DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

UPDATED: 30 April 2015 English Education Committee 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Secondary English Education Student Teacher Scre...
Author: Neal Skinner
25 downloads 0 Views 173KB Size
UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 1

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Secondary English Education Student Teacher Screening Process and Portfolio Guidelines Timing & Process: The Final Semesters of the Secondary English Education Program Here is the appropriate sequence of ENGLISH coursework as students approach the final semester of full-time student teaching: Pre-Screening semester ....................................... ENG 475/485 and ENG 490 (+other coursework) Screening semester.............................................. ENG 475/485 (+other coursework) Observation semester (CI 315A) ........................ ENG 497A: Senior Seminar (+other coursework) Student Teaching Semester (CI 315B/352F) ...... Full-Time Student Teaching (12 credits) (Note: this sequence is not always possible—rearrangements can be made where necessary)

One year before the student teaching semester, candidates for teacher licensure in secondary English Language Arts must successfully pass through the English Department’s student teacher screening process and apply for the School of Education’s pre-student teaching field placement course (CI 315A). Early in the second week of the semester in which the candidate intends to screen, a screening applicant must submit his or her screening portfolio to the screening director via email attachment (see more on this below). Committee members will evaluate the portfolios and will meet subsequently to conduct 30-minute interviews with each of the English student teaching candidates. The candidate’s portfolio submission and professional interview constitute his or her first steps toward entering into the English Education program’s final student teaching experience. Upon successful completion, he or she must register for the following semester’s observation course (CI 315A), which leads to full-time student teaching in the final semester at SIUE (CI 315B/CI 352F). Once the candidate has successfully passed through the English Department’s student teacher screening process, the School of Education Student Services office coordinates registration for CI 315A and arranges field placements at regional cooperating schools. Information Session At the end of the semester before the screening portfolio is due, the English Department conducts a mandatory information session for screening candidates. We typically meet once during the last two weeks of the semester. Contact Dr. Johnson for details: [email protected]. “B” Grade Point Average Requirement (minimum 3.0 GPA required)

PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 2

To begin the student teacher screening process, a student teaching candidate must have good academic standing as well as an SIUE cumulative grade point average of 2.5 (4.0 scale). In addition, a candidate must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the English major and, separately, in the Speech Communication Education minor to enter into the screening process, to student teach, and to complete SIUE’s English Education program. Students must also maintain the required 2.5 cumulative GPA at SIUE. All English and speech courses taken at all institutions count when we assess the cumulative GPA in English and in speech. All coursework (SIUE general education, English major, speech minor, and professional education) must be complete before the full-time student teaching semester. Transcript Evaluation and GPA Check Students may not take academic classes during the full-time student teaching experience (CI 315B/352F); therefore, English student teacher screening candidates must complete all required courses in the intervening semesters between screening and student teaching. To ensure that they will be done with their coursework before the student teaching semester begins, screening candidates must plan carefully as they prepare their schedules and register for the remaining academic semesters. The English Education Program Director, Prof. Jill K. Anderson, conducts transcript evaluations and GPA checks in conjunction with the English student teacher screening process (at the end of the semester before screening). If you are not sure whether you are qualified to screen at this time, contact your CAS advisor or make an appointment to meet with Dr. Anderson. Take this packet and the transcript evaluation form with you when you meet with your CAS advisor. He or she may have some questions about our program’s specific logistics. Illinois Certification Testing System Requirements and CI 315A Application Students must have passed CI 200: Introduction to Education and all four subareas of the Illinois Licensure Testing System’s (http://www.il.nesinc.com/) Test of Academic Proficiency (ILTS TAP subtests 401, 402, 403, and 404)—or the ILTS’s previous version of the TAP, known as the Basic Skills Test—before they will be permitted to screen for student teaching (additionally, there is a procedure by which you can replace the TAP with a recent ACT score—see your School of Education advisor for details about this). These are also primary requirements for enrollment in the School of Education’s professional teacher certification courses. Student teaching candidates must also apply for admission to the SOE’s secondary education program and CI 315A school placements (pre-student teaching observation course). The formal CI 315A application is typically due to SOE in the third week of the screening semester. The School of Education has many additional stipulations attached to the initial CI 315A field placements. See the SOE website for more information: http://www.siue.edu/education/field.shtml.

PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 3

Portfolio Submission The student will send a SINGLE email to [email protected] with the subject line: First Initial Last Name: Screening Portfolio. Each student will attach 5 or 6 files to this email (6 only if you are submitting an optional piece). ALL FILES should be in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx). If you have additional materials that go with your lesson plan, find a way to INTEGRATE those into the lesson plan file (add them at the end of the document). For specific file naming conventions, see the checklist below. In addition, Prof. Jill K. Anderson has created a substantial packet, entitled Useful Information about Academic Writing, which offers advice about expository essay writing. That packet also discusses some of the professional standards of the Modern Language Association, and it has a section on mechanics that might be a helpful review of the conventions of edited standard English. An updated copy of the Academic Writing packet is posted at our English Education website: http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/ in the “program information” section. Note: All of the items in your portfolio must be revised. Do NOT include the same paper you used for a class “as is”—you have a new audience with new expectations. A paper that got an “A” in a class might not even be passing in a portfolio, because the expectations can be very different. All the items should be highly polished—far more so than is required in most classes. Screening Portfolio Checklist _____ Teaching Philosophy (file name: FirstInitialLastName_TeachingPhilosophy) A concise statement of the applicant’s approach to teaching English Language Arts (maximum 2 pages, double-spaced); see pp. 6-7 of this document for details _____ Sample 50-Minute Lesson Plan (file name: FirstInitialLastName_LessonPlan) A formally written class plan demonstrating the applicant’s philosophy in action; applicants might rewrite a plan from English 475/485 or create a new class plan; use the English Department’s planning form; see p. 7 of this document for details. _____ Literary Analysis (file name: FirstInitialLastName_LiteraryAnalysis) An essay that analyzes a work of literature (4-6 pages; may include research; MLA style); see pp. 7-9 of this document for details. _____ Essay with Research (file name: FirstInitialLastName_EssayResearch) A longer paper on any topic that incorporates research—e.g., an extended literary analysis or other form of analytical exploration (8-10 pages; at least six sources; MLA style); see pp. 79 of this document for details. _____ Self Reflection and Portfolio Assessment (file name: FirstInitialLastName_Reflection) A formal evaluative document (using the provided form) containing the candidate’s reflections on his or her portfolio; see pp. 9-12 of this document for details. _____ Optional Work (file name: FirstInitialLastName_Optional) An additional piece of writing—only because the applicant wants to show the committee some other aspect of his/her personal writing style and ability (truly optional!). PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 4

Each paper should include an MLA-style heading on the left hand side of the page, as well as page numbers in the header, on the right. The heading should look like this: FirstName LastName Student Teacher Screening Name of Document Date of Submission Portfolio & Screening Process: What We’re Looking for and Why Candidates for student teaching should take this process very seriously. The screening portfolio is ultimately an examination of the candidate’s ability to write with purpose, focus, and style according to the conventions of edited standard English and the professional standards of the Modern Language Association. Moreover, the screening interview assesses the candidate’s capacity for proficient oral communication and professional comportment. If the candidate’s portfolio is sloppy or immature, if the candidate does not demonstrate skill in oral communication, or if the candidate does not exhibit an understanding of basic English pedagogy, then the committee will ask the student to rescreen the following semester. In some cases, the committee may attach additional stipulations to be completed before rescreening or may request that the student withdraw from SIUE’s Program in Secondary English Education. Candidates for student teaching will only be permitted to screen twice. If a candidate does not meet the committee’s expectations in his or her second attempt, then he or she will not be approved to student teach. In such cases, upon completion of remaining major/minor coursework, a student will be cleared for graduation from SIUE with an English major and Speech Communication minor. What follows is a breakdown of our primary concerns: •

Professionalism There’s a good reason this one is first on the list: it’ll determine your audience’s attitude toward you (your future audience, by the way, will include the principals and teachers who might hire you, as well as your students-to-be). You need to look, sound, and write like you deserve the job, like you belong in front of a classroom. It might be unfair, but first impressions matter. If you’re sloppy in any way—in your writing or selfpresentation, your “audience” will recognize it and dismiss you as a result. It is part of our job, as your screening committee, to let you know what kind of impression you are making (and to be painfully blunt, if that’s what’s called for). One additional warning: the job market is very tight—and your application might justifiably be eliminated for surface-level errors.



Dynamic, Analytical Thinking Not only is analytical thinking a skill that you will help your students to develop, it is also a necessary instrument in your own teacherly toolbox. Classrooms change, students’ needs change, prevailing social attitudes change, and educational goals change. If you can’t think analytically, you won’t be able to adjust to these changes; you won’t be able to develop new teaching strategies, new interpretations, new assignments, or new classroom management techniques to meet new conditions. Furthermore, if you can’t approach reading and writing analytically (that is, if you must rely on others to do the PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 5

analysis for you, or if you rely solely on previous designs), you’ll get bored quickly (and your students will, too). Getting into the habit of thinking analytically will allow you to more effectively think on your feet (an invaluable skill in the classroom). •

Critical Self-Reflection Right now, you’ve got teachers who are looking out for you—teachers who will point out when you are doing something well or poorly. In the future, you won’t have that luxury nearly so consistently. While you may have colleagues who can give you feedback, if you wish to really improve as a teacher, thinker, and writer, you’ll need to reflect critically on your own performance and find your own motivation to improve. You’ll need to be able to measure your own successes and failures (and devise ways of repeating the success or addressing the failures). In other words, when you become a teacher, it isn’t just your students you are teaching—it’s yourself as well. You need to become your own primary guide. The committee wants to see you start the process now.



Clarity Speaking and writing clearly is always important, of course, but it becomes even more so when you are writing for readers who may be reading quickly, with limited patience, or with less acuity. Your students will not, as a rule, be willing to read your prose carefully to determine meaning, and a member of a hiring committee may not have the time to parse your sentences. Write and speak clearly and concisely, with good audience awareness. While we appreciate creativity and risk-taking (see dynamic, analytical thinking, above), neither of these qualities will be apparent to a reader if your writing is unclear. Seek complexity, but don’t sacrifice clarity in pursuit of it.



Engagement Teaching is not a job for the dispassionate or ambivalent; it takes fortitude, drive, and genuine investment. If you don’t care about your subjects, your students, or the practice of teaching your students will know it. Perhaps more importantly, you’ll know it too. In order to succeed as a teacher (that is, to continue to educate and inspire your students in spite of low wages, heavy workloads, administrative hassles, and disciplinary headaches), you need to genuinely care about what you are teaching. We want to see intellectual engagement with and enthusiasm for the job, the material, and the process.



Pedagogical Acumen Obviously, we don’t expect you to know how to handle every classroom situation or how to best teach every concept and skill. These are things that come only with time, experience, and experimentation. However, you should already have a good sense of what effective pedagogy looks like. You should not only be familiar with some basic teaching strategies, but you should be able to apply fundamental pedagogical principles to new situations. We expect you to speak intelligently about your future teaching, approaching the subject from a thoughtful, reasoned perspective that sets high educational standards while recognizing possible limitations and obstacles.

PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 6

Advice for Portfolio Compilers Hints and Tips from SIUE English Faculty Profs. Jill Anderson, Heather Johnson, and Matthew Johnson Teaching Philosophy Teaching philosophies are sometimes required as part of a professional application for a teaching position, and are often included in teaching portfolios (which may or may not be requested by employers, but which are required by the School of Education as part of CI 325F). The idea is to create a short statement that “sums up” your beliefs about teaching. It answers the question: “What kind of teacher are you?” Teaching philosophies vary widely, depending on the author— there’s no real formula to follow—so just do your best to give your readers a sense of your main pedagogical foci. If they can clearly picture your classroom, your teaching style, and the gist of your content, you’ll have the basics covered. Try starting with a brainstorming session based on the following questions: 1. What teaching strategy do I plan to use most often? Which teaching strategies do I feel are most effective? (And why?) 2. What is the most important content in my class? What key elements will they learn (keeping mind, of course, that techniques, processes, approaches, and attitudes can all be learned)? 3. How will I manage the classroom? What do I want the classroom atmosphere to be like, and how will I achieve that? 4. What will my students do in the classroom? How will they be spending their class time? 5. How will you operate in a complex, 21st-century school environment? As you think through these questions, you might imagine someone posing them to you in an interview. What would you say about yourself as an organized and well-prepared teacher of reading, writing, speaking/listening, and language? Be sure to: • Read through the document with a critical eye toward polish and professionalism —e.g., eliminate such vagaries as “I feel that...” and purge such trite expressions as “I want to help students grow….” We know you all love English and literature and writing. Move beyond that. We know you all want to inspire students and be there for them. Move beyond that, too. Illustrate those professional goals, rather than blatantly stating those obvious facts. •

Offer concrete, but brief, examples which demonstrate to your reader that you have a sense of what you really may be doing in a classroom—e.g., if you say that you want a student-centered classroom, then what do you mean by that phrase? And, more to the point, what student-centered reading/writing assignments do you have in mind? What pedagogies have you demonstrated in your methods classes or planned in your academic lesson planning assignments (in such courses as ENG 475/485)? • Be creative, but not too radical. Don’t be conservative, either, as you do not want to sound like all the other teaching philosophies out there; it’s really easy to be “vanilla” PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 7

here. You might offer as an example a scholar or two who has influenced your teaching, but don’t be a carbon copy of, say, Peter Elbow—you need to communicate what your philosophy of teaching is, not someone else’s. If you don’t already write with a distinctive, authentic personal voice, you need to work on developing one. Although a teaching philosophy statement is a formal document and must be in academic prose, infuse yours with as much of your personality as you can. • Do more than just story-tell. You might include a specific pedagogical moment that you experienced as a teacher, if you have one, or as a student (that is, an example might be nice), but don’t dwell on it too much, and make sure it has a purpose (it demonstrates something important about you). • Mention influential education scholars if you can do so knowledgeably—but don’t drop names gratuitously. • Keep your audience in mind: the people who will be reading your teaching philosophy in the future will be education administrators and fellow teachers. It may well be that your teaching philosophy was heavily influenced by a negative experience, but it’s not a good idea to criticize your past teachers too strenuously or categorically; you don’t want to sound like you are accusing your readership of bad pedagogy! • Remember: we’ll be reading your philosophy with your future audience in mind. We’ll be imagining how future employers and colleagues would react to your prose. • This will be the first document in your portfolio, and you’ll want to make a good impression. Editing and proofreading are extremely important. Sample 50-Minute Class Plan As teachers, we make class plans for ourselves—not only to keep ourselves organized, but also to reflect on our own teaching strategies. Any class plan will implicitly answer rhetorical questions about the students we are teaching, anticipating how they will respond to the plan when it’s put into practice. Remember that, for this class plan, you have yet another audience in mind: the portfolio readers. These readers will have just read your reflective letter and your teaching philosophy, and they will expect to see your reflections and your philosophy illustrated in your class plan. A sample of the class planner that we expect you to use will be handed out separately, and copies can be found on the SIUE English Education site: http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/index.html Along with the planner, you should include any handouts or additional materials that are integral to our understanding of the lesson. This may mean that the class plan is quite long. That’s fine. If you are using a lesson plan developed in English 475 or 485, you may delete or keep parts of the section titled “Teacher Reflection and Impact on Student Learning.” If the section won’t make sense to a reader who did not see your demonstration, remove it. If, however, you think some of the information is accessible and important or enlightening, you may keep it. Literary Analysis & Essay with Research The literary analysis is your place to demonstrate your critical thinking skills, your ability to engage closely with a text, and your application of effective writing strategies (and by extension, PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 8

your ability to model these skills effectively for your students). The longer essay with research does this, too, but the best-researched essays will also show your ability to think independently in spite of the pressure of other influences (the authors whom you’ve discovered through research) and your ability to interact with others in your chosen field, as part of a larger community of scholars. No classroom is an island—or at least it shouldn’t be—you should be open enough to integrate new teaching strategies and philosophies into your own practice, but independent enough to alter them to suit your needs or to reject them when necessary. In other words, these two documents demonstrate what you will aspire to be as a teacher and a scholar. As always, the integrated source material and the works cited page for each paper must be professionally formatted in Modern Language Association style. When writing/revising these two papers, keep the following guidelines in mind: • Both the literary analysis and the longer essay with research must present and develop a strong main claim or thesis that makes an actual argument (that is, the main claim is NOT merely an opinion or a description). Think of the thesis in two parts: first, the claim itself; second, commentary on the significance of that claim (this latter element could be addressed in the conclusion, rather than the introduction, of the essay). Some notion of why the claim is important, what we learn from it, or how it inspires us to think differently will serve these papers well. • Both papers must be logically and effectively organized, with well developed paragraphs and smooth transitions between them. General rule of thumb: if paragraphs can be taken out or put in multiple positions without changing the argument flow substantially or requiring major and careful revision, then the structure of the paper has not been considered carefully enough. • Both essays must do MORE than merely summarize. In the case of the literary analysis, do not just summarize literary work or explain the most basic message of the text; your readers can discover this on their own—you need to give them something more, something that they can’t get from a simple reading. Same goes for the longer essay with research: don’t just summarize your sources, do something with them (see next note). You will need to very briefly summarize primary texts, just in case your new audience is unfamiliar with them, but do it very rapidly—just a few sentences should be sufficient, if you practice brevity. • The essay with research must provide evidence from outside sources that you then use or interpret. A true humanities scholar doesn’t simply collect data and then report it: you need to clearly show how the research you’ve done helps you to develop and complicate your overall argument. In other words, the source material can be used to support claims, certainly, but also can be used to complicate, counterargue, challenge, shape, illustrate, show by metaphor/example, prove, etc. Source material cannot stand on its own, but rather must be dealt with in some way. The essay with research should NOT be a data dump nor a mere report of information. You are still the author, the thinker, the person with something to say. • For the essay with research, you need to integrate at least six sources. Excessive use of nonacademic online sources, especially websites, is highly discouraged. Try to demonstrate your ability to interact effectively with different kinds of sources, especially traditional scholarly works. Show your readers that you’ve considered the degree to which any given source can be trusted and that you’ve thought through its appropriate use.

PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 9

• Papers should be significantly revised. Remember that you are writing in a different context and to a different audience than that for which the paper was originally intended. Don’t assume that we’re all familiar with specialized jargon that you might have discussed in a class or with the minutiae of particular historical periods. • This portfolio is a specialized compilation that demonstrates your aptitude for professional writing and presentation. You papers must maintain good diction and proper mechanics (readability) with interesting, varied sentence structure and careful, compelling word choice. • Each essay should have an interesting and/or catchy title that somehow relates to the paper’s main claim or content in general (that is, the title needs to be informative first, clever second). • Don’t use fancy fonts or odd spacing/layout. Since part of the task is to demonstrate your membership in the profession, you need to demonstrate that you understand the conventions of that profession. Scholars in English, education, and related fields don’t want flash; they want substance. Again, follow MLA style. • Research conventions differ greatly in different fields—a paper you may have written in a political science or biology course (for example) will most likely NOT be appropriate for this portfolio. If in doubt check with the screening director ([email protected]). Self-Reflection and Portfolio Assessment This document should be completed after you’ve compiled the rest of the portfolio, so make sure you leave yourself enough time at the end of the process to fill in the assessment form carefully, thoughtfully, and where applicable, creatively. This is your chance consciously show how you have reflected on your writing, your teaching, your learning—and how that reflection benefits you as writer/teacher. Why/how does this portfolio reveal your abilities/strengths as writer (or development as writer), future teacher, and thinker? The digital worksheet is available at: http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/ProgramInfo.html, or you may email Dr. Johnson ([email protected]) for a copy. Below, you’ll find a blank version of the form for reference purposes:

Self-Reflection and Portfolio Assessment Name: Screening Semester: Date Completed: Instructions: First, review your entire portfolio. Then fill in the right-hand column with your responses to the prompts on the left-hand side of the table. Take this as an opportunity to explore where you are in this moment of your academic development. Be positive, but honest. Do a frank appraisal of yourself and “where you are now” as demonstrated in the portfolio. Where possible, reference specific moments in your portfolio as evidence to support your assessment. PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 10

When the document is complete, save it as FirstInitialLastName_Assessment and email it to [email protected] along with your other files. Question/Topic Response/Discussion Scholarship: Consider the dual roles of teacher and scholar. You’ll need to model good scholarship for your students, and that means you’ll need to show them how to make good, significant claims about what they are investigating in their writing. And you need to show them that writing is about exploring, that to be a scholar is to try discover something new, to build on prior knowledge instead of just repeating it. How would you describe your own scholarship? Do you feel that your papers in this portfolio represent “additions” to the field? Where do you think you do your most significant thinking? Be specific! Style and Language: Think about your own writing style. How would you describe your academic writing style and attitude toward language? How would you describe your reading style? Academics and teachers alike need to be sensitive to variations in language and expression. What does that mean to you or in your experience? How is it revealed in your portfolio? Reference specific moments. Revision: Discuss your revision, editing, and proofreading strategies. How did you approach the process of building your portfolio, and how did you alter the items to fit the new parameters and audience expectations? What was most difficult about the PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 11

revision process? What was most rewarding? Professionalism: Consider your role as a future colleague (you’ll be working both with administrators and with fellow teachers) and role model (you’ll represent “responsible adulthood” for your students). What, in your opinion, are the hallmarks of professional behavior? How do you show your professional, responsible attitude in this portfolio and in your approach to education more generally? Creativity and Innovation: Contemplate your own ability to create and innovate. Obviously, there are many types and expressions of creativity— developing a significant literary claim, an original poem, or an innovative lesson plan are all examples of creative thinking. What kind of creative thinking do you engage in? How and where to do you display your brand of creativity in your portfolio? Point to a specific place! Pedagogy: Interrogate your approach to teaching. What pedagogical strategies are you most attached to? What are the most important goals in an ELA classroom? How do you link daily classroom practice to the Common Core Standards and other institutional demands? Pay special attention to any concerns that may not have appeared in your teaching philosophy or lesson plan. Independence: Reflect on your current status as a student and your future status as a teacher and guide. Right now, you’ve got people to guide you and PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

UPDATED:

30 April 2015

English Education Committee 12

point you in productive directions. Soon, you’ll be the one doing the guiding. Do you feel that you have become more independent as you’ve progressed through your college career? How is that growing independence (or not) reflected in the portfolio? Keep in mind that this sort of independence includes independent thinking of all kinds! It’s natural to use the work of others to help support main claims, or to provide a template for lesson plans. It’s also a good thing to seek help, but there are some things you need to be able to do on your own. Engagement: Assess your engagement with the portfolio process and the secondary education program. Are you truly and deeply invested in the program? Are you truly and deeply invested in your future students? Try to be frankly and starkly honest, if not with the committee, than at least with yourself. Discuss your thoughts about engagement, motivation, and dedication to the field. Reflective Learning: Examine portfolio construction as part of a larger learning process. The portfolio is one piece of your college experience, which also includes lots of different courses, observations, student teaching, and informal learning through peers. What do you feel you learned from the screening portfolio, and how might you pass your insights along to your future students?

PROGRAM IN SECONDARY ENGLISH EDUCATION http://www.siue.edu/ENGLISH/EDUC/

Suggest Documents