Engaging our city. Environmental Sustainability Strategy Engaging our city

Environmental Sustainability Strategy Engaging our city Engaging our city Protecting and enhancing our natural environment. Thinking globally and ac...
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Environmental Sustainability Strategy Engaging our city

Engaging our city

Protecting and enhancing our natural environment. Thinking globally and acting locally. Inspiring hearts and minds. Reducing our footprint. Respecting Ranginui and Papatúánuku. Breathing clean air. Tui feeding. Blooming Kowhai trees. Balance. Living in comfort. Creating opportunities. Restoring the wairua of the Waikato River. Planning for the future. Managing our land use. Using energy efficiently. Changing behaviours. Lush gullies and clean streams. This Environmental Sustainability Strategy identifies these aspirations for Hamilton and represents the joining of forces between key partners in a call to action.

Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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E NG AG ING OU R C ITY

learning to create a sustainable city Clean water, healthy air, fish in the streams and birds in the bush. Enough energy, efficient roads, convenient public transport - a sustainable city has all these features and more. A sustainable city means a better life for all of us. This Environmental Sustainability Strategy spells out the changes we need to make to create a sustainable Hamilton. However, success depends on the cumulative effect of those changes – from each of us as individuals right up to the big institutions and investors who will shape the city’s future.

signatories

Our city is constantly changing.

Mayor Hamilton City Council

Chief Executive WEL Networks

General Manager Policy Nga Mana Toopu O Kirikiriroa Ltd

Director Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research

Conservator for the Waikato Conservancy Department of Conservation

This Environmental Sustainability Strategy sets out key principles to help us shape that change over the next 5 years in a positive way. We have a shared responsibility for making it work. The groups and organisations that have signed this strategy recognise this. They have committed themselves to jointly pursuing a quality environment that will benefit us all.

National Director The Enviroschools Foundation

Senior Lecturer Strategy & Human Resource Management University of Waikato

Chief Executive Environment Waikato

Chair Sustainable Business Network, Waikato Advisory Board

Chair Waikato Raupatu Trustee Company Ltd

This strategy was developed in a sustainable building and has now been printed on recycled paper using vegetable inks. Please help to save resources by sharing your copy or encouraging others to view it on-line at www.hamilton.co.nz/envirostrategy

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

Hamilton has experienced rapid urban change in recent years. We are fast becoming a metropolitan hub yet we still enjoy many of the aspects associated with smaller city living such as large open green spaces, low air pollution, and sufficient high quality water to meet our current needs. However, growth within the city is placing increased pressure on these local resources and the natural environment. This pressure on resources is causing an increase in the cost of living resulting in an increased desire for the city to become more forward-thinking: living more sustainably and ensuring less impact on the environment. Hamilton’s natural environment is the backbone of the economic, social and cultural well-being of our city. Our environment provides resources, opportunities and benefits. Our engagement and connection as kaitiaki is paramount to its protection and enhancement to create a sustainable future for generations to come. This Environmental Sustainability Strategy gives Hamilton the opportunity to look at how we as a city strike the delicate balance between economic growth, land use, and the protection of important environmental resources.

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The strategy reflects our commitment to the environment, as part of an overall commitment to Agenda 21. It supports and builds upon the myriad of projects and actions that are already happening across Hamilton whilst forging new ground with new thinking, new projects and new energy. The vision of a future where a healthy Waikato River sustains abundant life and prosperous communities who, in turn, are all responsible for restoring and protecting the health and wellbeing of the Waikato River as articulated by the Guardians Establishment Committee is an aspiration shared by this strategy and emphasised through the strategy’s shared outcomes. There are a number of flagship projects focused on the River that will give effect to the Guardians’ vision. The collaborative approach taken by key players to develop this strategy is indicative of the collective responsibility and effort required to achieve a clear pathway towards a more sustainable Hamilton. As partners we recognise that achieving real progress toward sustainability will only be possible if the values, attitudes and behaviours of Hamilton people are consistent with this goal. Engagement across our city is therefore key to making this happen. Our environment is where we live…our home.

minds

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where do you live? in the universe? on this planet? in your country? in your region? in your city? in your neighbourhood? in your house? in your body? in your heart? Adapted from a quote by Richard Stine

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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where?

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mobilised responsive communities awareness action ownership

For any city to be sustainable under the growing influence of climate change, increasing resource scarcity, economic conditions and demographic change, it has to think differently. Solutions to these current urban challenges require an integrated perspective. We need collaboration, utilising the experience of citizens, the knowledge of academic researchers and the know-how of the private sector. The challenge is to use this strength that currently exists in pockets of our community as a springboard to engage all, encouraging and enabling widespread change. Each and every one of us is important, from householders and students, trades people to engineers, and business to industry. By taking little steps together, we can reduce our city’s footprint and make a big difference in our local environment.

shared outcomes

Hamilton has a long history of leadership in environmental action. The nationally successful Enviroschools Programme was founded in our city and Hamilton is one of the leading participants in the Communities for Climate Protection milestones.

We engage all sections of our community to encourage and enable change. Together we… • Develop new ways of thinking about and addressing the complex issues surrounding urban sustainability • Recognise that our personal choices have impacts within and beyond the city and make a contribution on a local, regional, national and international scale • Create a culture that advocates for environmental considerations to be included in all decision making across all sectors of the city. We are serious about the changes we want to make.

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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environmentally sensitive urban growth livability mobility balance In the 1930’s Hamilton was at the forefront of environmentally sensitive urban design. The city was relatively compact in comparison to today with shops, markets, and work within easy walking distance of our suburbs. Over time we have become increasingly dependent on private vehicles and the shape of the city reflects this. People no longer live and work in the same community with many of us now living on the outskirts or outside the city and commuting daily. The City’s increasing population has seen a sustained period of building development, new subdivision and infill housing over recent years. All of which has led to increased pressure on the city’s infrastructure and the local environment. As is the case for the rest of NZ, we currently lack an exact figure for per capita energy efficiency within Hamilton. We know that Hamilton has: • a sporadic uptake of energy efficient technologies, • high private vehicle ownership (51% of Hamilton dwellings have two or more motor vehicles), and • inadequate insulation. (Hamilton has approximately 25,000 pre-1978 homes, many of which, about 12,000 are poorly insulated). While 65% of Hamilton homes have ceiling insulation, 59% have thermal curtains and just under half have wall insulation, only 2.5% have double glazing. An alarming 15% have no form of insulation at all. From this we can see we still have some way to go in terms of energy efficiency. Households with low insulation tend to rely on older wood burners and this has negative flow on effects for air quality. Currently there is a lack of information on the rate of uptake of other environmentally sensitive technologies in homes and businesses but the information we do have paints an interesting picture:

• only 2.5 % of Hamilton dwellings have rain water tanks, • whereas 38% have low flow shower heads, and • approximately 70% of residences have dual flush toilets. In the last 3 years a greater focus has been put on the quality of the urban growth that is occurring in Hamilton, how our design and landuse effects the way we live our lives, the resources we use and the knock-on effects on our natural environment. Our planners, engineers, architects and builders are on a wave of new learning as to how we can achieve environmentally sensitive urban growth. In 2007, 1,233 new dwelling units were authorised for construction within Hamilton, up 27% from the previous year. Based on population projections, Hamilton will require approximately 36,000 new dwellings by 2044 to house around 85,000 additional people. In the past Hamilton has developed relatively uniformly with residential sections averaging between 600-800m2. In the future more efficient or compact use of land will help to slow the rate of urban sprawl, generally reducing the associated development costs such as roading, waste management and water services. An increasingly compact city will make sustainable transport choices more viable. On Census day 2006 only 3.2% of Hamiltonians cycled, 6.4% walked or jogged to work. Bus patronage has risen 25.8% in the past year. Moving forward we need to ensure that city growth and new developments are supported by the right transport choices, reflecting our need for intelligent use of resources and protecting our local environment.

Environmental Sustainability Strategy

shared outcomes

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As our population and city grows, we ensure Hamilton remains a vibrant and sustainable city that is planned for the well-being of our people and the natural environment by… • Taking the steps necessary to optimise use of land through the promotion and use of environmentally sustainable planning and design principles and solutions • Encouraging the conversion of existing buildings and redevelopment of previously developed sites to more viable and sustainable uses • Promoting land use patterns that facilitate viable sustainable travel • Using our collective influence to ensure development and infrastructure reflect the unique natural character, in particular the Waikato River and gully network, and consideration is given to the landscape at all scales of design

flagship projects DISTRICT PLAN REVIEW Currently the Proposed District Plan tends to lack leadership in the area of environmentally sensitive design. The District Plan review process aims to better align the document with the principles of CityScope and the shared outcomes of the Environmental Sustainability Strategy. The parallel review of the Development Manual will expand the options outlined to achieve development standards to include a range of environmentally sustainable design and development mechanisms (e.g. swale technology, permeable surfaces and road widths). Project leader: Hamilton City Council Partners: Environment Waikato, Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research. Funding: Hamilton City Council

A detailed Action Plan will be developed for this project. For further information, go to www.hamilton.co.nz/envirostrategy or contact the project leader listed.

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Taking the steps necessary to optimise use of land through the promotion and use of environmentally sustainable planning and design principles and solutions

Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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healthy ecosystems land air water life

Hamilton straddles the mighty Waikato River and boasts ten expansive gully systems. In the past these hidden treasures were rich with flora and fauna. Today we have lost most of the plants and animals which made up these once abundant and healthy ecosystems. The city and its surrounds are now one of the most modified areas in New Zealand. Over time development pressures have seen many of these natural features and their ecosystems degraded. • Only 3% of Hamilton’s original lowland ecological habitats remain and at least 20% of Hamilton City’s original flora is threatened or extinct. • Bird diversity is in an even poorer state with more than half of the original indigenous species having disappeared. In 2006 a Landcare Research survey observed 23 bird species of which only 10 were native. In spite of this large scale devastation plenty of sites of high ecological value remain worthy of protection. Maori have a long history of caring for the environment and recognising the need to allow areas to rejuvenate through Ráhui. Ráhui is a restriction that sets aside an area and places a ban on the harvesting of resources to allow the fish birds or plants to regenerate. Over the last ten years a large number of highly dedicated individuals, groups and organisations have worked tirelessly to protect, enhance, and restore our City’s natural values and unique ecological heritage. This has lead to some impressive gains. • Tui were sighted on 8 occasions in 2006 compared

with 3 in 2004, and although not statistically significant, are consistent with anecdotal reports of Tui on the rise in the city. • Hamilton is lucky enough to also be home to New Zealand’s only land breeding mammal species – the long tailed bats that have been found roosting in Hamond bush. • The most visible and extensive remnants are to be found at Jubilee Park reserve/Claudelands Bush (5.2 ha) and at Hammond Bush (1 ha) on the Waikato Riverbank, which supports an impressive 145 plant species. Additionally, the City lays claim to 7 Ministry for the Environment defined ecological sites, 67 sites of scientific significance, 290 ‘significant trees’ or ‘significant stands of trees, 30,000 street trees and over 5000 land parcels within or adjoining the Environmental Protection Overlay (EPO). • The jewel in the crown of citywide restoration undeniably belongs to Lake Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park. When finished, the Park will constitute 50ha of eco-sourced plantings and will be an outstanding wildlife habitat. Already the park harbours around 16 bird species. • As of May 2008, 884 residents had registered their land with the Gully Restoration Programme. There is still a lot of work that needs to be done, in particular to protect and restore the Waikato River and its tributaries, lakes, streams and wetlands. Our urban streams recorded satisfactory ecological health around 50% of the time and only 20% of the time it is up to recreational water quality standards. On it’s journey through Hamilton, the Waikato River reduces in water quality; 86% of ecological health samples

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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In the past Hamilton’s 4 lakes have had water quality issues in many cases preventing their use for contact recreation. Lake Rotoroa is currently classed as stable, representing an improvement on past levels with the lake now meeting contact recreation standards most of the time. Clean air is a product of healthy ecosystems and is essential for our good health. Although we don’t have the same level of problems caused by vehicle emissions as other large cities, we do have an aging housing stock many of which rely on older heating systems, such as inefficient wood burning fires. These older homes are generally poorly insulated. This has lead to high concentrations of air pollution particularly during winter months. A recently adopted National Environmental Standard for Air Quality (NESAQ) has set maximum limits for the allowable amount of suspended particulates (PM10) in the air. Hamilton must meet these high standards by 2013. Our failure to do so will result in limits being placed on business activities that adversely affect air quality. Currently Hamilton exceeds this standard 1-4 times per year. Our emissions of benzene, carbon monoxide and nitrogen are within required guidelines. Going forward, Hamilton needs to recognise the importance of healthy and functioning ecosystems, continue to value our premier natural assets and embed more sustainable practices into the operation of the city and our every day actions.

shared outcomes

taken upriver at Narrows show water quality as either ‘satisfactory’ or better compared with 77% of downstream samples at Horotiu. While some of this is caused by activity in the city, farm land surrounding our boundaries also plays a key role.

The urban environment, of which we are part, depends on natural cycles and ecosystems. As agencies we work together to restore their function and integrity. • The water flowing in our tributaries, the Waikato River, lakes, streams, wetlands and groundwater is clean and healthy • We have diverse natural ecosystems that function effectively • The city has clean air

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

flagship projects

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BIRDS IN THE BUSH, FISH IN THE STREAM Using a single ‘reach’ of stream as a case study, this project aims to educate the general public about aquatic habitat restoration and raise its profile within the community. The project reach will be subjected to a range of management actions aimed at improving fish passageways; managing pest species; and rehabilitating native fish populations, particularly giant kokopu. Particular attention will be given to better understanding the complex relationship between stream quality, urban development and stormwater impacts, and stream banks and gully vegetation; with a view to exploring alternative and more environmentally sensitive management solutions. Project leader: Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research Partners: Hamilton City Council, Environment Waikato, Department of Conservation, Enviroschools Funding: Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research BREATHE EASY In 2013 the Ministry for the Environment’s National Environmental Standard on PM10 particulates comes into effect. From this time onwards, Environment Waikato will be prohibited from granting any resource consents that might breach this ambient air quality standard. In preparation for this change, ‘Breathe Easy’ represents a collaborative approach to improving home insulation standards in the city and thereby reducing the need for ‘inefficient’ wood burners. The project will focus on retrofitting pre-1978 homes with adequate insulation. By replacing old, inefficient, wood burners with cleaner heating alternatives, it is hoped this will have a significant impact on air quality within and outside of the home. The project will also be exploring mechanisms to prevent backyard burning. Project leader: WEL Networks Limited Partners: Hamilton City Council, Environment Waikato, WEL Energy Trust, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority HAMILTON EAST ECO-SUBURB The Eco-suburb concept emphasises working collaboratively with neighbourhoods to improve environmental well-being at a suburban level. Enviroschools will play a central role in facilitating a number of schemes. They will be assisted by Environment Waikato, Hamilton City Council’s Walking School Bus programme, and Waimarie Hamilton East Community House and Garden. Schemes will include trialing a fruit tree planting programme along school routes; developing community produce gardens; and active coaching by students in areas such as composting, worm farming, organised planting and resource saving. Project leader: Enviroschools Partners: Hamilton City Council, Environment Waikato, Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research, Hamilton East Community Trust, Department of Conservation WAIWHAKAREKE.CO.NZ This project aims to maximise restoration efforts at the Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park by effectively co-ordinating the work of involved agencies and building bridges with other ecological restoration and conservation projects in the region (e.g. Hamilton Halo initiatives, Gully Restoration and Hamilton Zoo programmes). This includes working with nurseries to develop an ecosourcing accreditation framework and building supply capacity and using effective communications to develop a greater understanding and awareness among the public of the Park’s ecological significance. Project leader: Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research Partners: Waiwakareke Advisory Committee, Hamilton City Council, Environment Waikato, Department of Conservation VISION MAPPING This project is about educating the community by telling our environmental stories. This project aims to reveal to the community the ecological assets on their doorstep by engaging them in interactively creating highly visual maps and other explanatory tools (e.g. signs, models) of the city. Residents will be able to actively engage with their local natural heritage by locating themselves within the map’s context. Establishing an appropriate public places to display the map and other materials will be integral to the project. Project leader: Enviroschools Partners: Sustainable Business Network, Environment Waikato, Hamilton City Council, Department of Conservation

A detailed Action Plan will be developed for each of these projects. For further information go to www.hamilton.co.nz/envirostrategy or contact the project leader listed.

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Environmental Sustainability Strategy

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resource conservation reduce reuse recycle! Historically New Zealand has been blessed with an abundance of natural and physical resources. However, it is a simple fact that today many of these resources are under stress – the water we drink, food we eat, and the energy we use in our day to day life. Increasing global scarcity of key resources such as oil is permeating all aspects of our lives from increasing the cost of travel, the development of new roads and buildings, right through to the cost of home heating and food. We have reached this state through a combination of a growing population and inefficient use of resources. In 2008, Hamilton went through its worst drought on record and the need for water efficiency hit home to many communities, businesses and Council operations. We rely on water for drinking, cooking and washing as well as supporting businesses and agriculture in the surrounding area. Importantly we also rely on water for much of our energy supply both through Hydro electricity and cooling Huntly power station. On average Hamilton consumes 230 litres of water per person per day, approximately 62% higher than residents of Wellington and Auckland. In 2008, Hamilton’s water consumption peaked to a record high of 482 litres per person per day during which water restrictions were imposed and Hamiltonians witnessed first hand how quickly the parameters of sustainability can change.

New Zealanders are by world standards large consumers. Our use of resources produces a significant amount of waste, which if not carefully managed ends up in landfill posing a threat to the environment and human health. In 2006 Hamiltonians sent 21,000 tonnes of waste to landfill, or the equivalent of 6.4 buses every day. Currently around 45% of Hamilton’s residential waste and 26% of business waste is made up of organic matter. Most of this ends up in landfill producing toxic leachate and methane. Electronic waste or as it’s more commonly known, e-waste, is one of the fastest grown waste streams. This needs to be carefully managed as much of this waste has hazardous components. Each year, an estimated 75,000 tonnes of e-waste is thrown away in New Zealand. In 2007, Hamilton participated in the national e-waste day – a high-profile event, collecting old computers and mobile phones from the public for recycling. In 2007, 42 tonnes of e-waste was collected and in 2008 a further 90 tonnes was collected. Since kerbside recycling was introduced to Hamilton in 2002, 90% of households regularly recycle. However, there is still room for improvement. In the first 6 months of 2007 84% of waste collected from the kerbside could have been either recycled or composted. We are beginning to recognise that much of the waste we throw away, such as our green waste and kitchen scraps can also be a valuable resource and

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the key role of recycling and composting in the waste minimisation solution. It all starts with reduction. The less waste we generate, the less we need to manage. The lack of insulation in our homes and the relatively cheap cost of energy has historically led to Hamilton becoming large consumers of energy. Energy includes not just electricity but also the use of coal, oil and gas. In 2007, we used 5,600,000 Megawatt hours of electricity, or the equivalent amount of electricity required to run 469,000 households for a year. Although most of our electricity is generated from renewable hydroelectric sources, the supply remains limited, meaning we need to become more efficient to avoid the potential of power cuts in the future As a city our attitudes towards resources are changing. We now need to come to terms with the reality of what inefficient resource use will mean for us and work toward intelligent use of our water, waste and energy.

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shared outcomes We understand resources are becoming scarce. The city’s environmental footprint is minimised by ensuring natural and physical resources are used as intelligently as possible. As a community we… • Reduce the amount of solid and liquid waste we produce as households and businesses and reduce the quantity of waste going to landfill • Increase the efficiency with which we use energy • Value our precious water and our use reflects this • Reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, thereby minimising our contributions to global warming • Take a holistic approach to consumption by considering product origins, processes and the value of the resources used in production processes

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flagship projects

VALUING WATER How is water being utilised? What regimes have been put to the test? What is working? What is not? Why? These are the questions which will form the basis of a scoping investigation which examines how New Zealand’s territorial authorities are managing our water assets. The project will also investigate management mechanisms of an economic nature, such as: incentives (subsidies, tax rebates and rates remissions), command and control regulations (sprinkler ban), and moral persuasion (educational campaigns). Part of the project will be implementing initiatives based on the research findings. Such initiatives could range from the establishment of a Hamilton Tap Truck to visit properties throughout the city to identify and fix leaks, offer water saving tips and install water saving devices through to incentives around the purchase of rain water tanks. Project leader: University of Waikato, Hamilton City Council Partners: Environment Waikato BACK TO EARTH – ORGANIC WASTE REDUCTION Approximately 48 per cent of all household refuse and 26 per cent of commercial waste going to landfill is organic and could otherwise be composted. Back to Earth will investigate new ways to significantly reduce organic waste going to landfill. Commercially viable organic recycling and composting ventures will be key to diverting organic waste. In this industry volume is king - so we will explore opportunities to work with other near by councils and the synergies of working regionally. Environment Waikato will work closely with the waste industry and major waste suppliers to ensure their support. This regional approach will be used to submit a collaborative bid to the National Waste Levy. Project leader: Environment Waikato, Hamilton City Council Partners: Sustainable Business Network, University of Waikato, Department of Conservation Funding: Hamilton City Council, Environment Waikato EARTH HOUR In recognition of the need to reduce our carbon footprint and in collaboration with other Earth Hour partner cities and towns around the world, on Saturday 28th March 2009 from 8.30-9.30pm, Hamilton will take part in a nationwide campaign to turn off the lights (and other electrical appliances) for 60 minutes. Aside from the on-the-night energy savings, Earth Hour is a great opportunity to educate the public about global climate change and the need to reduce our carbon footprint. The hope is that it will drive long-term behavioural change. Project leader: Waikato Times Partners: All Environmental Sustainability Steering Group partners, Earth Hour working group

A detailed Action Plan will be developed for each of these projects. For further information go to www.hamilton.co.nz/envirostrategy or contact the project leader listed.

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Indicators used to assess contribution towards the key themes and shared outcomes of the Environmental Sustainability Strategy. We will monitor progress annually.

I N D I C AT O R

MONITORING PROGRAMME

SOURCE

Green-space (hectares of green space per 1,000 residents)

Intensification Study: Infill Housing Assessment, 2007

Hamilton City Council

New dwellings (building consents per year)

Building Consents Data

Hamilton City Council

Infill housing rate (new housing within established parts of the city)

Intensification Study: Infill Housing Assessment, 2007

Hamilton City Council

Vacant land (within 1977 City Boundary)

As above

As above

Infill housing potential (estimated infill potential within 1977 City Boundary)

Intensification Study: Infill Housing Assessment

Hamilton City Council

Motor vehicle use (% travelling by car to work)

Quality of Life’ 07 report on 12 New Zealand Cities

Quality of Life Project

Travel and Living (people travelling to and from Hamilton daily)

Census

Statistics NZ

Public transport (bus patronage)

Annual Report

Hamilton City Council

Active transport (walking and jogging)

Census

Statistics NZ

Active transport (walking school bus: participating schools and routes)

Transportation Unit

Hamilton City Council

Cycling (a) (number cycling Census day 2006) (b) (within CBD and suburbs)

Census City Cycle Survey

Statistics NZ Hamilton City Council

Travel plans (schools and businesses)

Active Travel Action Plan

Hamilton City Council

Environment Waikato’s air quality monitoring Programme

Environment Waikato

Carbon Monoxide (10 µg/m3 for an 8 hour average)

As above

As above

Benzene (micrograms of benzene per cubic metre (µg/m3)

As above

As above

Nitrogen (yearly excedences of 100 µg/m3 for a 24 hour average)

Air quality

As above

Waikato River water quality for ecological health (between Narrows and Horotiu)

Environment Waikato’s ongoing Environmental Indicators Programme

Environment Waikato

Waikato River water quality for contact recreation (clarity and E. coli between Narrows and Horotiu)

As above

As above

Stream water quality for ecological health

As above

As above

Stream water quality for contact recreation (clarity and E. coli)

Environmentally Sensitive Urban Growth URBAN LAND USE

TRANSPORT

HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS Air Level of PM10 (suspended particulate matter)

Water

As above

As above

Lake water quality for ecological health (Rotoroa and Waiwhakareke)

Waikato Regional Community Outcomes Data Report

Monitoring and Reporting Community Outcomes

Ecological heritage (sites listed)

Proposed District Plan

Hamilton City Council

Native vegetation (native vegetation land cover)

Waikato Regional Community Outcomes Data Report

Monitoring and Reporting Community Outcomes

Threatened species (avifauna and vascular plants numbers)

Ongoing Research Undertaken by the Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research

Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research

Waiwhakareke Natural Heritage Park (avifauna and vascular plants numbers)

Ongoing Research Undertaken by the Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research

University of Waikato

Street trees numbers

Annual Report

Hamilton City Council

Contaminated sites

Environmental Health: Contaminated Sites data base

Hamilton City Council

Cultural Health Index (CHI)

Guardian Establishment Committee

Under development

RESOURCE CONSERVATION Waste Waste to landfill (Hamilton City landfill)

Water and Waste Services: Contract Performance Data Collection Audit

Hamilton City Council

Organic Waste to landfill (commercial) (residential)

Water and Waste Services 3 yearly SWAP Residential SWAP

Hamilton City Council

Waikato Regional Community Outcomes Data Report

Energy Energy Consumption (per capita)

WEL Networks Monitoring

Monitoring and Reporting Community Outcomes WEL Networks Limited

Electricity demand (gigawatts hours per year)

WEL Networks Monitoring

WEL Networks Limited

Greenhouse gas emissions (Co2 equivalents)

Waikato Regional Community Outcomes Data Report

Monitoring and Reporting Community Outcomes Hamilton City Council

Home insulation (type and extent of insulation)

Hamilton Residents Survey

Energy saving devices

As above

As above

Domestic water consumption (litres/person/day)

Quality of Life’ 07 report on 12 New Zealand Cities

Quality of Life Project and Annual Report

Citywide water consumption (Ml/day)

Water and Waste Services Monitoring

Hamilton City Council

Commercial and Industrial water consumption

Quality of Life’ 07 report on 12 New Zealand Cities

Hamilton City Council

Water savings devices

Hamilton Residents Survey

Hamilton City Council

Household size (single person households)

Census

Statistic NZ

Vehicles per dwelling

Census

Statistic NZ

MOBILISED, RESPONSIVE COMMUNITIES ATTITUDES, PERCEPTION, AWARENESS Key environmental issues

Quality of Life’ 07 report on 12 New Zealand Cities

Quality of Life Project

Environmental perceptions

Environmental Awareness, Attitude and Actions Survey

Environment Waikato

Perception of Government and regulation

As above

As above

Environmental knowledge

As above

As above

Economy, business and environment

As above

As above

Environmental regulation and control

As above

As above

Actions, Affiliations and Educations Programmes

As above

As above

Personal choices and environmental actions

As above

As above

(a) number of community groups belonging to Hamilton Environment Centre

Hamilton Environment Centre registrar

Hamilton Environment Centre

(b) enrolled in the Gully Restoration Programme)

Annual Report

Hamilton City Council

(c) number of Enviroschools in Hamilton City Council

Annual Report

Hamilton City Council

(d) enrolled in the Know it?... live it!/Sustainable Urban Design programme

Annual Report

Hamilton City Council

(e) Walking School Bus schools and schools with HCC directed travel plans

Annual Report

Hamilton City Council

Environmental program membership

October 2008

Environmental Sustainability Strategy Engaging our city