FURNITURE AND PRODUCT DESIGN

FURNITURE AND PRODUCT DESIGN Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Luís Eslava Length of the course: 45 Hours COURSE DESCRIPTION This course f...
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FURNITURE AND PRODUCT DESIGN Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Luís Eslava Length of the course: 45 Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course focuses on product and furniture design, covering the entire process from conceptualization, formalization, development and pre-production of a designed object from the human, domestic or work environment. The course will analyze the social, ergonomic and aesthetic environment of the user, the method for producing the final work and the impact of this on the environment as a whole. Students will approach the semantics of objects, their functional and communicative capacity along with the integration of materials and technology. As part of the development and design of products, the class will visit factories, showrooms and design boutiques as well as use the school’s workshops.

MODULES • • • • • • • •

Design management. Creativity. Techniques of model construction. Technical project development. Suppliers, materials research, and the hardware. Presentation skills and project communication. Trade fairs and the latest trends. Preparation for final project presentation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES At the completion of the course, students will be able to: • Recognize the different types of design, designers and its work environment. • Use all the tools in the design process, including conceptualization, formalization, development and preproduction of a designed object from the human, domestic or work environment. • Identify the product design profession, its context and its relationship with modern society. • Demonstrate capacity to approach a design project from the briefing to the designed object.

REQUIREMENTS • Daily assignments: Students will have project assignments to apply and analyze the course content. These projects will help students to develop creativity and resourcefulness. • Semester project: Students will apply everything learned throughout the semester to identify a design company they would like to work for and propose a brief of a project to them.

TEACHING METHOD This course will combine classroom lectures, hands-on application, and visits to companies, design studios and shops.

GRADING 30% Daily assignments/projects. 50% Semester project. 20% Creativity Skills and Aptitude. Students will have to complete all the parts included in the grade weights and earn at least a 5/10 in each part.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • Uta Brandes, M. E. (2006). NON INTENCIONAL DESIGN. (DAAB, Ed.) • Boym, C., & Peter Hall, S. S. (2002). CURIOUS BOYM, Design Works. Princeton Arquitectural Press. • Branco Lukic, B. M. (2011). NON OBJECT. The Mit Press. • Brownell, B. (2006). TRANSMATERIAL 1. PRINCETON ARCHITECTURAL PRESS. • Brownell, B. (2008). TRANSMATERIAL 2. Princeton Architectural Press. • Fiell, C. &. (2005). Designing the 21st Century. TASCHEN. • Julian Galán, J. G. (2010). El Diseño Industrial en España. Madrid: Manuales Arte Cátedra. • NORMAN, D. (2005). Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things. Basic Books. • M. Huebner, S. E. (2007). TACTILE. Die Gestalten verlog. • MAGAZINE, C. (2003). 1000 Extra, Ordinary Objects. TASCHEN. • Morrison, N. F. (2007). SUPER NORMAL, Sensarions of the Ordinary. LArs Müller Publishers. • Smith, K. (2008). How to Be an Explorer of the World: Portable Life Museum. Perigee Books,U.S.

THE GLOBAL AND HISTORIC CONTEXT OF ART Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Albert Fuster Length of the course: 45 Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION The objective of this course is to analyze the different branches of human knowledge—architecture, sociology, history, anthropology and art—with the aim of developing a cognitive map of the world. The purpose is to give the student analytical and discursive tools to develop their own project from a critical and innovative point of view. This course will analyze the basic theories of art, architecture and design culture from the industrial revolution up to the present day. The first phase will study the emergence
of industrial design as a specific discipline
in Western European culture. This will be followed by an investigation of modern design language in daily life, the value of brands and consumer habits in a new world of mass communication, new technologies and sustainability. This course will use the extensive resources of Barcelona with visits to the city’s museums such as MNAC, MACBA, Joan Miró Foundation and the Picasso Museum, emblematic buildings by Gaudi, Mies Van Der Rohe, Richard Meier and Jean Nouvel as well as design stores like Vitra, BD and Vinçon and restaurants and leisure spaces around the city.

MODULES • • • •

Space, time and design. Design and art. Design, city and environment. The results of design; form experience to objects.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES At the completion of the course, students will be able to: • Analyze examples of modern art and design. • Identify the fundamental factors related to design, art and architecture, such as economy, tradition, and use. • Discuss the relationship between art, design, society and culture. • Apply methodologies and principles related to art and design to any case study. • Demonstrate capacity to approach a design project from the briefing to the designed object.

REQUIREMENTS • The student will be asked to read key texts, visit museums and art galleries in Barcelona, and present to the rest of students the results of his/her work. • A sketchbook will be the method through which students will write, draw, compare and synthesize all the topics of the course. • A final exam will confirm the student’s capacity to explain the conclusions of the course.

TEACHING METHOD This course will combine classroom lectures, reading and discussions sessions, visits to museums, buildings, art galleries, and class presentations on individual sketchbooks.

GRADING 10% attendance in class and field visits. 40% personal sketchbook. 20% participation and quality of involvement in class discussions. 30% final exam. Students will have to complete all the parts included in the grade weights and earn at least a 5/10 in each part.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • • • • • •

Colquhoun, Allan. Modern architecture. Foster, H.; Krauss, R.; Bois, Y. Art since 1900. Heskett, John. Industrial design. Hollis, Richard. Graphic design. Massey, Anne. Interior design in the 2oth century. Meggs, Phillip B. History of graphic design.

DESIGN FOR PACKAGING Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Cristina Taverner Length of the course: 45 Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course introduces the tools necessary for conceptualizing and developing comprehensive packaging projects. Students will learn to communicate—both formally and graphically—the attributes of a product. The goal is to understand the factors affecting production and selection of a package for a specific product, its possibilities and materials.

MODULES • • • • • • • • • • •

Market Research. Design an observation strategy. Comprehension of a trademark & user needs. Definition of the Product structure & needs. Learn, use & develop Design innovation techniques. Results analysis & interpretation. Identify opportunities. Define a packaging design briefing content. Design proposals. Transform ‘needs’ into a shape/design proposal. Create a mock-up.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES The course aims to provide students with the tools and knowledge to complete a packaging design process. At the completion of the course, students will be able to: • Develop any packaging design process successfully. • Demonstrate an understanding of the packaging market, as well as client and user needs. • Demonstrate an ability to analyze trade mark values and to communicate them by means of formal and attractive proposals.

REQUIREMENTS Research & Analysis essays, Project (definition & development), Final presentation. At the end of the course students will make a public presentation of their Project Proposal using posters, mock ups and a document explaining the design process including references.

TEACHING METHOD The course will be a combination of lecture, guided market analysis, teamwork, and hands-on application.

GRADING 10% Research & Analysis essays. 20% Project (definition & development). 25% Class presentations. 25% Final presentation. Report, Drawings and Mockup of the Final Project. 20% Attendance in class and field visits. Students will have to complete all the parts included in the grade weights and earn at least a 5/10 in each part.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • • • • • •

STEWART. Bill. Packaging. MORGAN, Conway Lloyd. Design for packaging. SONSINO, Steven. Packaging. SATAFFORD, Cliff. Packaging. Special designs. www.packagingoftheworld.com www.iopp.org

ADVANCED PRINCIPLES IN DESIGN: INTERACTING COMMUNICATION, HUMANITIES AND SCIENTIFIC TECHNIQUES Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Raffaella Perrone Length of the course: 45 Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION Through demonstrations, workshops and studio sessions, this course will exercise students’ creativity and knowledge regarding both traditional and contemporary ways of creating and doing. As creative minds and human beings in a constant learning process, we must understand the importance of context and the interactions between the artist/designer and the surrounding world. This course emphasizes collective creation, building teams and bringing students out of their comfort zones. This course will guide students through research and project exercises, culminating in the creation of an ephemeral installation within the public space of Barcelona. Visiting and re-visiting the city will help students reach an immersive understanding driven by analysis, data visualization, sketches and presentations. Students will select the most interesting ideas and create them.

MODULES • • • • • •

Design as need vs. emotional design. Narrative Object. Design and Communication. Developing a concept and form. Nature and artifice: matter and materials. Barcelona storytelling - focus on different areas/senses.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES At the end of the course, the student will be able to: • Demonstrate understanding of the foundations of a project (form, shape, texture, color, semantics, etc.). • Apply fantasy and imagination, encouraging divergent thinking. • Identify co-creation models. • Practice collective creativity models away from existing preconceptions. • Work in collaborative environments, especially between students from different backgrounds. • Analyze morphology of environment.

REQUIREMENTS Students will create the following project exercises: • Map of Barcelona– Visual communication (collaborative creation). • Creative dish – modeling clay / “cook” – taste communication (individual creation). • Map of smells - Communication through smell (individual creation). • Map of textures – Touch communication (collaborative creation). Sound recording - Audio communication (collaborative creation). • Death spaces and Genius Loci - Mix of perceptions (individual). For the final project, students will create an installation to transform a public space that creates an engagement between the creators, visitors and the city.

TEACHING METHOD This course will combine classroom lectures, discussions, interactive hands-on learning and projects.

GRADING 30% project exercises. 20% class presentations. 50% final project. Students will have to complete all the parts included in the grade weights and earn at least a 5/10 in each part.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • Bauman, Zygmund. 2000. Liquid modernity. Cambridge: Polity Press. • De Bono, Edward. 1991. Lateral thinking. London: Pelikan Book. 1999. Six thinking hats. New York: Back Bay Books. • Dondis, D. A. A primer of visual literacy. • Gardner, Howard. 1983. Multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Book. 2007. Five minds for the future. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard Business. School Press. • Goleman, Daniel. 1997. Emotional intelligence. New York: Bantam Book. • Munari, Bruno. Design visual communication 1977. Fantasia. Bari: Laterza. • Moles, Abramh. Information theory and esthetic perception. • Norman, Donald. 2004. Emotional design: why we love (or hate) everyday things. New York: Basic Books.

RETAIL DESIGN / VISUAL MERCHANDISING Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: David Pablo Length of the course: 45 Hours

REQUIREMENTS Interest in interior design, furniture and materials is required.

TEACHING METHOD COURSE DESCRIPTION Retail is naturally the showplace for new ideas, new concepts and new products. As such, the store environment serves as the selling stage for the latest merchandise offerings of the day, and a tool of communication used to create a dialogue with the targeted customer. Through effective visual merchandising, the retailer communicates both the attributes of the brand, and the attributes of the products offered. The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the importance of visual merchandising as an integral component of a successful retail strategy. This course will include an in-depth analysis of the retail store environment. The principles, philosophies and technologies of visual merchandising will be studied through exploration of the marketplace and hands-on classroom experimentation.

MODULES • • • • • • •

Product analysis. Space analysis of a store. Materials used in interiors and visual merchandising. Store windows, including use of materials. Retail furniture: types, scale, proportions. Lighting: types and applications. Approach to the classic creative process: briefing, brainstorming, ideas scheme, concept. • Final project: students will propose a concept to be applied in visual merchandising and a shop window.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES At the end of the course, the student will be able to: • Create and apply a new concept or idea in a interior retail space or shop window. • Categorize different kinds of products and materials, and analyze them. • Select different products and materials to showcase a specific product in a shop. • Apply all the knowledge learned in visits to different s howrooms and shops.

This course will combine lectures, practical exercise to apply concepts, and visits to retail furniture and lighting showrooms.

GRADING 10% attendance in class and field visits. 25% practical assignments. 25% class presentations. 40% final project. Students will have to complete all the parts included in the grade weights and earn at least a 5/10 in each part.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • Visual merchandising. Escaparates e interiores comerciales. Tony Morgan. Editorial Gustavo Gili. • Tiendas. Planificación y Diseño. Klaus Pracht. Editorial Gustavo Gili. • Dezeen - architecture and design magazine www.dezeen.com/

TYPOGRAPHY AND GRAPHIC DESIGN Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Mariana Eidler Length of the course: 45 Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course focuses on graphic communication with special attention to texts and the written word, and their integration and relationship with images, colors and textures. The course aims to teach students the basic tools of graphic design: Typography, Color and Composition. It will discuss graphic design as an essential element of communication across social, cultural and functional boundaries. Short projects will allow students to implement and experiment with design methodology and basic design skills. Projects will range from artistic and experimental calligraphy, typography, poster composition, editorials and digital interaction. All mock-ups (except for digital design) will be presented in foam.

MODULES • • • • •

Typography: from sign to type. Types and style. Designer analysis. Composition. Branding: Brand and logotype.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES At the end of this class, students will be able to demonstrate ability to: • Recognize the basic elements of graphic design. • Use the tools in the graphic design process, including conceptualization, formalization and printing to design a graphic piece. • Create graphic elements with basic tools and digital software. • Design communicative and graphic designs based on typography, color and composition.

REQUIREMENTS • Daily Projects. Student will develop creativity and resourcefulness in developing project proposals and working on daily projects. · Poster design: Design poster with only one color typography, no computer. · Template: Design a template for designer’s research. · Weekly designer research: Each week students will research 4 known designers. · Project assignment: Corporate identity including new technologies. • Semester Project: Apply all the knowledge learned during the semester. Students will identify and propose a design context to create their graphic design. • Final Exam: The final exam will be a presentation of all the works the student has created during the semester.

TEACHING METHOD This course will combine classroom lectures, discussion and interactive hands-on learning through visits to a design studio, printing plant, a newspaper studio and design museum.

GRADING 10% Attendance in class and field visits. 25% Daily projects. 25% Presentations and final exam. 40% Final project. Students will have to complete all the parts included in the grade weights and earn at least a 5/10 in each part.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • • • • • •

De Bono, Edward. Lateral Thinking. De Bono, Edward. Six thinking hat. J.J. Beljon. Gramática del arte. Gordon, Bob. 1000 fuentes tipográficas. Gustavo Gili The annual of TDC. Typography annual (26, 31 & 16). Collins. Satué, Enric. Arte en la tipografia y tipografía en el arte. Siruela.

BCN. CITY OF CITIES IN A GLOBAL WORLD Credits: 6 ECTS Language: English Professor: Victòria Garriga Length of the course: 45 Hours

COURSE DESCRIPTION This course in focused on the city and on urban design, understanding the global need growing cities have, “to sew” the modern and traditional city trough a redesigned public space. In recent decades the number of people living in dense urban environments is increasing. And this is a trend that continues. If anything characterizes these urban phenomena, beyond the size of the scales, is COMPLEXITY. This complexity can only be addressed from a TRANSVERSAL PERSPECTIVE, without prioritizing any aspect or discipline over another. This complexity can not be addressed with conventional instruments but with some intensely multidisciplinary teams and procedures. Urban design projects have to be present from the first ANALYZES and DIAGNOSES, to the formulation of operational proposals and its material realization. We firmly believe that the urban renewal, many times has to be a MICROSURGERY ACTION project based on an AMBITIOUS VISION (multiscale, holistic, social inclusive). In this sense the experience developed in the city of Barcelona in the last 40 years is great example that we will analyze in order to understand the methodologies and interiorize the tools of interpretation and transformation of the city, from the bigger to the smaller scale.

MODULES • Approach to the site. • Interpretation and diagnosis of the city. • The city as a SWOT: strengths/weaknesses/ opportunities/threats. • From past to future > Target Image. Creativity and compromise. • How? The plan. • What? The projects. • Whom? The people (citizens/investors…).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES At the completion of the course the students will be able to: • To develop a personal methodological and empirical way of approaching to any city. • To be able to extract a personal diagnosis of any city: physical, social, economic, environmental,… • To be able to synthesize the complexity of the city into a clear conceptual and graphical diagram SWOT. • To understand the need to “create”, to propose a transformation project for the city represented in a “ Target image”. The Target Image has to be this image able to generate a consensus around it that can agglutinate the transformation desires of the people. • Get knowledge of the Disciplinary Methodologies and Tools that makes possible to go from the idea to reality. • Understand the different scale and range of projects that can be developed. Some of them will be developed. • Understand that the city is made by people. Participation and Networking. Knowledge and practical approach.

REQUIREMENTS • The student will be ask to read key texts, visit the city and share his/her work with the rest of the students. • The students should write, draw and make pictures. • A final short presentation will confirm the students capacity to explain sinthetize the conclusions of the course.

TEACHING METHOD The course will combine classroom lectures, reading and discussion sessions, visitis to the city and individual presentations of the work in progress.

GRADING 10% attendance in class and field visits. 40% personal project. 20% participation and quality of involvement in class discussions. 30% final presentation.

BIBLIOGRAPHY • Kostof, Spiro. The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History. • Calvino, Italo. Invisible Cities. • McCandless, David. Information is Beautiful. • Rogers, Richard. Cities For A Small Planet.