DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

WRRO8A WRRO8A DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK This unit covers the skills required to systematically generate an...
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WRRO8A

WRRO8A

DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

This unit covers the skills required to systematically generate and develop ideas for workplace improvement. It involves interpreting or observing the need for improvement and developing a detailed idea. This requires the creative generation and discussion of a number of ideas or solutions and accepting positive and negative feedback. Ideas should be tested in order to establish and present a workable outcome which meets the needs of the end user.

ELEMENTS OF COMPETENCY

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

1

1.1 The need for innovation within workplace context is observed.

Interpret the need for innovation

1.2 Assumptions about products/processes are challenged to identify opportunities for innovation. 1.3 Possible future contexts and environments for the innovation are projected. 1.4 End user requirements are defined. 1.5 Resources and constraints are identified. 1.6 Factors and ethical considerations that may impact on the idea are researched. 1.7 Relevant organisational knowledge is accessed.

2

Generate ideas

2.1 Ideas are conceptualised using a range of creative thinking techniques. 2.2 Relevant knowledge to explore a range of approaches is applied. 2.3 Stimulation from alternative sources is sought. 2.4 Ideas are tested against brief and other factors. 2.5 Preferred option is selected.

3

Collaborate with others

3.1 Ideas are developed in conjunction with relevant people. 3.2 Feedback is sought and accepted from relevant people in an appropriate fashion. 3.3 Ideas are modified according to feedback. 3.4 A network of peers is maintained and utilised to discuss ideas.

© Australian National Training Authority 2002 Training Package WRR02:V1.00

To be reviewed by February 2005

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DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

ELEMENTS OF COMPETENCY

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

4

4.1 Ideas are analysed from different perspectives.

Analyse and reflect on ideas

4.2 Appropriate strategies are used to capture reflections. 4.3 Ideas are examined to ensure they meet context requirements, best practice and future needs. 4.4 Time is allowed for the development and analysis of ideas.

5

Represent ideas

5.1 An appropriate communication technique is selected for the target audience. 5.2 The presentation of the idea is developed with the audience in mind. 5.3 The idea is presented to educate/inform the client. 5.4 The idea is modified according to client feedback.

6

Evaluate the idea

6.1 The idea is reviewed using appropriate evaluation methods to ensure it meets required needs. 6.2 Idea is modified as required.

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WRRO8A

DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

RANGE OF VARIABLES The Range of Variables provide the range of applications of this unit of competency to allow for differences within enterprises and workplaces. It provides details of practices, knowledge and requirements referred to in the elements and performance criteria. The variables chosen in training and assessment will depend on the work contexts. The following variables may include but are not limited to: •

Innovation may include: − generating new ideas or solutions − developing new uses for old ideas and making them useful or a means of improvement



User requirements may refer to: − who will be using the end product − why the product/process is needed − how will it be used − advantages will it provide − where it will be used



Assumptions can be about any convention in the workplace and might include: − work process − product − materials − system − tools − working conditions



Resources and constraints include: − time required − costs − equipment − human resources − work culture − management practice − technology needed



Factors impacting on the idea might include: − aesthetic requirements − functionality − information available − occupational health and safety and environmental considerations



Creative thinking techniques might include: − brainstorming − visualising − making associations − building on associations − telling stories

© Australian National Training Authority 2002 Training Package WRR02:V1.00

To be reviewed by February 2005

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RANGE OF VARIABLES (CONTINUED) − − − − −

creative writing lateral thinking games mind mapping, drawings six thinking hats using prompts



Relevant knowledge might include: − technical knowledge − information gained from books and videos − knowledge from different work areas − information from work colleagues



Stimulation from alternative sources might include: − reading books and industry journals − talking with colleagues and friends − visiting art galleries and museums − going to industry workshops − networks



Relevant people might include: − colleagues − team members − supervisors − managers − the client



Maintaining a network of peers may include: − participating in forums − participating in industry training − attending workshops − becoming a member of a network Communication techniques refer to how you will present your ideas and may include: − writing a proposal − building a model − showing a film − presenting a talk − preparing a report − drawing a diagram



© Australian National Training Authority 2002 Training Package WRR02:V1.00

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WRRO8A

DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

RANGE OF VARIABLES (CONTINUED) •

Educating the client might include: − helping the client visualise and understand the idea − actively listening − asking questions − accepting others opinions − explaining the proposal − clarifying details



Reviewing the idea might involve: − checking that the idea can be implemented − that it meets the client/end user needs − best practice − financial requirements



Evaluation methods might include: − developing checklists − discussing the process with colleagues or supervisors − writing a report of the outcomes

© Australian National Training Authority 2002 Training Package WRR02:V1.00

To be reviewed by February 2005

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EVIDENCE GUIDE The following components of the evidence guide relate directly to the performance criteria and the range of variables for the competency standard and provide guidance for assessment of the unit in the workplace and/or training program.

Critical Aspects of Evidence Competency in this unit requires evidence that the candidate: •

Accurately interprets the need for innovation.



Identifies resources and constraints and researches impacting factors.



Generates ideas using creative thinking techniques.



Tests ideas against brief and other relevant factors.



Presents and discusses ideas with relevant people.



Seeks feedback and modifies ideas accordingly.



Analyses and reflects on ideas to ensure they meet end user requirements.



Presents ideas using appropriate communication methods.



Reviews idea using appropriate evaluation methods.

Underpinning Skills and Knowledge Knowledge and skills are essential to apply this unit in the workplace, to transfer to other contexts and deal with unplanned events. The requirements for this unit of competency are listed below: Knowledge of: •

Relevant technical knowledge



Broad industry/market knowledge



Organisational culture



Social, environmental and work culture impacts



Principles of innovation

Skills in: •

Research skills



Active listening



Interpersonal skills



Networking



Lateral thinking



The ability to analyse self and external factors



Time management skills

© Australian National Training Authority 2002 Training Package WRR02:V1.00

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DEVELOP INNOVATIVE IDEAS AT WORK

EVIDENCE GUIDE (CONTINUED) Generic Process Skills There are a number of processes that are learnt throughout work and life which are required in all jobs. They are fundamental processes and generally transferable to other work functions. Some of these are covered by the key competencies, although others may be added. The questions below highlight how these processes are applied in this competency standard. Following each question a number indicates the level to which the key competency needs to be demonstrated where 0 = not required, 1 = perform the process, 2 = perform and administer the process, and 3 = perform, administer and design the process. Key Competency

Example of Application

How can communication of ideas and information be applied?

Sharing ideas with others, presenting ideas to the client and obtaining feedback requires communication of ideas and information.

1

How can information be collected, analysed and organised?

Seeking or researching information from the client and other relevant sources requires information to be collected, analysed and organised.

1

How are activities planned and organised?

Planning and organising steps to be undertaken to develop idea will be required.

1

How can team work be applied?

Collaborating with others and sharing knowledge to develop the idea and present it requires team work.

1

How can the use of mathematical ideas and techniques be applied?

Generating basic graphs, designs and measurements to test out ideas will require the use of mathematical ideas and techniques.

1

How can problem solving skills be applied?

Identifying resources and materials needed will require problem solving skills.

1

How can the use of technology be applied?

Using computers and other relevant equipment will require the use of technology.

1

© Australian National Training Authority 2002 Training Package WRR02:V1.00

Performance Level

To be reviewed by February 2005

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EVIDENCE GUIDE (CONTINUED) Context of Assessment Assessment Process For valid and reliable assessment of this unit, evidence should be gathered through a range of methods to indicate consistent performance. It can be gathered from assessment of the unit of competency alone, through an integrated assessment activity or through a combination of both. Evidence should be gathered as part of the learning process.

Integrated Competency Assessment Evidence is most relevant when provided through an integrated activity which combines the elements of competency for each unit, or a cluster of units of competency. The candidate will be required to: •

Apply knowledge and skills which underpin the process required to demonstrate competence, including appropriate key competencies.



Integrate knowledge and skills critical to demonstrating competence in this unit.

Unit WRRO8A can be assessed with other units that make up a particular job function.

Evidence Gathering Methods Evidence should include products, processes and procedures from the workplace context. Evidence might include: •

Observation of the person in the workplace



Third party reports from a supervisor



Answers to questions about specific skills and knowledge

Resources required •

A retail environment



Relevant documentation, such as: − store policy and procedures manuals



A range of communication equipment

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To be reviewed by February 2005

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