First Language Education in Multilingual Contexts in the Philippines

University Press Scholarship Online You are looking at 1-10 of 28 items for: keywords : language education First Language Education in Multilingual ...
Author: Phyllis Allison
0 downloads 2 Views 44KB Size
University Press Scholarship Online

You are looking at 1-10 of 28 items for: keywords : language education

First Language Education in Multilingual Contexts in the Philippines Catherine Young

in Endangered Languages of Austronesia Published in print: 2009 Published Online: May Publisher: Oxford University Press 2010 DOI: 10.1093/ ISBN: 9780199544547 eISBN: 9780191720260 acprof:oso/9780199544547.003.0014 Item type: chapter

This chapter investigates whether bilingual and transitional literacy programmes can effectively be developed in multilingual and culturally diverse social contexts, such as the Philippines and other Asian nations. It argues that educational policies play a critical role in recognising the place of languages in Indigenous identity. The chapter describes current innovations in first language education in the elementary years in the Philippines. It draws on examples from Manobo and Kalagan language communities in Mindanao and the Kalinga languages of northern Luzon.

Understanding Sign Language Development of Deaf Children Brenda Schick, Marc Marschark, and Patricia Elizabeth Spencer

in Advances in the Sign-Language Development of Deaf Children Published in print: 2005 Published Online: April Publisher: Oxford University Press 2010 DOI: 10.1093/ ISBN: 9780195180947 eISBN: 9780199893737 acprof:oso/9780195180947.003.0001 Item type: chapter

This chapter begins with a discussion of historical reports of sign language. It then discusses sign language in the education of deaf children, attempts to join the “oral” and “manual” approaches to education into what was originally referred to as “the combined system”, progress in linguistic studies of sign language development, and the contemporary context for studies of sign language development.

Page 1 of 6

Language Education in China: Policy and Experience from 1949 Agnes S.L. Lam

Published in print: 2005 Published Online: May Publisher: Hong Kong University Press 2013 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789622097506 eISBN: 9789888180271 hongkong/9789622097506.001.0001 Item type: book

This book is unprecedented as a comprehensive study of the multilingual circumstances in China. It tracks policy changes in the learning of Chinese, foreign languages and minority ethnic languages in China since the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949. On the basis of survey and interview data, the experiences of different age cohorts of learners are presented as ‘windows’ to the realities of language education policy implementation over the last half century. The effects of political changes, language backgrounds and various motivations for learning, at both the national and individual levels, are vividly presented in this composite story of China and learners in China.

Cultural Coloniality: The English Language and Schooling Law Wing Sang

in Collaborative Colonial Power: The Making of the Hong Kong Chinese Published in print: 2009 Published Online: Publisher: Hong Kong University Press September 2011 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789622099296 eISBN: 9789882206755 hongkong/9789622099296.003.0003 Item type: chapter

This chapter follows the lead of Pennycook's study concerning the relationships between the English language and colonialism. It notes that Pennycook warns that to characterize colonialism according to simple stereotypes of a colonizer's oppression and exploitation of a colonized people draws attention away from the constant cultural and micropolitical operations of colonialism, although the complexities of related issues co-exist with the daily presence of simple dichotomizing. It notes however, that the focus in this chapter limits itself neither to colonial discourses in a narrow sense nor to Hong Kong per se; rather, it pits the colonialism-English relationships against the complex formation of collaborative colonial power in both Hong Kong and China. It shows that the privileged status of English-language education in Hong Kong was more likely to stem from irregular changes in policy and societal orientation than from an ingrained imperialist imperative.

Page 2 of 6

English as a Lingua Franca in Asean: A Multilingual Model Andy Kirkpatrick

Published in print: 2010 Published Online: Publisher: Hong Kong University Press September 2011 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789888028795 eISBN: 9789882206922 hongkong/9789888028795.001.0001 Item type: book

The lingua franca role of English, coupled with its status as the official language of ASEAN, has important implications for language policy and language education. These include the relationship between English, the respective national languages of ASEAN, and thousands of local languages. How can the demand for English be balanced against the need for people to acquire their national language and mother tongue? While many will also need a regional lingua franca, they are learning English as the first foreign language from primary school in all ASEAN countries. Might not this early introduction of English threaten local languages and children's ability to learn? Or can English be introduced and taught in such a way that it can complement local languages rather than replace them? The aim of this book is to explore questions such as these and then make recommendations on language policy and language education for regional policymakers.

Implications for language education policy Andy Kirkpatrick

in English as a Lingua Franca in Asean: A Multilingual Model Published in print: 2010 Published Online: Publisher: Hong Kong University Press September 2011 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789888028795 eISBN: 9789882206922 hongkong/9789888028795.003.0007 Item type: chapter

This chapter examines the implications for language-education policy behind three questions concerning the English language. These include the questions about the introduction of English into school curriculums and the introduction of English either as a subject or as a medium of instruction. The chapter discusses the ways in which Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries implemented their respective language-education policies with a particular focus on the teaching and learning of English.

Page 3 of 6

Problematizing the implementation of innovation in English language education in Singapore Rani Rubdy

in English in Singapore: Modernity and Management Published in print: 2010 Published Online: Publisher: Hong Kong University Press September 2011 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789888028436 eISBN: 9789882206939 hongkong/9789888028436.003.0009 Item type: chapter

This chapter examines the processes involved in the implementation of innovation in the teaching of English language in Singapore. It highlights the proactive management of educational policies and the decisiveness and expedience with which these policies are generally implemented. It provides a critical review of the structures and practices involved in the English language syllabus over the years and identifies the distinct stages in its evolution.

Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and the Philippines: Linguistic context and the role of English Andy Kirkpatrick

in English as a Lingua Franca in Asean: A Multilingual Model Published in print: 2010 Published Online: Publisher: Hong Kong University Press September 2011 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789888028795 eISBN: 9789882206922 hongkong/9789888028795.003.0002 Item type: chapter

This chapter provides a historical description and comparison of the role of the English language in members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) that were previously colonies of English-speaking empires including Brunei, Malaysia, and the Philippines. It suggests that the major motivation for language-education policies in Malaysia has been ethnicity and race, while the major motivation in the Philippines has been class. In all countries discussed, the need to modernize acted as a power motivator for English.

Maintaining Control: Autonomy and Language Learning Richard Pemberton, Sarah Toogood, and Andy Barfield (eds)

Published in print: 2009 Published Online: Publisher: Hong Kong University Press September 2011 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789622099234 eISBN: 9789882207165 hongkong/9789622099234.001.0001 Item type: book

Page 4 of 6

Whereas in previous decades autonomous, self-directed, or “ independent” learning may have been assumed to be an alternative to classroom learning, the emphasis has now shifted to the point where learner autonomy, viewed as the capacity to take charge of one's own learning, is increasingly being promoted as a goal for general language education. Autonomy, as pointed out in one chapter in this book, has “become part of the current orthodoxy of language teaching and learning research and practice: an idea that researchers and teachers ignore at their peril”. This volume brings together work by theorists of autonomy in language education, as well as locally situated accounts by autonomy practitioners working with secondary-level, university, or adult migrant learners, or engaged in teacher education and curriculum development. Localising autonomy in such settings, different views of autonomy emerge as social practice, much less an abstract set of discrete skills, attitudes, or behaviours to be developed, and much more a historically and socially situated process that evolves through relations among persons-in-action in specific contexts of practice. Different chapters explore learners' and teachers' voices to raise thought-provoking questions about roles, resources, and practices important to any pedagogy for autonomy.

Conclusion

Agnes S. L. Lam in Language Education in China: Policy and Experience from 1949 Published in print: 2005 Published Online: May Publisher: Hong Kong University Press 2013 DOI: 10.5790/ ISBN: 9789622097506 eISBN: 9789888180271 hongkong/9789622097506.003.0005 Item type: chapter

In this chapter, the major findings on learner experience in the last half century in China have been summarized and the implications for the study of multilingualism have been discussed. Some current trends in language education in China in the teaching of Chinese, the promotion of English and the development of minority education have been highlighted and a few areas for further research have been pointed out. It remains for me to hope that a multilingual orientation in studying language education in China can continue to be adopted, not only because that is a more fruitful approach to understand the circumstances in China but also because a multilingual outlook to linguistic developments around the world is more culturally enriching. In modern human history, the language that spreads to other nations is often the language that has economic and political power. When the English-speaking world loses its pre-eminence by those yardsticks, other European languages and Asian languages may return to their former Page 5 of 6

positions in the world. Hopefully, no single language will predominate over the globe ever again and the world will be truly multilingual.

Page 6 of 6

Suggest Documents