DEPARTMENT OF CLOTHING AND TEXTILES. Semester III Fashion Designing

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadoda...
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The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

DEPARTMENT OF CLOTHING AND TEXTILES Semester III Fashion Designing

Semester III

Elective

Generic 3(1+2)

found ation Allied

Core

4(2+2) 3(3+0) 3(1+2)

4(0+4) 8(2+6) 06(4+ 2)

Course No.

Elementary Textiles Children’s Clothing Fundamental of design in CT Accessory Design &Surface Ornamentation Fundamentals of marketing Product development-I Total Total (22)

FAD 1304 FAD 1301 FAD 1302 FAD 1303

Compulsory 4(1+3) 4(2+2)

3(3+0)

Course Title

8(3+5) 16(5+11)

FAD 1306 FAD 1305

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

B.Sc.(F.C.Sc.) YEAR

Semester

I

Foundation Generic ELEMENTARY TEXTILES FAD 1304

III

OBJECTIVES

CREDIT

HOURS To enable the students to learn the facts of textiles. 2. To prepare the students to judge the textile qualities they seek as consumers. 3. To students will learn to identify textile fibres and fabrics practically COURSE CONTENT/SYLLABUS

UNIT-I

UNIT-II

UNIT-III

UNIT-IV Practical

3 (2+1)

Introduction 1. Textile Terms 2. Classification of Textile Fibers 3. General properties of textile fibers Natural Fibers 1. Fiber morphology of the Natural Fibers.. 2. The polymer system of Natural Fibers. 3. Microscopic, Physical and Chemical Properties of Natural Fibers. 4. Use of Natural Fibers Man-Made Fibers 1. Spinning of Man-Made Fibers 2. Fiber Morphology of Man-Made Fibers. 3. The polymer system of Man-Made fibers 4. Microscopic, Physical and Chemical Properties of Man-made Fibers. 5. Uses of Man-Made Fibers. Fiber and fabric Identification 1. Fiber Identification by Microscopic, Burning and Solubility Tests. 2. Collection of representative samples of fabrics and their understanding.

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

REFERENCES 1.

Bukayev, General Technology of Cotton Manufacturing Mir Publicatiobn, 1984.

2.

Gohil E.P.G. and Vilensky L.D., Textile Science, CBS Publishers and Distributors, Delhi, 1987. Hollen Norma and Saddler Jane, Textiles, The MacMillan Co., 1973.

3 4 5 6 7

Koch P.A., Microscopic and Chemical Testing of Textiles, New York Textile Book Service, 1963. Mishra S.P., A Text Book of Fiber Science and Technology, New Age International Publishers, New Delhi. Trotman E.R., Dyeing and Chemical Technology of Textile Fibers, Charles Griffin & Co. Ltd., London, 1975. Wynne, The Motivate Series, Maclillan Education Ltd., London.

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

B.Sc.(F.C.Sc.) YEAR

Semester

I

III

OBJECTIVES

UNIT-I

UNIT-II

UNIT-III Practical

Core Compulsory CHILDREN’S CLOTHING FAD 1301

CREDIT

4 (1+3)

HOURS 1. To gain an understanding for the psychological, sociological effects of clothing on children. 2. To acquire some ability in selecting clothes from the standpoint of design, fabric and activities of the children’s. 3. To learn and develop skills of garments construction for children’s clothing. COURSE CONTENT/SYLLABUS History and Clothing for the child 1. A brief history of children’s clothing. 2. Clothing for the child – a. The psychological effect of clothing. b. Effect of clothes on the child’s growth and development. c. Selection of fabric and trimmings for the garment. 3. Clothing for – a. The infant (0-6 months) b. The creeping age (7 to 12 months) c. The pre-school age (2.5 to 6 yrs.) Clothing for elementary school child The elementary school child (6-12 yrs.) a. Ready-made versus home-made clothing. b. Labelling and sizing c. Desirable features and Growth allowance d. Wardrobes for elementary school children 2. Practices and preferences in children’s clothing. a. Children’s preferences b. Styles and fit Drafting and Construction of garments 1. Garments for infants, creeping age and pre-school age a. Diapers – square (64.0 X 64.0 cm) and shaped b. Sun suit – yoke, gathers, side plackets, belt, crotch opening, riveting

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

c. A line dress – front placket, patch pocket, flat collar, puff sleeves UNIT-IV Practical

UNIT V

Drafting & constructing garments - elementary school child (boy) 1. Shorts – in-seam pockets, zipper and fly opening, waist band 2. Shirt – yoke, pocket, closure, full roll straight collar, short sleeve

Drafting and constructing garments - elementary school child (girl) 1. Skirt – knife / box / inverted box pleats, with placket or wrap around type 2. Dress – sleeveless, gathers at low waist, yoke, darts, tucks on the upper body or yoke, peterpan collar REFERENCES

1. 2. 3 4 5 6 7

Juvekar M.B.Easy Cutting Bombay Ball companies 166 Dr. Ambedkar Road Dadar, Bombay, and 14 DD 1967. Pandit Savitri Manual of Children’s Clothing, Bombay Orient Longman Ltd. 1967. Tanous H.N. Making Clothes for Your Little Girls U.S.A. Abernnett Company Inc., Illinois. Tate H.T. and Gisson O., Family Clothing New York, John Wiley & Sons. Inc. 1961. Thomson H.M. & Rea L.E. Clothing for Children, New York John Wiley & Sons. Inc. 1949. Zarapkar K.R. Zarapkar system of cutting Zarapkar Tailoring College Dadar, Bombay – 28. Catalogues: a) Vogue b) Simplicity, c) Macalls, d) Buttrick.

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

YEAR

Semester

I

III

OBJECTIVES

UNIT-I

UNIT-II

Core Compulsory FUNDAMENTALS OF DESIGN IN CLOTHING AND TEXTILES FAD 1302

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

CREDIT

4 (2+2)

HOURS 1.To gain an understanding of the elements and principles of design. 2. To develop an understanding of the application of art principles in textile and fashion design. 3. To develop sensitivity towards aesthetics which, will further enable the students to be good art consumers 4. To provide practical experience in free hand drawing, scale drawing, creating objects, structure etc. COURSE CONTENT/SYLLABUS Understanding Design, Designing and Designer . Design – its meaning and importance a. Division of design – Art form and Applied form. b. Qualities and aims in design – Beauty, Functionalism, Expressiveness c. Types of design: Structural and Surface design 2. Importance of good taste in design 3. Designer at work – Textile designer and Fashion designer 4. Challenges and opportunities – for design and designers d. Elements and Principles of design and its expressiveness 1. Elements of design a. Point b. L i n e c. Plane d. Volume e. Space f. Shape g. Form h. Light i. Texture j. Pattern

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

2. Principles of design a. Balance b. Proportion and scale c. Rhythm d. Emphasis e. Harmony f. Variety g. Subordination h. Contrast i. Discord j. Law of area UNIT-III

Aspects of Colour and Pattern in design 1. Colour an important element of design. a. Dimensions and modifications of colour b. Colour mixing and colour systems. c. Colour harmony and colour schemes. d. Colour in different media. e. Principles of introducing colour. f. Colour in fabric, texture and light 2. Surface pattern and pattern groups a. Principles for creating a pattern. b. Preparing a layout.

UNIT-IV Practical

UNIT V

Understanding Line, Colour and its application 1. Line and its expressiveness a. Line, its types and composition b. Effect of lines to create rhythm and optical illusions 2. Colour expression a. Colour wheel and its dimension b. Effect of tone – warm, cool, advancing and receding c. Apparent change of colour d. Colour schemes e. Colour vocabulary f. Colour rhythm Other elements, principles of design and its application 1. Shapes, Textures and Patterns a. Basic shapes and Silhouette shapes b. Textures: natural and created c. Repeat patterns: all over, spot and striped d. Design: structural and surface

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

2. Relationship of Scale and proportion 3. Balance 4. Emphasis 5. Rhythm in styling. REFERENCES

4

Bhatt Pranav and Goenka Shanita., Foundation of Art and Design, vallabhvidyanagar., Deep prakashan, 1990 Birrell and Verla leone. Colour and Design A basic Text., vol. I and II., Digest submitted in requirement for the degree of education in Teachers College Columbia University. Bustanoby. J. H., Principles of colour and colour mixing., McGraw Hill Book Company New York, London,1947 Campbell Mackie, Pattern, Longmans, green and Co. Ltd., 1928

5

Feltsted C.J., Design Fundamentals., pitman publishing corporation New York.

6

Goldstein, Harriet and Velta., Art in everyday life., McGraw Hill Book Company

7

Hideaki Chijiiwa, Colour Harmony - A guide to creative colour combinations, Rockport Publishers, 1987, First Indian edition, Indian book distributors, 1992.London. Luthra S. K., Appiled Art Handbook, Admark Advertising, Bombay, 1966.

1. 2.

3

8 9

10

Marshal Sussane, Jackson Hazel., and et al, Individuality in Clothing Selection and Personal appearance, 5th edition, Prentice and Hall, 2000 New York, London, 1960 Skull John., Key terms in Art Craft and Design, Elbrook Press, Australia, 1988.

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

YEAR

Semester

I

Core Allied ACCESSORY DESIGN AND SURFACE ORNAMENTATION FAD 1303

III

OBJECTIVES

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

CREDIT

HOURS 1. 1. To impart knowledge to the students about different techniques of surface Ornamentation 2. To make them aware of product diversification by using these techniques in various accessories and / or outfits. 3. To develop skill in sketching and designing various accessories by effectively combining it with different ornamentation techniques. COURSE CONTENT/SYLLABUS

UNIT-I

UNIT-II

Surface ornamentation Techniques . Value addition: types and its stages 2. Terminology of surface ornamentation 3. Types of coloring agent and stages of dyeing 4. Styles and methods of printing Accessory making . Brief history of accessories 2. Glossary of several accessories 3. Methods and materials used in accessory manufacture

UNIT-III

UNIT-IV Practical

4 (2+2)

Texturing through use of various 1.Using trims and other decorative items e.g. shells, beads, metallic wires, stones, coins etc. 2. Using decorative techniques using such as Layering, patch work, cording, needle weaving, tucks, draw thread work etc. 3.Using dyes, pigments and techniques of dyeing and printing. Sketching and designing of accessories 1. . Analysis of the latest styles and components in terms of functionality and design. 2. Accessories for different occasion or outfits (formals, casuals and theme based clothing) a. Headgears b. Bags

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

c. Ornaments d. Footwear e. Scarves/ Ties/ Gloves

UNIT V

Construction of accessories Translate own projects into finished products using different techniques and developing the pattern making details.

REFERENCES 1.

Evelyn Manfield, Clothing construction, Houghton Miffin Co. Boston 1953.

2.

Giles C. H., “A Laboratory course in Dyeing”, 3rd edition, 1974 (TP 897 A21G4)

3

Gohl E. P. G. and Vilensky L. D., “Textile Science – An explanation of fibre properties” 2nd edition, 1987 Harries N. G. and Harries T. E., “Textiles – Decision making for consumers” (TS 1445 H2) Kaldolph S. J, Langford A. L., “Textiles” Prentice Hall, Pearson Education, Inc., New Jersey, 2002 Kathrya Mckelvy & Janini Munslow, Illustrations Fashion, Blackwell Science Ltd. 1997 Readers digest complete book of needle work, New York, Montreal, The readers digest association Inc., 1979. Wyne A., “Textiles” THE MOTIVATE SERIES, Macmillan Texts for Industrial Vocational and Technical Education. Elaine Stone, The Dynamics of Fashion, 3rd Edition, Fairchild Publications, New York, 2008. Celia Stall-Meadows, Know Your Fashion Accessories, Fairchild Publications, New York, 2004. Bina Abling, Marker Rendering for Fashion, Accessories, and Home Fashions, Fairchild Publications, New York, 2006. Phyllis G. Tortora, Illustrations by Bina Abling, The Fairchild Encyclopedia of Fashion Accessories, Fairchild Publications, New York, 2003.

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

YEAR

Semester

I

Foundation Elective FUNDAMENTALS OF MARKETING FAD 1306

III

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

CREDIT

HOURS 1. To help students acquire a knowledge and understanding of basic principles involved in the field of retailing, merchandising and advertising. 2. To gain an understanding of rules and voluntary standards which affect textile products and how they may aid the producers, retailers and consumers. 3. To aid students to acquire knowledge of quality standards and labelling.

OBJECTIVES

COURSE CONTENT/SYLLABUS UNIT-I

UNIT-II

Retail fashion merchandising 1. Definitions of retailing and merchandising and related terms 2. Types of retail operations 3. Marketing and market segmentation 4. Merchandising operations 5. Buying preparation 6. Retail pricing 7. Retail sales 8. Merchandising evaluation Consumer demand and fashion marketing 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

UNIT-III

UNIT-IV

3 (0+3)

Consumer groups and consumer behavior Economic influences on consumer demand and marketing Global influences on marketing Technological influences on consumer demand and marketing Marketing chain Fashion categories

Retail fashion promotion 1. 1. Fashion advertising 2. Publicity 3. Special event 4. Visual merchandising 5. Buyers role in fashion promotion Wholesale marketing and distribution

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

Practical

1. 2. 3. 4.

UNIT V

Quality standards for textile products 1. Meaning of standard, standardization and its importance 2. Certifying agencies- Indian and International 3. Quality and related terms-quality control, quality assurance, quality management, quality system. 4. Labels- definition, types, agencies and eco-labeling. REFERENCES

1. 2. 3 4 5 6

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

1 International markets Domestic markets Computer aided marketing Fibre / fabric product development and marketing

Gordon L.J, “Economics for consumer”, New York, American Book Company 1961. Hotchkiss G.B, “An Outline on Advertising”, New York, The MacMillan Company, 1960 Troxell Mary & Judelle Beatrice, “Fashion Merchandising.” McGraw Hill Inc., U.S. 2003 Gini Stephers Frings “Fashion from Concept to Consumer”, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. 9th edition, 2007. Wingate Isabel B., “Know your Merchandise for Retailers and Consumer”, by I.B. Wingate and others, 1975. Wingate John W., “Retail Merchandise Management”, 1972.

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

YEAR

Semester

I

Core Allied PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT I FAD 1305

III

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

CREDI T HOURS

. To identify and assess different markets for yarns, fabrics, trims, home textiles and ancillary producers. 2. To deconstruct a textile product and through a hands-on simulation determine the appropriate product making process and price.

OBJECTIVES

COURSE CONTENT/SYLLABUS UNIT-I practical

UNIT-II

Sourcing and procurement 1.Sourcing and procurement definition – need for sourcing – methods of sourcing 2. Major producers and suppliers of raw materials – a. Dyes – natural and synthetic b. Yarns – knitting, crocheting, tatting etc. c. Fabrics – Men, Women and Children – apparels and home textiles d. Trims – buttons, laces, appliques’, zippers Survey of ancillary producers 1. 2. 3. 4.

UNIT-III

UNIT-IV

4 (0+4)

Dyers and printers Tailors – garment, accessories, craft items, furnishings Embroiderers Mass producers – different categories of apparel, craft and home textiles. Product Analysis 1.Selection and analysis of an apparel and non-apparel product that is a forerunner in terms of – utility, appearance, ease of maintenance and communication goals. 2. Technical drawing of the selected product with pertinent information such as the season, source, product size, fabric contents, trims etc. Cost Analysis

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda Faculty Of Family and Community Sciences Department of Clothing And Textiles Prof. C.C. Mehta Road, Vadodara- 390002 Ph. (+ 91-0265) 2795522

UNIT V

ACADEMIC YEAR 2015-2016

1. Economic analysis of apparel and non apparel product. a. Calculation of the monetary values of different determinants of the total product cost. b. Calculation of labour cost depending on the number of hours needed in producing the product c. Calculation of cost for the machinery and electricity used Documentation of survey work 1. Swatch book to document the sourced raw materials in terms of content, structure and use 2. Digital diary of ancillary producers REFERENCES

1. 2. 3 4

Grace I. Kunz and E. Glock Ruth, Apparel Manufacturing: Sewn Product Analysis, 4th Edition, Prentice Hall, New York; 2004 Jeannette Jarnow, Kitty G. Dickerson, "Inside the Fashion Business", PrenticeHall, New York; 1997 Jennifer Yurchisin, Kim K. P. Johnson, Fashion and the Consumer, Berg Publications, New York; 2010 Patty Brown and Jane Rice, Ready-to-Wear Apparel Analysis, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, New York; 2000