Domino War. KINDERGARTEN Domino War

KINDERGARTEN – Domino War Dominoes make excellent math manipulatives. A students can start to recognize patterns (subitize): five as 2 groups of two w...
Author: June Lang
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KINDERGARTEN – Domino War Dominoes make excellent math manipulatives. A students can start to recognize patterns (subitize): five as 2 groups of two with a central pip, nine as 3 groups of three, 2 odd numbers added together make an even number…

Domino War

• The domino war game is very similar to the card war game and can be played by two or more players. There should be enough dominoes so that each player can receive at least eight dominoes to start the game. • Pass out all the domino tiles in the same fashion that cards are dealt. Each player's tiles are placed in a line face down on the playing table in front of him. A round is played by the players turning over the tile on the right edge of their tile lines. Each player adds up the dots on his domino to find the total. The player with the largest total of dots (pips) wins each domino from that round. The won dominoes are placed back into each player's tile line, but placed on the left side. Play continues, as players turn up tiles from the right side. • When two or more dominoes in a round equal the same number, Domino War ensues. Every player with the equal number domino turns over the next tile in their line and adds the dots on that domino. The player with the highest domino collects the dominoes from the entire round. • As the play continues, players will eventually run out of dominoes and they will be out of the game. The winner is the player who is left with all of the dominoes. Math Night 2016



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GRADE 1 - Domino Parking Lot



Domino Parking Lot

Students use a set of regular dominoes and a domino parking mat. Each student selects a domino, counts the total number of dots (pips) and places the domino in that parking spot. Dominoes with the same number of dots may be stacked on top of each other in the parking spot, if necessary. Center Activity: Teachers may use craft foam and a sharpie marker to create the parking lot mat or download the Domino Parking Lot game mat, copy it on card stock, and laminate the mat for student use. Provide sets of dominoes for small groups of students to sort. Challenge: As a variation of the game, select target sums and give students a point for each domino they find to park in those spaces. This motivates students to search for those particular combinations and heightens interest in finding those dominoes to win the most points for the group. Have one member of the group use a Domino Parking Lot recording sheet, write in the day's winning numbers, then draw in the dots of the dominoes the group finds for those numbers.



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GRADE 2 – Domino Muggins

Domino – Muggins -- (Muggins is a Dutch domino game.)

Materials One domino set with tiles 0-0 through 6-6. Can be played with larger sets. Object of the game The player with the most points wins the game. The deal All bones (dominoes) are shuffled face down. To start, all players draw one domino. The player with the most points is the first player and all following plays are to the player on the left. The dominoes are returned and shuffled again. Players draw dominoes from the center. In a two-player game, both players receive 7 stones. In a three-player game and four-player game, each player gets five dominoes. The remaining bones are left in the middle. This is called the boneyard. The starting player puts one domino in the middle. This does not need to be a double. The turn then rotates to his left. The rules • All bones played must be played to a free end and must match numbers. • The layout always has two open ends, each sprouting from the first stone. • If a player can not legally play a bone, he must draw from the boneyard untill he can play. If the boneyard is exhausted, he must pass. • Doublets are placed crosswise as usual. • It is allowed to draw from the boneyard while a player can play a bone. • A player scores points if the sum of the two open ends total a multiple of 5. • Example 1: • The dominoes on table are: • The open ends total 6+4=10, the player scores 10 points. • Example 2: • The next player adds • • • • •

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The dominoes on table are: The open ends total 1+4 = 5, the player scores 5 points. If a double is at the open end, both sides are counted. Example 3: At one end is a 0-0, at the other end is 5-5:

• • The player scores 0+0+5+5=10 points.

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The end The game ends when one player goes domino (plays his last bone) or when all players have consecutively passed. The player who dominoes or, if everyone passed, the player with the least number of spots, scores points equal to the number of spots on the stones in the hands of all other players. Small variations • Play your doubles whenever you can. • The number of bones dealt at start varies in different parts of the world. • The game can also be played with larger sets, such as the double 9 game or even the double twelve set. With the double 9 set, play starts with bones added to both long sides and both short sides of the first middle, thus giving four branches and four free ends to add a bone to at all times. With the double 12 set, bones are added to all four sides and all four corners, thus giving eight free ends to play to. Strategy Strategies are basically the same as in The Draw game. • However, make as many points as possible while playing. This is usually more advantageous then foregoing a score for a slight chance to play the next turn. • Keep your own hand as varied as possible. • Try to deduce what stones other players have in hand. Try to block other players with a series you've got lots of.



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GRADE 3 – Domino Maze

GRADE 4 – Fraction War

Materials: • Dominoes • Paper & Pencil The Fraction War game is very similar to the card war game and can be played by two or more players. There should be enough dominoes so that each player receives at least eight dominoes to start the game. Objective: Students decide who has the largest fraction based on the dominoes in play. The winner gets to keep all the tiles. Player with most tiles at end wins. Goal: to develop quick comparison of fraction values Rules: • Shuffle and deal the dominoes. • Each player puts their cards faced down in a pile. • Both players turn over one domino at the same time. • The player whose tile has the larger fraction wins all face-up tiles currently in play. • Players may use the paper to figure equivalent fractions or use the Tip Sheet. • If players turn over equivalent fractions, then there is a fraction war. • Each player turns over one new domino. • Who ever has the higher fraction wins all the cards. • The game can continue until one player has all the cards or for a given amount of time. Fraction War Tips and Tricks • If two fractions have a common denominator, the fraction with the larger numerator is the larger fraction. Ex: 3/5 > 2/5 • If two fractions have a common numerator, the fraction with the smaller denominator is larger. Ex: 1/4 > 1/8 • If you are unsure about which fraction is larger, use the fraction strips to compare. from: http://www.mathfilefoldergames.com/fraction-war/ Math Night 2016



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Games to Play with Dominoes



ORDERING DECIMALS • Students choose five dominoes and turn them over. • One side is the whole number; the other side is the decimal. • Order the decimals from least to greatest or greatest to least. • Want to make it a game? Partners order their dominos then find the difference between their greatest decimal and least decimal. The partner with the greatest (or least) difference wins.

COMPARE DECIMALS • Students choose two dominoes and turn them over. • One side is the whole number; the other side is the decimal. • Compare both dominoes. • Want to make it a game? Each partner chooses one domino. Then, they compare their decimal. The partner with the greatest (or least) decimal wins.

ADD OR SUBTRACT DECIMALS • Students choose two dominoes and turn them over. • One side is the whole number; the other side is the decimal. • Add or subtract the decimals. • Want to make it a game? Partners compare their sum or difference. The partner with the greatest (or least) sum or difference wins.

COMPARE FRACTIONS • Students choose two dominoes and turn them over. • One side is the numerator; the other side is the denominator • Compare both fractions. • Want to make it a game? Each partner chooses one domino. Then, they compare their fraction. The partner with the greatest (or least) fraction wins.

ORDERING FRACTIONS • Students choose five dominoes and turn them over. • One side is the numerator; the other side is the denominator • Order the fractions from least to greatest or greatest to least. • Want to make it a game? Partners order their dominos then find the difference between their greatest fraction and least fraction. The partner with the greatest (or least) difference wins.