer. 
 Also, remember to neatly write your name anywhere that you see a place for it. Thanks, and have a wonderful summer. We will see you next fall! Doreen Winn, PAPA Executive Director

THIS PAPA SUMMER PACKET BELONGS TO: ________________________________

SECTION 1

Mathematics: Essentials and Explorations The work in this section is crucial to incoming PAPA sixth-grade students. Some parts of this section are review, while much of it will help students build a solid foundation. The section has two parts: Essentials (for review) and Explorations, or ways to take your math skills outside and explore. THIS MATH SECTION BELONGS TO: ________________________________

ESSENTIALS: These problems are chosen to help you excel during your first weeks in math at PAPA. Take your time and try just one page a day. It’s not a race! Remember, please do not use calculators. The idea is to exercise your mind and to figure out how to accomplish the tasks -- and to make you the best math student. Make sure to bring this packet with you on the first day of school. Each problem is worth one point.

6.) Multiply 8 x 6 A.) 84 B.) 40 C.) 56 D.) 48

Sample: Round the number to the underlined digit: 34,181 A.) 34,190 B.) 34,200 C.) 34,180 D.) 34,000 1.) Round the number to the underlined digit: 219,843 A.) 22,000 B.) 200,000 C.) 220,000 D.) 219,000

7.) Multiply 9 x 7 A.) 54 B.) 63 C.) 45 D.) 72 8.) Multiply 84 x 21 A.) 1,764 B.) 1,674 C.) 1,647 D.) 1,746

2.) Add. Remember to line up the digits by the place value. 2,385 + 9,368 A.) 6,983 B.) 33,218 C.) 7,023 D.) 11,753

10.) Divide 90÷8 A.) 11r2 B.) 11 C.) 12r11 D.) 12

3.) 623 + 455 A.) 1,078 B.) 168 C.) 11,780 D.) 1,068

11.) Divide 32÷8 A.) 6 B.) 5 C.) 3 D.) 4

4.) Subtract. Remember to line up the digits by the place value. 7,415 – 305 A.) 7,720 B.) 10,465 C.) 7,110 D.) 4,635

12.) Divide 537÷7 A.) 75r6 B.) 76 C.) 76r5 D.) 75

5.) 5,005 – 2,184 A.) 2,821 B.) 2,221 C.) 2,800 D.) 2,822

13.) Find the Greatest Common Factor (GCF) of 8 and 28 A.) 2 B.) 4 C.) 6 D.) 8

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14.) Find the Greatest Common Factor (GCF) of 10 and 15 A.) 5 B.) 10 C.) 150 D.) 20 15.) Find the Least Common Multiple (LCM) of 6 and 8 A.) 6 B.) 12 C.) 18 D.) 24 16.) Find the Least Common Multiple (LCM) of 9 and 15 A.) 27 B.) 36 C.) 45 D.) 3 17.) Find the Prime Factorization for the number 20 A.) 22 x 5 B.) 5 x 4 C.) 2+2+2+2+2+2+2+2+2+2 D.) 10 x 2 18.) Find the Prime Factorization for the number 12 A.) 12 x 1 B.) 2 x 2 x 3 C.) 6 + 6 D.) 2 x 6 19.) Find the value of the expression 23 A.) 9 B.) 5 C.) 8 D.) 6 20.) Find the value of the expression √49 A.) 7 B.) 6 C.) 8 D.) 9 21.) Write the fraction in lowest terms: 8/100 A.) 4/50 B.) 2/25 C.) 1/12 D.) 16/200

22.) Write the fraction in lowest terms: 24/32 A.) 2/3 B.) 2/7 C.) 3/4 D.) 1/16 23.) Find the missing number: 3/6 = ?/12 A.) 6

B.) 5 C.) 4 D.) 2 24.) Find the missing number: 7/15 = ?/45 A.) 3 B.) 21 C.) 28 D.) 4 25.) Change each mixed number to an improper fraction: 3 2/3 A.) 11/3 B.) 8/3 C.) 2/3 D.) 9/3 26.) Change each mixed number to an improper fraction: 8 ¾ A.) 3/4 B.) 7/4 C.) 15/4 D.) 35/4 27.) Multiply 1/2 x 1/9 A.) 2/11 B.) 1/7 C.) 1/18 D.) 1/11 28.) Multiply 3/5 x 10/13 A.) 30/65 B.) 13/18 C.) 7/8 D.) 5/13 29.) Multiply 9 x 2 2/3 A.) 18 2/3 B.) 24 C.) 2/3 D.) 24 1/18 30.) Multiply 3 3/4 x 5 ½ A.) 20 5/8 B.) 20 1/8 C.) 16 5/8 D.) 156

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31.) Divide 1/2 ÷ 2/3 A.) 3/4 B.) 1 1/3 C.) 2/6 D.) 2/3 32.) Divide 2/5 ÷ 3/7 A.) 5/12 B.) 15/14 C.) 6/35 D.) 8 1/3 33.) Divide 2/3 ÷ 5 A.) 3/5 B.) 3/25 C.) ¼ D.) 8 1/3 34.) Divide 6 3/5 ÷ 3 A.) 5/99 B.) 2 3/5 C.) 2 1/5 D.) 6 1/5 35.) Divide 4 2/5 ÷ 1 1/10 A.) 1 1/10 B.) 2 2/5 C.) 3 D.) 4 36.) Add 1/9 + 7/9 A.) 6/9 B.) 8/9 C.) 7/9 D.) 8/18 37.) Subtract 7/12 – 5/12 A.) 1 B.) 1/12 C.) 1/6 D.) 2/0

38.) Add 7 5/7 + 3 2/7 A.) 9 B.) 8 C.) 10 D.) 11 39.) Subtract 4 4/5 – 3 1/5 A.) 4 1/5 B.) 3 3/5 C.) 1 3/5 D.) 2 ¾ 40.) Subtract 5 – 3/4 A.) 4 1/4 B.) 4 1/2 C.) 4 3/4 D.) 5 3/4 41.) Add 3/14 + 1/2 A.) 5/8 B.) 5/7 C.) 8/12 D.) 1/6 42.) Subtract 7/8 – 1/4 A.) 5/8 B.) 1 1/2 C.) 8/12 D.) 7 1/4 43.) Add 3 1/2 + 9 2/3 A.) 12 4/5 B.) 12 1/6 C.) 13 1/6 D.) 12 ½ 44.) Subtract 3 4/5 – 1 1/2 A.) 4 3/7 B.) 4 3/10 C.) 2 3/10 D.) 2 3/7

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45.) Write the decimal in words: 39.7 A.) thirty nine and seven tenths B.) thirty nine and seven hundredths C.) thirty nine point seven ones D.) thirty nine sevenths

52.) Subtract 4.088 - .726 A.) .3362
 B.) 336.2 C.) 33.62 D.) 3.362

46.) Write the decimal in words: .04 A.) four B.) four tenths C.) four hundredths D.) fourths

53.) Multiply .4 x .7 A.) 28 B.) .28 C.) 2.8 D.) .028

47.) Write the decimal in words: .075 A.) seventy-five hundredths B.) seventy-five thousandths C.) seventy-five millionths D.) seventy-five tenths

54.) Multiply 13.25 x .04 A.) 530.0 B.) 5.300 C.) .53 D.) 53.00

48.) Compare 5.1 and 5.11 A.) = B.) < C.) > D.) ≤

55.) Divide .81 ÷ 6 A.) 13.5 B.) 135 C.) .135 D.) 13.5

49.) Compare 0.99 and 1 A.) > B.) = C.) < D.) ≤

56.) Divide .48 ÷ .06 A.) 8 B.) .8 C.) 80 D.) .08

50.) Add 1.3 + 4.5 A.) 0.58 B.) 0.058 C.) 58.0 D.) 5.8

57.) Change the fraction 3/4 to a decimal A.) 3.4 B.) .25 C.) .50 D.) .75

51.) Add 34.9 + 2.8 A.) 37.7 B.) 30.7 C.) 37.0 D.) 3.7

58.) Change the fraction 2/5 to a decimal A.) .4 B.) .2 C.) .5 D.) 2.5

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59.) 12 parts of 100 are shaded. What percent is shaded? A.) 1.2% B.) 12% C.) .12% D.) 120%

66.) = Solve for ? A.) 4 B.) 3 C.) 2 D.) 10

60.) Change 43% to a decimal A.) 4.3 B.) .43 C.) .043 D.) 43.0

67.) 36 in = ____ft A.) 4 B.) 3 C.) 2 D.) 5

61.) 50% of 66 is _____. A.) 33 B.) 132 C.) 66 D.) 166

68.) 3 lbs = ___oz A.) 16 B.) 48 C.) 40 D.) 50

62.) 20% of 45 is ____. A.) 10 B.) 9 C.) 8 D.) 7

69.) 6 qts = ___pts A.) 11 B.) 10 C.) 12 D.) 14

63.) .23 is what as a percent? A.) 2.3% B.) .23% C.) 23% D.) 230%

70.) 5 hrs = ___ mins A.) 30 B.) 3,000 C.) 300 D.) 3

64.) What is the fraction 3/50 as a percent? A.) 600% B.) 60% C.) 6% D.) .06%

71.) Find the mean of 24, 15, 18, 27 A.) 18 B.) 19 C.) 20 D.) 21

65.) = Solve for ? A.) 6 B.) 5 C.) 4 D.) 3

72.) Find the median of 7, 16, 3, 95, 21, 12 A.) 14 B.) 13 C.) 12 D.) 11

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73.) Find the mode of 3, 9, 6, 3, 12, 3, 10 A.) 9 B.) 12 C.) 3 D.) 6 74.) Find the elapsed time: 5:15pm to 7:40pm A.) 2hrs 10min B.) 2hrs 15min C.) 2hrs 20min D.) 2hrs 25min 75.) 12:00 noon to 12:00 midnight A.) 10hrs B.) 12hrs C.) 11hrs D.) 1 hr

76.) Find the measure of the unknown angle: A.) 20o B.) 25o C.) 30o D.) 35o

A.) 180in2 B.) 180 in C.) 15in2 D.) 15in

A.) 28in B.) 28in2 C.) 11in2 D.) 3in

77.)

A.) 27in2 B.) 27in C.) 45in2 D.) 135in2

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87.) Multiply 2 x (-5) A.) -10 B.) 10 C.) 7 D.) -7 * Use π = 3.14 A.) 26.69 ft B.) 26.7 ft C.) 267 ft D.) 266.9 ft

88.) Multiply -11 x -5 A.) 55 B.) -55 C.) -16 D.) 16

82.) Add -6 + -2 A.) -8 B.) 8 C.) -4 D.) 4

89.) Divide -63 ÷ 7 A.) 9 B.) -9 C.) 6 D.) -3

83.) Add -1 + 12 A.) 13 B.) 11 C.) -13 D.) -11

90.) Solve 40 – (10+2) A.) 24 B.) 26 C.) 28 D.) 30

84.) Add -7 + 9 A.) 2 B.) -2 C.) -16 D.) 16

91.) Exactly 210 students signed up for soccer. Each team has 14 players. How many teams can be formed?

85.) Subtract -2 - -9 A.) -11 B.) 11 C.) 7 D.) -7 86.) Subtract -3 - -10 A.) -13 B.) 13 C.) 7 D.) -7

92.) The soccer coach ordered 4 pairs of socks, 2 jerseys, 1 sweatshirt and 3 pairs of shorts for each team member. If each team has 14 players, how many pairs of socks are ordered for each team?

93.) Last season, each soccer team practiced a total of 180 hours. If practice was held 2 hours each day, how many days did the team practice?

94.) The sales tax in New Jersey is 6%. What is your total , including tax, if your purchases are $17.50? What is the amount of tax you will pay?

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95.) A television costs $450. It is on sale for 30% off. What is the discount?

96.) What is the price with tax for 15 pencils, given the price list:

Item Ruler

Asking price Tax $1.29 .07

Pencil $.99 Calculator $14

.05 .06

97.) Jaimie practiced piano for 3 ½ hours on Monday and 2 ¾ hours on Tuesday. On Wednesday, she practiced the drums for 5 hours. How much longer did she practice the piano than the drums?

EXPLORATIONS: On these pages, you will find different types of fractal designs. What are fractals? There are many definitions, but fractals consists of patterns within patterns. A simple fractal is like the one drawn below. The type of fractal that you see below shows many types of geometric shapes. How many can you find? There are squares, of course - and triangles. Here is a challenge: Go outside and discover three fractal patterns that occur in nature. It won’t take you long. Then, on the next two blank pages, draw those designs and label them. Don’t worry, you don’t have to be the best artist in the world - just try your best and have some fun. You must use COLOR!

98.) Reid decided to run 26 miles over three days. He ran 9 7/8 miles on Monday and 8 ½ miles on Tuesday. How many miles should he run on Wednesday in order to reach his goal?

99.) Brandon bought 9 apples and his friend, Hanna, bought 4 mangos. The price of each apple is $0.75 and the price of each mango is $1.25. What number sentence can be used to find the total price of the fruits bought by Brandon and Hanna?

100.) Benjamin wants to estimate the sum of 170, 374, 260, to the nearest 100. What is his estimated sum?

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Here are some fractal designs in nature. Notice how the natural designs repeat? Now go find some of your own and draw them on the next two blank pages. Each fractal is worth 10 points.

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My Fractal Design:

My Fractal Design:

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E NGLISH L ANGUAGE A RTS

English Language Arts:

Essentials and Explorations The work in this section will help you in all areas when it comes to being a high-achieving PAPA student. The more that you work on grammar, spelling, vocabulary, reading and writing, the better you will do in all of your classes. Just like the Math section, English Language Arts will Essentials and Explorations will help you get a strong start to your first year at PAPA.

For this next assignment: A Bright Idea, read the short story, answer the questions, and then write a small story about why YOU would like to be an inventor. To start your work, answer the question, Would you like to be an inventor? Start with this statement: I would like to be an inventor (or not) because ... then state your reasons and explain. This is called the ACE strategy, for Answer, Cite, Explain. Memorize that strategy, and it will help you for years. 25 points: One point for each question and your name, 15 for writing, and 5 for neatness.

What is described in this paragraph? 4. What is described in this paragraph?

____________________________


Name



A Bright Idea By Colleen Messina

____________________________
 
 ____________________________


This item is a bulb, but it does not go into the ground. Bulbs that go into the ground often produce flowers. Bulbs that go into the ground spend their time in the dark. This item, on the other hand, brings light. Although many people worked on different ideas related to this one for many years, the first practical version of this item was developed by Thomas Edison. He invented it in 1879. This item changed people's lives in the early 1900s. It was a brilliant invention. In fact, this item is sometimes used to illustrate that a person has had a bright idea. What is it?

___________________

A Bright Idea

___________________

Would you like to be an inventor? Why or why not?

___________________

Questions 1. What does this item bring to people? A. water B. gas C. propane D. light 2. Which person invented the first practical version of this item? A. Marie Curie B. Thomas Edison C. Isaac Newton D. none of the above 3. This item was invented in 1879. A. true B. false

THIS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS SECTION 
 BELONGS TO: ________________________________

___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________

For this work, read the article about civil rights leader Rosa Parks, titled “A Glimpse of an Integrated Life.” Follow the instructions, answer the questions, and carefully read the last set of directions when it asks you to explain your answer. Write a short answer at the bottom. Please remember the ACE strategy, Answer, Cite, and Explain. 25 points: 1 for writing your name, 4 for the short answers, and 15 your brief answer, and 5 for neatness. 
 A Glimpse of an Integrated Life Name

A Glimpse of an Integrated Life

Questions 1. Why was Rosa allowed to ride an integrated trolley at work?

By Erin Horner After she was married, Rosa Parks finally had a chance to go back to school. She earned her high school diploma. This was quite a feat! Very few black people in Montgomery actually had their degree. Eventually, this helped her land a job at the local air force base, Maxwell Field. By this time, President Roosevelt had declared that military bases could not be segregated. When Rosa was on the base, she rode on an integrated trolley. Black workers and white workers rode together. They also worked together and visited with one another in all of the public places. Once she left the base, however, it was back to society's harsh reality. Segregation laws said that Rosa had to ride in the back of the city buses. Occasionally, a white woman from Maxwell would board the base trolley with her young son. Rosa and the woman enjoyed sitting across from one another. They visited with each other during the ride. Once they arrived at the bus stop in town, everything changed. Rosa boarded the city bus, paid her fare, and moved to the seats in the back. Her friend, on the other hand, was free to sit up front. Rosa said that the white woman's son always seemed puzzled when this happened. It was as though he was wondering why it was okay for Rosa to visit with his mother on one bus but not on another. It was a good question. Many people pondered the same thing. Rosa's time at Maxwell gave her a glimpse of what an integrated life could look like. It was also another piece of encouragement that Rosa would later need as she carried the fight against segregation all across the South.

2. Ponder is the root word in pondered. What does ponder mean? A. to enjoy B. to forget C. to think deeply D. to join 3. What is the antonym of segregated? A. apart B. different C. integrated D. separated 4. This article is mainly about ______. A. riding a trolley to work B. Rosa's experience working at an integrated air force base C. Rosa earning her degree D. Rosa's marriage

Why do you think President Roosevelt integrated military buses? Explain what you think of the idea. Remember the ACE strategy!

Why do you think President Roosevelt decided that military bases should be integrated? Do you think this was a good decision even _____________________________________________________________________________________________________
 though many places in the South were still segregated? Explain your answer. 
 _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________
 
 _____________________________________________________________________________________________________

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For these next exercises, find the write by reading the sentence, and following the instructions. Make sure to use your family dictionary, and hunt for the 
 correct word if you need to. Remember that a dictionary will be a useful tool for you at PAPA! This project is worth 13 points, or one for each correct word

Explorations: Follow the directions below about how to write a humorous myth about how a yak gets its fur. You will receive 15 points for the outline, 25 points for the myth. Name ____________________________________

THE SECRET OF SILK 3/31/2014

Class ___________________

LANGUAGE ARTS

www.edhelperblog.com/cgi-bin/la.cgi?FORMMODE=TP6_1

Writing Your Own Myth

Date ___________________

Name _____________________________

(Answer ID # 0870581)

In 1902, author Rudyard Kipling wrote a humorous story to explain how the camel got its hump. Read the outline of the story on the left. On the right, write an outline for a story you would write to explain how the yak got its thick fur.

Spelling Pick the word that is spelled correctly and best completes each sentence. 1. The butterfly's ________ 2. We were a little afraid to go to 3. Her ________ personality wings were pale green. our first algebra class since we cheered everyone at the dellicate had heard many rumors about gathering. delicete buoyan the ________ teacher. delicae formidable buyant dilicate formideble buoyant delicate formidabli bouyant farmadiblo baiyint farmidable 4. We watched the two cars ________ and burst into flames. collidi collidde colide callide collide

5. He came from a poor 6. Do we have enough ________ ________ family and grew up to build a tree house? lumbir in a run-down section of lumber Chicago. ummigrint lumbor ommigrint lembur immigrant luumber immigrent immegrant

7. We want to form a comfortable, ________ relationship. coopirative cooperative cooperativi cooparetive cooperetive

8. It is very difficult for my dad to 9. When you do your homework, be ________ when he referees ________ questions 11, 15 and my games. 19. impatail omi impartial omit impartail ommit impartael omiit impertail oit

10. The ________ tried to alter her original story, but the police officer didn't believe her. witniss witnes wotniss watness witness

11. The doctor obtained the patient's ________ for the operation. cansent consent consen cansint consint

How the Camel Got His Hump by Rudyard Kipling

How the Yak Got His Fur by

Three animals, Horse, Dog, and Ox, told the Camel he had to work along with them, but Camel didn’t want to. Whatever they asked Camel to do, he would say “Humph.”

Introduce the character’s setting:

Horse, Dog, and Ox were angry because Man told them they would have to do Camel’s work for him.

Present the problem:

The three animals had a meeting. During their meeting, a magic Djinn came along. They told him about lazy Camel. The Djinn found Camel. He talked to Camel and got “Humph” in reply to everything. Djinn warned Camel to start working but Camel said “Humph.” So the Djinn made some magic. The next time Camel said “Humph” and puffed up his back, the Djinn sent the magic to Camel’s back. Camel’s “Humph” turned into a hump.

12. The cat stood up, yawned, stretched, and began to groom its already ________ coat. sleek slaek sleak sleekk slek

Develop the humorous solution:

Djinn told Camel that because he now had a hump, he could do all the work he had been avoiding for three days without stopping for food. However, Camel was still so lazy that he never caught up on the work he missed, so he will always wear his hump.

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Write your yak myth here. There is plenty of space!
 _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ ___________________________

Finally, for your last assignment, please read this script with your parents. Follow the directions, and make sure that you are ready to enjoy working at an amazing school in Math, English, and all the arts. Your parents will be a part of your success, in all things big and small. Name ____________________________________

THE MAGIC OF THE MOVIES

Class ___________________

LANGUAGE ARTS

Read a Script Can you act? Do you dream of being in theater, television, or movies? In this activity, you will practice reading a scene from a movie. 1. Below is a scene from a movie. Al is a teenage boy, Ellen is his step-sister in her early 20s, and Ted is their father. This scene is written for a female and two males, but the scene could also be two sisters and their mother or two brothers and their father. Find two partners to practice reading with. 2. Read through the lines silently once to see what the scene is about. Now practice reading your lines aloud. You should be able to read fast enough and be familiar enough with the lines that you do not sound like you are reading. Also practice the tone of voice you use for each line. Make sure every word is pronounced clearly and correctly. 3. Read through the scene aloud several times with your partners. Critique each other’s reading until you are all pleased with how you sound together. TED ELLEN TED AL TED AL ELLEN TED AL ELLEN TED ELLEN TED AL TED

Ellen, tell me again why you are going to throw away your life. Come on, Dad, a year in the Peace Corps is not throwing my life away. Well, what is it then? It sure won’t do your career any good. (Speaking to himself) Hmmm . . . Career . . . Ellen . . . Those don’t seem to go together. (Speaking to Al) Well, at least she’s going to college. What kind of a career will you have? Dad, we have talked about this before. It’s my life, I should be able to choose how I want to spend it. Yeah, at the mall playing video games. Ellen, don’t talk like that. Al, you can’t spend your life doing other people’s fingernails. Dad, a cosmetologist doesn’t just do people’s nails. I want to help people be the best they can be. That’s right, Dad. And I want to help people to learn to be the best they can be too. Yeah? How can the Peace Corps do that? You will be wasting your time in some little village planting beans. Dad, the Peace Corps is not about planting beans and you know it. The Peace Corps needs teachers, doctors, even lawyers. Lawyers? Really? Maybe there’s something to this idea after all. Dad, you do know that a really good cosmetologist can make a lot of money, don’t you? Hmmm . . . Maybe we need to talk some more about this.

© 2000 – 2007 Pearson Education, Inc. A ll Rights Reserved.

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