Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan 8.8.12, Updated 9.6.16 Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Introduction ...
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Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

8.8.12, Updated 9.6.16

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Introduction

Emergencies can occur at any time, without warning. In the event of an emergency, taking all reasonable and appropriate steps to protect people, property, and the university’s interests is essential. The university’s emergency management procedures are implemented first and go into effect when an emergency or crisis situation occurs. All emergency or crisis events will require some degree of recovery before resumption of normal activity. The extent of recovery activity required depends on the consequences of a particular crisis. Soon after an emergency situation is stabilized, planning for recovery should begin. The purpose of this plan is to define the emergency management, recovery and continuity processes developed to restore American University’s critical functions. The plan components detail the university’s procedures for responding to a crisis situation that affects its ability to provide services to the students, faculty, and staff or its ability to meet legal or regulatory requirements. Three levels of emergency events have been identified, relative to the magnitude of the emergency. Level 1—the emergency involves a localized department or building incident that can be quickly resolved with internal resources or limited help. A Level 1 emergency has little or no impact on personnel or normal operations outside the locally affected area. Impacted personnel or departments coordinate directly with operational department personnel from the University Police Department, risk management, facilities or other units to resolve Level 1 conditions. Level 2—a mid-level emergency that disrupts sizable portions of the campus community and can no longer be managed using normal procedures. Level 2 emergencies may require assistance from external organizations. These events may escalate quickly, and may have serious consequences for mission-critical functions and/or life safety. Level 3—a major incident that adversely affects the entire campus, and may also affect the surrounding community. During a Level 3 emergency, normal university operations could be suspended. The effect of the emergency is wide-ranging and complex and a timely resolution of disaster conditions requires broad cooperation and extensive coordination.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Mission Statement

It is the mission of American University to respond to an emergency situation in a safe, effective, and timely manner. University personnel and equipment will be utilized to accomplish the following:  Protect lives and reduce chances of injury or death  Protect university assets and minimize loss of data  Maintain public image and reputation  Minimize the critical decisions to be made in a time of crisis  Restore general campus operations To the greatest extent possible, regulations regarding the protection of the environment will be complied with during disaster response activities.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to formalize American University’s emergency management and continuity of operations planning process and provide guidelines for the developing, maintaining and exercising its Plan. This policy provides for:  The response to emergency scenarios and disasters  The recovery of time sensitive processes in accordance with pre-established recovery time objectives  The restoration and ultimate return to a permanent operating environment Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Process Governance 1. The American University Vice President for Finance and Treasurer is responsible for and owns the enterprise-wide emergency management and continuity of operations planning program. 2. The American University Assistant Vice President of Risk Management and Safety Services is responsible for establishing the scope of emergency and continuity planning, providing guidance to the enterprise-wide emergency planning team, reviewing analyses, approving strategy selection, determining funding needed for continuity-related programs, and ensuring compliance with this policy. 3. Departmental management is responsible and accountable for developing and implementing their department/unit’s crisis management and continuity plans. Although the execution of the plan may be delegated, the ultimate responsibility for continuity solution design, implementation, and maintenance resides solely with these senior managers. Management Policy 1. The University’s emergency planning workgroup will identify applicable risks, assess operations, processes, and functions, and as economically justified, formally develop strategies and plans to manage those risks in an emergency management and continuity of operations plan. 2. The University will systematically address risk mitigation, crisis management, crisis communication, technology recovery, business process recovery and restoration, plan exercising, personnel training and awareness, and plan maintenance. o Risk Assessment a. The emergency planning workgroup will periodically conduct risk assessments to understand the risks related to the university, with an emphasis on estimating risk likelihood and vulnerability. b. Environmental, man-made (intentional and unintentional), business process, and information technology-related risks impacting emergency management and continuity of operations will be assessed annually. Focus will be placed on risk likelihood and vulnerability. c. The Director of Business Compliance will retain risk assessment documentation for the current year plus five years. o Business Impact Analysis (BIA) a. A Business Impact Analysis (BIA) will be conducted periodically for each department, critical processes, and support functions in order to

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan develop realistic priorities and recovery time objectives for each. The BIA will be conducted whenever significant business process change occurs and the emergency planning workgroup will approve the BIA results. BIA documentation will be submitted to the Director of Business Compliance. b. The impact associated with business interruptions will be quantified, if possible. Emphasis will be placed on service requirements and expectations, as well as regulatory impact.

o Plan Storage a. A copy of the Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan and technology recovery plans will be stored securely off-site with other reserve supplies. Plans will be maintained at each command center. b. Personnel who leave American University and have a copy of the Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan must return the copy and all attachments as part of the exit process. c. Each Emergency Response Team member will maintain a current copy of the Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan, which must be immediately accessible at home or work. o Exercising and Maintaining the Plan a. The Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan will be exercised annually, resulting in a review and, if necessary, revision of the Plan. b. The Assistant Vice President of Risk Management and Safety Services and the Director of Emergency & Continuity Management are jointly responsible for exercise script development, execution, monitoring and reporting. o Training and Awareness a. Emergency management and continuity training will focus on preparing the emergency response team and the recovery teams to execute the Plan and to recover critical processes within the stated objective. b. Awareness programs will focus on educating the American University community and all other concerned parties of what they should expect if the Plan is executed.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Purpose of the Plan

The purpose of the American University Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan is to establish an organizational structure and procedures for response to major emergencies that disrupt normal campus operations such as, but not limited to, fires, storms, hazardous materials incidents, and terrorist threats.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Cabinet Executives President Provost

Emergency Response Leadership Structure

Vice President of Finance and Treasurer Vice President and General Counsel Vice President of Campus Life Vice President of Development Vice President of University Communications and Marketing Chief-of-Staff The Cabinet functions as the university-wide strategic decision making body focusing on assessment, not implementation. Emergency Response Team* Executive Director of Risk, Safety, and Transportation Services Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management—University Police Department * Others added based on specific incident needs. The Emergency Response Team fulfills many operational functions during an emergency, and is the primary vehicle for managing emergency response from an implementation standpoint.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Scope of the Plan

This Plan is a university-level plan that guides the response of appropriate American University (AU) personnel and resources during and after an emergency or crisis event. It is the official Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan for AU and supersedes previous plans. Nothing in this Plan shall be construed as limiting the use of good judgment and common sense in matters not foreseen or covered by components of the Plan or its appendices. The Plan and organizational structure shall be subordinate to Federal or District plans during a disaster declared by those authorities.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Plan Terminology Alternate Worksite — A work location, other than the primary location, to be used when the primary location is not accessible. Business Continuity — A comprehensive managed effort to prioritize key business processes, identify significant threats to normal operation, and plan mitigation strategies to ensure effective and efficient organizational response to the challenges that surface during and after a crisis. Contact List — A list of team members and key players in a crisis. The list includes home phone numbers, cell phone numbers, etc. Crisis — Any global, regional, or local natural or human-caused event or business interruption that runs the risk of (1) escalating in intensity, (2) adversely impacting the university’s financial position, (3) causing harm to people or damage to property or the environment, (4) falling under close media or government scrutiny, (5) interfering with normal operations and wasting significant management time and or financial resources, (6) adversely affecting employee morale, or (7) jeopardizing the university’s reputation, products, or officers, and therefore negatively impacting its future. Crisis Management — Intervention and coordination by individuals or teams before, during, and after an event to resolve the crisis, minimize loss, and otherwise protect the university. Crisis management is a component of business continuity planning. Command Center(s) — Specific room(s) or facilities staffed by personnel charged with commanding, controlling, and coordinating the use of resources and personnel in response to a crisis. Critical Function — Activity or process that cannot be interrupted or unavailable for several days without having a significant negative impact on the university. Critical Records — Records or documents that, if damaged, destroyed, or lost, would cause considerable inconvenience to the university and or would require replacement or recreation at a considerable expense to the university. Damage Assessment — The process used to appraise or determine the number of injuries and human loss, damage to public and private property, and the status of key facilities and services resulting from a natural or human-caused disaster or emergency. Disaster — An unanticipated incident or event, including natural catastrophes, technological accidents, or human-caused events, causing widespread destruction, loss, or distress to an organization that may result in significant property damage, multiple injuries, or deaths.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Disaster Recovery —An ongoing process supported by senior management and funded to ensure that the necessary steps are taken to identify the impact of potential losses, define the university’s immediate intervention to minimize further loss from a disaster and to begin recovery, maintain viable recovery strategies and plans, and ensure the continuity of operations through personnel training, plan testing, and maintenance. Emergency — An unforeseen incident or event that happens unexpectedly and demands immediate action and intervention to minimize potential losses to people, property, or revenue. Emergency Response Team — A group of individuals with responsibility to oversee the recovery and restoration process being executed by the response teams. Evaluation and Maintenance — Process by which a Disaster Recovery and Continuity of Operations Plan is reviewed in accordance with a predetermined schedule and modified in light of such factors as new legal or regulatory requirements, changes to external environments, technological changes, test/exercise results. Exercise — An activity performed for the purpose of training and conditioning team members and personnel in appropriate crisis responses with the goal of achieving maximum performance. Incident Commander – Member of the AU University Police Department staff who will remain at the incident scene to manage, coordinate, schedule and deploy appropriate personnel and equipment. Mutual Aid Agreement — A pre-arranged agreement developed between two or more entities to render assistance to the parties of the agreement. Prevention — Plans and processes that will allow an organization to avoid, preclude, or limit the impact of a crisis occurring. The tasks included in prevention should incorporate compliance with university policy, mitigation strategies, and behavior and programs to support avoidance, deterrence and detection. Recovery/Resumption — Plans and processes to bring the university out of a crisis that resulted in an interruption. Recovery/resumption steps should include damage and impact assessments, prioritization of critical processes to be resumed, and the return to normal operations or to reconstitute operations to a new location. Response Team — A group directed by the emergency response team to lead incident response comprised of personnel from functions like human resources, facilities, information technology, risk management, media relations, finance, etc. Risk Assessment — Process of identifying internal and external threats and vulnerabilities, identifying the likelihood of a crisis arising from such threats or vulnerabilities, defining the

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan critical functions necessary to continue university operations, defining the controls in place or necessary to reduce exposure, and evaluating the cost for such controls. Simulation Exercise — A test in which participants perform some or all of the actions they would take in the event of plan activation. Simulation exercises are performed under conditions as close as practicable to the “real world” conditions. Tabletop Exercise — A test method that presents a limited simulation of a crisis scenario in a narrative format in which participants review and discuss, not perform, the policy, methods procedures, coordination, and resource assignments associated with plan activation. Technology Recovery Planning – Recovery of IT systems, applications, databases and network assets, independent of the business environment. Technology recovery planning is a component of business continuity planning. Vital Records — Records or documents, for legal, regulatory, or operational purposes, that if irretrievably damaged, destroyed, or lost, would materially impair the university’s ability to continue business operations.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Assumptions This section identifies assumptions made by American University’s Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan. 1. The type of disaster (fire, civil unrest, natural disaster, terrorist attack, chemical spill) and the impact of the disaster will vary significantly. 2. Only one building will be impacted by a single disastrous event. However, should an incident(s) impact more than a single building, the plan would be adapted to the situation. 3. Alternate administrative office sites will be available to the university at the time of need. 4. That adequate training is given in the use of the plan and that all faculty and staff are made aware of its existence and their roles, if appropriate, within the plan. 5. The plan is tested and reviewed on a regular basis. 6. That this document, related procedures and all vital records are stored in a secure offsite location and not only survive the disaster but are accessible immediately following a disaster. 7. Some level of technical resources will not be available for at least 1 week in the affected building(s). Attachment B – Business Continuity Risk Analysis

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Plan Activation

1. The president will be notified immediately and apprised of any university emergency situation. The president has the final authority for emergency decisions and directives; in the absence of the president, the provost or the vice president of finance and treasurer has this authority. 2. With an emergency level at a stage 2 or 3, the president can convene the Cabinet at an off-campus Executive Command Center ((ECC) See ECC Activation Guidelines— Attachment A of the Plan). As needed during the emergency, these individuals will plan and direct activities of the ECC. (See Executive checklists—Attachments D and E of the Plan or copies available in the ECC) 3. Once the ECC is activated, the Emergency Response team leader will convene the appropriate members of the Emergency Response Team (ERT) at an off-campus Operations Command Center (OCC). They have responsibility for overseeing the emergency management procedures being executed in the field. 4. The ERT are responsible for communicating the status of operations to the Cabinet and making the necessary management decisions to support the recovery efforts. The ERT leader has overall responsibility for the team and direct communications with the Cabinet.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Command Centers

Command Centers are set up at central locations for university communications and decision-making during a crisis situation. Command Centers will be set up in response to a crisis and will be equipped with copies of the Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan documents and other resources that may be needed in a disaster. A full supply of standard university forms (e.g., purchase requisitions, workers’ comp reporting forms, disbursement requests, human resources forms, standard contracts, etc.) should also be on hand in the Operations Command Center.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Emergency Management 1. During the initial response, the Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management or designee will review the situation and will choose appropriate actions such as evacuating the campus or specific buildings. The Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management or designee will be responsible for coordinating the initial response to an on-campus emergency to include notifying and coordinating with external resources such as MPD or DCFEMS and for sending emergency notifications to the university campus community through the AU Alerts or other approved mass notification system. 2. For situations requiring an extended or campus wide response, the president and Cabinet will review the situation and the president will choose appropriate follow up actions, such as canceling classes, closing the university, communicating with the campus and the media, and securing emergency provisions. Communications regarding emergencies situations requiring an extended response will be handled through the Vice President of Communication in accordance with the Communications Plan contained herein. 3. Police, fire, rescue, or medical officials from the District of Columbia, or the U.S. Government may be on campus to assist. University emergency personnel and the campus community will rely upon the expertise of these professionals during an emergency. 4. During the damage assessment phase, the ERT will identify specifically who and what has been affected by the disaster. The Team leaders will evaluate the event that has occurred and determine which response teams will be required to respond to the situation. 5. The decision to activate disaster recovery activities for the affected areas will be made after notification and review with the Cabinet. 6. The Team leaders will notify the members of their response teams using the Notification Script (Attachment H).

Determining Levels of Emergencies

Initial response (AUPD) and information on emergency gathered by the University Police DepartmentERT leader

Status of emergency situation given to the President

President confers with one or more Cabinet members and determines Level of emergency Level 1 Standby/Alert -localized -can be resolved quickly -internal resources used -little impact on university operations

Level 2 Partial Activation -mid-level emergency -sizable portions of the campus disrupted -events may escalate quickly -may require outside resources

-Determine appropriate recipients and types of communications -Approve public information statements and releases -Set schedule to receive updates from the ERT leader -Close communication loops when the emergency ends

-Establish communication with appropriate Cabinet members -Establish ECC, if desired -Consider whether or not to consult with subject matter experts. -Determine appropriate recipients and types of communications -Approve public information statements and releases -Set schedule to receive updates from the ERT leader -Continue to provide strategic policy and direction of recovery efforts -Close communication loops when the emergency ends

Level 3 Full Activation -major incident -involves entire campus -normal operations could be suspended -effects are wide-ranging and complex -ECC is activated

-Declare a campus emergency and activate the ECC -Direct communication with the BOT -Determine appropriate recipients and types of communications -Approve public information statements and releases -Set schedule to receive updates from the ERT leader -Authorize funding for emergency-related expenses -Continue to provide strategic policy and direction for recovery efforts -Close communication loops when recovery is complete

-Emergency Response Team Leader will confer with appropriate members of the response teams -OCC will be established, if appropriate -ERT leader will make a preliminary assessment of the damage and prepare an Incident Action Plan and consider whether or not to consult with subject matter experts -ERT leader will notify the President and appropriate Cabinet members of the current situational status, impact to university operations and plan of action -ERT leader will direct Mutual Aid activities, as appropriate -ERT leader will provide regularly scheduled and/or immediate updates to the President as activities take place

9/6/16

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Communication Plan

1. The Assistant Vice President, Communications or a designee will act as the university’s spokesperson and will authorize the distribution of university-wide statements to keep the community updated. 2. The most effective means of communication will be identified in light of the situation (e.g., e-mail, text alert, telephone, cell phone, flyers, or in-person announcements). Local TV, radio, and newspapers will be contacted to provide expanded communications. 3. The university’s Web site, voice mail, e-mail, and the university information line (202-885-1100), will be used for official updates. 4. Other appropriate communication procedures will be used for students and employees living off campus (e.g., contact by supervisors, faculty, or staff). 5. Students, faculty, and staff should notify family, relatives, and friends of how to obtain information about university operations. 6. Vital information will be communicated:  A description of what has occurred  Preliminary assessment of impact  Immediate course of action  The urgency of action  Emergency procedures being implemented  Time of safe return to campus (after an evacuation)  Other significant decisions or information 7. Every effort will be made to communicate a single, clear message simultaneously to as many students, faculty, and staff as possible 8. Emergency messages will be adapted for various constituencies 9. Certain campus services and support personnel will receive specific instructions relating to their specialized duties. The statements below are generic statements that should be used prior to an official statement being released from the university spokesperson. Generic Holding Statement for a MAJOR ON-CAMPUS EVENT (Army Corps of Engineers work-related incident, bomb threat, hazardous materials spill, etc.) American University officials are actively cooperating with local authorities, including the [police/fire/emergency management agency], to manage the situation. There is no higher priority for the University than the health and safety of the campus community, and we are taking this situation very seriously. In consultation with the authorities and in accordance with approved University procedures, we have [list actions taken e.g., evacuated a portion of campus, directed students, faculty and staff to shelter in place, etc.]: We will continue to work with the proper authorities to take any additional precautions and response actions that may be appropriate. Decisions about University actions are being made continuously in conjunction with [police/fire/emergency management agency]. The

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan University is regularly updating the campus via [list outreach mechanism(s)] and will also post information on our official website www.american.edu if you have any additional questions regarding specifics of the situation, please contact the [police 202/715-7300/fire 202/673-3360/emergency management agency 202/727-6161]. Generic Holding Statement for a MODERATE ON-CAMPUS EVENT (fire, blackout, police response, etc.) American University officials are cooperating with local authorities to respond to the situation on campus. Our top priority is the well-being of the campus community, and we are taking appropriate steps in coordination with the [police/fire/emergency management agency]. As a result of the emergency situation, we are experiencing some temporary disruptions such as [road closings/power outages/other]. Once the emergency has been appropriately addressed, we will work to restore routine operations as soon as possible. The University is regularly updating the campus via [list outreach mechanism(s)] and will also post information on our official website at www.american.edu. If you have any additional questions regarding the specifics of the emergency, please contact the [police 202/7157300/fire 202/673-3360/emergency management agency 202/727-6161]. Generic Holding Statement for a MAJOR OFF-CAMPUS EVENT (terrorist threat, hurricane, etc.) American University officials are working with [police/fire/emergency management agency] to assess the situation and determine if it could affect the campus. The health and safety of the campus community remains our highest priority, and we will work with the authorities to determine the appropriate steps and implement any necessary precautions/preparations. Due to the situation, we are advising students, faculty and staff to [fill in]. As conditions develop, we will regularly update the campus via [list outreach mechanism(s)], and will notify students, faculty and staff about additional actions. Generic Holding Statement for a MODERATE OFF-CAMPUS EVENT (local bomb threat, fire, etc.) American University officials are aware of the situation involving the [identify situation]. We have been in close contact with the [police/fire/emergency management agency] to determine if this situation could affect the campus community. While we don’t believe an impact to campus is likely, we will continue to coordinate with the appropriate authorities and will keep the community informed about ongoing activities. As the situation continues to develop, we will regularly update the campus via [list outreach mechanism(s)], and will notify students, faculty and staff about the additional developments.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Disaster Resource Phone Numbers

Law Enforcement & Fire Departments D.C. Emergency Management Agency

202-727-6161

D.C. Fire Department and Emergency Medical Services

911

D.C. Fire and Hazardous Materials

911

D.C. Fire Department – Non-emergency

311

Federal Bureau of Investigation

202-324-3000

FBI, Washington Field Office

202-278-2000

Fort Meyers MP

703-696-3526

Metro Transit Police

202-962-2121

MPD, 2nd District Front Desk

202-715-7300

MPD Dispatcher

311

MPD, EMERGENCY/BOMB SQUAD

911

U.S. Secret Service Uniformed Division Foreign Missions

202-634-2234

U.S. Secret Service Uniformed Division Govt. & Public Affairs 202-406-5708 U.S. Secret Service Washington Field Office Federal and State Agencies American Red Cross – Main Number

202-406-8000 202-303-4498

American Red Cross – National Capital Area

703-584-8400

Animal Control

202-576-6664

D.C. City Council

202-724-8000

D.C. Water & Sewer Authority

202-787-2000

D.C. Water & Sewer – EMERGENCY

202-612-3400

Dept. of Public Works – Energy Services Hotline

202-673-6750

D.C. Department of Transportation

202-673-6813

Federal Emergency Management Agency

202-566-1600

Health and Human Services Department

202-619-0257

Homeland Security

202-282-8000

Mayor’s Office-City-wide Call Center

202-727-1000

Naval Security Station

202-764-0507

Pepco-Non-emergency

202-833-7500

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Pepco-EMERGENCY

202-872-3432

Washington Gas - Non-emergency

703-750-1000

Washington Gas - EMERGENCY

703-750-1400

Washington Humane Society

202-234-8626

Hospitals, Shelters & Resource Services Bethesda Chevy Chase Rescue – Non-emergency

301-652-0077

Bethesda Chevy Chase Rescue – EMERGENCY

301-652-1000

Children’s Hospital

202-884-3000

Doctor’s Community Hospital – ER

301-552-8665

Georgetown University MOU Contact

202-687-4343

Georgetown University Hospital – ER

202-444-2119

Georgetown University Hospital - General Number

202-444-2000

George Washington MOU Contact

202-994-6110

George Washington University Hospital

202-715-4000

Holy Cross Hospital

301-754-7000

Howard University Hospital – ER

202-865-1141

Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church

202-363-4900

National Presbyterian Church and Center

202-537-0800

Prince Georges Hospital

301-618-2000

Sibley Hospital – ER

202-537-4080

St. Ann’s Church

202-966-6288

Suburban Hospital

301-896-3100

University of Maryland

301-405-1000

ABC 7/News Channel 8

703-236-9555

Associated Press

202-736-9690

CBS 9

202-895-5999

Fox 5

202-895-3000

NBC 4

202-885-4111

The Eagle

202-885-1414

Media

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan WAMU

202-885-1200

WMAL

202-686-3100

WTOP

202-895-5000

Washington Post Metro

202-334-6000

Washington Times

202-636-3000

Transportation Martz Group

800-899-1675

Golden Touch Limousine

202-686-0505

Mainor’s Bus Service

202-291-7910

Middledorf Bus Company

301-856-5576

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Recovery Strategies

This section describes the recovery strategies identified for American University equipment and services. General Recovery Strategies  University operations will be recovered in priority sequence based upon the classification of the function as agreed upon with senior management.  Communications concerning the recovery status will be coordinated through the Operations Command Center so that those executing the recovery will not be interrupted repeatedly for status.  Purchase and acquisition of equipment and supplies needed for the recovery effort will be coordinated through the Operations Command Center as per the instructions in this document.  The contingency planning infrastructure, which is described in this document, will provide for coordination of travel arrangements, food and accommodations for individuals supporting the recovery effort.  Non-critical American University functions will be temporarily discontinued as necessary to support the recovery efforts.  American University personnel may be called in during non-standard business hours to support the recovery efforts.

Attachment C – BCP Rankings

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Recovery Management Cabinet The Cabinet consists of the President of American University, the Provost, the Vice Presidents, the Executive Director of University Communications and Marketing, and the Chief-of-Staff who have an overall responsibility for the recovery and continuity of the University’s operations and services. As needed during the crisis, these individuals will plan and direct activities of the Executive Command Center (ECC) established for the recovery efforts. The President or his designee has overall responsibility for communications with the University’s Emergency Response Team. (See Executive checklists—Attachment D and E of the Plan or copies available in the ECC) Title President Provost Vice President, University Comm. & Marketing Vice President of Campus Life Vice President and General Counsel Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations Vice President of Finance and Treasurer Chief of Staff

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Emergency Response Team These team members would report directly to the Operations Command Center (OCC) and have responsibility for overseeing the recovery and continuity processes being executed by the Response Teams in the field. They are responsible for communicating the recovery status to the Cabinet and making the necessary management decisions to support the recovery efforts. The Emergency Response Team Leader has overall responsibility for the team and communications with the Cabinet. (See Emergency Response Team Leader checklist—Attachment F or copies available in the OCC.) The objectives and the functions of this team are: 1. Make a preliminary assessment of the damage and prepare an Incident Action Plan. (See Attachment G of the Plan or copy available in the OCC.) 2. Notify the Cabinet of current status, impact to university operations and plan of action. 3. Initiate the plan after a crisis has been declared. 4. Organize and manage the OCC as a central point of control for the recovery efforts. 5. Organize and provide administrative support to the recovery effort. 6. Administer and direct the problem management function.

Conference Call Bridge

Two conference call bridges have been created to enhance our emergency communications. The first call bridge is for the Cabinet and the second is for the Emergency Response Team. These conference call bridges should be used in the event of an emergency when the entire group cannot assemble at one location, but needs to be informed and contribute to the decision making process. The Cabinet and ERT leaders will be the Conference Call Chairpersons. They are responsible for setting up the conference call and for informing all call bridge participants what time they should call in.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Academic Response Team The Academic Response Team leader will contact the team members and communicate the situation. At that time, the damage will be assessed and an estimate of impact on academic programs will be given. The team leader will work with the deans and registrar to make a decision on how to resume classes and other programs and will communicate the information to all units and affected departments. Using a grid chart of classes and buildings, they will work with Facilities to identify alternate classrooms on and off campus. The Academic Response team will ensure Center for Teaching, Research, and Learning and the Office of Information Technology work together to assist faculty in Blackboard support for distance learning classes. The deans will be responsible for contacting all faculty and academic staff to inform them on where and when to resume classes. In turn, the faculty will communicate with the students to ensure that they are advised as to when and where to report for class or if the class may continue online. The Academic Response team will monitor the level of recovery and the classes held and make necessary adjustments. (See Academic Response Team Leader checklist—Attachment I or copies available in the OCC) Academic Response Team Title

Title

Vice Provost for Academic Administration Biology, Department Chair

Senior Vice Provost and Dean of Academic Affairs Associate Dean, Academic Affairs School of Communication Associate University Librarian

University Registrar Assistant Dean, Student Services Washington Semester Associate Dean, Faculty Affairs & Graduate Education School of International Service Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education School of International Service Associate Dean, Faculty and Academic Affairs Washington College of Law

Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Research Associate Dean, Academic Affairs School of Public Affairs

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Washington College of Law Senior Associate Dean Kogod School of Business

Interim Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies

Associate Dean, Graduate Studies College of Arts and Sciences Associate Dean, Undergraduate Studies College of Arts and Sciences

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Facilities and Risk Management Response Team The Facilities and Risk Management Response Team will coordinate risk reduction in the area affected by the crisis. An assessment will be performed to determine the damage and make a prognosis for occupancy of the structure affected by the crisis. Services will be coordinated to allow for the restoration of plumbing, electrical, and other support systems as well as structural integrity. A liaison will be provided to the insurance carriers and claims adjusters. Reports will be given to the Emergency Response Team on a regular basis with pertinent information. (See Facilities and Risk Management Response Team Leaders checklist—Attachment J or copies available in the OCC) Finance Response Team Cost Center The cost center and cost pool to be used for all transportation, lodging, meals, equipment, cash advances or any other type of expense related to the recovery effort is 10-640415xxxxx-00000. This cost center is only effective in a declared disaster. It is important that this cost center be used so that all expenses can be tracked. Equipment Purchases General requests for items like PCs, FAX machines, modems, office supplies, PC software, etc., should be requested on the purchase requisition form and faxed or called in to the Operations Command Center. Requests will be combined for volume discounts where possible and completed as quickly as possible through existing vendor relationships or if necessary through other vendors. Purchases may be made directly by Emergency Response team members using AU’s Purchasing Card or through a direct billing arrangement with the vendor. Existing vendor relationships should be used wherever feasible to facilitate billing and payment for services. Expense Reports The normal procedures for submitting expense reports will continue during the recovery effort. All disaster related expenses should reference 10-640415-xxxxx-00000. Every effort will be made to reimburse the employee for out-of-pocket expenses as expeditiously as possible. (See Finance Response Team Leader checklist—Attachment K or copies available in the OCC) Human Resources Response Team Injury to Employee If an employee is injured as a result of a declared emergency or during the recovery process, the first step is to seek medical attention for the injured employee as quickly as possible. This can be done by calling the University Police Department at (202) 885-3636. Then make the necessary provisions to prevent further injury to others. Once medical attention has been provided for the injured employee, it is important to notify Human Resources at (202)885-2591 as soon as reasonably possible so that appropriate

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan family notifications and risk management paperwork can be completed. Initial information to be provided is as follows:  Employee name  Employee department  Location at time of injury  Nature of injury  Time injury occurred  Brief description of circumstances under which injury occurred. Employee Fatalities In the event that an emergency situation results in the death of one or more employees, it is imperative that the information be communicated to Human Resources at (202)885-2591 as quickly as is reasonably possible. Faculty Staff Assistance personnel have been trained to respond to a tragedy such as this so that communication can be made to family members as quickly and compassionately as possible. Human Resources can also assist the family in obtaining appropriate insurance or other university benefits. A phone call to the Operations Command Center (202-885-1532 or 202-364-2580) should be made as soon as possible. Initial information to be provided is as follows:  Employee name  Employee department  Location at time of death  Time death occurred  Brief description of circumstances under which death occurred  Where deceased has been taken (if known) Temporary Help If you require the support of additional AU staff during the recovery effort, contact the Operations Command Center by phone or fax. Every effort will be made to provide any additional help needed to support the recovery effort. Family Issues The university recognizes that responding to American University’s needs in a disaster situation places hardships on the families of its Response Team members. To be able to give the best to the university at a time when it is needed most, employees need to have a level of comfort that their family members are safe and that the employee’s absence during the recovery effort will not place undue hardship on them. The level of support to team members will clearly be defined by the nature of the disaster itself. In the case of natural disaster where the employee’s family may be at risk, the university may provide for temporary relocation of family members or allow the family to accompany the employee to the university. It may range from facilitating dependent care services to providing cash advances to provide for family needs. Family issues should be brought to the attention of the Human Resources representative in the Operations Command Center as soon as it is feasible. (See Human Resources Response Team Leader checklist—Attachment L or copies available in the OCC)

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan University Police Department The University Police Department will serve as the initial response team to any emergency situation on campus. The on-duty supervisor (watch commander) or designee will serve as the incident commander for an emergency situation and will be responsible for assessing the situation, taking the necessary steps to mitigate the effects of the situation (i.e. conducting building evacuations, obtaining the assistance of outside resources to include AU departments including Facilities Management or external resources including MPD and DCFEMS, etc.), and upon the approval of the Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management, notifying the campus community through AU Alerts, of any immediate threats to the campus community and the procedures to follow. Executive Director of University Police and Emergency Management will be in constant contact with the on-duty police supervisor so periodic updates on recovery operations can be provided to the Cabinet and Emergency Response team. In the event more assistance is needed, the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) is the primary agency to provide immediate back up. If there are multiple public emergencies, MPD’s law enforcement resources may be directly impacted and potentially degraded. In the event the District cannot effectively control the situation, the Mayor can request federal assistance through proper channels. (See University Police Response Team Leader checklist— Attachment M or copies available in the OCC)

Response Teams These individuals are responsible for executing the recovery processes necessary for the recovery or continuity of critical university functions. They report to the Emergency Response Team through emergency response team leaders who have overall responsibility for the Response Team’s efforts. The Response Teams may be broken into sub-teams, each with its own leader to facilitate the recovery effort. The primary responsibilities of the members of these teams are as follows: 1. Retrieve offsite records and recovery information from offsite storage, if appropriate. 2. Report to the identified site. 3. Execute recovery procedures for their areas of responsibilities in order of priority identified. 4. Communicate the status of the recovery to the Operations Command Center as needed. 5. Identify issues or problems to be escalated to the management team for resolution. 6. Establish shifts for recovery team members to support the recovery effort 24 x 7. 7. Establish liaison with alternate site personnel if needed. 8. Support efforts to return to normal operations. 9. Reestablish support operations affected by the disaster. 10. Identify replacement equipment/software needed for recovery effort and to return

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan to normal operations. Student Life Response Team The Student Life Response Team will coordinate living arrangements, feeding, and personal support to all students, including those living off-campus. The Student Life Response Team also plays a primary support role to families of students during an emergency. (See Student Life Response Team Leader checklist—Attachment O or copies available in the OCC)

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Technology Response Team Technology Response Team leader will contact the team members and communicate the situation. OIT disaster response protocols will be activated, as appropriate. Team leader will report to the Operations Command Center. Staff will be dispatched to complete an inventory of IT functions within the affected buildings and to determine the extent of infrastructure damage. A determination will be made of the steps necessary to restore IT services, and baseline services will be provided in an alternate location for affected staff. In the event that a disaster affects the data center facility at 4200 Wisconsin Avenue, IT staff will implement contingency plans for conducting operations at another site. The recovery strategy is based on automatically duplicating the most critical data at an off-site location. Sufficient processing resources should be available at the off-site location to conduct essential business at a reduced performance/capacity level; additional processing resources would be added at the time of need in response to the severity of the disaster. (See Technology Response Team Leader checklist—Attachment P or copies available in the OCC) University Communications Response Team The University Communications Response Team will coordinate communications during a university emergency. They will utilize all emergency communication methods available as the situation warrants. (See University Communications Response Team Leaders checklist—Attachment P or copies available in the OCC)

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Attachment A

Executive Command Center (ECC) Activation Guidelines

The ECC will be activated upon information and advice received from the Emergency Response Team (ERT) leader to facilitate the University’s response and subsequent recovery from any emergency. Generally, the ECC is activated during two types of events: an immediate, unforeseen and ongoing incident, or a pending event for which there was some forewarning. ACTIVATION AUTHORITY The decision to activate the ECC rests with the President, and in his absence, the decision rests with the Provost or the Vice President of Finance and Treasurer. The President or his designee may decide to convene an ad-hoc advisory group to assist in this determination. EMERGENCY LEVELS Three levels of emergency operation have been identified, relative to the magnitude of the emergency. The decision to activate the ECC takes into account what level emergency the campus is experiencing:  Level 1 (“Standby/Alert”)—the emergency involves a localized department or building incident that can be quickly resolved with internal resources or limited help. A Level 1 emergency has little or no impact on personnel or normal operations outside the locally affected area. Impacted personnel or departments coordinate directly with operational department personnel from the University Police Department, risk management, facilities or other units to resolve Level 1 conditions. The ECC is not activated, but appropriate ECC personnel are informed and placed on alert status.  Level 2 (“Partial Activation”)—a mid-level emergency that disrupts sizable portions of the campus community and can no longer be managed using normal procedures. Level 2 emergencies may require assistance from external organizations. These events may escalate quickly, and may have serious consequences for missioncritical functions and/or life safety. The ECC is partially activated ( i.e., some, but not all Cabinet members are convened) to coordinate and support the response to the incident. One or more ERT members may be contacted, depending on the nature of the incident. ECC staffing decisions are made by the President and depend in part by the scope of the incident and the extent of coordination needed to respond to the incident.  Level 3 (“Full Activation”)—a major incident that adversely affects the entire campus, and may also affect the surrounding community. During a Level 3 emergency, normal university operations could be suspended. The effect of the emergency is wide-ranging and complex and a timely resolution of disaster conditions requires broad cooperation and extensive coordination. The ECC is activated in either its primary or secondary location. All or most ECC members and ERT are activated. All emergency personnel should report for duty.

Attachment D

Checklist Exec-1 President

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities: PROCEDURES 1. Establish the ECC and communicate with Cabinet members. 2. Provide direction to the scribe. 3. Communicate with Emergency Response Team (ERT) leader regarding the situation. 4. Consider whether or not to consult with subject matter experts. 5. Approve appropriate public information statements (news media, web site, voice messages, text messages, etc.) to communicate with various constituencies. 6. Authorize funding for emergency-related expenses. 7. Continue with regularly scheduled and/or immediate updates from ERT leader as activities take place.

Date:

Time:

 Declare campus emergency  Authorize activation of Executive Command Center (ECC)  Authorize funding for emergency projects exceeding existing funding levels  Direct communication with the Board of Trustees  Approve public information statements and releases DATE/TIME/NOTES

Attachment E

Checklist Exec-2 Cabinet

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES

1. Establish contact with the President and report to the Executive Command Center (ECC) or participate in discussions via the conference call bridge. 2. Obtain a briefing on the emergency situation from the ERT leader. 3. Consider whether or not to consult with subject matter experts. 4. Provide input to the decisions driving the strategic direction of emergency management and recovery operations. 5. Authorize funding for emergency-related expenses. 6. Continue with regularly scheduled briefings and/or immediate updates as activities take place.

Date:

Time:

 Policy level decisions  Fiscal authorization for division-specific emergency expenditures  Strategic policy and direction for recovery and resumption of normal operations  Communicate with the President  Assist with public information statements and releases  Provide executive level authority to the Emergency Response Team (ERT) DATE/TIME/NOTES

Attachment F

Checklist ERT-1 Emergency Response Team Leader

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Date:    

Support Responsibilities:

 

PROCEDURES 1. Establish the Operations Command Center (OCC) and communicate with Cabinet members. 2. Provide direction to the scribe. 3. Make a preliminary assessment of the damage and prepare an Incident Action Plan and consider whether or not to consult with subject matter experts. 4. Notify Cabinet of current status, impact to university operations and plan of action. 5. Organize and manage the OCC as a central point of control for recovery efforts. 6. Direct Mutual Aid contacts. 7. Continue with regularly scheduled and/or immediate updates for ECC as activities take place. 8. Schedule debriefing meeting with ERT.

Time:

Oversee the recovery and continuity processes being executed by the individual response teams Communicate the recovery status to the Cabinet Make necessary management decisions to support recovery efforts Overall responsibility for the team and communications with the Cabinet Organize and provide administrative support to the recovery effort Administer and direct the problem management function

DATE/TIME/NOTES

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Attachment G

Incident Action Plan (IAP) American University

An IAP formally documents incident goals, operational objectives, and the response strategy defined by the Emergency Response Team leader. It contains general tactics to achieve goals and objectives within the overall strategy, while providing important information on event and response parameters. Equally important, the IAP facilitates dissemination of critical information about the status of response resources. Because incident parameters evolve, action plans must be revised on a regular basis to maintain consistent, up-to-date guidance. The following should be considered for inclusion in an IAP:  Incident goals (what the response teams want to achieve at the end of the response)  Operational objectives (major areas that must be addressed in a specified operational period to achieve the goals)  Response strategies (priorities and the general approach to accomplish the objectives)  Response tactics (methods developed to achieve the objectives)  Assignment lists with specific tasks  Critical situation updates and assessments  Resource status updates  Health and safety plan (to prevent responder injury or illness)  Communications plan (how functional areas can exchange information)  Logistics plan (e.g., procedures to support operations with equipment, supplies, etc.)  Additional component plans, as indicated by the incident. What follows is an example of an action plan as it might appear following response planning by the Emergency Response Team. This is meant only to provide a general idea of how the components might be described in an action plan during emergency response. In reality, the information included in an action plan will vary depending on the incident circumstances and available resources.

Sample Scenario: Contagious disease outbreak with limited numbers infected.  



Goal—to protect the students, faculty and staff from infection while providing optimal care to victims and maintaining normal operations. Objectives: o Maintain safety of students, faculty and staff o Maintain safety of non-infected persons o Provide care to infected, exposed, or concerned parties Strategies and Tactics—activate appropriate Emergency Assistance Staff (EAS) and/or first responders to: o Provide for infection control  Distribute PPE to EAS and first responders  Provide instruction to staff on use of PPE  Provide instruction to staff on procedures that are high risk for transmission of infection o Monitor Student Health Center for entry of infected/contagious patients o Monitor calls to the University Police Department requesting ambulance transport due to illness o Post signs that contain easy-to-understand instructions for potential incident victims to decrease the likelihood of disease transmission

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan











o Monitor staff for signs/symptoms of illness o University resources assigned  University Police Department personnel (numbers assigned)  EAS to augment the University Police Department response (area and numbers assigned)  Personnel pool staff available to supplement above assignments Event updates: o Number of patients screened and released over the past 24 hours o Number of patients admitted to area hospitals with diagnosis of suspected disease o Number of patients admitted to area hospitals with confirmed disease (placed in cohort isolation) o Information on known student/faculty/staff to student/faculty/staff transmission of disease (or lack thereof) o Updates on risk factors for contracting the disease, and other new information Section updates: o Incident control o Operations with particular emphasis on staffing o Logistics, including emphasis on where and how to obtain PPE and prophylaxis o Planning with emphasis on turning in functional area reports by pre-designated times o Administration/finance Safety message: o Coordinated with area healthcare facilities and jurisdictional authorities to promote a uniform message to AU community o Cover infection control, PPE, prophylaxis, extended incident stress and other topics. Communications message: o Internal—contact method for emergent messages and routine functional area updates o External—provides explanation for the differences in communication channels for strategic issues and for tactical issues Event projections—as available.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Attachment H

Call Notification Script

This procedure is to be used by all American University employees when contacting other employees at home to notify them of the occurrence of a disaster. The purpose of this procedure is to standardize the information given to employees regarding a disaster and to prevent disclosure of information regarding the disaster to anyone outside of the university. Anyone making phone calls as a result of a disaster should also be cognizant of the fact that it is possible that the employee was at the site of the disaster when it occurred. Using this script will prevent unnecessary panic for the family members of the employee. 1. Contacting via direct phone contact Hello, may I speak with

please?

If employee is not at home, state the following: 

When he/she returns, would you ask him/her to please contact me immediately at the following number (location where you will be--Command Center, your home, alternate site, etc.).

If employee is at home, explain the following:       

Give the employee a brief description of the situation that has occurred and what it has impacted and estimate of the length of outage, if known. Tell the employee where to report and when and how long they should expect to stay. Remind them to bring any recovery procedures with them. If travel arrangements have been made for the employee, inform them of what they are. If travel arrangements are to be made by the employee, inform them of where and when they are expected and verify they have the information to make the arrangements. If employee is to remain at home, inform them that they are to remain on-call and prepared to report to work. Remind the employee that they are not to speak to anyone regarding the situation.

2. Contacting via computer/phone text messaging  

ALERT MESSAGE—DISASTER ALERT contact xxx-xxx-xxxx immediately When employee contacts you, provide the same information as listed above for direct phone contact.

Attachment I

Checklist ERT-2 Academic Response Team Leader

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Get clear understanding of what happened, where, when  Receive instructions on next steps 2. Contact academic response team members and communicate the situation.  Initiate phone tree notification of team members  Group email to team members can also be used to describe the situation 3. Team leader proceeds to OCC and establishes academic representative coverage.  Establish method to receive updates from various team members regarding situations in respective units  Maintain a log/record of developments and communicate to the team 4. Determine how to resume classes and other programs.  Solicit recommendations from each team member as to how they view their respective unit situations and what approaches/options could be adopted: ask for specific resource needs for each recommendation  Discuss recommendations with ERT

Date:

Time:

 Determine how to resume classes and other academic programs  Communicate with appropriate academic administrators  Organize and provide administrative support to the recovery effort  Administer and direct the problem management function DATE/TIME/NOTES

in OCC to make decisions. Determine logistical issues of recommendations (e.g., doable, practical?)  Develop list of resource needs and work with ERT and support units to implement and obtain what is needed 5. Communicate continuation information to all affected departments and units.  Advise all team members of the agreed upon approach to resume classes and how to implement  Facilitate logistics of implementation with support from other service units 6. Deans are responsible for contacting all faculty and staff to inform them on where and when to resume classes.  Team members discuss the implementation plan with the deans from the affected areas  Deans or designates send broadcast email to all unit faculty and staff; where possible follow up with phone calls via a call tree (e.g., deans to department chars, department chairs to faculty, etc.) 7. Faculty communicates with students to ensure that they are advised as to when and where to report for class.  Each faculty will be asked to post on Blackboard when and where to report for class. Also, send e-mail to each student on the class roster  AU website should contain the same information and instructions 8. Monitor level of recovery and the classes held and make necessary adjustments.  Maintain contact with team members on a regular basis—hourly at first, then several times a day, etc.  Conduct site visits of alternative classroom sites, if necessary

 Adjustments to situations will be addressed immediately through the ERT 9. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/journal and continue contact with team members  Contact each dean for his/her perspectives  Meet with ERT for debriefing.

Attachment J

Checklist ERT-3 Facilities and Risk Management Response Team Leaders

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Mobilize appropriate resources to the site of the emergency to assess the magnitude of problems, initiate actions to stabilize the situation and make preliminary report to the Operations Command Center (OCC). 2. Assess and coordinate response to safety and hazardous materials related issues.  Initiate appropriate actions to manage safety and hazardous materials issues. Action could include mobilization of staff to establish a perimeter around the site, mobilization of contract resources to determine safe entry requirements and/or mobilization of contract resources to plan and initiate abatement activities. Make a report to the OCC.  Identify all major areas of utility damage or non-service. Determine needs, estimated time for restoring services and estimated cost to repair, and forward this information to the OCC.

Date:

Time:

 Coordinate risk reduction in the area affected by the emergency  Damage assessment and report  Campus utilities  Administer and direct the problem management function  Act as liaison with insurance carriers and claims adjusters  Repair and construction DATE/TIME/NOTES

3. Team leaders proceed to OCC.  Establish method to receive updates from various team members regarding the situation.  Maintain a log/record of developments and communicate to the team. 4. Evaluate the initial status of the damaged functional area, and estimate both the time to reoccupy the facility and the salvage ability of the remaining equipment.  Mobilize the appropriate resources to determine structural, mechanical or electrical problems and begin to develop a restoration plan and take restoration first steps. Make a report to the OCC. 5. Salvage equipment, data and supplies.  Mobilize in-house and contract resources to salvage equipment, data and supplies from the affected area, move those items to an area outside of the disaster, coordinate process to determine who has access to salvaged equipment, data and supplies. Make a report to the OCC. 6. Identify and report to the OCC on what resources remain and determine their future utilization in the recovery process.  Collect information from mobilized resources and make a complete and updated report to the OCC to include current status on all items above along with a preliminary listing of what is inaccessible, unusable, lost or otherwise not available for utilization. Team leaders will make first formal report of resources needed to continue stabilization/abatement/salvage efforts and estimates of time required.

7. Arrange for necessary replacement equipment.  Submit a list to the OCC of replacement equipment and other resources required. 8. Coordinate insurance program with continuity plan programs.  As soon as possible after a loss, Director of Risk Management and Transportation Services or the university’s insurance broker should be notified. The company will assign an adjuster, loss control engineer, and other experts to assist with the loss claim.  In the event of loss or damage, take all reasonable steps to protect the covered property from further damage. Also, keep a record of all expenses for emergency and temporary repairs. 9. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/record and meet with ERT to debrief. Addendum: Facilities and Risk Management Response Team Leaders

Attachment K

Checklist ERT-4 Finance Response Team Leader

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Team leader is notified of the scope of the emergency. 2. Contact finance team members using established procedures.  Use phone tree to contact members of the Finance Response Team after determining where they should be deployed. 3. Team leader proceeds to the OCC and establishes Finance representative coverage.  Establish method to receive updates from various team members regarding the situation and direct activities regarding emergency purchases and expenditures.  Maintain a log/record of developments and communicate to the team.  Extra check stock and hard copies of requisitions and disbursement requests will be available in the OCC.

Date:

Time:

 Recommend budget and funding plans for emergency and recovery expenses  Accounting for all emergency expenses  Fiscal analysis to determine total expenses, funding authorization, and funding sources  Manage One Card purchases and direct billing arrangements with vendors  Organize and provide administrative support to the recovery effort  Administer and direct the problem management function  Emergency procurement  Emergency contracts and purchase orders DATE/TIME/NOTES

4. Activate Disaster Recovery Cost Center.  All emergency and recovery related expenses should reference xx-xxxxxxxxxxx-00000. This account is only effective in a declared emergency. 5. Provide channel for authorization of expenditures by response teams.  Purchases may be made directly by using AU’s One Card or through a direct billing arrangement with the vendor.  Extraordinary expenditures will be coordinated through the OCC.  Develop a plan with recommendations for continued authorization of expenses, funding accounts and budget management for submission to the ECC. 6. Arrange recording of emergency extraordinary costs and expenditures.  All purchases related to the emergency and recovery will be reported to the director of contracting and procurement, Brian Blair, or the controller, John Smiell. 7. Arrange for immediate cash advances for response teams, with appropriate approval.  Team leader will provide information to the ERT on how to obtain cash advances and that information will then be communicated to the response teams in the field. 8. Direct Purchasing to facilitate the ordering of replacement supplies and equipment for immediate delivery.  Communicate with the director of contracting and procurement to arrange vendor contact and equipment delivery. 9. Arrange and authorize immediate payment for expenditures when required

to facilitate recovery effort.  Finance Response Team members have the authority to authorize payment for emergency expenditures amounting to more than established One Card individual limits. 10. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/record and meet with ERT to debrief.

Attachment L

Checklist ERT-5 Human Resources Response Team Leader

Name:

Date:

Primary Responsibilities:

   

Support Responsibilities:

  

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Team leader is notified of the scope of the emergency.

DATE/TIME/NOTES

2. Contact human resources team members using established procedures.  Use phone tree to contact members of the Human Resources Response Team after determining where they should be deployed.  Team leader receives status report of all on-site faculty and staff. 3. Team leader proceeds to the OCC and establishes HR representative coverage.  Establish method to receive updates from various team members regarding the situation.  Maintain a log/record of developments and communicate to the team.  Team leader will have access to a hard copy of an employee roster that contains contact information. 4. If injuries or fatalities have occurred, activate HR team trained to respond.  Contact the Director of the Faculty Staff Assistance Program and request appropriate employee services, and obtain the appropriate benefits information for the families of the victims.  Team leader will coordinate handling workers compensation-related injuries

Time:

Personnel status Hire temporary help Maintain records of hours worked Maintain records of mutual aid (personnelrelated) Food services and water Equipment and supplies Finance/budget

with Risk Management. 5. Provide resources for response teams by reassigning staff not involved in recovery effort or through temporary or contractor support.  Identify all AU employees who are on campus and working during the emergency.  Identify AU employees who wish to work on disaster response, those who do not want to work, or those who cannot work on the emergency response.  Coordinate assignment of staff to alternate locations, if necessary.  Direct activities associated with alternate pay arrangements (e.g., rate of pay, overtime, etc.) for employees.  HR response team members will contact outside employment contractors, if needed, to provide assistance during recovery.  Coordinate with Contracts and Procurement to identify all contracted services working for AU. 6. Ensure that records are maintained for the hours worked. 7. Plan for extended recovery operations and determine staffing needs. 8. Coordinate with response teams to assess the number of field personnel who will need food and water and work through OCC to obtain and distribute. 9. Respond to other Human Resource issues as they arise.  With particular attention to and assistance with family-related situations. 10. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/record and meet with ERT to debrief.

Attachment M

Checklist ERT 7 University Police Department Response Team Leader

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Team leader briefs ERT leader and/or AU president on the emergency.  Implement University Police Department’s emergency mobilization plan.  Establish Incident Command Center (ICC). 2. Proceed to the Operations Command Center (OCC).  Team leader assigns the senior ranking member of the University Police Department Response Team to oversee ICC operations.  Have an Activity Log maintained.  Provide status reports to the ERT leader every half hour or immediately, if warranted. 3. Coordinate with facilities management to secure and post non-entry signs around unsafe areas.  Ensure that field teams identify and report to the ICC any hazard and unsafe condition encountered while performing their duties. 4. Identify and provide alternative means

Date:

Time:

 Field Incident Command  Manage, coordinate, schedule, deploy outside agency personnel and equipment at the emergency site.  Campus patrol  Perimeter access control  Mutual aid and multi-agency response coordination  Emergency transportation  Facility inspections DATE/TIME/NOTES

for accomplishing critical communication tasks if normal equipment is not functioning. 5. During a declared emergency, University Police Department will manage all transit operations.  Determine the number and types of usable vehicles on campus and their capabilities. An inventory of vehicles is available in the OCC.  Check with local gas stations for fuel supply and availability.  Obtain emergency purchase orders or One Cards for fuel and parts purchases. 6. Instruct University Police Department personnel to monitor ongoing operations in the field for signs of stress and inappropriate behavior and, if observed, report it to the ICC. 7. Plan for extended emergency activation and determine staffing needs. 8. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/record and meet with ERT to debrief.

Attachment N

Checklist ERT 8 Student Life Response Team Leader

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Date:    

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Mobilize appropriate resources to the site of the emergency to assess the magnitude of problems, initiate actions to stabilize the situation and make preliminary report to the Operations Command Center (OCC). 2. Team leader notifies Student Life Response Team members and provides information on the emergency. In consultation with team members, determines what additional staff needs to be called in. 3. Proceed to the Operations Command Center (OCC).  Have an Activity Log maintained.  Establish method to receive updates from various team members regarding the situation. 4. Ensure that all residence hall staff are notified of the emergency declaration and coordinate schedule for periodic updates to staff.  Team leader and appropriate team members determine information to be released to residence hall staff and ensure that all information is accurately communicated. 5. Activate the Housing and Dining Programs Emergency Management and

  

Time:

Track status of all students Coordinate emergency student/family message center First aid and triage screening Coordinate medical transfer and transport of students Mental health and psychological services Care and shelter of students Personal support for on and off-campus students and their families

DATE/TIME/NOTES

Continuity of Operations Plan.  Ensure that appropriate staff has copies of the Housing and Dining checklists for Emergency Response and Recovery. 6. Coordinate activities with other offices, like the Registrar, to attempt to track the students. 7. Ensure all facilities are able to be used and determine alternate arrangements if necessary for both housing and dining.  Appropriate staff does thorough facilities analysis to determine which, if any, are unavailable for use. 8. Identify the status and availability of all on-campus resources including food, water, supplies, equipment, etc. Maintain an inventory of available resources and be prepared to procure supplies that may be needed.  Obtain an assessment of equipment and supply needs for medical personnel.  If needed, determine an appropriate site for first aid and triage screening.  Work with University Police Department to obtain hospital transport. 9. Plan for extended emergency activation and determine staffing needs. 10. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/record and meet with ERT to debrief.

Attachment O

Checklist ERT 9 Technology Response Team Leader

Name:

Date:

Primary Responsibilities:



Support Responsibilities:

 

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Mobilize appropriate resources to the site of the emergency to assess the magnitude of problems, initiate actions to stabilize the situation and make preliminary report to the Operations Command Center (OCC). 2. Team leader notifies Technology Response Team members and provides information on the emergency. In consultation with team members, determines what additional staff needs to be called in. 3. Proceed to the Operations Command Center (OCC).  Have an Activity Log maintained.  Establish method to receive updates from various team members regarding the situation. 4. Inventory the IT functions within the affected building(s).  Coordinate through OCC and, if conditions permit, work with appropriate OIT staff, IT service providers, vendors and contractors to examine the extent of the IT infrastructure damage. 5. Based on the scope of the problem, OIT Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Plan will be activated. 6. Establish baseline services on an interim basis in an alternate location for affected staff, if necessary. 7. Manage process required to restore

Time:

Determine status of IT functions within the affected area Implement contingency plan at off-site location Provide baseline functions at alternate location for affected staff

DATE/TIME/NOTES

normal operation.

Plan for and

tion and



response

Update long/record and

ER

Attachment P

Checklist ERT-10 Communications Response Team Leader

Name: Primary Responsibilities:

Support Responsibilities:

PROCEDURES 1. Receive communication on emergency situation.  Team Leader is notified of the scope of the emergency. Get clear understanding of what happened, where, when, and why. 2. Contact University Communications & Marketing’s Emergency Communication Response (UCM) Team.  Initiate phone tree notification of team members. Group email to team members can also be used to describe the situation.  If situation warrants, begin immediate communication to all audiences using most effective means of distribution (ie: RAVE Text Alerts, AU Homepage, mass e-mail). 3. Communications Team Leader proceeds to OCC.  Establish method to receive updates from UCM team members regarding the situation.  Maintain a log/record of developments and communicate to the ERT team 4. Receive updates from ERT members,

Date:

Time:

 Provide input or assist in the preparation, implementation, evaluation and revision of all university communication during a crisis.  Coordinate the communication efforts of the university’s operating status to students, faculty, staff (primary); media, alumni, and general public-at large (secondary).  Monitor university’s overall image  Provide archival records of communications for recovery and evaluation period. DATE/TIME/NOTES

determine if additional communications need to be distributed.  Solicit recommendations from each team member as to how they view their respective unit situations and what approaches/options could be adopted.  Discuss recommendations with OCC’s ERT to make decisions. Determine logistical issues of recommendations (e.g., doable, practical?). 5. Communicate new/additional communication needs to UCM Team.  Advise UCM Team members of the agreed upon approach and task them with implementation.  AU Homepage will be the location for most up-to-date information for all audiences.  Continue additional communications until crisis has concluded. 6. Respond to incoming media inquires and be prepared for media to arrive on campus en masse  Prepare to implement a Press Briefing Room on Main Campus, if necessary. 7. Plan for extended emergency activation.  Coordinate with UCM Continuity of Operations Contact to determine additional staffing needs.  Determine an alternate work location for UCM Emergency Response Team staff, if necessary. 8. Debrief and evaluate the response team procedures.  Update log/journal and continue contact with UCM team members.  Contact UCM Ex. Dir. for her perspective.  Meet with ERT for debriefing.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Active Shooter Response Protocol Nationally, active shooter situations do not occur often on college campuses, but we know all too well that the possibility exists and it is important to have protocols in place on how to respond. These kinds of situations are unpredictable and usually evolve rapidly and the response decisions are influenced by numerous variables. Members of the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) are trained and equipped to respond to an emergency incident of this nature. The police will evaluate the situation to determine the best course of action for the safety of the AU community. MPD will be responsible for all tactical operations and AU Police Department officers will provide assistance. The immediate response of the first officers on the scene is to take aggressive action to find and stop the shooter or shooters. As they move into the affected area, rescue efforts will be delayed until the shooter is located and stopped or no longer a threat to life safety. If you are wounded or with someone who is wounded, these officers will bypass you to search for the shooter. Rescue teams will follow shortly to aid you and others. The following protocol is sound and generally applicable but must be adapted to the specific situation. Bottom line, if you hear shots fired on campus, or if you see or know that an armed person is shooting people, protect yourself first – move to a safe location. IF THE SHOOTER IS OUTSIDE YOUR BUILDING:  If you can do so safely, inform building occupants.  Close and lock your door and all windows. If you cannot lock the door, try to block the door with furniture.  Turn off all lights.  Close the blinds and stay away from the windows and doors.  Seek protective cover.  Keep quiet and act as if no one is in the room.  Do not answer the door or respond to commands until you are certain they are issued by a police officer.  Silence cell phones.  Have ONE person call 911.  Wait for police to assist you in getting out of the building. IF THE SHOOTER IS INSIDE YOUR BUILDING:  If it is possible to escape the area safely and avoid danger, do so by the nearest exit or window.  Evacuate to a safe area away from the danger, and take protective cover. Stay there until emergency responders arrive. Leave books, backpacks, purses, etc. in the room.  Notify anyone you may encounter to exit the building immediately.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan  As you exit the building, keep your hands above your head and listen for instructions that may be given by police officers. If an officer points a firearm at you, make no movement that may cause the officer to mistake you actions for a threat. Try to stay calm.  If you get out of the building and do not see a police officer, call 911 and American University Police Department at 202-885-vvv3636, or use a Blue Light phone and provide the dispatcher with the following information: a. Your name b. Location of the incident c. Number of shooters, if known d. Identification or description of shooter(s) e. Number of persons who may be involved f. Your exact location g. Injuries to anyone, if known  If you are unable to escape the building, move out of the hallway and into an office or classroom and try to lock the door.  If the door will not lock, try barricading the door with desks and chairs. Lie on the floor and/or under a desk and remain silent.  Silence cell phones.  If possible, place signs in exterior windows to identify the location of injured persons.  Wait for the police to come and find you. IF THE SHOOTER ENTERS YOUR OFFICE OR CLASSROOM: There is no set procedure in this situation.  If possible call 911 or 202-885-3636 and talk with a police dispatcher.  If you cannot speak, leave the phone line open so the police can hear what is going on.  Use common sense. If you are hiding and flight is impossible, attempts to negotiate with the suspect may be successful.  Playing dead may also be a consideration.  Attempting to overcome the suspect with force is a last resort that should only be considered in the most extreme circumstances. Only you can decide if this is something you should do.  If the shooter exits your area and you are able to escape, leave the area immediately. Do not touch anything in the area and remember to be alert for responding police officers who may mistake you as the shooter.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Anthrax

Introduction

Anthrax is an acute infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium B.anthracis. It occurs most frequently as a disease of herbivores (e.g., cattle, goats and sheep) that acquire spores from direct contact with contaminated soil. Humans usually become infected through contact with, or ingestion of, B.anthracis spores from infected animals or their products. Human-to-human transmission has not been documented. The spore form of B.anthracis is durable and can be delivered as an aerosol, making it an effective biological warfare candidate. The incubation period of anthrax is 2 – 60 days. Inhalation causes the most serious form of human anthrax, and although contemporary experience in humans is limited, mortality may be high even with the appropriate therapy. In order to cause disease, at least 8,000 to 10,000 spores need to lodge deep in the lungs, in the tiniest air sacs known as alveoli. This warm environment stimulates the bacterium to emerge from its protective spore. As each bacterium reproduces it releases toxins, which eventually spread throughout the body and destroy tissue and organs. One of the toxins, called protective antigen, attaches to a receptor found on most cells. Once seven of these antigens find a cell, they latch together to form a ring with a hold in the middle. Then one of the other toxins produced by the bacterium—either a killing or swelling toxin—plugs the hole and puts the cell immune system into overdrive to the point where tissue destruction starts. The likelihood of developing cutaneous disease (i.e., being infected through the skin) is low, however, in situations where the threat for transmission of B.anthracis spores is deemed credible, decontamination of skin and potential contact points (i.e., clothes, disks, chairs, etc.) must be considered, to reduce the risk of cutaneous and gastrointestinal (ingested) forms of disease.

Symptoms and Effects of Anthrax

After an incubation period of 1-7 days, the onset of inhalation anthrax is gradual. Possible symptoms may include; fever, malaise/depression, fatigue, cough or mild chest discomfort followed by severe respiratory distress. This mild illness can progress rapidly to respiratory distress and shock in 2-4 days followed by a range of more severe symptoms, including breathing difficulty and exhaustion. Death usually occurs within 24 hours of respiratory distress.

Clinical Features of Anthrax

Anthrax is an acute bacterial infection of the skin, lungs or gastrointestinal tract. Infection occurs most commonly via the skin. The cutaneous or skin form of the infection occurs most frequently on the hands and forearms of persons working with infected livestock or contaminated animal products and represents 95% of cases of human anthrax. It is initially characterized by a small solid elevation of the skin, which progresses to a fluid-filled blister

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan with swelling at the site of infection. The scab that typically forms over the lesion can be black as coal, hence the name anthrax—Greek for coal. The inhaled form of anthrax is contracted by inhalation of the spores, occurs mainly among workers handling infected animal hides, wool and fur. Under natural conditions, inhaled anthrax is exceedingly rare, with only 18 cases reported in the United States in the 20th century. With treatment, the case fatality rate is less than 1% among people who get the skin form of the disease. The fatality rate for untreated inhaled or intestinal anthrax is over 90%.

Risks Associated with Anthrax

Anthrax is only deadly when you inhale a huge number of spores. Once the spores hit the ground, they stay there, so the risk from re-aerosolization is minuscule. In Sverdlovsk (now) Ekaterinburg) there was a large release of anthrax spores from a bio-weapons factory, due to a faulty or missing filter, in 1979. Only 66 people in the town of more than 1 million died from anthrax, although the citizens were not notified of the release, and therefore did not receive prompt antibiotics or optimal medical therapy. Anthrax does NOT spread from person to person. When it travels with the wind, it follows a narrow path, and does NOT spread out widely over long distances. That is why there were so few cases in Sverdlovsk. Workers in American factories who were grossly contaminated with anthrax spores, who inhaled hundreds of spores a day, almost never developed inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form of the disease. Therefore, if anthrax is used, it will affect only a limited area, and relatively small numbers of people.

Coordination of Response Teams

The public health response to bioterrorism requires effective communication and coordination with response teams and law enforcement. Senior management personnel should work with these groups to define the roles of each agency, including protection of first responders; and ensure that procedures are tested through simulation.

Terrorist Attacks – Chemical and Biological Agents

In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center and Pentagon tragedies, fears mounted that both chemical and biological agents could be used in terrorist actions against civilian targets. In fact, chemical agents identified as Anthrax have been sent through the mail in such a fashion, affecting the Washington, DC area and other communities throughout the United States.

Emergency Supplies

It is recommended that the university keep an ample supply of bathrobes, plastic trash bags, soap, and household bleach reserves onsite in a detached storage facility (i.e., external to central air-conditioning supply system that feeds main building/office areas). If practical, portable shower enclosure(s) should also be kept onsite. These resources will be used to effectively mitigate further spread of anthrax on clothing and skin beyond the primary infection area.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Information About Possible Exposure to Anthrax

What constitutes a “suspicious parcel?”

Some typical characteristics that Postal Inspectors have detected over the years, that ought to trigger suspicion, include parcels that;  are unexpected or from someone unfamiliar to you,  are addressed to someone no longer with your organization or are otherwise outdated,  have no return address, or have one that can’t be verified as legitimate,  are of unusual weight, given their size, or are lopsided or oddly shaped,  are marked with restrictive endorsements, such as “Personal” or “Confidential,”  have protruding wires, strange odors or stains,  show a city or state in the postmark that doesn’t match the return address.

What should a person do who has received a suspicious parcel in the mail?     

Do not try to open the parcel. Isolate the parcel. Evacuate the immediate area. Call the University Police Department (202-885-3636)

What should a person be advised to do if they receive an anthrax threat by mail?

The person should be advised not handle the mail piece or package suspected of contamination. Notify the University Police Department (202-885-3636. Make sure that damaged or suspicious packages are isolated and the immediate area cordoned off. All persons who have handled a suspicious package should wash their hands with soap and water. List all persons who have touched the letter and/or envelope. Place all items worn when in contact with the suspect mail in plastic bags and keep them available for law enforcement agents. Contact the University Police Department and the director of risk management and provide the above list of involved persons, informing them if clothing has been collected. the University Police Department will contact the police who will collect the mail, assess the threat situation, and coordinate with responding authorities. When practical, shower with soap and water.

Preserve the Immediate Area

Avoid moving items in the direct area of the perceived threat. If possible, cover the threat area with a cloth or piece of clothing to prevent additional aerosol contamination. . Leave the immediate area closing the door behind you. Evacuate the building, and immediately wash your hands with soap and water.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan

Evacuation – to “Staging Areas” only

The University Police Department (once notified) should evacuate personnel from the building, but ensure that they remain at the secure, localized staging area until emergency authorities arrive and conduct an initial assessment of the threat. Personnel should NOT be sent home or allowed to leave the collection area(s) until an initial assessment has been completed, and they have been properly debriefed by responding authorities.

HVAC shutdown

If time permits, Facilities Management should shut down all HVAC systems to prevent further spread of airborne contaminants. HVAC systems should NOT be restarted until an initial assessment has been completed, and only under the instruction of responding authorities.

Evidence Preservation

Local police and Scene of Crime officials will coordinate the collection of evidence (e.g., letters, packages, or air-handling supply system samples) and deliver materials to an authorized local laboratory for testing. The intent is to obtain either a false or positive indication of anthrax contamination with 24-48 hours following a reported incident. This timeline is mission critical in order to commence treatment within the first 48 hours; otherwise, incubation of the disease will transpire, and the effects may not be controlled even given the proper treatment. American University senior management personnel are NOT to engage in any anthrax investigation activities. This task is to be left to the properly tooled and trained emergency response authorities.

Signs and symptoms debriefing

Once the initial assessment is complete, local authorities should collect contact information for potentially exposed persons and all personnel should be debriefed and provided with information about the signs and symptoms of illness associated with the suspected biologic agent, and given details about who to contact if they develop a related illness. All staff is to be advised to also contact their supervisor if they become ill. Once debriefed, all personnel should be instructed to engage in precautionary decontamination activities at the designated on-site location (if practical), or sent home to carry out these initial prevention activities.

Decontamination – personal

All staff should remove their clothing and personal effects, place clothing items in a sealed plastic bag, and shower using copious quantities of soap and water. All personal effects (i.e., watches, bracelets, etc.) should be decontaminated with a 0.5% hypochlorite solution (i.e., one part household bleach to 10 parts water). Clothing and personal items not decontaminated using hypochlorite solution must be kept in labeled plastic bags as potential evidence. These items will be quarantined by responding

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan authorities and returned to the owner once the threat has been analyzed and a false-positive, or retained indefinitely as evidence if the threat is real.

Decontamination – Affected Environment

For incidents involving possibly contaminated letters, the environment in direct contact with the letter and its contents should be decontaminated with a 0.5% hypochlorite solution (i.e., one part household bleach to 10 parts water) following a crime scene investigation. American University senior management personnel are NOT to engage in any anthrax abatement activities. This task is to be left to the properly tooled and trained emergency response authorities.

What is the treatment for anthrax?

Treatment with antibiotics beginning one day after exposure has been shown to provide significant protection against death in tests with monkeys, especially when combined with active immunization. Penicillin, doxycycline, ciproflaxin, are all effective drugs against most strains of the disease. Penicillin is the drug of choice for naturally occurring anthrax. If untreated, inhaled anthrax is fatal. A Cipro vaccine is available and consists of a series of six doses over 18 months with yearly boosters. This vaccine, while known to protect against anthrax acquired through the skin, is also believed to be effective against anthrax inhaled spores. Does the government have a plan in place to make Cipro available if there were mass exposure to anthrax? Yes. Under emergency plans, the Federal government in the USA would ship appropriate antibiotics from its stockpile to wherever they are needed. Effective decontamination can be accomplished by boiling contaminated articles in water for 30 minutes or longer and using common disinfectants. Chlorine is effective in destroying spores and vegetative cells. Remember, anthrax spores are stable, able to resist sunlight for several hours and able to remain alive in soil and water for years.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Bomb Threat Call Checklist Use the bomb threat call checklist below to record details of the threat. Call the University Police Department at 202-885-3636. The University Police Department will respond and evaluate the threat. In the event an evacuation is necessary, the Metropolitan Police Bomb Squad and the University Police Department will coordinate an orderly and safe evacuation. Questions to Ask: 1. When will it go off? 2. Where is it located? 3. What type of bomb is it? 4. What type of explosive is it? 5. Why are you doing this? 6. Who are you? Exact wording of the threat:

Date

Time of call

Voice on the phone (circle as applicable): Male Female Adult Child Estimated age

Race

Speech (circle as applicable): Slow Foul Rapid Broken Normal Sincere Excited Accented Loud Intoxicated

Impeded Soft/high pitched Deep Calm Angry

Background Noises (circle as applicable): Music Typing Talking Machines Laughing Traffic

Factory Trains Quiet

Additional Observations:

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Bomb Threat Procedures

Overview In 2005, the University Police Department received a bomb threat saying that “There is a bomb in the sports Arena, where the graduations are being held.” In most cases, bomb threats of this type are designed to disrupt the normal business operations of the institution. Additionally, true terrorists are interested in killing or maiming as many people as possible and therefore will not typically make phone calls prior to the bomb going off. For these reasons and others, the recommended course of actions is to: 1. Notify selected staff that we have received a bomb threat. 2. Have selected staff inconspicuously conduct a visual search for suspicious packages or devices. 3. Notify the University Police Department if a suspicious device or package is located. 4. If package is confirmed as suspicious, conduct a safe and orderly evacuation of the building. 5. Notify MPD that a suspicious device or package has been located in the building after receiving a bomb threat. It must be emphasized that the University Police Department has no credible information that American University is the proposed target of any attack. This plan is being devised simply as a precautionary measure and predefined plan to deal with bomb threats and suspect devices or packages. This plan is designed to have select staff members and the University Police Department work as a team to ensure a safe environment.

Notification It is extremely important that staff members avoid using terms like “we have a bomb threat” or providing members of the audiences with details about what is going on. Any inquiries, especially from members of the press, should be directed to the Media Relations spokesperson. Except for making visual searches for suspect devices, staff members should look and act like nothing is wrong.

Searches

1. Staff members should simply visually look in their immediate surroundings for packages or items that look out of place or unusual. 2. DO NOT TOUCH ANY SUSPECT DEVICE. 3. If you see something that truly looks suspicious, then notify the nearest university police officer that you believe you have a “code 10” in your area. 4. Try to be as accurate as possible about the device and why you deem it to be suspicious.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan 5. Avoid using radios or walkie-talkie devices as radio signals can detonate explosive devices. 6. Do not start any evacuation procedures without authority from the University Police Department or the incident commander. 7. University Police Department officers will conduct visual searches of primary areas and report back to the incident commander on status.

Evacuation

If a suspect device is located and verified then the building will need to be evacuated. The decision to evacuate will only be made by the President after consultation with the incident commander. If evacuation is decided, the President and others should use soft works like “We have a possible problem in the building and would like to ask you to leave the building in an orderly fashion while the situation is further evaluated.” American University Police Department officers will assist staff in evacuation of building. All evacuation efforts should be directed away from the area where the suspect device is located. The recommended safe distance from an explosive device is 300 feet. Staff members and the University Police Department should evacuate patrons so that all are outside the 300 foot radius. MPD and DC Fire EMS will be notified to respond to check out the suspicious device. No one will be allowed back in the building unless MPD or DC Fire EMS provides the ALL CLEAR.

All Clear

If no suspicious device is located, then the incident commander will issue a Code 12 and all staff members can resume normal operations. Examples of packages or devices that can be suspicious: 1. Unattended book bags, brief cases, knapsacks, etc. 2. Boxes with strange markings on them and look out of place. 3. Packages or boxes with unexplained “ticking or humming.” 4. Items or boxes with wires protruding from it in an unexplained manner. Remember, bombs can be concealed in just about anything these days. When looking for these items, also look for anything that looks out of the ordinary. Do not touch the item. Contact the University Police Department immediately (202-885-3636). It must be emphasized that most of the time, no evacuation will be necessary. This plan is a simple precautionary measure to ensure that we are ready to handle a bomb threat situation in an organized and professional manner with minimum disruption to university activities and no loss of life or property. Monitoring Suspicious Activities & Items Maintain a high level of awareness at all times. Monitor and observe people, events, activities, and items around you and note irregular or suspicious behavior or happenings. Look for people who:

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan  Are not where they are supposed to be (restricted area, etc.);  Look lost and/or wandering around;  Appear to be conducting unusual surveillance;  Cause disruptions or intentionally distracting behavior;  Show an unusual interest in employees;  Abandon an item and leave the area quickly;  Openly possess a dangerous item; and/or  Use a vehicle in a suspicious way (parking, erratic driving, following, etc.). *Monitoring a suspect should not be based on national origin, ethnicity, color, race, gender or age. Look for items or devices that:  Were abandoned and left in the open;  Were abandoned and hidden;  Appear to be suspicious or dangerous, such as a canister, tank, metal box, bottle, etc.;  Have an attached message;  Appear to be emitting a mist, gas, vapor, or order;  Seem to have seepage or leakage of a suspicious substance;  Are connected to wires, timers, tanks or bottles; and/or  Appear to be the source of a foreign substance that is causing people to cough, have trouble breathing, feel nauseated, lose consciousness, or have any other medical reaction.

Identifying and Responding to Suspicious People

ONLY approach or question a suspicious person if you feel comfortable. If you feel uncomfortable or threatened, seek assistance from a safety university police officer. Avoid using a “rough” approach – being aggressive, confrontational, abusive or offensive. Avoid detaining or getting physical with the suspect. Make sure to note individual’s original location. Focus on his/her behavior and physical characteristics and keep him/her in your sight, if possible. If suspicious person is no longer visible, note the last known direction headed. If he/she is seen in a vehicle, be ready to give description of vehicle, license plates, any stickers or logos. When reporting on individual(s), note the following characteristics:  Head – eyes, ears, hair, mouth, nose, forehead, cheeks, chin, complexion, and if wearing any jewelry, clothing, hats.  Body – neck, arms, chest, stomach, shirt/blouse/dress, coat, accessories, tattoos, scars, and/or birthmarks.  Legs – pants, skirt, belt, feet, socks, shoes.  Overall appearance – height, weight, gender, age.

Mail Bombs Public awareness of mail bombs has increased at all levels, including university mailrooms and offices. To apply proper safety procedures, it is important to know the type of mail normally received and be aware of the following:

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan            

Mail bombs come in letters, books, and packages of various sizes, shapes, and colors. Letter texture may feel ridged, look uneven or lopsided, or feel bulkier than normal. Excessive amounts of postage may be present—often far more than needed. Sender is unknown or there is no return address. Handwritten notes appear such as “rush” “personal” or “private.” Addressee normally does not receive mail at the office. Cut or pasted homemade labels are used for lettering. The letter or package may emit an odor or appear to have been disassembled and reglued. Distorted or foreign writing is present. Resistance or even pressure is felt when trying to remove contents from package. Several combinations or tape are used to secure the package. Contents of the parcel may slosh or sound like liquid; some packages may emit noises.

If suspicious piece of mail is received and its contents cannot be verified, the following protocol applies:  Stop. Do not open the item. Do not panic.  Isolate the letter, parcel, or package. Note: All people should be asked to leave the area quickly. The package should be observed from a safe distance until the bomb squad arrives.  Call the University Police Department (202-885-3636).  Never move or place the item in water, a drawer, or a cabinet.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Civil Disorder and Demonstrations Most campus demonstrations such as marches, meetings, picketing and rallies are peaceful and non-obstructive. However, the Executive Director of director of University Police and Emergency Management reserves the right to call for police assistance without counsel from others if it is deemed to be of paramount importance to the safety of persons involved. A student demonstration should not be disrupted unless one or more of the following conditions exists as a result of the demonstrations:  Interference with the normal operations of the university.  Prevention of access to office buildings or other facilities.  Threat of physical harm to persons or damage to university property. If any of these conditions exists, the University Police Department should be notified at 202885-3636 and will be responsible for contacting and informing the president and appropriate university members. Depending on the nature of the demonstration, the appropriate procedures listed below should be followed. The president, director of the University Police Department and the dean of students will consult and determine the need for an injunction and intervention by civil authorities and/or the University Police Department. If civil authorities are asked to intervene, the dean of students will inform the demonstrators, if possible. If demonstrators are still remaining when civil authorities arrive, they will be warned of the intent to arrest and, if necessary, demonstrators may be arrested for violations of law.

A. Peaceful, Non-Obstructive Demonstration

Peaceful, non-obstructive demonstrations should not be interrupted, blocked or provoked, and efforts should be made to conduct business as usual. If demonstrators are asked to leave, but refuse to do so by regular facility closing time, the director of the University Police Department will make arrangements to monitor the situation during non-business hours or decide to treat the violation of regular closing hours as a disruptive demonstration. If the demonstrators persist in the disruptive activity, the dean of students will inform them that failure to discontinue the activity within a specified period of time may result in disciplinary action including, but not limited to, suspension, expulsion or possible intervention by civil authorities. Efforts should be made to secure positive identification of demonstrators, including photographs or videotaping, to facilitate later testimony, if necessary.

B. Nonviolent, Disruptive Demonstrations

Demonstrations that block access to facilities or interfere with the operation of the university are considered disruptive and will be responded to by:

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan  Dean of students, assistant vice president of campus life, vice president of campus life or alternate designee asking demonstrators to terminate the disruptive activity.  Dean of students or appropriate designee asking key university personnel and student leaders to go to the area and request that the demonstrators desist.

C. Violent, Disruptive Demonstrations

During Business Hours  The University Police Department should be immediately notified of the disturbance (202-885-3636).  If injury to persons or property appears to be imminent in a violent demonstration, the president, vice president of campus life and dean of students will be notified.  The president, appropriate vice president or alternative designee will assemble a crisis management team and will respond accordingly.  If physically possible, photographing and videotaping the incident should be considered.  The president, in consultation with campus life, the University Police Department and appropriate university officials, will determine the possible need for an injunction. After Business Hours  The University Police Department should be immediately notified of the disturbance (202-885-3636).  The University Police Department will investigate the disruption immediately and report and notify the director of The University Police Department, dean of students and other key university officials.  Campus life will report the circumstances to the president, notify key administrators, the chief-of-staff or media relations.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Death in the Campus Community One of the important touchstones for creating community involves establishing guidelines for use on the occasion of the death of a student or a member of the faculty or staff. The university needs to provide caring leadership when a member of the community dies. When the office of campus life learns of the death of a member of the AU community, the dean of students or vice president of campus life will immediately notify the university chaplain. The university chaplain will initiate steps to assist the larger community in coping with the loss. Community Notification Student Death In the event of a student death, the dean of students will notify the student’s family and will inform the university chaplain. Faculty/Staff Death The university chaplain will convey news of faculty and staff deaths to the dean of academic affairs and the executive director of human resources, respectively. The chaplain’s staff will then inform the campus community of the death through the following contacts:  Media relations (202-885-5950), in case there is media interest in the death.  All contributing faith chaplains.  Marquee at the entrance to Kay Spiritual Center to notify the campus of the death.  If the deceased is an international student, the international student services office (202885-3350) will be consulted about providing assistance to the deceased student’s family and the international student campus community.  Provide AU Publications department (202-885-5970) and The Eagle (202-885-1400) with an advance copy of the printed announcement to the community.  The development office (202-885-5900) and a staff contact designated in the event that family and friends of the deceased wish to make gifts to the university in the person’s memory. The University Police Department will be asked to adjust the AU flag to half-mast for 48 hours following notification of a death. Memorial Service The university chaplain or an appropriate contributing faith chaplain will consult with the family of the deceased to ascertain whether it is all right to proceed with a campus memorial service, and if so, what role the family may wish to have in planning and participating in the service. If the family has no objection to the campus service, but chooses not to participate or attend, the chaplain will organize a memorial service consistent with the needs of individuals and campus groups affected by the loss. Student/Staff Death As soon as information has been gathered on a deceased student or staff member and plans for a memorial service are firm, the chaplain will draft a formal announcement to the university community to be signed by the president (or other appropriate university official). The president’s staff will fax advanced copies of the announcement to the telecommunications billboard (FAX 202-885-2016), University Publications (FAX 202-885-5949) and The Eagle (FAX 202-885-1428).

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Counseling Service Psychological Support The chaplain will work with the counseling center to insure that all affected parties and groups know about the availability of counseling services provided by the university. Counseling may be provided to individuals or groups. The counseling staff suggests placing the following notice in Kay memorial service programs, in the Kay newsletter and other descriptive material, in the Student Handbook, and in policy manuals or other guides on AU’s response to the deaths of community members: American University offers counseling and support to members of the community experiencing bereavement and grief. If you wish to talk to a counselor, please call 202-885-3500 to arrange for an appointment. A support group, “Living with Death,” is also offered each semester. Please contact the counseling center, Mary Graydon Center 214. Spiritual Counseling The chaplain’s staff will use internal communication means to remind the campus community that contributing faith community chaplains are available for spiritual counseling. Death of an AU Executive In the event of the death of an AU executive, the university will need to inform internal and external audiences of this matter ensuring them that other executives and capable, experienced staff will provide stable interim management. This will be accomplished in the following manner:  As soon as possible, informing AU staff/students about the death and circumstances.  Presenting information to staff/students about who will assume duties on an interim basis.  Informing AU staff/students about funeral/memorial services.  Informing the media about the death and AU plans to move forward.  Providing opportunities for AU staff and students to grieve and share. Communication Steps The president, appropriate vice president or provost will notify the immediate family of the death and circumstances, and will provide appropriate assistance. He or she will then notify the campus community of the death as quickly as possible through voice mail, memo, e-mail and the AU website providing as much information as possible. The chief-of-staff and the media relations office will work together to notify The Eagle, University Publications, local, national and international media. The president, appropriate vice president of provost will ask the University Police Department to adjust the flags to half- mast for 48 hours following notification of the death. The chief-of-staff will notify the development office and a staff contact will be designated in the event that family and friends wish to make gifts to the university in memory of the deceased.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Earthquake Preparedness

Preparation

Know the safest places in your office, work area or living unit. These areas should be away from heavy furniture, appliances, fireplaces, and large panes of glass (windows, mirrors, etc.).

During an Earthquake

 If you are indoors, drop to the floor. Take cover under a sturdy desk, table or other furniture. Hold on to it and be prepared to move with it. Hold the position until the ground stops shaking and it is safe to move. Stay clear of windows, fireplaces, wood stoves, and heavy furniture or appliances. Stay inside. If you are in a crowded area, take cover and stay where you are; encourage others to do likewise.  If you are outside, get into the open, away from buildings and power lines. Be watchful for falling glass and building debris.  If you are driving, stop if it is safe, but stay inside your car. Stay away from bridges, overpasses and tunnels. Move your car as far out of the normal traffic pattern as possible. If possible, avoid stopping under trees, light posts, power lines or signs.

After an Earthquake

 Check for injuries. Do not move a seriously injured person unless he or she is in immediate danger of further injuries. If you need emergency assistance, call the University Police Department at 202-885-3636.  Be aware of any structural damage around you. If necessary and safe to do so, carefully leave the building per the “General Emergency Evacuation Procedures.”  Always check for hazards: o Fire and fire hazards. o Damaged electrical wiring. o Downed or damaged utility lines. Stay away from downed lines, even if power appears to be off. o Fallen objects in closets and cabinets. Displaced objects may fall when you open the door. o Telephones. Make sure each phone is on its receiver. Telephones off the hook can tie up the telephone network. o Potentially harmful materials and/or medicines that may have spilled.  Expect aftershocks. Most of these are smaller than the main earthquake, but some may be large enough to do additional damage to weakened structures.  If you are instructed to go to a shelter, take blankets, a flashlight, clothing, prescription medications, and snack items, etc.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan               

Evacuation Procedures All occupants are required to evacuate the building immediately when a fire alarm sounds or some other evacuation signal is given. Individual office personnel will turn of personal computers to protect University data from possible damage. The last person to leave an office, classroom, or lab will close and lock the door behind them. Keep calm. Use the nearest exit to leave the building. Use the stairwell only (hold on to hand rails). Do not use elevators. Person(s) with disabilities should be assisted to the stairwell landing. Request assistance from DC Fire Department personnel and direct them to the area where the disabled person(s) is waiting. In a medical emergency, seriously injured persons should not be moved unless they are in an immediately life-threatening situation. If medical assistance is needed, contact the University Police Department (202-885-3636). Do not smoke. Do not panic – walk slowly. Never attempt to travel through smoke-filled or other imminently hazardous areas. If you encounter smoke in the stairwells, close the door and use a different exit. Never assemble near exits or fire lanes. A perimeter will be established by the University Police Department and/or DC Fire Department. Do not return to the evacuated building unless you are told to do so by the University Police Department or DC Fire Department. A. General: All University employees and students should be aware of the emergency evacuation procedures. Each department should develop department – specific evacuation procedures. These procedures should be posted in every department and distributed to the building marshal and all members of the department. B. Process: Each department is responsible for ensuring that its employees and students are aware of the proper emergency evacuation procedures. Each department should also consider the particular activities being conducted in the department, as well as a means to account for all individuals after an evacuation. C. Evacuation Plans: Each department administrator is required to establish and maintain an evacuation plan for the department. Evacuation plans should consist of

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan written statements describing exit routes and the expected response of personnel to an alarm or other call for evacuation. The evacuation plan should address, as appropriate, the following:  The needs of persons with disabilities, e.g., mobility, visual or hearing impairments.  Scientific experiments or demonstrations in progress.  Hazardous or volatile substances in use or processes in progress.  Classes in progress.  Sensitive or valuable items to be secured.  Assembly areas after evacuation and accounting for personnel.  All building occupants should be familiar with evacuation plans through training sessions provided or arranged by the building marshal.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Evacuation Sites The default evacuation sites for campus-wide evacuations are: Metropolitan Memorial Methodist Church at Nebraska and New Mexico Avenue, National Presbyterian Church at 4101 Nebraska Avenue, St. Anne Church at 4001 Yuma Street AU Building 3201 New Mexico Ave. 4200 Wisconsin Ave. Anderson Hall Asbury Battelle-Tompkins Beeghly Bender Library Butler Pavilion Centennial Hall East Campus Congressional East Campus Constitution East Campus Federal East Campus - DMTIB Financial Aid Gray Hamilton Hughes Hall Hurst Katzen Kay Spiritual Life Center Kogod Leonard Hall Letts Hall Mary Graydon Center McCabe McDowell Hall McKinley Media Production Center Nebraska Hall Osborn President’s Office Building Public Safety Building Rockwood Roper School of International Service Sports Center Sports Center Annex

Evacuation Site Bender Library WCL Warren Building Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Bender Library Bender Library Bender Library Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Ward Circle Building Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Sports Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Katzen Art Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center 3201 New Mexico Mary Graydon Center Bender Library Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan AU Building Spring Valley Building Tenley Campus – Dunblaine Ward Circle Building Watkins WCL – Capital Hall WCL – Warren Building WCL - Yuma Building

Evacuation Site Mary Graydon Center WCL – Warren Building Building Mary Graydon Center Mary Graydon Center Spring Valley Building Spring Valley Building Spring Valley Building

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Hazardous Material Accident Spills of a hazardous chemical or radioactive material need to be reported immediately to the University Police Department at 202-885-3636. When reporting, be specific about the kind of material involved and exact location of the spill. The University Police Department will contact the necessary specialized authorities and medical personnel. Anyone who may have been contaminated by a spill should avoid contact with others as much as possible, and remain in the vicinity. Specialized personnel will provide required first aid and clean up such as removing contaminated clothing, and flushing with water. Small spills are best handled by the person(s) using the material because he/she is probably familiar with the hazardous material. The key person on site should vacate the affected area at once, if necessary, and seal it off to prevent further contamination of other areas until the arrival of University Police Department personnel. If an emergency exists:  Do not attempt to clean up a spill yourself.  Alert others and quickly exit the building, if appropriate.  The nearest exit may be blocked in the event of a hazardous material accident. The building marshal will assist with evacuation; however, building occupants should try to familiarize themselves with all building exits.  Assist persons with disabilities in exiting the building. Do not use elevators and do not panic.  Once outside, move to a clear area away from the affected building(s).  Keep streets, fire lanes, hydrants and walkways clear for emergency vehicles and crews. An Incident Command Center may be set up near the emergency site. Do not return to an evacuated building unless you have permission to do so by the University Police Department.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Hurricane Preparedness

Preparation     

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Move all furniture, including beds, away from windows. Electrical appliances should be off the floor, preferably in a closet. Objects should be cleared from the floor and from the tops of desks and dressers. The university will follow the Weather Emergency Operating Policy. Residents should place all valuables in a lockable closet or drawer, which should remain locked when the residents are not in the room. Those students who reside in facilities that have bathtubs are asked to clean the tub and fill it half full with water. In a hurricane there is the risk of loss of water supply. If this should happen, the water in the tubs will be needed for washing and flushing toilets. Fill smaller containers with water for drinking purposes. If additional drinking water is needed, it will be made available as soon as possible. Close all windows tightly. Venetian blinds should be raised all the way to the top. Curtains or drapes should be closed. Each student should provide his/her own flashlight in case of power failure. Do not use candles or other flame-type lighting under any circumstances. Use battery powered light only. If you are instructed to go to a shelter, take blankets, a flashlight, clothing, prescription medications, and snack items, etc.

During a Hurricane 

    

It is essential that everyone stay indoors throughout the entire hurricane. Do not leave your area until directed to do so by the University Police Department or housing and dining personnel. During the peak of the storm, for maximum protection, you should close all doors and remain in interior hallways. Stay away from dangers such as glass windows and unsecured furniture or objects. Power failure is likely to occur during a hurricane; therefore, do not use elevators. Do not attempt to travel between floors, but if you must, use the stairs. Do not attempt to open windows or doors to see what is happening outside. Telephone calls should be made only in case of emergency so that telephone lines will be clear when needed.

After a Hurricane   

Check for injuries. Do not move a seriously injured person unless he or she is in immediate danger of further injuries. If you need emergency assistance, call the University Police Department at 202-885-3636. Be aware of any structural damage around you. If necessary and safe to do so, carefully leave the building per the “General Emergency Evacuation Procedures.” Always check for hazards such as: o Fire or fire hazards. o Damaged electrical wiring. o Downed or damaged utility lines. Stay away from downed lines, even if power appears to be off. o Fallen objects in closets and cabinets. Displaced objects may fall when you open the door. o Telephones. Make sure each phone is on its receiver. Telephones off the hook can tie up the telephone network. o Potentially harmful materials and/or medicines that may have spilled.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Mass Care Procedures Mass care services include, but are not limited to, providing shelter, food, and emergency first aid assistance to members of the AU community—and possibly some of our neighbors—following a disaster severe enough that temporary shelter is necessary. This assumes that the disaster would be of such magnitude that roads may be impassable, communications systems limited or unavailable and emergency assistance delayed, fording the University community to implement and manage mass care procedures independently for a short period of time, not exceeding 72 hours. Implementation The President will implement mass care procedures when shelter is necessary for longer than 12 hours. Emergency Response Team (ERT) members will help open and operate the shelter. Other emergency response operations will be taking place simultaneously, requiring close coordination and communication between the ERT and other who may be assisting with this type of disaster. The ERT will be responsible for establishing contact with local emergency responders, American Red Cross, Sibley Hospital and any other necessary agencies to alert them of the situation and request assistance as soon as possible. The assigned ERT leader will be responsible for communicating to the President and his Cabinet on the status of the crisis. Shelter Location and Operation The nature of the disaster and number of people needing shelter will dictate where shelter facilities will be set up and how much outside support the University will have available from agencies such as the American Red Cross. If the disaster affects more than just American University, there will be fewer resources available from outside sources. Faculty and staff may choose to stay in their offices; however, everyone will be required to check in at a central location, to be designated at the time of the emergency. If necessary, alternate campus locations, other than residence halls, will be prepared as shelter facilities. The shelter will operate on a 24-hour basis, with three eight hour shifts to be covered by shift supervisors. Shift supervisors will assist the shelter manager with shelter operations. Initial assessment by members of the ERT will include an estimate of the number of people requiring services, and staffing and support requirements for the next 48 hours. Shelter Set-Up Immediately upon notification that the shelter needs to be set up, the executive director of housing and dining will coordinate and supervise lay out of the shelter space. He will also brief other shelter staff on responsibilities outlined below.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Responsibilities

Housing Services: The AVP Housing Dining Programs will be responsible for shelter and residence hall management, including:  ensuring that student, faculty and staff rosters are brought to the shelter site;  bringing American Red Cross “Disaster Shelter Registration” forms, index cards or paper to the shelter facility to record information about residents;  making sure that the reception desk and waiting area are set up near the entrance of the shelter facility;  setting up an efficient process to register residents as quickly as possible;  posting signs clearly marking the registration area;  answering questions, welcoming, and directing residents;  providing residents with shelter regulations;  referring persons with special needs (medical, diet) or special skills (medical) to appropriate areas in the shelter;  referring persons with missing or deceased persons to the counseling services area;  signing out residents when the shelter closes.

Dining Services: The AVP Housing Dining Programs will:

 organize and supervise on-site food preparation, including quantity and timing of meals;  inventory food and food supplies on hand and determine the best method of feeding (i.e., Bon Appetit, McDonald’s or other fast food options);  as soon as possible, set up snack and beverage service;  determine the number of staff available and recruit volunteers to assist if necessary;  set up for cafeteria style food service;  set up food disposal area;  keep accurate records of food and supplies received and expended;  prepare and monitor food service staff schedules;  determine a meal plan for the estimated duration of shelter operation and review it with the shelter manager;  determine whether there are any special dietary needs (babies, cultural, medical, etc.);  ensure that the food areas are kept clean and sanitary.

Health Services: The Director of the Student Health Center will work with medical staff

from the Student Health Center and health services volunteers to make injured persons comfortable until they can be transported to, or treated by, emergency medical personnel from Sibley Hospital. They will also:  arrange health care for any special populations such as the elderly, infants, or persons with disabilities;  assess the number and type of injuries, if necessary;  establish contact with Sibley and with the Department of Health;

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan  refer residents to counseling services and collaborate with counseling services on care, as necessary;  follow-up on care that has been provided and referrals made to ensure that needs have been met.

Disability Support Services: The Director of Disability Support Services will account for any disabled students who may be on campus. Working with other shelter staff, she will ensure that proper services and arrangements are made for any persons with disabilities who may be residents of the shelter.

Counseling Services: The Director of the Counselling Center and designated members of their staff will provide counseling services at the shelter. Counseling services staff also:  notify the executive director of housing and dining services when a resident may be incapable of living in a mass care environment due to a mental health condition, or exhibits problematic, potentially dangerous, or dangerous behaviors;  coordinate with other shelter support staff to provide stress-reducing activities for residents;  develop and maintain a log for counseling services;  identify residents who may need more extensive mental health treatment than treatment from an appropriate facility or provider;  work collaboratively with other health care workers at the shelter who may arrive to assist;  communicate with the executive director of housing and dining services throughout the duration of the crisis.

University Police Department: The Executive Director of University Police Department and designated staff will:  provide security inside and outside the shelter;  ensure safety of shelter residents at all times;  intervene if any disputes arise among residents;  direct vehicle and pedestrian traffic, if necessary;  notify residents of other available community support and assist in providing access to that support.

Facilities Management: The Director of Facilities Management and designated staff will manage logistics, including:  coordinating with the executive director of housing and dining services and the appropriate staff of designated facility (e.g., Bender Arena, Mary Graydon Center, the University Library, etc.);  preparing the facility for shelter;  posting shelter directional signs on campus and outside the designated shelter facility;  posting signs inside the facility denoting different areas of the shelter (dining services, counseling services, registration, etc.);  organizing transportation and other support services;  distributing supplies and equipment (e.g., bedding, etc.);

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan  overseeing sanitation of the shelter facility, including the kitchen, sleeping area(s), bathrooms, exterior and registration area;  returning the facility used as the shelter to order after the shelter closes.

University Communications: The AVP of University Communications and designated staff will:  set up a separate location, to be designated, to handle media inquiries, if necessary;  be responsible for communicating and coordinating with the media;  be responsible for controlling media access to the shelter site.  Establish a central location where messages and shelter rules can be posted;  updating residents and dispelling any rumors that may arise.

Telephone and Networking Services: The CIO and designated staff will:

 be responsible for providing alternate means of communication if regular phone lines are down;  set up internet access in shelter location, if possible.

Child Care: The CDC Administrator and designated staff will:

 be in charge of communicating with parents of the children enrolled in the Child Development Center (CDC);  be responsible for care of any CDC children in the shelter;  assist with care of any other children who may require shelter;  provide activities for the children.

Volunteers: will be recruited as necessary from residents of the shelter. Closing Operations All shelter staff will assist in returning the shelter facility to pre-shelter conditions. All staff will meet with the ERT or representative members to debrief after the crisis.

Medical Emergencies The director of the student health center will supervise medical disaster emergencies occurring on campus. Relief measures are principally the responsibility of the student health center, even if the emergency reaches the point where it threatens to disrupt the operations of the university or cause temporary closure. This could include a wide range of situations, such as mass food poisoning or viral epidemics. The nature and timing of any given medical emergency may require coordination by the University Police Department with Sibley Hospital or other regional hospital as necessary. Actions:  The director of the student health center will coordinate with the vice president of campus life in recommending to the president a declaration of disaster and implementation of this procedure.  The president or his designee will notify media relations and the University Police Department of the declaration of emergency.  Media relations will coordinate with the president and the executive director of university communications and marketing to establish a media staging area and they will select a single spokesperson and prepare a statement.  During an emergency, media relations will provide timely updates to the campus and the media.  In accordance with directives received, the director of the student health center will obtain required assistance for lodging, feeding, transporting or protecting patients, their property and AU’s property.  All previous student health center appointments will be rescheduled; walk-in services will be suspended until the emergency is resolved.  In preparing for mass casualties, additional supplies will be obtained by purchasing. Medical supplies normally on hand should be adequate for minor injuries to a limited number of victims.  In the event of an unplanned disaster, the staff will assist with triage and first aid to the extent possible while relying on community agencies and providers for primary care and transportation of victims. The Counseling Center and student health center staff will assist with crisis intervention counseling.  In the event of a communicable disease outbreak/epidemic, the District of Columbia Health Department serves as the local authority. This entity would direct the student health center staff on matters of control and containment. Student health center staff will assist with reporting, identifying and notifying contacts, isolation practices, mass immunizations and updated advisories.  Where mass immunizations are indicated, the United States Public Health Service frequently absorbs the vaccine costs associated with mass immunizing at-risk individuals. Administrative costs, financial and otherwise, associated with mass vaccination, quarantine, hospitalizations and disruption of the academic and business functions of the university are impossible to predict and plan for as each possible scenario would require individual consideration.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Psychological Crisis A psychological crisis exists when an individual is threatening harm to himself/ herself, to others, or is out of touch with reality because of a drug reaction or psychosis. A major psychological crisis always requires the intervention of trained personnel. University Police Department personnel should immediately be contacted in situations requiring medical or peace- keeping intervention. Counseling Center personnel can be contacted for consultation or assistance in resolving the situation. Less severe psychological crises may involve uncontrolled crying, feelings of panic, or anger/yelling (without indications/threats of physical harm). If the psychological crisis resolves quickly in response to attention and kindness, no intervention of professional counselors or officers may be necessary. Plans for follow-up support should be put in place (i.e., a follow-up conversation, a referral to counseling, an action-plan should the situation become acute again, etc.). If the crisis does not resolve, or escalates, follow the guidelines above for a major psychological crisis. If a psychological crisis occurs:  Never try to handle a situation on your own that you feel is dangerous.  Notify the University Police Department at 202-885-3636. Clearly state that you need immediate assistance, give your name, your location and the area involved.  The counseling center will provide post-trauma counseling and referrals.  In extreme situations, call 911.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Shelter-In-Place Procedures In certain emergency situations, the campus community may be advised to shelter-in-place to avoid or minimize exposure to outside risks. Risks could include chemical or radioactive releases and some weather-related emergencies. Once shelter-in-place instructions have been communicated, students, faculty and staff should either stay in the building they are in when they get the message or if outside, go to the nearest building and await further instructions. While it may be advisable to shelter-in-place in certain situations, no one can be forced to do so. Campus community members who choose not to shelter-in-place should vacate the premises immediately so the building can be secured as soon as possible. The Emergency Response Team (ERT) will be responsible for keeping building marshals informed of the situation as it unfolds. Building marshals should put on the appropriate items from their orange backpacks (hats, armbands, ID display) so that they will be readily identifiable. In addition, building marshals will:  communicate information to occupants in their building;  shut and lock all windows and doors;  limit egress to one door or area of the building;  put orange tape up on all doorways;  instruct occupants to gather in the center of the room, away from doors and windows;  account for employees in the building;  contact employees who are absent to alert them of the shelter-in-place status;  communicate when the all clear message is received. The director of facilities management or other member of the ERT will communicate the appropriate message (based on information provided from DC emergency officials to the President and Cabinet) to facilities management staff about shutting down heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems in all buildings. Typically, emergencies that require sheltering-in, will not last more than three to five hours. However, departments may wish to keep extra water and small amounts of non-perishable food on hand, and individuals may want to keep an extra supply of prescription medicine, eyeglasses, or other essentials on hand in the event the emergency goes beyond 12 hours. If the President is informed by the DC Emergency Management Agency or other civil authority that the campus community is advised to stay for an extended period of time (longer than 12 hours) mass care procedures will be implemented.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Tornado Preparedness

Tornado watch - tornadoes are possible in the warning area Tornado warning - a tornado has actually been sighted somewhere in the warning area During a Tornado

 If you are indoors and if time allows, move to the lowest floor possible. Move into an inside room away from windows. Everyone must remain inside the building for maximum protection. If time allows, close all doors to rooms. Assume a fetal position to protect your head and eyes.  If you are outside and hear a tornado warning or see a tornado, try to reach a building immediately. If you cannot reach a building, then you should lie flat in the nearest depression such as a ditch or ravine away from power lines, buildings and trees.  If you are driving, do not remain in the vehicle. Get out of your vehicle and follow the instructions above. Do not attempt to outrun a tornado.

After a Tornado

 Check for injuries. Do not move a seriously injured person unless he or she is in immediate danger of further injuries. If you need emergency assistance, call the University Police Department at 202-885-3636.  Be aware of any structural damage around you. If necessary and safe to do so, carefully leave the building per the “General Emergency Evacuation Procedures.”  Always check for hazards: o Fire or fire hazards. o Damaged electrical wiring. o Downed or damaged utility lines. Stay away from downed lines, even if power appears to be off. o Fallen objects in closets and cabinets. Displaced objects may fall when you open the door. o Telephones. Make sure each phone is on its receiver. Telephones off the hook can tie up the telephone network. o Potentially harmful materials and/or medicines that may have spilled.  If you are instructed to go to a shelter, take blankets, a flashlight, clothing, prescription medications, and snack items, etc.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Utility Failures If a major utility failure occurs, immediately notify facilities management at 202-885-2349. If there is the potential danger to people, notify the University Police Department as well at 202-885-3636.  If an emergency exists, activate the building alarm.  Assist the disabled in getting to the marked areas of refuge so they can safely wait to be evacuated.  Once outside, move to a clear area at least 500 feet away from the affected building. Keep streets, fire lanes, hydrants, and walkways clear for emergency vehicles and crews. Electrical/Light Failure Building lighting is designed to provide only minimal lighting in corridors and stairs for exiting. Flashlights and portable radios should be kept available for emergencies. Elevator Failure If you are trapped in an elevator, use the emergency phone to notify the University Police Department. If the elevator does not have an emergency phone, turn on the emergency alarm, which will signal for help. Plumbing Failure/Flooding Cease all operations. Do not turn on any lights or any electrical equipment.  Wet areas can present the danger of electrocution if someone comes in contact with the wet area and electricity at the same time.  Leaking natural gas can be ignited/exploded by lighting or electrical equipment. Notify the 2-fix line at 202-885-2349 and if possible, evacuate the area. Ventilation Problem If smoke odors come from the ventilation system, notify the 2-fix line at 202-885-2349. If necessary, cease all operations and vacate the area. Steam Line Failure Immediately notify the 2-fix line at 202-885-2349.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Violent or Criminal Behavior Everyone is asked to assist in making the campus a safe place by being alert to suspicious situations and promptly report them. If you are a victim or a witness to any on-campus offense, avoid further risks. Immediately notify the University Police Department at 202885-3636 and report the incident, including the following information:    

nature of the incident location of the incident description of person(s) involved description of property involved

Additionally, 1) Assist the officers when they arrive by supplying them with any additional information requested and ask others to cooperate. 2) Take cover immediately using an available concealment if gunfire or explosives endanger you or the campus community. 3) After the disturbance, seek emergency first aid if necessary. If taken hostage, try to remain calm, avoid drastic action, and try to keep the following ideas in mind:         

The initial 45 minutes are the most dangerous. Try to stay alert. Don’t speak unless you are spoken to and then only when necessary. Don’t talk down to the captor, who may be in an agitated state, but treat him or her with dignity. Avoid appearing hostile. Maintain eye contact if the captor is engaging in conversation, but do not stare. Avoid maintaining eye contact if the captor is hostile, agitated, or aggressive. Avoid speculating, and arguments. Expect the unexpected and comply with instructions as best as you can. Inform the captor, if medications, first aid, or restroom privileges are needed.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan Weapons of Mass Destruction Potential Indicators of Threats Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and Emergency Actions This document is intended to provide general information to assist in efforts to recognize potential WMD-related threats or incidents. The information is not all encompassing, and its applicability should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, in accordance with local conditions, policies, and procedures. Chemical, biological, and radiological material can be dispersed in the air we breathe, the water we drink, or on surfaces we physically contact. Dispersion methods could include placing an open container in a heavily used area, using conventional (garden/commercial) spray devices, or detonating an improvised explosive device to disseminate chemical, biological or radiological material. Chemical incidents are characterized by the rapid onset of medical symptoms (minutes to hours) and easily observed signatures (colored residue, dead foliage, pungent odor, and dead insect and animal life). In the case of a biological or radiological incident, the onset of symptoms requires days to weeks and there are typically few characteristic signatures. In all cases, being alert to the following could assist law enforcement and emergency responders in evaluating potential threats. POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF WMD THREATS OR INCIDENTS a. Unusual packages or containers, especially those found in unlikely or sensitive locations, such as near HVAC or air intake systems. b. Unusual powders or liquids/droplets/mists/clouds, especially those found near air intake/HVAC systems. Indications of tampering in targeted areas/equipment (i.e., locked ventilation/HVAC systems; stocks of food; water supply). c. Reports of suspicious person(s) or activities, especially those involving sensitive locations within or around a building. d. Surveillance of targeted areas, including but not limited to hotels, entertainment venues, subway systems, aircraft; water sources, office buildings, apartment buildings. e. Theft of chemical products/equipment. Dead animals/birds, fish, or insects. f. Unexplained/unusual odors. Smells may range from fruity/flowery to sharp/pungent, garlic/horseradish-like, bitter almonds, peach kernels, and new mown grass/hay. g. Unusual/unscheduled spraying or discovery of spray devices or bottles. PROTECTIVE MEASURES a. Maintain a heightened sense of awareness. b. Place an increased emphasis on the security of immediate surroundings.

Emergency Management and Continuity of Operations Plan c. Conduct periodic inspections of building facilities and HVAC systems for potential indicators/irregularities. d. Review emergency operations and evacuation plans/procedures for all locations/organizations to ensure that plans are up-to-date. e. Promptly report suspicious activities to appropriate law enforcement authorities. EMERGENCY PROCEUDRES – POTENTIAL THREAT IDENTIFIED/CONFIRMED a. Maintain a safe distance/evacuate area (if outside move to upward location; if inside keep outside doors/windows closed). b. Call your local 911 (law enforcement and the University Police Department personnel 202-885-3636) after reaching safe area. Do not handle or disturb suspicious objects. c. Remove possibly contaminated external clothing (including hats, shoes, gloves). d. Follow emergency operations plans/instructions from emergency response personnel. Please contact your local FBI Field Office if you observe any suspicious activity. * This document is a copyright of ASIS International*